Page 1

KJCA FALL CLASSIC SEE THE WINNERS PAGE 42

NEW UK PROGRAM TO HELP WITH BULL SELECTION FIND DETAILS PAGE 38

LOCAL MARKET SEES SUCCESS WITH FARMERS ELITE PROGRAM FIND DETAILS PAGE 68


CENTRAL KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION Reg. No. 18810115

56th Annual Fall Female Sale

Saturday • November 10, 2018 • 1 PM (EDT) Central Kentucky Angus Sales Pavilion • Danville, KY

4 miles NE of Danville just off of Hwy 34 on Chenault Bridge Road and then Fork Church Road GPS Address: 2286 Fork Church Road, Lancaster, KY 40444

KB-Denver of 789 E01 He sells as lot 62

Reg. No. 18809981

KB-GENERATION OF 4156 E14 He sells as lot 60

Reg. No. 18807139

Selling 147 Head of Registered & Commercial Angus Cattle

Registered Angus: 24 COWS WITH 12 CALVES: More to calve this fall • 15 OPEN HEIFERS: Most are ready to breed • 13 BRED HEIFERS: 4 fall calving, 9 spring calving • 24 BULLS: 14 qualify as heifer acceptable. All will sell with current BSE’s. All but 5 are 18 months or older!

Commercial Angus: All will sell as cost share eligible. 52 BRED HEIFERS: Start calving in February. Raised on the farms of the respective consignors. Uniform groups of 10, 12, & 30. All are bred to calving ease Angus bulls. 7 OPEN HEIFERS: 1 very fancy show prosprect, 6 ready to breed.

AUCTIONEER:

SALE MANAGER:

Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Road Danville, KY 40422 Office: 859-236-4591 • Mobile: 859-238-3195 Logan Goggin: 859-516-3199 tdievert@dievertsales.com • Like us on FB Catalogs available at dievertsales.com

Eddie Burks, 270-991-6398

SALE DAY PHONES:

859-238-3195 or 859-583-0364

LIVE INTERNET BIDDING AT:

CKAA Officers:

KB-TENX OF B26 E37 He sells as lot 58

CSCF Commercial Heifer

This fancy daughter of Capitalist sells as lot 101.

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PRESIDENT: Henry Smith

SECRETARY: Joe Goggin

TREASURER: John Goggin

PAST PRESIDENT: Bob Clark

VICE PRES: Adam Chunglo

JR ADVISOR: Ann & Diana Covell

Reg. No. 16612080

GAR PREDESTINED N1039 Donor dam of lot 7.

COW COUNTRY •

CKAA Calendar of Events:

NOVEMBER

2018

November 10, 2018: 56th Annual Fall Heifer Sale January 26, 2019: 55th Annual Winter Sale April 20, 2019: 54th Annual Spring Sale June 2019: 29th Annual Jr Show & Picnic

Reg. No. 17507864

MJ PHYLLIS 1218

Grand Champion Female of the 2014 KY Angus Sweepstakes. Dam of the flush brothers that sell as 72A & 72B.

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JOIN THE 6REVOLUTION AND TAKE COMMAND

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

74257-2_CommandPro_1pAd.Indd 1

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JohnDeere.com/BeInCommand

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8/8/18 2:25 AM


TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNISTS 7 Bobby Foree: President’s Thoughts 8

Ryan Quarles: NAILE Dates Set For October 30 - November 15

11

Dave Maples: Highs and Lows in the Beef Industry

12

Baxter Black: Ear Tag Identification

22

Chris Teutsch: Managing Mixed Stands of Cool- and Warm-Season Grasses

36 Dr. Michelle Arnold: Pneumonia in Feeder Calves? Don’t Forget Histophilus Somni 94

Dr. Roy Burris: Bad Things Can Happen to Good People

FEATURE STORIES The Ugly Side of Organic, Natural and Cage-Free

18

UK to Offer Certificate in Food Systems and Hunger Studies

18

NCBA: New US-Mexico -Canada Agreement “Great News” for Cattle Producers

20

Kentucky Winter Wheat Production Down 17 Percent from 2017

24

Eastern Kentucky University Hosts Ribbon Cutting for Robotic Milking System

26

August Beef Exports Soar To New Heights; Pork Export Value Still Under Pressure

32

Operating Committee Approves FY19 Plan of Work

34

Grain Markets Favor Storage; Alternative Structures Likely Option

38

New UK Program to Help with Bull Selection

40

Registration Now Open for 2019 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show

Jan. 30-Feb. 1

43

Gauging the Current Outlook for Preconditioning Cattle

44

Junior Cattlemen Host Fall Classic Cattle Show in Russellville

48

KJCA Fall Classic 2018 Show Results

52

Fragipan Field Day Shows Research Breakthrough to Farmers

53

NCBA to Reiterate Unwavering Support for USDA Oversight of Lab-Grown

Fake Meat

54

Livestock Groups Petition Department of Transportation

56

Kentucky Corn Yield May Set A Record

58

UK Offers Information on Ticks & Alpha-Gal Syndrome

60

Planning For Tax Filing Time on the Farm or Ranch

More Weight...More Profit. From dry conditions to an abundance of grass, self-fed delivery of SWEETLIX® Rumensin® pressed blocks predictably increases weight gain on pasture. Extensive research consistently confirms the advantages that Rumensin® delivery has on stocker performance and economic returns. To achieve the greatest returns, SWEETLIX® Rumensin® pressed blocks are your only choice.

www.sweetlix.com 1-87-SWEETLIX

62

The Certified Angus Beef Brand Marks 40th Anniversary with Barn Paintings

65

UK Baseball’s New Stadium Named Kentucky Proud Park

68

Local Market Sees Success with Farmers Elite Program

72

USDA Outlines Next Steps for Advancing Animal Disease Traceability

80

USDA-NASS Announes the 2017 Census of Agriculture Response Rate, Data

Release Details, and Upcoming Special Studies

85

What To Do When Pregnancy Check Doesn’t Go Your Way 14-17

County News

28-30

Economic & Policy Update

74-75

Membership

76-77

Kentucky Beef Council

78-79

Kentucky Beef Network

88

Kentucky Angus Association News

83

News Releases

91

Market Report

92

Calendar of Events

92

Advertisers Index

93

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Cover Your Grass

15

Classifieds

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NOVEMBER

2018

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OAK HOLLOW

Private Treaty

DATA DRIVEN MATERNAL SELECTION Oak Hollow takes an approach to the cow calf sector that no one else is willing to use. We use data driven selection with an emphasis on commercial cow-calf sector profitability. There have been minimal advancements in the selection tools for developing maternal sire lines regardless of breed. This is largely due to the unwillingness of most seedstock producers to collect maternal cow herd data necessary to create accurate maternal EPDs. Oak Hollow has collected data for maternal traits for nearly 40 years and was one of the first seedstock producers to enroll in MaternalPlus for whole herd reporting. Our commitment to creating sound bulls that leave profitable, durable commercial females is second to none. By putting maternal selection criteria first with every breeding decision we have been able to increase heifer fertility and demand consistent 365-day calving intervals while weaning highly marketable calves.

Commercial Females

Spring calving Oak Hollow commercial females are available. They range from open and bred heifers to middle of the herd 3-5 year old cows. Contact us today to reserve your set of replacements

Are You Ready For Fall Breeding Season? We have a good selection of service ready bulls available for fall breeding. They range from yearling to mature herd sires able to handle large groups of cows. Contact us today to find the bull your cow herd needs.

Kenneth D. Lowe (270) 202-7186 - Joe K. Lowe II (270) 202-4399 www.OakHollowAngus.com - Smiths Grove, KEntucky COW COUNTRY •

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KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION 2018 LEADERSHIP KCA REGIONAL DIRECTORS: REGION 1

Daniel Hayden, Vice President*(270) 570-2815 Bobby Bell................................(270) 547-8547 Gary Woodall...........................(270) 725-0819 Ricky Haynes..................................................... Keith Johnson..........................(270) 635-0723 Wayne Johnson.......................(270) 726-7896 John Walpole..........................(270) 542-7534 Martin Hayden........................(270) 281-4076 JJ Tucker.................................(270) 257-8548 Dennis Wilson.........................(270) 952-1714 Caleb Jenkin...........................(270) 952-0767

REGION 2

Joe Lowe, Vice President*.......(270) 202-4399 Craig Thompson......................(270) 590-5174 Mark Thomas...........................(270) 723-6175 Joe Stults..................................(270) 735-3229 Joe Mike Moore........................(270) 670-7493 Frank Rowland........................(270) 646-0882 Reva Richardson.....................(270) 735-2959 Steve Webb..............................(270) 646-8277 Dr. Kenneth Green..................(270) 879-0229 Richie Thompson....................(270) 617-2710 Kirk Cecil.................................(270) 692-7698 Hunter Galloway....................(270) 745-5972 Donald Reynolds.....................(270) 528-5239 Gerry Bowman........................(270) 427-6922 Adam Estes..............................(270) 528-3904

KCA 2018 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OFFICERS: PRESIDENT

Bobby Foree 2440 Eminence Road Eminence, KY 40019 (502) 845-4947

PRESIDENT ELECT Tim White 3660 Military Pike Lexington KY 40513 (859) 223-0326

TREASURER

Ken Adams 90 E Horseshoe Ave. Upton, KY 42784 (270) 734-1443

PAST PRESIDENT Chuck Crutcher 4364 Berrytown Rd. Rineyville, KY 40162 (270) 877-0239

VICE PRESIDENT Steve Dunning 8200 Antioch Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 498-8180

KCA PROGRAM CHAIRMAN Chris Cooper 2140 Tates Creek Rd. Richmond, KY 40475

(859) 200-7711

KBC CHAIRMAN

Andy Bishop 6135 High Grove Road Cox’s Creek, KY 40013 (502) 275-6177

REGION 3

Jon Bednarski, Vice President*...(502) 649-8706 Danny Cooper..........................(606) 782-4809 Nathan Lawson.......................(502) 836-3879 Dallas McCutchen...................(502) 255-7020

KBN CHAIRMAN

Cary King 250 Bright Leaf Drive Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 734-2173

Jere Caldwell† - Boyle Smith T. Powell† - Lincoln Larry Lovell - Union John Masters† - Mason Seldon Hail† - Laurel Bob Vickery† - Wayne Glenn Mackie - Bourbon Dale Lovell - Muhlenberg Steve Henshaw† - Union Jerry Fraim - Grayson Glen Massengale† - Wayne Dell King - Christian Kenneth Lowe - Warren Dr. J.L.Cole - Monroe Harvey Mitchell - Mercer Jim Naive† - Spencer Shelby Hughes - Logan Hoppy Lovell - Barren

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Charles Miller - Jessamine Larry Clay - Perry Jack Kimbrough† - Shelby Mark Williams - Crittenden Paul Napier - Lincoln Eddie Young - Washington Greg Ritter† - Barren Don Pemberton - Christian Billy Glenn Turpin - Madison Scotty Parsons - Christian Corinne Kephart - Shelby Greg Robey - Mercer Mike Bach - Bath Don Reynolds - Hart Steve Downs - Marion Gary Woodall - Logan David Lemaster - Clark Chuck Crutcher - Hardin

COW COUNTRY •

Jeremy Jones*.........................(859) 749-2233 Mickey Staton..........................(606) 674-2195 David Lemaster.......................(859) 749-0258 Ron Ray...................................(859) 825-8516 Bo Tate....................................(859) 661-2325 Larry Swetnam........................(859) 293-5600 Jason Sandefur.......................(859) 987-0336 Danielle Harmon....................(606) 748-8059 Ronnie Lowe...........................(606) 782-5058 Clay Wills.................................(859) 749-8248 Jason Crowe............................(859) 582-0761

REGION 5

Gary Ford, Vice President*......(270) 402-2194 Steve Devine............................(859) 583-7824 Steve Downs...........................(270) 865-2611 Brent Woodrum......................(859) 397-1078 Ian Thomas..............................(859) 613-2453 Anne Bays................................(615) 478-8450 Larry Parman..........................(606) 878-7516 Greg Robey...............................(859) 734-0067 Eddie Young.............................(859) 262-5682 Adam Chunglo.........................(859) 613-2985 Brenda Williams......................(606) 669-2909 Tommy Glasscock....................(270) 692-4336 * Denotes member of Executive committee

176 PASADENA DRIVE • LEXINGTON, KY 40503 PHONE: (859) 278-0899 • FAX: (859) 260-2060 WWW.KYCATTLE.ORG • INFO@KYCATTLE.ORG Executive Vice President Dave Maples

KBC Director of Product Development Katelyn Hawkins

Staff Accountant Kelly Tucker

Membership Coordinator Nikki Whitaker

Director of Kentucky Beef Network Becky Thompson

Communications Manager Jacob Redway

KBN Industry Coordinator Dan Miller

Publication Coordinator Carey Brown

KBC Director of Consumer Affairs Kiah Twisselman

Graphic Designer Todd Brown

KBC Director of Education Niki Ellis

†(Deceased) 6

REGION 4

VOLUME 31 • ISSUE 11

KCA’S PAST PRESIDENTS: 1972-73 1974-77 1978-79 1980-82 1983-85 1986-87 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

John Ellegood.........................(502) 532-7573 Kevin Perkins..........................(502) 269-7189 Larry Bryant............................(502) 845-4615 Wanda Hawkins......................(502) 321-5602 Jerry Oak.................................(502) 255-7502 Phillip Douglas.........................(502) 845-4620 Lincoln Clifford........................(859) 954-0102

National Advertising Sales, Livestock Advertising Network, Debby Nichols, (859) 321-8770 Bernie Scheer, (859) 421-5783

COW COUNTRY NEWS is published monthly by THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any material which he feels is unsuitable for the publication. Although the highest journalistic ethics will be maintained, the KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION limits its responsibilities for any errors, inaccuracies, or misprints in advertising or editorial copy. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements made against the publisher.

NOVEMBER

2018

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PRESIDENT’S THOUGHTS BOBBY FOREE Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association President At some point over a period of years, an acquaintance becomes a friend. Such was the case with my relationship with Charlie Hunt, one of our five KBN managers having oversight of the Eden Shale Farm. By now most of you know that Charlie passed away suddenly at our Eden Shale Farm field day on October 13, 2018 – on his 82nd birthday. As I write this article, I’m reminded of some of Charlie’s last words to me no more than ten minutes before he suffered his lifeending heart attack, “Bobby, I like your articles!” Because of the timing, I will never forget those kind words. Again this month, I have enjoyed representing you as your president. Just yesterday I presented a “KCA Highlights” program to a local Rotary Club lunch crowd – where it was extremely satisfying to watch the enthusiastic acceptance of our Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef by that non-farm group. One in the audience (i.e., Jessica, our county librarian) returned to work boasting to everyone, including my wife, Jean Kaye, that our whole-cow-grind product even contains the higher value cuts -- unlike other ground beef made only from trim. It was extremely satisfying to hear that Jessica remarked, “Who would have thought that a Cattlemen’s Association has all of those super projects going on!” Earlier in October, I gave a KCA update to the largest crowd to ever attend our four-county regional beef field day. John Allison, a purebred Charolais breeder near New Castle, Kentucky, hosted a spectacular event on October 1st with over 300 in attendance. Numerous persons commented that the field day tours – with stops discussing heifer development, hoop barns, alfalfa management, endophyte toxicity, and bull evaluations – were the best ever at a field day. A great debt of gratitude goes out to John for his one year of advance planning for such an outstanding event! In late September, our entire KCA board traveled to UK’s new Grain and Forage Center of Excellence in Princeton, KY

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NOVEMBER 2018

for our third quarter board meeting. As in the past, our board meeting coincided with UK’s biannual “Beef Bash” where the latest beef and forage research is presented to cattlemen across the state. This year’s Beef Bash was special in that it honored the retirement of Dr. Roy Burris. If there is anyone who has advanced our Kentucky beef industry more over the past four decades than Dr. Burris, I do not know who that might be! When I attend cattle and forage field days, it is always amazing that I come away with knowledge which proves to be invaluable in my farming operation. A case in point was the pasture weed control session presented by Dr. Chris Teutsch at the Princeton field day to which I just referred. Dr. Teutsch provided data that the herbicide Sharpen (often used on soybeans), when sprayed in late June or early July (with methylated seed oil as an additive), obtained 100% control of cocklebur and common ragweed. Because the cost is comparable to 2,4D (and it is a non-volatile herbicide), I plan to incorporate Sharpen into my pasture spray program next summer (instead of 2,4-D), thereby eliminating the possibility of injury to my neighbor’s soybeans.

September-October calving is complete, our AI program is about to begin, and there is still a bountiful supply of stockpiled grasses sufficient for grazing well into winter. As harvest is now in full swing, my monthly legal tip involves farmer safety. KRS 189.810 defines a “slow-moving vehicle” as any vehicle (except bicycles) “capable of a rate of speed no greater than twenty-five (25) miles per hour”. KRS 189.820(2) requires a “slow-moving vehicle emblem” to be displayed on such vehicles – day or night – traveling on public highways in Kentucky. KRS 189.820 (3) then requires said emblem to be “maintained in a clean, reflective condition”. So when one carries a roll bale of hay (or any other three-pointhitch implement) which blocks the view

of a SMV emblem, such action is not only a hazard to a farmer; but such an action is also a statutory violation. When one considers that Kentucky courts have adopted the principles of “comparative negligence” when apportioning damages among parties according to each party’s share of fault, one should never block the view of a SMV emblem when traveling on a public highway. Always remember “Safety is something that happens between your ears, not what you hold in your hands.” (Quote by American journalist Jeff Cooper.) And lastly, as we await cattle prices to rebound, “Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.” (Earl Nightingale)

Additionally, while at Eden Shale I observed Dr. Steve Higgins’ latest experimental “automatic” hay feeding structure. Said structure allows one to “load” the structure with 32 rolls at a time, then let the cows “roll” a straight hay feeding panel until all 32 rolls have been consumed. One major advantage is that cows can be limit-fed by moving a clamped-chock along the rolling rail – thereby allowing a cattle producer to allocate hay supplies according to his/her work schedule. The structure is another of Dr. Higgins’ ingenious designs for the part-time farmer who cannot haul rolls daily to his cattle. On our farm, we are weaning our springborn calves, and witnessing tremendous weaning weights due in part to the plentiful summer and fall grazing. Our

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COMMISSIONER’S CORNER

NAILE DATES SET FOR OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 15 RYAN QUARLES Commissioner of Agriculture Many of you will attend the North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) to upgrade your herds. Others will go to exhibit your own animals. Still others will go to take a look at some of the best seedstock in the world, catch up with old friends, and make new ones. Whatever your reason for going, you will be a part of the largest all-breed, purebred livestock event in the world with 10 livestock divisions and nearly 30,000 entries from throughout the nation during its 16-day run Oct. 30Nov. 15 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville. During the expo, the NAILE Quarter Horse Show will run Oct. 30-Nov. 7, and the North American Championship Rodeo will take place Nov. 8-10 in Freedom Hall. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) will be there to help conduct the livestock shows and check the veterinary papers on every animal that enters the Kentucky Exposition Center grounds. We’re Kentucky Proud to be a part of the North American! Kentucky is able to host major national events such as the North American and the National Farm Machinery Show because of our central location and our world-class transportation system but

also because of the Kentucky Exposition Center. It’s one of the premier convention facilities in the nation with 1.2 million square feet of indoor, climate-controlled exhibition space. The expo center and the newly renovated Kentucky International Convention Center (KICC) bring visitors to the Commonwealth from every corner of the country and around the world. These visitors spend money while they are here, and many of them come back to see what else Kentucky has to offer. We also are fortunate that the Kentucky State Fair Board earlier this year named David Beck as the new CEO of Kentucky Venues, the umbrella organization that manages the expo center and the KICC. Mr. Beck (even I feel compelled to call him Mr. Beck) assumed the position after a 40-year career at Kentucky Farm Bureau, where he served as executive vice president since 1995. He is well-known and respected in agricultural circles throughout the United States. A native of Lyon County, Mr. Beck has hit the ground running to make the expo center and the KICC more appealing for exhibitors and visitors alike. We are fortunate to have him. Best wishes for an enjoyable and successful North American. I hope to see you there!

Central Kentucky Premier Heifer Sale November 3rd, 2018 • 1:00 PM EST Marion County Fairgrounds • Lebanon, KY

• Approximately 150 heifers will sell from producers in Marion, Nelson and Washington Counties. • Bred to calve in the spring starting Febuary - March 2019. • Guaranteed bred to bulls with known EPDs and have met stringent requirements for health, quality and pelvic measurements. • Guaranteed pregnant 30 days past sale. • Some heifers are synchronized and artificially bred. • All consignors are certified Master Cattlemen. • Free delivery of 10 head or more up to 100 miles.

For More Information Visit www.heifersales.com or Contact: Steve Downs Lebanon 270-402-3672 8

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2018

Todd Harned Boston 502-249-2354

David Sandusky Lebanon 270-692-7793

Terry Geoghegan Bardstown 502-827-0771

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FROM DAVE’S DESK

HIGHS AND LOWS IN THE BEEF INDUSTRY DAVE MAPLES Executive Vice President It just comes with the territory, there are highs and lows when you are in the cattle business. You think you have everything figured out and then you get a curve ball pitched to you. It could be the weather, the market, an animal health issue, a personal problem, a family situation, or a new government regulation. Staying on top of the best management practices can help when the curves come your way. The amount of rain this fall has been a blessing but also causes problems with the floods and all the mud. Going into winter the heavier cattle use areas are going to be wetter and could be a problem all winter. October is a red flag month for animal health. Warm days and cold nights translates into sickness in new calves. As cow/calf producers with new born calves you have to stay on top of the issues and this year it has been the heavy rains. For the spring calving producers now is the time to wean calves or sell calves at the local market. The producers that are buying these calves need to pay attention to animal health. Death loss rates can jump and medicine bills skyrocket. One strategy that is more popular now and is used in avoiding the death loss issue can be the purchase of weaned calves. The problem buyers are finding is that all weaned calves are not free of health issues. Some representations are wrong either stating the cattle are weaned or misrepresenting the number of days weaned. You can do everything by the book but weaned calves often when introduced to new pathogens break down the same as an unweaned calf. But the odds have to be in favor of a long weaned calf. There have been many articles written as of late about the packer and how much money they are making. I have often

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wondered why not take a lesson from the packer. They have demonstrated an ability to manage the supply chain in a manner to sustain the large margins they have enjoyed all year. If cattle supplies are tightening, they simply slow up the slaughter volumes leaving more supplies to choose from the next week. To make up for the slow down the cattle feeders place more and more cattle on feed in hopes for a miracle. If the miracle happens the cow calf producer is ok if not the price situations back up all the way through the system and the cow calf producers are hoping for a miracle. The food supply chains are getting more organized to smooth out some of the highs and lows. Our industry has been hesitant to follow the path as with the competing proteins. But one can see the day when we will be more aligned with a defined supply chain system. Field days I have had the opportunity to attend several field days or county meetings this past month. Starting with the Beef Bash at Princeton. This is always a great event and wonderful opportunity to get to visit with many cattlemen and see the latest that the researchers at the University of Kentucky have to offer. This year the event was a tribute to Dr. Roy Burris and his dedication to Kentucky’s beef industry. Logan County had a wet but fun Saturday night cattlemen’s meeting and on the contrast, Johnny Allison in Henry County hit the perfect day for a field day. The weather was just right and the event was perfect with a large crowd. The annual Eden Shale Farm Open H ouse had some nice new projects to unveil related to reducing the drudgery of beef cattle production.

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COMMENTARY

EAR TAG IDENTIFICATION BAXTER BLACK, DVM On the Edge of Common Sense Good ranch managers often use numbered ear tags to monitor their herd more closely. Clem thought Reg ought to give up and start all over again. They had moved the pairs that were mothered up to the east pasture down the road. Accidentally, calf number R31 had gone with that bunch. His mama had been left behind. In his I.D. number the R stood for red. His mama’s number was also R31 but her tag was yellow. In the record book she was listed as YR31. Her calf was listed as BYR31. There was also a cow in the herd with a red tag numbered 31 (R31 in the book). Mama YR31 was bawlin’ and missin’ her calf. Reg asked Clem to haul her to the pasture and find her calf. On the way he asked him to pick up a dry cow they’d left in a trap.

12

When Clem reached the pasture he had two cows loaded in the 16-foot stock trailer. They were separated by the inside gate. Sure enough a calf came runnin’ toward the trailer. He was black brockle just like the cow. She went to bellerin’. Unfortunately she was in the front. Clem couldn’t coax her out the side escape hatch. So, somehow he smashed the dry cow between the inside gate and the side of the trailer with a piece of cotton rope. And using one foot and one hand managed to lift the wooden door panel out of the tail gate. Mama YR31 squeezed by and leaped out. She raced to the herd and never even looked at the calf! Clem closed the trailer up, leaving the dry cow in the rear section. Reg drove up. After finding out that Clem never actually saw the calf suck the cow, he thought they ought to check her to be sure. Out across

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the pasture they drove to find the cows. Reg was drivin’ and lookin’ for a place to cross the creek. “Reg,” said Clem. “We don’t wanna cross here. I see cattails.” They stuck it when the front bumper hit the opposite bank! Clem escaped out the window and they walked the mile back to his pickup and trailer. Reg got the handy man jack and set it under the tongue. “Reg,” we’re not gonna need the jack. We’ve got a thousand pound cow in the back section. Reg jacked it up anyway. When Clem slid the sleeve back on the hitch it came off the ball like a monkey touchin’ a hot plate. The nose of the trailer shot four feet in the air, rolled forward and creased the pickup’s tailgate...permanently. It

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2018

still won’t open. By the time they’d pulled Reg’s truck outta the creek, the cows had circled the pasture, gone out the gate Reg had left open and were headed down the road. It took ‘em an hour to get the cows gathered back in the east pasture. As they were closing the gate they saw a calf with a blue tag that read R31 suckin’ a cow with a red tag 31. And next to her was a cow R31 with a yellow tag nursin’ a big Charlois-cross calf. They never did get the calf’s number but as Reg said, “That’s alright. We’ll catch’er in the fall!” www.baxterblack.com

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Held at Loretta Lynn's Ranch in Hurricane Mills, TN Smokey Hill Angus, B3 Cattle Company, HS Cattle Company, Cedar Ridge Angus and Indian Springs Angus

This impressive Pathfinder® female has been a donor for the Allison program and blends the Pathfinder® sires Mytty In Focus and Final Answer in her pedigree.

This three-year-old daughter of Sitz Upward 307R will be a highlight of the fall-calving females. Safe to TEX Playbook 5437. CED +5

BW WW YW MILK +3.1 +78 +138 +28

CW Marb +75 +.59

RE +.78

$W $F +73.42 +106.21

$B +182.27

George Jr. & Ginger Peak 136 Torian Lane / Erin, TN 37061 Phone 931-764-2533 / Cell 615-419-7728 email: arrowheadranch@att.net

www.arrowheadranchtn.com follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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A top set of fall pairs sell including this donor who also has ET progeny selling.

A highlight of the GAR females selling will be this daughter of Connealy In Sure 8524 who offers an impressive EPD profile.

Martin Allison & Martin (Marty) Allison 5726 Clydeton Rd • Waverly, TN 37185 3248 Halls Creek Rd • Waverly, TN 37185 931-622-0794 Phone/Text/Voicemail allisomw@aol.com

10/22/18 11:57 AM

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COUNTY NEWS BARREN COUNTY Submitted by James W. Bailey Cattlemen’s Meeting – The Barren County Cattlemen’s meeting was held Thursday evening, September 29th at the Barren County High School Trojan Academy. During the meeting, Brett Rogers, Krone North American territory manager, presented a program on Krone Hay and Forage Equipment. Pictured from left to right is Joe Furlong, representing Hobdy Dye & Read Inc, Brett Rogers and Don Woodlee representing Krone North America, Michael Gentry, and Bruce Harper representing Hobdy Dye & Read Inc., and Gerry Bowman, President of the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association. A delicious dinner was served which was sponsored by Hobdy Dye & Read Inc. Donation to Cattlemen – The Farmers Regional Livestock Market held their Appreciation Day September 24th. During the event, the Farmers Livestock Market presented the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association with a one-thousand-dollar donation. Receiving the award was Gerry Bowman (pictured in the middle), President of the Barren Count Cattlemen’s Association. Pictured from left to right is Ryne Towe of Farmers Livestock Market, Gerry Bowman, and Brad Towe of Farmers Livestock Market. Serving at Appreciation Day – Members of the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association served lunch during the Farmers Regional Livestock Market in Glasgow, KY on September 24th. Those shown serving from right to left are Cynthia Rowland, Ken Wininger, Carol Spiegl, Carol Elmore, and Mike Elmore. Cooking at Appreciation Day – Members of the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association Cooking Committee cooed the rib-eye steaks for the Farmers Regional Livestock Appreciation Day which was held on September 24th at Glasgow, KY. They are (from left to right) Charles Dale Embry, Richie Thompson, David Billingsley, and Bob Gerring..

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FEATURE

THE UGLY SIDE OF ORGANIC, NATURAL AND CAGE-FREE Dr. Richard Raymond, former Undersecretary of Agriculture for Food Safety.

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Before anyone overreacts and gets their underwear in a knot, I still believe in freedom of choice. If someone wants to pay more for a label, they should have that option. I will continue to purchase conventional. But I wonder how many of those who feel good about buying organic, cagefree chicken meat because of how they are raised fully understand the potential price the chickens and taxpayers might pay. A Georgia-based organic operation recently learned that they were entitled to $2.2 million dollars to compensate them for the loss of 160,000 chickens to bald eagle attacks. The compensation will come from the USDA’s Farm Service Administration (FSA) using your and my tax dollars. In 2010, this poultry grower expanded its production business to include pastureraised organic chickens. They claimed they were raised in a humane, sustainable environment. Humane, sustainable; touchy feely words to the millennials and others.

Seeing 160,000 chickens killed by bald eagles does not equate to humane, sustainable environment in my old brain. To quote the fifth-generation owner: “We are proud to be a working farm committed to doing what is right for the land and our animals…” Let’s see here. He is fifth-generation, so the farm/ranch (3,200 acres) has been around a long, long time. The decision was made in 2010 to expand to include organic, pasture-raised chickens and since then 160,000 have died. I can only guess who made that “proud” decision to do what is right for the animals. The FSA has funds set aside for livestock deaths and destruction by federally protected species such as the 80 bald eagles who set up camp when they saw easy pickings and destroyed 30 percent of the farm’s organic chickens, despite efforts to divert the bald eagles from the area using tarps and loud noise among other efforts that would not harm the eagles. 160,000 chickens; $2.2 million U.S. taxpayer dollars. Heck of a price to feel good.

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(The views and opinions expressed in this article are strictly those of the author. COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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COUNTY NEWS METCALFE COUNTY Submitted by Moe Hensley The 3rd quarter meeting of the Metcalfe County Cattlemen was held on September 27 at the Metcalfe County Extension Office. Sponsors for the evening were Gilley’s Supply and CPC. After in the invocation by Extension Agent Brandon Bell, everyone enjoyed a ribeye meal prepared by the Cooking Crew. Dainel Gilley explained what his business provides. Everyhing from nuts and bolts to farm feed and anything in between. He carries the Pro Heritage line of feed offered through CPC. From beef and horse to swine and poultry and even a wildlife mix. Teri Atkins, with CPC was also in attendance answering any questions the audience had. Brandon Bell discussed the Field Day to be held Oct. 11 at the Brad and Lauren Carter Farm located in Center, KY. The topic for the day is Rotational Grazing Systems and Livestock Management. Burkmann Feeds will sponsor the event with representatives from the Metcalfe Conservation District, NRCS, FSA and the Univeristy of Kentucky Extension Service on tap to speak. This should be a very informative evening. “Some people grew up playing with tractors....The lucky ones still do.”

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Daniel Gilley of Gilley’s Supply discusses his business and what it offers.

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President Christi Wilson welcomes everyone to the meeting.

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COUNTY NEWS BATH COUNTY

JACKSON COUNTY Submitted by Ginger McQueen The Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association had their Family Fun Night on Sept. 21st, 2018. It was a fun evening of fellowship with inflatables, hay ride, ribeye sandwiches, and some amazing door prizes. We would like thank Southeast Farm Supply for bringing out their equipment and their contributions of prizes. Also, thanks to the following sponsors for their donations: Southern States, London (door prizes), Jackson County Bank (calf raffle), and Greg and Stephanie Wilson (puppy raffle). Thanks to all our members who helped make this a successful event.

Members of our Junior Cattleman cooking Ribeyes at Court Day. Never too early to start them learning about Beef

LARUE COUNTY Submitted by Brenda Gaddie A huge thank you to all who made 2018 Lincoln Days a success. Shown here are only some of the members who volunteered their time and effort!

Left to right Larry Allen, Kelly Flanders, Sharon Allen, Rodney Mcdowell (in background), Joe Stults, Jerry Gaddie, Brenda Gaddie, Craig Thompson, Trudy Gardner, Bailey Rogers, Kalli Flanders, Truman Edlin, and Donald McDowell. COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

FEATURE

UK TO OFFER CERTIFICATE IN FOOD SYSTEMS AND HUNGER STUDIES

NCBA: NEW US-MEXICO-CANADA AGREEMENT “GREAT NEWS” FOR CATTLE PRODUCERS

Katie Pratt

LEXINGTON, KY - University of Kentucky students can now receive a certificate in Food Systems and Hunger Studies. The undergraduate certificate is offered by the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and is open to any undergraduate UK student, regardless of major. “Students completing the certificate will have the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide thoughtful

and impactful strategies to promote a sustainable food system and to fight hunger and related issues,” said Tammy Stephenson, director of the certificate program and an associate professor in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition. “The certificate can be tailored toward the major and career goals of each student, and all students will participate in hands-on activities on campus and in the community that address food systems, food security poverty and/or related issues.”

WASHINGTON (Oct. 1, 2018) - Kevin Kester, a fifth-generation California rancher and President of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, today released the following statement in response to news that negotiators have reached agreement on a new U.S.Mexico-Canada trade agreement: “This new agreement is great news for American cattle producers, and another sign that President Trump’s overall trade strategy is working. Over the past quarter century, free

To receive the certificate, students must complete 12 hours of coursework that includes food systems and sustainable agriculture, hunger, food behavior and the environment. Through a crossdisciplinary approach, students will learn about the impact of food systems on food security, hunger and the overall health and well-being of a community and apply that knowledge to develop strategies to help end hunger.

and open trade between the United States, Mexico, and Canada has been tremendously successful for our producers, and we’re pleased that we’ll be able to maintain our existing market access while seeing other U.S. producers get a better deal than they’ve gotten in the past. Hopefully Congress will approve this new deal early next year and provide American producers with the certainty we need to continue selling our products to our partners to the north and south.”

LEVERAGE

In addition to Stephenson, Krista Jacobsen, associate professor in the Department of Horticulture, and Amanda Hege, director of community outreach for the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, coordinate and teach courses as part of the certificate program. “Globally, 795 million people do not have enough food to lead a healthy and active life and more than 750,000 Kentuckians are food insecure,” Jacobsen said. “There is a dire need for those from diverse backgrounds to have the knowledge and experience to address issues related to food insecurity, which includes promoting a sustainable food system.”

Top 1% WW, Top 2% YW, Top 1% TM, Top 10% REA and MB

Interested UK undergraduate students pursuing any major can receive more information and enroll online at https:// hunger.ca.uky.edu/.

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Carolina Leverage 3214a was #2 in registrations last year and our walking herd sire. He combines growth, maternal strength, and carcass traits that we want out of bulls used. All calves are out of A.I. sires. We have 30 registered black fall yearling bulls for sale, price starting at $2200 - $4500. We also have fall bred 3-year-olds bred to the bull above, heifers sired by him, and other A.I. bulls.

Coles Bend Cattle • Gelbvieh & Balancer Bulls and Heifers For Sale. Call Trent Jones: 270-590-5266 2018

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ONLINE FEMALE SALE NOVEMBER 8, 2018

SALE HOSTED BY ANGUSLIVE.COM

REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE

Legacy/B&L Bandy Maid 232F

Legacy Everelda 228F

Legacy/B&L Bando Baby 230F

Legacy Blackbird 252F

1-18-18 Musgrave Sky High x B&L Bandy's Reflection 19X AAA 19206709

1-16-18 Musgrave Sky High x Legacy 66X Everelda 25A AAA 19206707

1-18-18 LD Capitalist 316 x B&L Miss Bando Baby 08Z AAA 19206708

2-15-18 SAC Conversation x TAF Blackbird 421 AAA 19316346

Legacy Entense 229F

Legacy Adelaide 259F

Legacy Everelda Entense 262F

Legacy Blackcap 264F

1-18-18 Baldridge Bronc x TAF Miss Forward 413 AAA 19219691

2-21-18 Brooking Bank Note x TAF Miss Adelaide 336 AAA 19216344

2-24-18 Musgrave Sky High 1535 x Legacy 636 Everelda 66X AAA 19216348

2-28-18 LD Capitalist 316 x Legacys Taylor Complete 74X AAA 19206612

Legacy Farms Daniel & Lindsey Reynolds 1709 South Jackson Highway Hardyville, KY 42746 D 270.528.6275 L 270.528.6120

Legacy Emma 254F

musgrave lucy 816 283

3-11-18 Musgrave 316 Stunner x TAF Emma 425 AAA 19216343

(reference donor AAA 18467567 & High selling bred heifer from the 2018 Musgrave Production Sale)

ld capitalist 316 x musgrave lucy 283-162 sexed heifer Embryos by sav raindance sell.

Open House for cattle viewing at the farm November 3rd and 4th Check us out on Facebook or at www.legacyfarmsANGUS.com

COW COUNTRY •

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FEATURE

KENTUCKY WINTER WHEAT PRODUCTION DOWN 17 PERCENT FROM 2017 Dr. Richard Raymond, former undersecretary of agriculture for food safety.

LOUISVILLE, KY – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released its Small Grains Summary Report today from the Small Grains Production Survey conducted earlier this month. “Kentucky winter wheat production was disappointing in 2018, both from a quantity and quality standpoint,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “I have heard more than one producer remark that this was their worst wheat crop ever.” Farmers harvested 19.8 million bushels of winter wheat during the summer of 2018. This

was down 17 percent from the previous year. “Harvested acres were down from a year ago, but most of the production decline is the result of a 14 percent drop in yield,” Knopf said. “Unfavorable weather during the growing season and harvest limited yield potential and resulted in lighter test weights.” Yield is estimated at 66.0 bushels per acre, down 11.0 bushels from 2017. Farmers seeded 450,000 acres last fall, down 30,000 acres from 2017. Area harvested for grain totaled 300,000 acres. Acres for

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other uses totaled 150,000 acres and was used as cover crop, cut as hay, chopped for silage or abandoned. Production of all wheat for the U.S. totaled 1.88 billion bushels, up 8 percent from 2017. Grain area totaled 39.6 million acres, up 5 percent from the previous year. The United States yield is estimated at 47.6 bushels per acre, and up 1.3 bushels from last year. The levels of production and changes from 2017 by type are winter wheat, 1.18 billion bushels, down 7 percent; other spring wheat, 623 million bushels, up 50 percent, and durum wheat, 77.3 million bushels, up 41 percent.

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Bowling Green - Columbia - Edmonton - Hardinsburg - Lebanon London - Rineyville - Shelbyville - Winchester 2018

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The question to ask is how fast does the treatment kill BRD-causing bacteria. Single-dose Baytril® 100 (enrofloxacin) Injectable delivers effective, therapeutic levels of drug in the lung tissues in 1-2 hours*1 and kills 97% of BRD-causing bacteria in 1-2 hours.*2,3 The sooner bacteria are killed, the faster a calf will feel better and get back to work eating and gaining weight. You know the drill. You turn to the one you trust. *The clinical significance of in vitro data has not been demonstrated. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Extra-label use of this product in food-producing animals is prohibited. Davis JL, Foster DM, Papich MG. (2007). Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of enrofloxacin and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin in calves. J Vet Pharmacol Ther. 30(6):564-571. Blondeau JM, Borsos S, Blondeau LD, et al. (2005). The killing of clinical isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) by enrofloxacin (ENR) using minimum inhibitory and mutant prevention drug concentrations and over a range of bacterial inocula. In: ASM Conference on Pasteurellaceae; 23-26 October 2005; Kohala Coast, Big Island, Hawaii: American Society of Microbiology; Abstract B12. 3 Blondeau JM, Borsos SD, Hesje CH, et al. Comparative killing of bovine isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica by enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tilmicosin and tulathromycin using the measured minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and mutant prevention concentration (MPC) drug values. In: International Meeting of Emerging Diseases and Surveillance (IMED); Vienna, Austria: International Society for Infectious Diseases. February 23-25, 2007. Figures 8-10. 1 2

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FORAGES

MANAGING MIXED STANDS OF COOL- AND WARM-SEASON GRASSES CHRIS D. TEUTSCH UK Research and Education Center at Princeton

I am not a climate scientist, but I can tell you that it was hot this summer! In fact, in Western Kentucky we had 68 days above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. That is more than 60% above normal. Recently, the USDA Cold Hardiness Zones were readjusted northward. The northward adjustment of these zones indicate an increase in the average minimum winter temperature. These increases could have significant implications for both agricultural production and naturalized vegetation. In terms of grasslands in the transition area of the United States, antidotal evidence and observations indicate that warmseason grasses are increasing in pastures and hayfields. These species include annual warm-season grasses such as crabgrass and foxtails, and perennials such as Johnsongrass, bermudagrass, dallisgrass, and nimblewill. At a recent field day held at Mary Anne Ellison’s farm in Mayfield, KY, participants saw pastures t h a t

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chris.teutsch@uky.edu

have shifted away from orchardgrass and tall fescue to bermudagrass. I don’t mean a little bit of bermudagrass, but rather almost 100% bermudagrass. To be clear, this is a naturally occurring ecotype of bermudagrass, NOT something that Mary Anne planted, although she said that it did save her this summer. A field day was held at Morehead State University. We saw a tall fescue pasture that has been traditionally used for hay in the spring and stockpiled for winter grazing in the fall that had a significant proportion of crabgrass. In fact, although tall fescue was there, it was hard to see it in early September. These shifts in botanical composition are likely a result of both management and climatic conditions. Understanding how to manage mixtures of cool- and warmseason grass can help us to manipulate forage availability during both spring/ fall and summer periods.

effective approach. The remainder of this article will discuss how we might accomplish this.

Manipulating Mixtures of Cooland Warm-Season Grasses

Selecting pastures to manipulate. So if you want to shift your botanical composition towards warm-season species, choose a weak cool-season pasture. If you want to shift the composition toward cool-season species, then choose a stand that has a decent stand of cool-season grasses and manage it to enhance those grasses.

We can spend a tremendous amount of time and money establishing new stands of cool- and warm-season grasses. In many cases, simply changing management can shift the botanical composition from cool- to warmseason grasses and vice versa. This may be a less expensive and in many cases equally

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Implement rotational stocking. Grazing management is a powerful tool for manipulating the botanical composition of pastures. In order to effectively apply it, you must be in control of grazing. Temporary electric fencing can be a very effective tool once animals are trained to it. Above ground waterlines equipped with quick couples can supply water at a minimal cost. Decide what you want. The first step in manipulating the botanical composition of your pastures is deciding what you want and need. Do you need more grazing during the summer months? Or maybe your cool-season pastures are thinning and you want to thicken them up. Either way, you need to know where you want to go before you get there.

Grazing height. In our naturalized pastures, close grazing will tend to favor grass and legume species that have leaf area and energy stores close to the soil surface. This results in a shift toward low growing species such as

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2018

bermudagrass, Kentucky bluegrass and white clover under close grazing. A higher grazing height would tend to shift the botanical composition back toward our tall growing cool-season grass species such as tall fescue and orchardgrass. Grazing frequency. How often we graze a pasture can influence the botanical composition of our naturalized pastures. Most pasture species benefit from rotational stocking. Some species are more tolerant of frequent grazing. These species tend to have leaf area close to the soil surface that is retained even under close grazing and include bluegrass, white clover, and bermudagrass. This means that grazing naturalized pastures closely and frequently will tend to shift the botanical composition toward these species. Grazing timing. The time of the season when pastures are grazed can also influence the botanical composition. Grazing a mixture that includes both cool- and warm-season species during the summer months will tend to shift the botanical composition toward the warmseason species. This commonly occurs in pastures in transition zone states like Kentucky. Grazing these pastures hard during the summer months favors the bermudagrass and crabgrass, especially during and after droughts. Nitrogen fertilization timing. The timing of nitrogen applications can also influence the balance of warm- and coolseason grasses in your pasture. Early spring and late summer applications

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FORAGE MANAGEMENT TIPS •

Remove livestock from sorghum-sudangrass pastures and pastures that contain johnsongrass prior to frost events. This will reduce chances of prussic acid poisoning.

Feed hay and allow cool-season pastures to stockpile for winter grazing.

Utilize pastures with high percentage of legumes first.

Save pure stands of stockpiled tall fescue for winter grazing.

Strip graze tall fescue, allocating only enough grass for 2-3 days.

Soil test pastures and apply any needed lime, P, and K.

Test hay that will be fed this winter to determine if and how much supplementation will be needed.

Inventory forage and hay supplies and make plans to purchase any needed hay.

will encourage cool-season grass growth (tall fescue and bluegrass). In contrast, late spring and summer applications will shift the pasture composition toward crabgrass and bermudagrass in mixed stands. So the optimal time to apply nitrogen depends on what you want and need. If you desire more naturalized warm-season species in your pasture for summer grazing, then apply your nitrogen in early summer. If your goal is to maintain a healthy stand of tall fescue for stockpiling then applying nitrogen in early spring and late summer would be a better choice. Putting it all together. This is an example for the western portion of the state. A producer has a mixture of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and bermudagrass,

FEATURED EVENT American Forage and Grassland Council Annual Conference “Forages Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow” St Louis, MO January 6-9, 2019 http://bit.ly/2PGxTVa

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

but would like to have more summer grazing. In this situation he or she can shift the composition of the sward toward the bermudagrass (warm-season grass) by applying nitrogen fertilizer in early summer and utilizing his pastures heavily during the summer months. This will tend to suppress and weaken the cool-season species and encourage the bermudagrass. Alternatively, he or she may want to shift the botanical composition back toward the tall growing cool-season grasses. In this case, early spring and late summer applications of nitrogen, not grazing closer than 4-5 inches, and letting the pastures rest during the summer months would tend to favor the cool-season grasses in the mixture.

FEATURED PUBLICATION This month’s featured publication is: Bermudagrass: A Summer Forage in Kentucky By D.C. Ditsch, S. R. Smith, and G.D. Lacefield. You can access it via the link below or visit your local extension office http://bit.ly/BGrass

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FEATURE

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY HOSTS RIBBON CUTTING FOR ROBOTIC MILKING SYSTEM Kentucky Dairy Producers To Benefit From Training And Education Sessions

RICHMOND, Ky. (Oct. 22, 2018) – Eastern Kentucky University staff, Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy staff, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles, state and local officials and members of the community attended a ribbon cutting ceremony and tour of the Eastern Kentucky University’s new, state-of-theart robotic milking system today. Eastern Kentucky University (EKU)

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received $179,373 in Kentucky Agricultural Development Funds to purchase and install an Automated Milking System (AMS) for demonstration, education and research at EKU’s Meadowbrook Farm. “Technology is constantly upgrading agriculture. Who would have ever thought that cows could be milked without the dairyman going to the barn? Cows are milking themselves,”

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Warren Beeler, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy said. “Congratulations to EKU and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board in this partnership that will show the world the cutting edge technology of today’s agriculture.” In partnership with the Kentucky Dairy Development Council, EKU’s Meadowbrook Farm hopes to improve economic prospects for dairy farmers by

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2018

increasing exposure of this technology to Kentucky producers. The robotic milking system will benefit both existing dairy farmers across the state as well as agriculture students studying dairy production. EKU’s Meadowbrook Farm is located at 485 Whitt Road, Richmond, KY. For more information on the facility, please contact Justin McKinney at (859) 6222061 or at justin.mckinney@eku.edu.

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Production Sale

1 PM • Sunday • Held at the Farm in Shelbyville, KY

November 18, 2018 CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B

+7 +2.2 +69 +129 +20 +67 +1.10 +1.02 +60.26 +86.40 +54.68 +180.39

Georgina G 12E Surefire 59A

CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B

+12 -.2 +73 +123 +30 +40 +.80 +.27 +82.53 +99.48 +38.19 +147.93

Heritage Assertive 680

10/1/16 • Reg. 18644028 2/5/17 • Reg. 18713787 This spring bred heifer by GAR Sure Fire from a dam by This big-numbered daughter of KCF Bennett Assertive from the Eisa Erica family sells bred to Jet Black. Weigh Up sells bred to Jindra Acclaim.

CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B

+6 +2.9 +70 +121 +32 +55 +.25 +.60 +72.73 +96.42 +22.41 +155.48

Heritage Up N Coming 628 3/17/16 • Reg. 18421997 Several productive spring and fall calving cows sell including this granddaughter of Sitz Upward 307R who has a fall heifer calf at side sired by KCF Bennett Fortress.

CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B

NOVEMBER 2018

10/1/17 • Reg. 19052180 A special highlight will be this maternal sister to Deer Valley Old Hickory sired by KCF Bennett Fortress. A great genetic investment opportunity!

Heritage K2243 Blackcap 788

Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-5100 Cell (502) 655–0164 tom@heritage111.com

ANGUS SALES SERVICE

heritage aj 11-18_9.5x9.5.indd 1

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+1.1 +77 +128 +29 +46 +.34 +.82 +86.23 +98.08 +32.97 +146.71

Heritage 4147 Rita 789

+13 +.9 +75 +132 +28 +52 +.49 +.56 +74.34 +95.90 +29.14 +143.09

9/30/17 • Reg. 19031124 A maternal sister to a $9,000 highlight of the spring sale, sired by EXAR Stetson from a dam by B/R New Day 454.

BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B +10

10/22/18 12:56 PM

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CED


FEATURE

AUGUST BEEF EXPORTS SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS; PORK EXPORT VALUE STILL UNDER PRESSURE U.S. beef exports set new records in August with export value topping $750 million for the first time, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). August pork exports were fairly steady with last year’s volume, but retaliatory duties in key markets continued to pressure pork export value.

with favorable terms being preserved in Mexico, Canada and South Korea and trade talks getting underway with Japan. A trade agreement with Japan would bring opportunities for even greater expansion as U.S. beef becomes more affordable for Japanese consumers and is back on a level playing field with Australian beef.”

August beef exports totaled 119,850 metric tons (mt), up 7 percent from a year ago, valued at $751.7 million – up 11 percent year-over-year and easily exceeding the previous record of $722.1 million reached in May 2018. For January through August, beef exports totaled 899,300 mt, up 9 percent from a year ago, while value climbed 18 percent to $5.51 billion.

August pork export volume was down 1 percent from last year at 182,372 mt, while export value fell 3 percent to $494.1 million. Pork muscle cuts fared better in August, increasing 5 percent to 148,736 mt, but value still declined 1 percent to $414.7 million. Pork variety meat exports declined sharply in August in both volume (33,636 mt, down 20 percent) and value ($79.4 million, down 15 percent).

For the third consecutive month, beef muscle cut exports set a new volume record in August at 95,181 mt (up 9 percent from a year ago), valued at $679.6 million (up 13 percent). Through August, muscle cut exports were 14 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (692,234 mt) and 21 percent higher in value ($4.93 billion).

For January through August, combined pork and pork variety meat exports remained 1 percent ahead of last year’s record pace at 1.63 million mt, while value increased 3 percent to $4.32 billion. For pork muscle cuts only, exports increased 6 percent from a year ago in volume (1.31 million mt) and 4 percent in value ($3.58 billion).

August exports accounted for 13.2 percent of total beef production, up from 12.5 percent a year ago. For beef muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was 11.2 percent, up from 10.4 percent last year. For January through August, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total beef production and 11.1 percent for muscle cuts – up from 12.8 percent and 10.1 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value averaged $320.92 per head of fed slaughter in August, up 11 percent from a year ago. The January-August average was $318.66 per head, up 16 percent.

August exports accounted for 21.9 percent of total pork production, down from 23.1 percent a year ago, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported held steady at 19.2 percent. For January through August, exports equaled 26.3 percent of total pork production (down from 26.9 percent a year ago), while the percentage of muscle cuts exported was 22.8 percent (up from 22.4 percent). Pork export value averaged $44.29 per head slaughtered in August, down 8 percent from a year ago, while the January-August per-head average dropped 1 percent to $53.28.

“U.S. beef exports continue to achieve tremendous growth, not only in our mainstay Asian markets but in the Western Hemisphere as well,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “USMEF is excited about the recent market access developments achieved by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and USDA, 26

U.S. pork currently faces retaliatory duties in two markets: China and Mexico. China’s duty rate on pork muscle cuts and variety meat increased from 12 to 37 percent in April and from 37 to 62 percent in July. Mexico’s duty rate on pork muscle cuts increased from zero to 10 percent in June and jumped to 20 percent in July (pork variety meats continue to enter Mexico duty-free). Beginning in June, COW COUNTRY •

Mexico also imposed a 15 percent duty on sausages and a 20 percent duty on some prepared or preserved hams and shoulders. “Pork exports have posted an impressive performance in 2018, but the retaliatory duties are a clearly a significant obstacle,” Halstrom explained. “The fact that U.S. trade officials were able to secure dutyfree access for U.S. red meat in the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement is critically important, and we are hopeful that duty-free access for U.S. pork entering Mexico will be restored soon. Tariff relief in China may not come as quickly, but USMEF continues to work with industry partners to keep as much product as possible moving to China while also working aggressively to expand exports in other key markets, including Korea, Central and South America, the ASEAN region and Australia.” U.S. beef also currently faces retaliatory duties in two markets: China and Canada. China’s duty rate increased from 12 to 37 percent in July, with the higher rate applying to all eligible products. Canada’s 10 percent duty, which also took effect in July, applies to cooked/prepared beef products. All other U.S. beef still enters Canada duty-free. Beef exports to Korea already near last year’s value record August beef exports to South Korea were up 42 percent from a year ago in volume (24,482 mt) and set another new value record at $176.4 million (up 60 percent). This pushed January-August exports to 161,379 mt, up 39 percent from a year ago, while export value reached $1.15 billion – up 54 percent and just short of the 2017 full-year record of $1.22 billion. These results included a 30 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 35,683 mt, valued at $343.7 million (up 41 percent). Through August, U.S. beef accounted for 58 percent of Korea’s chilled imports. Under the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) that took effect in 2012, Korea’s duty rate on imports of U.S. beef has declined from 40 to 21.3 percent and will be eliminated by

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2018

2026. These terms are preserved in the revised KORUS agreement signed Sept. 24. Beef exports to leading market Japan climbed 8 percent from a year ago in August to 33,548 mt, including a postBSE record for muscle cuts (28,863 mt). August export value was $209.3 million, up 5 percent from a year ago and the highest since 1996. For January through August, exports to Japan were up 7 percent from a year ago in volume at 224,785 mt, while value increased 11 percent to $1.42 billion. This included a slight increase in chilled beef to 100,952 mt, valued at $807.2 million (up 9 percent). U.S. beef accounted for nearly 50 percent of Japan’s chilled imports through August. For January through August, other highlights for U.S. beef exports include: • Exports to Mexico were up 1 percent from a year ago in volume (158,496 mt) and were 8 percent higher in value ($693.9 million). Mexico is the leading destination for U.S. beef variety meat exports, which have trended lower in recent months to fall 8 percent below last year’s pace at 64,642 mt. Variety meat value to Mexico remained steady with last year at $148.7 million. • While beef shipments to China/Hong Kong slowed in the summer months, January-August exports remained 6 percent higher than a year ago in volume (79,584 mt) and 30 percent higher in value ($638.8 million). Exports to China, which reopened to U.S. beef in June of last year, were 4,580 mt valued at $39.8 million. • Beef exports to Taiwan soared 36 percent above last year’s pace in volume (38,923 mt) and 40 percent higher in value ($359.9 million). Chilled exports to Taiwan were up 32 percent in volume (15,676 mt) and 41 percent in value ($197.1 million), as the United States captured 74 percent of Taiwan’s chilled beef market – the highest share of any Asian destination. • Strong growth in the Philippines

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pushed beef exports to the ASEAN region 11 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (29,261 mt) and 23 percent higher in value ($160.7 million). • Led by sharply higher exports to Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama and El Salvador, export volume to Central America increased 26 percent from a year ago to 9,519 mt, while value climbed 22 percent to $51.6 million. Japan, Korea and Latin America bolster August pork exports August pork exports to leading value market Japan increased 10 percent from a year ago to 34,935 mt, valued at $146.8 million (up 5 percent and the highest of 2018). For January through August, exports were up 2 percent from a year ago in both volume (265,250 mt) and value ($1.1 billion). Pork exports to Korea continued to surge in August, increasing 39 percent in volume to 11,303 mt and 40 percent in value to $31.3 million. This pushed January-August exports to 159,536 mt (up 43 percent) valued at $455.6 million (up 49 percent). Exports of pork variety meat, including bungs and feet, have

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NOVEMBER 2018

contributed significantly to this growth. Through August, pork variety meat exports to Korea increased 84 percent from a year ago in volume (10,358 mt) and more than doubled in value to $32.4 million (up 111 percent). Most U.S. pork products enter Korea duty-free, and this will continue under the revised KORUS agreement. August pork exports to leading volume market Mexico fell 4 percent from a year ago to 62,319 mt, while value dropped 21 percent to $103 million. Through August, exports to Mexico remained 2 percent ahead of last year’s record pace at 532,034 mt, but value declined 6 percent to $921.1 million. August exports to the China/Hong Kong region fell 43 percent from a year ago to 19,732 mt, with value dropping 32 percent to $52.9 million. For January through August, exports were down 24 percent in volume (257,939 mt) and fell 13 percent in value to $615.9 million. January-August highlights for U.S. pork exports include: • Led by strong growth in Colombia and Peru, exports to South America increased 29 percent from a year ago

in volume (82,153 mt) and 24 percent in value ($204.4 million). A slow start to the year kept exports to Chile below last year’s record volume pace, but shipments regained momentum in July and August. • Following a record performance in 2017, pork exports to Central America surged 20 percent higher in volume (52,528 mt) and increased 17 percent in value ($123.8 million). Pork exports to all seven Central American nations have achieved double-digit growth in 2018. • Exports to the Dominican Republic continue to gain momentum, increasing 30 percent in volume (29,480 mt) and 25 percent in value ($64.5 million). • Led by strong growth in the Philippines and Vietnam, exports to the ASEAN region increased 29 percent in volume (39,021 mt) and 28 percent in value ($100.1 million). The ASEAN is an especially important destination for pork variety meat, with these exports nearly doubling from a year ago in both volume (14,273 mt, up 99 percent) and value ($24.2 million, up 94 percent).

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• Exports to Australia were 9 percent ahead of last year’s record pace in both volume (51,070 mt) and value ($147.5 million). Australia is the third-largest destination for U.S. hams exported for further processing, trailing only Mexico and China/Hong Kong. Lamb variety meat exports surge in August, but muscle cuts trend lower August exports of U.S. lamb reached the largest monthly volume this year (1,353 mt, up 105 percent from a year ago), due primarily to large shipments of lamb variety meat to Mexico. August export value was just under $2 million, up 16 percent year-over-year. Lamb muscle cut exports took a step back in August, totaling just 142 mt – down 32 percent from a year ago and the lowest since January. Through August, lamb exports were 60 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (8,033 mt) and 20 percent higher in value ($15.4 million). This growth was fueled mainly by stronger variety meat demand in Mexico, but muscle cut exports increased significantly to the Caribbean, the United Arab Emirates, Singapore and the Philippines.

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

FALL 2018 WHEAT PLANTING DECISION Greg Halich

Kentucky grain farmers have started harvesting corn and are getting to the point where they will decide if and how much wheat they will plant this fall. Compared to last year there is a modest increase in wheat prices, and a significant decrease in soybean prices. These changes will make planting wheat more attractive relative to last year. The following analysis attempts to quantify the extent of the relative change in profitability for crops harvested in 2019. The analysis includes estimated returns comparing double-cropped wheat/ soybeans with full-season soybeans for the 2019 crop, and the likely implications for Kentucky grain farmers. Additional costs associated with doublecropping are accounted for, including fuel, fertilizer, herbicides, machinery repairs, labor, hauling and depreciation.1 The analysis assumes a blended mix of selling directly from the field and selling from storage for both wheat and soybeans, as well as typical basis for each crop with those scenarios. This results in 2019 crop prices of $5.50/bu for wheat and $9.00/bu for soybeans. Note that the basis for soybeans for fall/winter 2018/19 is exceptionally weak and I’m assuming it will be closer to normal in 2019/20, but still $.10/bu weaker than what we would normally see. Two regions with different agronomic characteristics are evaluated. The first region is along the southwest tier of counties roughly between I-24 and I-65, which traditionally does a lot of doublecropping. The second region is along the northwest tier of counties (Ohio Valley region) that has some of the best yields for corn and soybeans, but traditionally plants less wheat. Cash rent is assumed to be $175/acre for both these regions for the average ground and $225/acre on the best ground (note: this will vary substantially, but is done here for illustrative purposes only). Other major assumptions are: $2.75/gallon fuel, 25 mile one-way grain hauling, $.40/unit N, $.40/unit P, and $.30/unit K.

wheat/double-crop soybeans were as profitable. This would equate to a 12% yield loss of double-cropped soybeans compared to full-season soybeans.

Southwest Tier Assumptions (Average Ground) 72 bu wheat 40 bu double-cropped soybeans 50 bu full-season soybeans

Northwest Tier Assumptions (Best Ground)

Resulting net profits

75 bu wheat

-$25 double-crop

50 bu double-cropped soybeans

-$27 full-season soybeans

60 bu full-season soybeans

This results in a $2 difference in favor of the double-crop, or essentially a break-even between the double-crop and full-season soybeans.

Resulting net profits +$28 double-crop +$10 full-season soybeans

This results in a $18 difference in favor of the double-crop. The double-cropped soybean yield could drop down to 48 bu before full-season soybeans were as profitable.

Southwest Tier Assumptions (Best Ground) 90 bu wheat 48 bu double-cropped soybeans 60 bu full-season soybeans Resulting net profits +$89 double-crop +$10 full-season soybeans

This results in a $79 difference in favor of the wheat-soybean double-crop. The double-cropped soybean yield could drop down to 39 bu before full-season soybeans were as profitable. Northwest Tier Assumptions (Average Ground) 65 bu wheat 40 bu double-cropped soybeans 50 bu full-season soybeans Resulting net profits -$61 double-crop -$27 full-season soybeans

This results in a $34 difference in favor of the full season soybeans. The double-cropped soybean yield would have to increase to 44 bu in this case before the

Given the current expected market conditions for 2019, planting wheat looks attractive this fall in much of Kentucky. Only those fields with relatively poor wheat yields relative to soybeans would full-season soybeans be expected to be more profitable. On the best ground in the south-west tier of counties, the wheat-soybean double-crop is projected to net almost $80/acre more than full-season soybeans. This analysis doesn’t account for potential payments from the ARC and PLC Farm Bill programs. However, these programs would pay on base acre crop allocation and not planted acres, so there would be no effect on the planting decision. To change the assumptions above to your specific conditions and evaluate your expected profitability, go to the grain budget site at: http://bit. ly/RowcropBudgets. The Corn-Soybean Budgets and Wheat Budgets can be downloaded or opened directly from this page.

SOYBEAN DELIVERY APP FOR 2018 Jordan M. Shockley

Just in time for the 2018 soybean harvest, The Best Bean Buyer app has been updated and is available for download in the App Store for Apple and Google Play for Android users for free. For those that have already downloaded the app, thank you and no action is required at this time. In partnership with the Kentucky Soybean Board, this app helps soybean producers determine and compare the best price received by elevators when considering delivery costs and high moisture discounts. This app helps answer the question, should I sell my soybeans to the closest elevator or should I haul them a further distance to receive a price premium? By incorporating critical factors such as cash price, discount schedules, and hauling elements, a soybean producer can estimate and compare net prices at various elevators in realtime. The balance between maximizing the price per bushel received and minimizing hauling costs could be the difference in turning a profit given the current margins for soybeans. A short YouTube tutorial on how to use the app can be found at: http://bit.ly/SoybeanApp

1. $20/acre was deducted from the double-crop scenario to account for fixed depreciation on the wheat enterprise that should not factor into the wheat planting decision The Agricultural Economics Department publishes the Economic and Policy Update towards the end of each month.  Each issue features articles written by extension personnel within the department and other experts across the country. 

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Topics will vary greatly but regularly include marketing, management, policy, natural resources, and rural development issues. If you would like to recieve this newsletter by email, please contact Kenny Burdine at kburdine@uky.edu.

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2018

You can also view current and past issues online at https://bit.ly/2PoHsZj Co-editors: Kenny Burdine, Alison Davis, and Greg Halich

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

GOALS FOR THE FARMING OPERATION Kayla Brashears

Over the past few years, many producers have been focusing on surviving the current growing season, without clear direction in where the future of the farm is going. An important exercise in reframing your focus for the farming operation is to develop and/or update the goals of the farm. Regardless of whether you’ve written them down or if you think this is a trivial exercise, almost all producers will have some type of goal. Ask yourself, “why am I farming?”, and you’ll have a good start. Most likely, you will answer that question with statements such as; “I’m doing what mom and dad did,” and, “I want to make an honest living,” or, “I have to pay back my debts.” For most, the goal of the farming operation may be to become more financially secure/build wealth, have a happy, healthy family, continue a family tradition of farming, or get out of debt. While these generalized statements are relatable and noteworthy ambitions, developing objective and specific goals may allow you to see your farming operation in a new light. For this example, let us address the goal of being financially secure. This statement can mean different things to different people. For some, it may mean that they could absorb three bad crop years in a row with their cash reserves and other investments. For others, it could

mean improving their situation enough that they are no longer a high-risk operator to their lender. Determine what financially secure means to you and set your objective. In this example, a more detailed objective may read; “Improve the farm financial position in such a way that three years of net losses less than $100,000 could be easily absorbed,” or “Fall below the bank’s high-risk benchmarks to lower the interest rate on the operating line.” Once your objectives are set, it is time to set specific, measurable goals to reach your objectives. The goals should be challenging but achievable, and they should be relevant to you and your farming operation. Ideally, there is a time deadline to achieve these goals. In our example, you may set goals such as: • Increase liquidity two fold within the next five years. • Reduce and/or eliminate intermediate debts from equipment purchases, or operating line, term outs within the next two years. • Diversify investments to absorb volatility in the agriculture industry over the next three years. Of course, if there is not a plan to achieve these goals, the exercise is almost

pointless. While you are developing goals, set a few checkpoints to help you achieve them. For our three goals listed above, you could develop checkpoints such as: • Develop a budget to reduce operating expenses by 7% to increase profitability. • Sell equipment that is not necessary and apply the proceeds to intermediate debts. • Obtain a part-time, off-farm job for additional cash flow. Goals for the farming operation should be fluid and adaptable. Ideally, it would be prudent to revisit your goals at the end of each year to measure your progress and possibly set new goals. As you become more proficient in the practice of goal setting, expand the scope. Try setting short-term goals that are achievable within 6 months to a year, as well as long-term goals. As previously mentioned, using measurable goals such as, “reduce family living expenses by 10% within the next year,” is especially helpful to staying on track. You may consider developing goals for your personal life as well as the farming operation. Hopefully, a goal setting exercise will refocus your attention on the path of your farming operation.

@kycattlemensbeef for more information, visit kentuckycattlemensbeef.com

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION OF FOOD BANKS UPDATE Kayla Brashears

The Kentucky Association of Food Banks (KAFB), a 501(c)3 charitable organization, was formed in 2001 when representatives from all seven Feeding America food banks in the state collaborated with the mission to end hunger in Kentucky. The seven Feeding America food banks include Dare to Care, God’s Pantry, Facing Hunger, Purchase Area Development District, TriState, Freestore, and Feeding America, which service all 120 counties in the state. Building alliances that help support hunger relief are at the forefront of KAFB’s goals while increasing quality, variety and nutritional value of the food that is available to hungry Kentuckians. Their outstanding work in mobilizing the public to join the hunger fight has led to a fantastic impact on the state. KAFB started their partnership with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture in 2009 to establish the Farms to Food Banks program. Less than ten years later, in 2017, KAFB reports 3.6 million pounds of food was distributed translating to roughly 6 million meals for hungry Kentuckians. Fortunately, KAFB is not just in the business of helping hungry Kentuckians; they also do a great deal to support local farmers. KAFB uses funds to help farmers recoup the loss from produce that otherwise may be considered unmarketable. It’s important that the food banks are able to offer a fair price to farmers for surplus product without directly competing with local markets or spurring additional production. The University of Kentucky Center for Crop Diversification and Department of Agricultural Economics have worked closely with KAFB to help them determine appropriate pricing for the products they buy. These prices are based on average produce auction prices with some consideration given to regional terminal market prices. Over $600,000 went to farmers for 28 different types of

produce, which resulted in farmers receiving an average payment of $1,700. So far, in 2018 (as of 9/14/18) KAFB has reported purchases totaling $584,837, which has provided 3,175,929 pounds of produce or 5,293,215 meals to all 120 counties. 2018 has been an excellent year for KAFB, with $1.0 million for the Farm to Food Banks program included in the biennial state budget. The fiscal year shows 7.6 million pounds of produce and grocery products resulting in 64 million meals reaching one in seven Kentuckians. KAFB has accepted more than $300,000 of In-Kind contributions, and they anticipate this number will continue to grow throughout the remainder of the year. Additionally, 335 farmers from 64 counties have worked with KAFB to provide fresh local food to hungry Kentuckians. For more information about how you can help KAFB visit their website at http://www.kafb.org. To reach someone directly contact Tamara Sandberg, Executive Director at tamara@kafb.orgor Sarah Vaughn, Program Coordinator at sarah@kafb.org.

Fiscal Year 2018 Pounds Distributed (to Kentucky Counties)

Food Banks

Pounds of Food Distributed

Dare to Care

18.6 million

Facing Hunger

1.9 million

Feeding America, KY

11.5 million

Freestore

5.3 million

God’s Pantry

34.5 million

Purchase Area

2.5 million

Tri-State

2.5 million

Table 1: The fiscal year for KAFB runs from Jul 1 to Jun 30.

LEITCHFIELD TRUCK & TRAILER

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

OPERATING COMMITTEE APPROVES FY19 PLAN OF WORK Maggie Henton

industry information, foreign marketing and producer communications during fiscal 2019, subject to USDA approval. In action at the end of its September 11-12 meeting in Denver, the Operating Committee approved checkoff funding for a total of 14 “Authorization Requests” – or proposals – brought by seven contractors for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2018. The committee, which includes 10 producers from the Beef Board and 10 producers from the Federation of State Beef Councils, also recommended full Beef Board approval of a budget amendment to reflect the split of funding between budget categories affected by their decisions.

The Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board will invest about $40.5 million into programs of beef promotion, research, consumer information,

The seven contractors had brought a total of $45 million worth of funding requests to the Operating Committee this week, almost $5 million more than what was available from the CBB budget. “The

members

of

the

Operating

Committee listened with open minds as contractors presented their requests for funding. The committee engaged in respectful debate as they went through the funding for each request, mindful of program committee comments from summer convention,” said Beef Board Chariman Joan Ruskamp, a feedlot owner from Nebraska. “Trimming nearly 4.8 million dollars to meet the budget of $40,521,900 was not an easy task, yet the committee remained focused on program funding that would best strengthen demand for beef.. In the end, the Operating Committee approved proposals from seven national beef organizations for funding through the FY 19 Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board budget, as follows: • National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (five proposals for $27.4 million) • U.S.

Meat

Export

Federation,

a

subcontractor to NCBA (one proposal for $8.3 million) • North American Meat Institute (four proposals for $1.9 million) • Cattlemen’s Beef Board (one proposal for $1.7 million) • American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture (one proposal for $700,000) • Meat Import Council of America (one proposal for $417,000) • National Livestock Producers Association (one proposal for $60,000) Broken out by budget component, the Fiscal Year 2019 Plan of Work for the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board budget includes: • $10.5 million for promotion programs, including continuation of the checkoff’s consumer digital advertising program,

KENTUCKY HEREFORD AUTUMN SALE

December 1, 2018 • Noon

Chenault Agricultural Center • 2130 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353

SELLING 70 LOTS Sale is sponsored by the Kentucky Hereford Association.

Sale will feature registered breeding stock, cow-calf pairs, bred cows, bred heifers, open show heifer prospects, a select few bulls, and commercial black baldies. Auctioneer: Dale Stith • 918-760-1550

Sale Headquarters:

Fore more information or a catalog, contact: Earlene Thomas 2396 Union Cit Rd. • Richmond, KY 40475 859-623-5734 • thomasep@roadrunner.com

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COW COUNTRY •

Comfort Inn & Suites 105 Stone Trace Dr • Mt. Sterling, KY 859-498-4050 NOVEMBER

2018

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as well as veal promotion • $9.2 million for research programs, focusing on a variety of critical issues, including pre- and postharvest beef safety research, product quality research, human nutrition research and scientific affairs, market research, and beef and culinary innovations • $7.6 million for consumer information programs, including a Northeast public relations initiative; national consumer public relations, including nutritioninfluencer relations and work with primary- and secondary-school curriculum directors nationwide to get accurate information about the beef industry into classrooms of today’s youth • $3 million for industry information programs, comprising dissemination of accurate information about the beef industry to counter misinformation from anti-beef groups and others, as well as funding for checkoff participation in a fifth annual national industrywide symposium focused on discussion and dissemination of information about antibiotic use • $8.3 million for foreign marketing and education in 80 countries in the following regions: ASEAN region, Caribbean, Central America/ Dominican Republic, China/Hong Kong, Europe, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Middle East, Russia/ Greater Russian Region, South America, Taiwan, and new markets • $1.7 million for producer communications, which includes investor outreach using national communications and direct communications to producers and importers about checkoff results; as well as development and utilization of a publishing strategy and platform, and a state beef council content hub. The full fiscal 2019 budget is $43.9 million. Separate from the authorization requests, other expenses funded include $227,000 for evaluation; $300,000 for program development; $800,000 for USDA oversight/CBB legal; and about $2 million for administration. The fiscal 2019 budget represents an increase of $3 million from the $40.9 million FY19 budget. COW COUNTRY •

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FEATURE

GRAIN MARKETS FAVOR STORAGE; ALTERNATIVE STRUCTURES LIKELY OPTION Katie Pratt

PRINCETON, KY - Continuous years of large crops and demand uncertainty makes grain storage attractive for producers this fall. While Kentucky producers have added on-farm storage to their operations in recent years, many will store corn and soybeans in alternative structures through the winter, particularly as markets are showing positive returns.

crop on record. The report puts soybean production at 4.6 billion bushels. Projections for Kentucky are 214 million bushels for corn and 119 million bushels for soybeans, according to the Kentucky Agricultural Statistics Service. Kentucky producers grew about 3 million fewer bushels of corn compared to last year, but they have raised 16 million more bushels of soybeans than last year.

“Higher futures prices in spring 2019 and a wide basis are classic market signs for storage,” said Todd Davis, agricultural economist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Given the current futures carry and average basis appreciation after harvest, the net return for storing corn until February is $0.19 per bushel and $0.29 a bushel for storage until May. Soybeans should have a net return of $0.45 per bushel if held until January and $0.57 per bushel return in May. This return is over the opportunity cost of not selling grain at harvest.”

Alternative storage structures have become more common across the state in recent years as producers hold larger amounts of grain in anticipation of better marketing opportunities. Equipment storage buildings, grain bags and covered outdoor piles are some of the more common alternative storage structures.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s September crop report predicts a U.S. corn crop of 14.8 billion bushels. If realized, it would be the second largest 34

Producers who plan to store grain in alternative structures need to keep a watchful eye. “A producer’s job really isn’t done until grain has passed grade at the elevator and is sold,” said Sam McNeill, UK extension agricultural engineer. “The diligence spent scouting fields during the growing season should transfer to managing stored grain.” COW COUNTRY •

If producers properly dry and cool grain, protect it from pests, aerate and regularly inspect it, it will store well with little chance of excess spoilage, which will help prevent potential price docks when delivered for sale. Clean, undamaged grain is best for temporary storage when farmers use less-thanideal facilities. Producers should aim for 14 percent moisture content for corn and 12 percent for soybeans that will be stored in alternative structures through February. If held through May, producers should reduce these levels by 0.5 to one point of moisture to compensate for warmer temperatures. Producers should thoroughly clean storage sheds before putting grain in them, and they need to fill all temporary structures last and empty them first. A properly designed aeration system is essential for successful grain storage and is the key to maintaining uniform temperatures, which control moisture accumulation and subsequent grain spoilage. Producers should run aeration fans at least once a month in flat storage buildings and continuously in covered piles to hold down the cover.

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2018

Producers should routinely monitor grain held in alternative storage structures for damage from rodents, birds and insects. These structures are at greater risk for damage due to inherent exposure. Producers should address any issues quickly with approved pest control methods. Alternative storage costs vary widely depending on the type of structure, its original condition and holding capacity. Farmers can use a spreadsheet available on the UK Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering website, http://bit.ly/UKbae, to estimate the amount of grain these types of structures can hold. They can enter the dimensions of the structure, pile or bag to calculate storage capacity in bushels. The UK Cooperative Extension Service also has a recent publication, ID-249: A Comprehensive Guide to Soybean Management in Kentucky, which includes chapters on production economics and post-harvest management. County extension offices have additional information on managing stored grain in bins or alternative structures.

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CALCIUM(Ca),

(max)

15.00%

COPPER(Cu),

(min)

625 ppm

CALCIUM(Ca),

(min)

13.00%

MANGANESE(Mn),

(min)

805 ppm

PHOSPHORUS(P),

(min)

6.00%

IODINE(I),

(min)

400 ppm

SALT(NaCl),

THE FORM OF MINERAL MATTERS. (max)

32.00%

SELENIUM(Se),

(min)

30 ppm

(min)

30.00%

ZINC(Zn),

(min)

2,000 ppm

MAGNESIUM(Mg),

(min)

0.50%

VITAMIN A,

(min)

160,000 IU/lb

POTASSIUM(K),

(min)

1.20%

VITAMIN D3,

(min)

11,500 IU/lb

IRON(Fe),

(min)

3,100 ppm

VITAMINE,

(min)

225 IU/lb

SALT(NaCl),

INGREDIENTS Salt, Monocalcium and Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Selenium Yeast, Zinc Proteinate, Hydrolyzed Yeast, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Carbonate, Cobalt Proteinate, Yeast Extract, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Magnesium Oxide, Potassium Chloride, Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast culture, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Iodate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Dried Molasses, Cottonseed Meal, Potassium Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate, Soybean Oil, Calcium Silicate, Calcium Salts of long-chain fatty acids, Silicon Dioxide, natural flavors.

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FEEDING DIRECTIONS: • Offer BLUEPRINT 100 RANGE MINERAL free choice. • Recommended intake of BLUEPRINT 100 RANGE MINERAL is 2.5-3.5 ounces per head daily, or the equivalent of approximately 1.01.5 lb per head per week. • Remove other salt sources. at https://go.alltech.com/sebeef January 30 - February 1, 2019 • Place mineral near normal feeding, watering or loafing areas. • Keep feeders or troughs clean and only put out a 7 to 10 day supply. • Consumption levels may vary depending on condition of cattle and pasture. CAUTION: Store in a dry area away from insects and rodents. Do not feed moldy or insect-infested feed to animals. Not intended for If you want want Total Replacement Technology Equine. This feed contains addedresults, copper andyou selenium. Do not100% feed to Sheep or other copper sensitive species. Use as directed. Feed at a rate not to exceed an intake of 3mg/hd/day selenium.

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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35


FEATURE

PNEUMONIA IN FEEDER CALVES? DON’T FORGET HISTOPHILUS SOMNI (Formerly known as Haemophilus somnus) MICHELLE ARNOLD DVM-Ruminant Extension Veterinarian, University of Kentucky

In this era of advanced vaccine technology and long-acting, expensive, powerful antibiotics, why do cases of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) continue to increase? One reason is the re-emergence of Histophilus somni (formerly known as Haemophilus somnus) as a major bacterial pathogen responsible for the development of pneumonia in feeder operations. While Mannheimia haemolytica is the bacteria known to cause the dramatic pneumonia signs of fever, depression, appetite loss and rapid death, Histophilus somni (HS) can cause similar symptoms and is proving very difficult to treat and control with traditional methods. The organism is often found in combination with Pasteurella multocida or other BRD bacteria in “biofilms” which are clusters of bacteria in a matrix that serves as protection from antibiotics and host immune system responses. Stress can trigger dispersal of large numbers bacteria from the biofilm that can then invade the lower respiratory system. Once it establishes infection in the lungs, it can travel in the bloodstream to joints, organs (especially the heart), and to the brain. These calves may develop pneumonia, pleuritis (infection of the membrane surrounding the lungs), myocarditis (infection in the heart muscle), thrombotic meningoencephalitis (infection in the brain), tenosynovitis (infection within joints), and otitis media (middle ear infection). The disease can happen anytime in the year but most clinical cases occur between October and January. Previously, disease due to HS or “histophilosis” was associated with primarily Western and Midwestern states in the USA and Canada but cases are now being diagnosed throughout the US, including Kentucky. Most comprehensive studies have been conducted in Canada where HS accounts for an estimated 40% of the death loss in feedlots. Unlike typical BRD outbreaks that peak at 14 days after arrival to the feedlot, HS acute pneumonia

36

cases peak at 25 days on feed. In the absence of consistently effective treatment or vaccine options, management practices are crucial to controlling Histophilus pneumonia. Metaphylaxis, where treatment is applied to the whole group (either on arrival or once 10-20 % of the calves are showing clinical signs of BRD), along with prompt individual treatment of sick cattle is one recommended control approach. Vaccines are available against HS but their ability to prevent disease has not been proven. The common BRD-associated bacteria (Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis) are considered normal bacteria in the nasal passages of healthy calves but with stress (such as transportation and commingling) and viral infection, they can descend into the lungs and sometimes spread throughout the body, causing disease. This simple disease model is now under scrutiny with the realization that multiple factors contribute to combinations and complex interactions between the environment, the bacteria and viruses, and the calf’s immune system. Stressed cattle are more susceptible to the viral components of BRD, including Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR), Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus (BVD), Parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3), Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (BRSV) and possibly another agent commonly found, Bovine Coronavirus (BCV). Viruses are known to damage the lining of the respiratory tract and some will actually suppress the immune system, allowing secondary bacterial infection. Once established in the lung, the bacterial components are responsible for the inflammation and bronchopneumonia signs seen with BRD. Combinations of different bacteria can work synergistically to cause more severe disease than if operating alone. There are no early clinical signs that indicate Histophilus is COW COUNTRY •

part or all of the disease problem, other than it occurs later after arrival than most cases of BRD. The Histophilus somni Disease Complex (HSDC) is a term used to describe the respiratory disease when HS reaches the lungs and the complications from “septicemia”, when HS leaves the lungs and lands in the brain, heart and joints. Components of the HSDC include: 1. Rapidly Fatal Pneumonia: Some animals with HS pneumonia are simply found dead due to a rapidly fatal type of damage to the lung called “severe fibrinous pleuritis”. Currently, this is the most common manifestation of HS in western Canadian feedlots and is seen 30-90 days after arrival. Rarely are abnormalities found in any other organ besides the lungs which are covered in a thick sheet of fibrin and the lungs are often remarkably collapsed underneath. 2. Bronchopneumonia:

NOVEMBER

2018

Some

calves

with HS develop typical signs of BRD including depression, separation from the group, off feed, cough, excessive nasal discharge and difficult or rapid breathing. Respiratory signs with fever of 104°F or above confirms the diagnosis of BRD but detection of the bacteria and/or viruses involved must be done at a diagnostic laboratory. Treatment is often very difficult and unrewarding in the field although in the laboratory, the bacteria is susceptible to many antibiotics. 3. Heart Muscle damage: HS can cause a “necrotizing myocarditis” when it localizes in the muscles of the left ventricle of the heart. Death can be rapid with no previous signs (a heart attack) or chronic forms lead to “poor doers”. 4. TME:Thromboticmeningoencephalitismyelitis or “TME” is a disease of older calves and yearlings affecting the brain.

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During an outbreak, individual cases occur sporadically in separate pens in a feed yard. Signs include depression, fever, blindness, coma and death; this can look similar to signs seen with polioencephalomalacia or “brainers”. Treatment is most often unrewarding. 5. Other Manifestations: Arthritis with joint swelling may follow episodes of pneumonia. Middle ear infections with drainage from the ear canals may also be seen. Diagnosis of Histophilus somni pneumonia in a live calf is challenging because it is present in the upper airways of both healthy and diseased calves so swabs taken from deep in the nose will not tell the story of what is actually happening in the lungs. Only lung fluid removed from the lung via bronchoalveolar lavage can be used for culture or molecular assays such as PCR to identify the organism. The organism is very difficult to grow in the laboratory, especially if the calf was treated with antibiotics, so PCR is strongly recommended for detection. Mixed lung infections with other diseasecausing bacteria such as Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida can easily overgrow Histophilus somni

on a culture plate so the identification is easily missed when relying on traditional bacterial culture methods alone.

is recommended in high risk cattle to keep appetite up and reduce vaccineinduced fever.

Prevention depends on sound biosecurity and biocontainment practices. Because HS pneumonia or septicemia may develop secondary to viral infections (especially BVD) or in combination with other bacterial pathogens, control should begin with minimizing the effect of well-recognized factors predisposing to BRD. Stress plays a major role in disease through immunosuppression so excellent nutrition, sound vaccination protocols and management are critical. There are numerous challenges to production of an effective vaccine to prevent Histophilus somni infections. In spite of all the considerable amount of work on bacterinbased HS vaccines, there is no direct proof that these vaccines are effective under field conditions. Consult with your local veterinarian for the best management plan for your operation.

2. Cattle with extremely low blood concentrations of the trace elements selenium and copper have difficulty fighting any disease challenge. An injectable trace mineral supplement (such as Multimin 90) is often needed to boost the copper and selenium levels during the initial arrival period.

6. Buying preconditioned calves that have been weaned and vaccinated for respiratory diseases prior to weaning (especially BVD) and dewormed will help minimize sickness and death loss. In summary, the clinical features of disease caused by Histophilus somni are often confused with other diseases commonly seen in the feedlot. Response to antibiotic therapy is frequently very poor due to biofilm protection. Diagnosis in a live calf can be difficult since H. somni is often recovered from nasal swabs of healthy calves so the presence of the bacteria in the nose of a sick calf does not prove it is causing disease. It is also a difficult bacterium to grow in the laboratory, especially if the calf has been recently treated with antibiotics. Future research will focus on the relationship between HS and other respiratory pathogens, developing improved diagnostic tests, monitoring antibiotic effectiveness and development of new vaccines for prevention of disease.

3. Metaphylactic treatment (treatment of all calves on arrival) of high risk calves with long-acting antibiotics is a well-established, beneficial procedure that can reduce morbidity (sickness) and cause fatality (death) by up to 50% in high risk calves. Be aware that overconfidence in and reliance on metaphylaxis and long-acting antibiotics can lead to delayed follow-up treatment if calves are not adequately monitored. 4. Feed bunks and watering troughs are known areas for disease transmission. Keep sick cattle, especially chronic pneumonia calves, away from healthy calves and manage the feed and water separately.

The following steps should reduce the risk of pneumonia in feeder calves: 1. Vaccination with a 5-way respiratory virus vaccine and a Mannheimia haemolytica toxoid. Use of an intranasal vaccine for the viral fraction

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• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

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FEATURE

NEW UK PROGRAM TO HELP WITH BULL SELECTION Paying high costs in freight, shrink and commissions when selling your livestock?

Aimee Nielson

Our team can help you put more money in YOUR pocket! Visit your local weekly auction to learn how!

Photo by Matt Barton

LEXINGTON, KY - One of the most important decisions in a cattle operation is choosing a bull for the herd. It can affect a producer’s operation and bottom line for many years. The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service is launching a new program to help producers make the best, educated decision about herd genetics.

Kentucky Locations: UPI - Bowling Green, Ky. Weekly Auction: Tuesday at 2 p.m. CST

The Bull Value Assessment Program will be a two-session event that will take place in five locations across Kentucky.

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UPI - Irvington, Ky. Weekly Auctions: Monday - 9 a.m. EST and Thursday - 10 a.m. EST John Gibson, Facility Manager, (812) 968-4097

UPI - Owenton, Ky. Weekly Auction: Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. EST Doyle Devers, Facility Manager, (502) 803-0389 United Producers is a market-leading provider of livestock marketing, credit and risk management solutions. | www.uproducers.com

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COW COUNTRY •

“We wanted to spread it out to make it accessible to producers around the state,” said Ben Crites, Beef Integrated Resource Management coordinator for the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We are looking forward to helping producers learn and deepen their knowledge of all the factors that go into choosing a bull that will be best for their enterprise.” In Western Kentucky, sessions are Oct. 9 and 16 at the Hopkins County Extension office. In Central Kentucky, sessions are Oct. 11 and 18 at the Madison County Extension office. In Southern Kentucky, sessions are Oct. 22 and 29 at the Barren County Extension office. In Northern Kentucky, sessions are Oct. 23 and 30 at the Shelby County Extension office, and

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2018

in Eastern Kentucky, sessions are Nov. 1 and 8 at the Fleming County Extension office. Producers will learn how to understand and use expected progeny differences and how to match genetics to management and environment. Other topics include bull breeding soundness exams, proper bull nutrition and health, selection tools and selection decisions for different marketing operations. The first session at each location is for classroom education and the second session is a mock auction. Participants must attend both sessions. Cost is $25 per person and each location has a limit of 50 attendees, so preregistration is required. All programs begin at 6 p.m. local time. To register, visit http://bit.ly/ BullValueProgram For more information, visit Kentucky Beef IRM on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ KyBeefIRM. The program has several sponsors including the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, the Kentucky Beef Network and Kentucky Beef IRM.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Trace ADD, Kentucky 4-H Centennial Hall of Fame-Kentucky 4-H, Recognition to Distinguished and Dedicated Service to Kentucky Agriculture-Kentucky Farm Bureau, Distinguished Service AwardMason County Conservation District, Distinguished Service Award-Kentucky Association FFA and Kentucky Agriculture.

William B. Tolle, 82, passed away Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. He was born on Sept. 22, 1936, to the late Gus and Iva Carpenter Tolle. Mr. Tolle was a retired Chrysler/Dodge and Plymouth Automobile Dealer of Carpenter Motors and was a local farmer. He was a U.S. Army Veteran in the Berlin Conflict. He was an active member of the Oakwoods Church of Christ, Maysville Rotary Club, Extension District Board, Mason County Livestock Association, Kentucky Cattleman Association, Kentucky Pork Producers, Kentucky Farm Bureau, Kentucky Livestock Association, Kentucky FFA Foundation Board of Finance, Mason County 4-H Counselor and active with Mason County 4-H for 50 years and he served for 26 years on the Kentucky State Fair Board. Other awards and recognitions are Kentucky Colonel, Paul Harris FellowMaysville Rotary, Thomas Cooper Poe Award-UK College of Agriculture, Distinguished Service Award-Maysville Rotary, Honorable State FFA DegreeKentucky FFA Association, Unbridled Spirit Award-Governor Fletcher, Community Leadership Award-Buffalo

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

Kentucky Farm Bureau established the Wm. B. Toll Farm Bureau Scholarship in his name to be presented each year to any youth (4-H or FFA Member) that excel in livestock at that level and the Mason County Extension office was named Tolle and Cary Extension Education Center. His passion was livestock, farming, and promoting participation in 4-H, FFA, and Farm Bureau youth activities to all students/ youth and his family. Mr. Tolle is survived by his wife, Ruth Jackson Tolle, whom he married Dec. 20, 1959. He is also survived by two sons, William Rodney (Amber) Tolle of Maysville and Brent Tolle of Taylorsville; three grandchildren, William Jackson (Annie) Tolle, Taylor Tolle and Courtney Tolle; four brothers, Don (Jeanette) Tolle, Frank (Sue) Tolle, Jerry (Linda) Tolle and Ronnie (Judy) Tolle; and one sister, Jenny (Charles) Rottinghouse. He was preceded in death by four brothers, Milton Tolle, Emerson Tolle, Dwayne Tolle and Edward “Ned” Tolle; and three sisters, Allene Parker, Bonnie Perrutt and Rebecca “Sis” Calvert. Memorials may be made to Mason County 4-H, Mason County FFA, or Oakwoods Church of Christ. Condolences may be sent MooreAndParkerFh.com.

to

Charles William Hunt passed away at Owenton, Kentucky on October 13, 2018 on his 82nd birthday. He is survived by his wife of 59 years of marriage, Carole Cunningham Hunt, his five daughters, who were the loves of his life and he was very, very proud of all of them, Angela (Mike) Siemens of Towanda, KS, Deborah (Larry) Waltz of Greenfield, IN, Gayle (Rob) Starkey of Bay St. Louis, MS, Annette (David) Downs of Jackson Center, PA and her twin sister, Jeanette (Rusty) Burk of Noblesville, IN. He had seven grandchildren and finally got four boys in the family! He also had two great-grandchildren and got to claim another boy. He is also survived by a brother, Raymond Hunt, and two sisters, Martha Graham, and Ruby Fielding. Charles was a graduate of Galveston High School in Indiana and a 1960 graduate of Purdue University.

4-H and cattle shows all around the United States. Charles was a volunteer. Every state that Carole and he lived in, their lives revolved around Ag Extension, 4-H, and cattle related activities. He was an advisor for several State Junior Cattle groups. He has received many recognitions throughout his life endeavors, including being named a Kentucky Colonel. He never met a stranger and always had time for everyone. He will be missed by his wife, his daughters, extended family, and people all over the United States. Charlie operated Paradox Farms with his wife Carol, and was an active member of KCA and of the Fleming County Cattlemen’s Association, serving as the President of the Fleming County chapter for many years. He also served on the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Board of Directors in 2007 and from 2009-2011. He served as the Producer Communications Chair for the Kentucky Beef Council from 2012 -2014. And he was currently serving as a Kentucky Beef Network Manager when he passed away at Eden Shale Farm on Saturday, October 13th.

He was a Cattleman and loved to talk about cattle to everyone he met. When his daughters were growing up, vacation times were

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

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FEATURE

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR 2019 CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION AND NCBA TRADE SHOW JAN. 30 – FEB. 1 It’s Let’s Geaux! to New Orleans for Thousands of Cattle Industry Members DENVER (Oct. 2, 2018) – Registration and housing for the 2019 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade show is now open. The annual convention will be held in New Orleans, La., Jan. 30 – Feb. 1, 2019. Advanced registration is now

open, and its recommended attendees register early, as convenient housing will fill quickly. Annual meetings of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, American National CattleWomen, CattleFax and

National Cattlemen’s Foundation will be held at this event.

next morning with a morning full of educational sessions.

Convention participants will gather insights on industry trends at a CattleFax Outlook Seminar, enjoy an evening of entertainment from country music entertainers Big & Rich, hear from NFL Hall of Famer and Super Bowl champion Terry Bradshaw at the Opening General Session, be part of the country’s largest cattle industry trade show (with more than 300 exhibitors on more than 6 ½ acres), work with other industry leaders on both beef checkoff and NCBA policy efforts, and appreciate fellowship with thousands of other cattle producers from around the country. And that just scratches the surface of the event.

In addition, the National Environmental Stewardship Award winner will be named, and some of the industry’s most cutting-edge individuals will be recognized at the Best of Beef Breakfast.

The convention will again be preceded by 26th annual Cattlemen’s College, which is famous for stimulating and thought-provoking sessions that can help generate high returns for cattle operations. The event will begin on Jan. 29 with an afternoon session featuring Temple Grandin, be followed by an evening reception and be continued the

NCBA President and California cattleman Kevin Kester says the convention is the highlight of the year for many of the people who attend. “Combining the education, information, entertainment, engagement and important decisionmaking opportunities, the convention is what many producers look forward to every year,” says Kester. “This year’s event in New Orleans presents a welcome new and entertaining opportunity to explore a different part of the country, while retaining traditional elements of the convention we have come to expect and appreciate.” To register and secure housing for the 2019 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, visit www.beefusa. org.

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

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• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


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Catt le Industry Convention

Join or Renew your Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Membership

JANUARY 30-FEBRUARY 1, 2019

STAY IN THE KNOW

R C ALENDARS M A R K YO U

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR FARMERS AND RANCHERS JUST LIKE YOU

REGI STRA TI ON & HOUSI NG OPEN

Get down to business in the Big Easy! Unmask your potential at the largest event in the beef cattle business! Apply for a chance to win a scholarship and Geaux to New Orleans! Applications open August 1, 2018.

OCT. 1, 2018

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show interns are vital to the success of the largest annual meeting in the U.S. beef cattle industry. Our intern positions provide a unique opportunity for students to gain firsthand experience and to interact with leaders from every segment of the cattle and beef industry.

J o i n u s a s w e g e t j a z z e d u p i n Ne w Or l e a n s !

T

he 122nd Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade show, to be held January 30-February 1, 2019 in New Orleans, LA, promises to be one for the record books with countless leadership development and educational opportunities, a trade show that will span more than six acres, and entertainment for the entire family. Of course, we’ll also do the work of America’s beef business during the week.

Selected interns must be available to attend onsite in New Orleans. Applications open August 20, 2018

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

The NCBA Trade Show is the largest trade show in the beef cattle industry, featuring over 300 exhibitors offering the latest products and services for the beef industry. In addition you’ll receive: • Classroom style session hosted in our Learning Lounge • Live animal handling sessions in the demonstration area featuring the Stockmanship and Stewardship program • BQA certifications will be held on Thursday and Friday during the Convention • Lunch each day • Receptions each day

2019 Catt lemen’s College 24 BREAKOUT SESSIONS + FACILITY DESIGN SESSIONS USING LIVE ANIMALS + TWO GENERAL SESSIONS = ONE AMAZING, WORLD-CLASS EDUCATION EXPERIENCE

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As the largest cattle producing state east of the Mississippi River, Kentucky is home to over 1.1 million beef cows and ranks 5th nationally in total number of farms. KCA’s mission is to provide a strong, proactive voice for all of Kentucky’s Beef Farm Families, serve as a resource for information and education for producers, consumers and the industry and be a catalyst for enhancing producer profitability. NOW IS THE TIME to join or renew your Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association. Unite and become a unified voice for all cattle producers.

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• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION & NCBA TRADE SHOW

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Bred to Angus Bulls

Spring Calvers

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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FEATURE

GAUGING THE CURRENT OUTLOOK FOR PRECONDITIONING CATTLE Jason Bradley, Noble Foundation

It’s that time of year again — the time when decisions about weaning the spring-born calves have to be made. Is it better to sell them directly at weaning, or should they be held for a period of time in some type of preconditioning program? Many reports show a cow-calf operation can gain value by preconditioning its calves before marketing. In this article, we will look at what the current preconditioning outlook shows us and a couple of other items to consider when deciding whether preconditioning is for you. Two things you must consider when thinking about preconditioning are the value of gain (VoG) and the cost of gain (CoG). The VoG is the value added to the animal with every pound it gains, while the CoG is what it costs you, the producer, to put that pound of weight on. Value of Gain To begin, we need to find the VoG. We can do this by estimating the selling value and the weaning value. But where do these values come from? This is where we use the futures market and a historical basis. In the futures market, traders from all around the world come together with information and try to outguess each other. This provides us with the best guess at where the price for a group of 62 steers weighing 800 pounds and located somewhere near the region where cattle are fed is going to be at some time in the future — which is why we call it the futures market. But not all of us have 62 steers weighing 800 pounds, so we have to adjust that futures price. This adjustment is the basis. We could get into the details of what basis is, but that’s an article for another time. Basically, basis accounts for all the differences between your cattle and those in the futures contract. Since the cash market and the futures generally follow one another, a historical basis

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

can be figured for almost every cattle type. Taking the basis for a particular set of cattle and adding it to the futures price, we can get an expected value. In This Scenario By making some assumptions, we can come up with the prices for the cattle at weaning and after preconditioning. The assumptions are that: • We are weaning 600-pound calves. • The weanling calves will experience 5 percent shrink due to the stress of the selling process. • The preconditioned cattle will experience 1.5 percent shrink. • The livestock auction OKC West is our sale barn. • Our weaning date is going to be Oct. 2, 2019. • The preconditioned cattle are going to gain 2.75 pounds per day. Based on these assumptions above, our payweight on the weanling calf is going to be 570 pounds. Based on the current futures prices (as of this writing) for October of $151.48 and a historical basis for steers and heifers of about $1.10, our estimated sale price is around $152.58 per hundredweight. Historically, we’ve seen a discount of around $10 for a bawling calf at this weight. This makes our final weaning price $142.58 and an estimated value of $812.68 per head. One of the most common preconditioning programs is to wean for 45 days with a vaccination protocol. Using our assumed average daily gain of 2.75 pounds per day for 49 days (so the sale date matches up), our estimated ending weight after preconditioning is 734.75 pounds. Subtracting the 1.5 percent shrink leaves us with a payweight of 723.7 pounds. Using the January futures of $148.03 and a basis of -$8.29, our estimated price is $139.74 with a value of $1,011.34 per head. Now we can find our VoG. With $198.66 of added value divided by the 134.75 pounds the animal put on, our

VoG is $1.47 per pound. Cost of Gain The next step is to look at what the CoG is going to be. We’ll say a standard vaccine protocol is going to run us around $15 per head. Then we’ll add in the feed of $1.25 per day. So, adding up 49 days of feed at $1.25 per day plus $15 for the vaccines, our preconditioning cost is $76.25 per head. Dividing this by the estimated 134.75 pounds of gain gives us an estimated CoG of 57 cents per pound. In this scenario, our VoG is $1.47 per pound and our CoG is 57 cents per pound, resulting in a margin of gain of 91 cents per pound. Another 60-day preconditioning program is similar to the previous one except the calves have been weaned for at least 60 days. The health protocols are generally very similar to the 45-day program, so using many of the same assumptions, the selling price after 63 days of preconditioning is $1,055.92 per head, giving us a VoG of $1.40 per pound. At 54 cents per pound, the CoG is a little less since we can spread the vaccine cost out over more pounds. In the end, our margin of gain is 86 cents per pound. So, economically, based on the first example, does this scenario make cents? Yes, about 91. I know, bad joke … but does that mean you should precondition your calves? Well, like all great answers, I’d start with saying it depends. That’s because it really does. There are other things to consider when preconditioning calves: • It’s going to take a lot more of your time. • Weaning is a stressful period for cattle, and it requires you to be ready for any health issues that may arise. • Not having the facilities to handle this process could prevent you from preconditioning.

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FEATURE

JUNIOR CATTLEMEN HOST FALL CLASSIC CATTLE SHOW IN RUSSELLVILLE Nikki Whitaker

The 2018 Kentucky Junior Cattlemen’s Association Fall Classic Show was held September 28-30 at the Logan County Ag Arena in Russellville, KY. Fortythree youths from all over Kentucky came together to participate in the KJCA Prospect Show and KDA Bull and Heifer Show and compete in the beef focused contests and quizzes held over the three day event.

SPONSORS

The stalls filled quickly as youth prepared for the Prospect Show and the KDA Heifer and Bull Show. In all, 65 entries competed in the two shows.

Barren County Cattlemen’s Association

The Fall Classic Show would not be a success without the many volunteers and sponsors that dedicate their time and resources to ensure this event continues each year. The Logan County Extension Agents always go above and beyond to welcome the Fall Classic by setting up the ring and stalls for the participants and by being a helping hand whenever it is needed. There are also many parent volunteers that keep the show running smoothly. Tim Prather with Cowboy Fire in Somerset has furnished the KJCA awards for many years and we appreciate the unique craftsmanship he gives to each of his items.

Silver Sponsors:

Lastly; KJCA President, Kathryn Goodman and the KJCA Board of Directors help coordinate, facilitate, and manage the Fall Classic so everything stays on track. Their enthusiasm for the Junior Cattlemen’s is evident and it’s an honor to have such fine young men and women representing the Kentucky beef industry’s future.

Campbell County Cattlemen’s Association

Show Sponsors: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association Contest Sponsors: Taylor County Cattlemen’s Association Meal Sponsors: Christian County Cattlemen’s Association Logan County Cattlemen’s Association

Bath County Cattlemen’s Association Ellegood Farm Products (For-Most) Farmers Feed Mill Grayson County Cattlemen’s Association Hardin County Cattlemen’s Association Harrison County Cattlemen’s Association Hinton Mills Kentucky Hereford Association Russell County Cattlemen’s Association The Farmer’s Pride Bronze Sponsors: Bovine Medical Associates Casey County Cattlemen’s Association C&C Cattle Farm, LLC Finally Got It Farm Four Acres Farm Johnson County Farm Bureau KY Gelbvieh Association KY/TN Livestock Market

If you would like more information on the KJCA Fall Classic or would like to participate next year, please contact Nikki Whitaker at 859278-0899.

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Sherwood Acres, LLC Webster County Cattlemen’s Association

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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JUDGING CONTEST

SALES TALK

Novice

Novice

1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Brody Knight 3rd – Jacob Kernodle 4th – Colton Fitzpatrick 5th – Hannah Clark

1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Hannah Clark 3rd – Colton Fitzpatrick 4th – Brody Knight

Junior

Junior

1st – Lilly Jeffries 2nd – Abbi Walpole 3rd – Josh Kernodle 4th – Blane Smith 5th – Anna Weaber

1st – Lucy Jeffries 2nd – Lily Jeffries 3rd – Jacob Marksbury 4th – Bryanna Smith 5th – Blane Smith

Intermediate

Intermediate

1st – Caleb Kernodle 2nd – Matthew Mobley 3rd – Ryan Underwood 4th – Mayson Toll 5th – Caroline Hayden

1st – Ryan Underwood 2nd – Taylor Jeffries 3rd – Zach Imbruglio

Senior

Senior

1st – Bradon Burks 2nd – Reba Prather 3rd – Kailey Thompson 4th – Savanna Hill 5th – Rachael Drumm

1st – Bradon Burks 2nd – Kailey Thompson 3rd – Rachael Drumm 4th – Reba Prather 5th – Savanna Hill

BEEF SCHOLARS SKILLATHON

PHOTOGRAPHY

Novice

Novice

1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Hannah Clark 3rd – Colton Fitzpatrick 4th – Brody Knight 5th – Jacob Kernodle

1st – Hannah Clark 2nd – Emily Jeffries 3rd – Colton Fitzpatrick 4th – Brody Knight

Junior

Junior

1st – Austin Poat 2nd – Lily Jeffries 3rd – Eli Foley 4th – Lucy Jeffries 5th – Jacob Marksbury

1st – Lily Jeffries 2nd – Hayden Clark 3rd – Lucy Jeffries 4th – Eli Foley 5th – Anna Weaber

Intermediate

Intermediate

1st – Zach Imbruglio 2nd – Sarah Mobley 3rd – Julia Weaber 4th – Caroline Hayden 5th – Ryan Underwood

1st – Jessica Tucker 2nd – Julia Weaber 3rd – Cass Foley 4th – Ryan Underwood 5th – Sarah Mobley

Senior

Senior

1st – Savanna Hill 2nd – Rachael Drumm 3rd – Bradon Burks 4th – Walter Steely 5th – Kailey Thompson

1st – Walter Steely 2nd – Kennedy Eden 3rd – Kathryn Goodman 4th – Savanna Hill 5th – Bradon Burks

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

Judging Contest - Novice

Judging Contest - Junior

Judging Contest - Intermediate

Judging Contest - Senior

Beef Scholars Skillathon - Novice

Beef Scholars Skillathon - Junior

Beef Scholars Skillathon - Intermediate

Beef Scholars Skillathon - Senior

Sales Talk - Novice

Sales Talk - Junior

Sales Talk - Intermediate

Sales Talk - Senior

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AD DESIGN Novice 1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Colton Fitzpatrick 3rd – Jacob Kernodle 4th – Hannah Clark 5th – Brody Knight Junior 1st – Bryanna Smith 2nd – Lily Jeffries 3rd – Jacob Marksbury 4th – Lucy Jeffries 5th – Abbi Walpole Intermediate 1st – Caroline Hayden 2nd – Sarah Mobley 3rd – Will Banks 4th – Ryan Underwood 5th – Matthew Mobley

High Individuals Overall - Novice

High Individuals Overall - Junior

High Individuals Overall - Intermediate

High Individuals Overall - Senior

Senior 1st – Reba Prather 2nd – Savanna Hill 3rd – Bradon Burks 4th – Kathryn Goodman 5th – Kalli Flanders SHOWMANSHIP Novice 1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Hannah Clark 3rd – Colton Fitzpatrick 4th – Jacob Kernodle 5th – Brody Knight Junior 1st – Bryanna Smith 2nd – Jacob Marksbury 3rd – Lily Jeffries 4th - Blane Smith 5th – Lucy Jeffries Intermediate 1st - Julia Weaber 2nd – Mayson Toll 3rd – Zach Imbruglio 4th – Taylor Jeffries 5th – Caleb Kernodle Senior 1st – Rachael Drumm 2nd – Reba Prather 3rd – Kalli Flanders 4th – Kennedy Eden 5th – Kathryn Goodman 46

HIGH INDIVIDUALS OVERALL Novice

Intermediate

Senior

1st – Emily Jeffries 2nd – Hannah Clark 3rd – Colton Fitzpatrick 4th – Brody Knight 5th – Jacob Kernodle

1st – Ryan Underwood 2nd – Zach Imbruglio 3rd – Taylor Jeffries 4th – Julia Weaber 5th – Cass Foley 6th – Caroline Hayden 7th – Matthew Mobley 8th – Mason Toll 9th – Caleb Kernodle 10th - Sara Mobley

1st – Reba Prather 2nd – Rachael Drumm 3rd – Savanna Hill 4th – Bradon Burks 5th – Walter Steely 6th – Kathryn Goodman 7th – Kalli Flanders 8th – Kailey Thompson 9th – Kennedy Eden 10th – Addie White

Junior 1st – Lily Jeffries 2nd – Bryanna Smith 3rd – Lucy Jeffries 4th – Jacob Marksbury 5th – Abbi Walpole 6th – Blane Smith 7th – Hayden Clark 8th – Austin Poat 9th – Anna Weaber 10th – Eli Foley COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Photography - Novice

Photography - Junior

Photography - Intermediate

Photography - Senior

Ad Design - Novice

Ad Design - Junior

Ad Design - Intermediate

Ad Design - Senior

Showmanship - Novice

Showmanship - Junior

Showmanship - Intermediate

Showmanship - Senior

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

Bryanna Smith

GRAND HEIFER

GRAND HEIFER

GRAND HEIFER

KJCA FALL CLASSIC 2018 SHOW RESULTS

MaKayla Massey

ANGUS

%AOB

RESERVE HEIFER

RESERVE HEIFER GRAND HEIFER

Jacob Marksbury

P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

GRAND HEIFER

RESERVE HEIFER GRAND HEIFER

MaKayla Massey

Caleb Underwood

Rachael Drumm

COMMERCIAL

Hayden Clark

HEREFORD

RED ANGUS Hayden Clark

COW COUNTRY •

RESERVE HEIFER

Matthew Mobley

RESERVE HEIFER

Anna Weaber

RESERVE HEIFER

Rachael Drumm

A.O.B.

Blane Smith

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P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

NOVEMBER

2018

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FEATURE

Tyler McGinnis

Ryan Underwood

ANGUS

P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

Reba Prather

HEREFORD

Lily Jeffries

RED ANGUS

GRAND BULL

P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

RESERVE COW/CALF

MaKayla Massey

GRAND BULL Taylor Jeffries

P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to all the winners! Please visit KJCA on facebook for more photos. Rachael Drumm

ANGUS

HEREFORD

RESERVE BULL

Kailey Thompson

RESERVE BULL

Mayson Toll

RED ANGUS

GRAND BULL

RESERVE COW/CALF

GRAND HEIFER

GRAND COW/CALF

GRAND COW/CALF

KJCA FALL CLASSIC 2018 SHOW RESULTS

P H O T O N O T AVA I L A B L E

Reba Prather COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

RESERVE CHAMPION FEMALE Rachael Drumm

Bryanna Smith

RESERVE COW/CALF

SUPREME COW/CALF

SUPREME GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE

KJCA FALL CLASSIC 2018 SHOW RESULTS

Reba Prather

RESERVE CHAMPION BULL

SUPREME CHAMPION BULL

Tyler McGinnis

Rachael Drumm 50

Bryanna Smith COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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FEATURE

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

FRAGIPAN FIELD DAY SHOWS RESEARCH BREAKTHROUGH TO FARMERS Katie Pratt

PRINCETON, KY - Row crop producers recently got a first look at the results of a groundbreaking University of Kentucky research project that should increase production on their farms and their bottom lines. UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment soil scientists Lloyd Murdock, Tasios Karathanasis, Chris Matocha and John Grove found that annual ryegrass broke down soil fragipan in laboratory, greenhouse and field studies during the past six years. “I’m more excited about this research than any other project I’ve worked on in my 45 years at UK, because it can help so many people,” Murdock said. “It is something that farmers can work into their operations now to increase their yields.” Fragipan is a cement-like layer in the soil that creates shallow soils with limited yield potential due to low water-holding capacity. Soil fragipans are in 50 million acres across the nation, including 2.7 million in Kentucky. Kentucky soil fragipans are in some of the largest crop production areas of the state. “When we found that annual ryegrass broke down the fragipan, I liken it to the feeling that earlier UK researchers must have felt when they started no-till agriculture research,” Karathanasis said. “It was just amazing, especially when I learned about the economic benefits it could bring to producers.” During a recent Fragipan Field Day at UK’s Research and Education Center farm in Princeton, participants heard about the laboratory discovery and saw a fragipan layer in the soil. They also learned about yield increase potential from annual ryegrass, ways to incorporate and control it and had their questions answered by project

researchers, other specialists from the college, industry representatives and producers already growing annual ryegrass on their fragipan soils. Illinois farmer Junior Upton and the late Mike Plummer, University of Illinois soil scientist, first got the inkling that annual ryegrass might be doing something to Upton’s soil after he began noticing annual ryegrass’ deep roots in his field. The corn that followed it yielded better than in other fields. The UK team later confirmed this rotation was lowering the fragipan depth on his farm. Upton shared his story at the field day. “Everything happened by accident,” Upton said. “When I started, I only had about 5 inches of topsoil before I would hit the fragipan. I was trying to get through dry weather. I got a grant and started studying no-till and cover crops. Then a representative of Oregon Ryegrass asked me to try annual ryegrass as a cover crop.” Dave Fischer is a beef producer from Indiana who has planted annual ryegrass on fragipans soils on his farm for the past eight years. Murdock visited Fischer’s farm and found that he had lowered the fragipan depth by 14 inches and had annual ryegrass roots 29 inches deep. “It floored me, but at the same time, I had noticed that these fields seemed to not dry out as fast compared to what they used to and to neighboring fields. We were hanging in there a lot longer during drought periods,” Fischer said. “I would plant it just because of the forage, but the addition of breaking up the fragipan has just been super.” UK researchers are currently developing an extension publication on the research breakthrough.

28th Annual

UK soil scientist Lloyd Murdock shows the fragipan layer in the soil in a pit at the UK Research and Education Center farm in Princeton. Photo by Stephen Patton, UK agricultural communications.

ELITE BRED HEIFER S

Presented by Bourbon County Livestock Improvement A WEBSITE: www.eliteheifer.com

28th ANNUAL

® ELITE BRED HEIFER SALE Monday, November 5th, 201

Presented by Bourbon County Livestock Improvement Association WEBSITE: www.eliteheifer.com Monday, November 5th • Sale 6:00 PM EDT •Inspection Inspection 1-5 PMPM EDTE.D.T. 1-5 • 300 heifers - approximately 150 AI (Angus & Angus X, Charolais X, Simmental X, Red Angus) • All heifers calfhood vaccinated ® • All heifers have tested negative for BVD, PI • Sale lots will be grouped to calve in 45 days • Heifers bred to calving ease bulls with EPD’s available, some bred AI • Heifers have met minimum pelvic measurement requirements  Approximately 300 heifers available- approximately 150 AI (Angus & Angus Charolais X, Simmental X, Red Angus) • Heifers have met target weight requirements for their breedX,types All 5 heifers vaccinated • Fall health work completed (Bovi ShieldGold FPL5calfhood & Pour-on wormer,  All heifers have tested negative for BVD, PI 45 days before sale)  Sale lots will be grouped to calve in 45 days 2018 Sale • All heifers meet Large or Medium frame Heifers bred to calving ease bulls with EPD’s available, some bred Monday Night • No shorts, bad eyes, no horns, no rat tails November 5th  Heifers have met minimum pelvic measurement requirements (Inspected by KDA graders)  Heifers have met target weight requirements for their breed types  Fall health workedcompleted (Bovi Shield Gold 5 FPL5 & Pour-on wormer • All heifers are Source Verified AND Electronically Identifi heifers meetMILES Large or Medium frame  AllUP • FREE DELIVERY OF 10 OR MORE HEAD, TO 500  No shorts, bad eyes, no horns, no rat tails (Inspected by Ky Dept o • Heifers owned and managed under Elite Heifer guidelines since 12/1/17 All heifers are Source Verified AND Electronically Identified • All heifers guaranteed pregnant 60 days post sale. Heifers may be palpated by a licensed  FREE DELIVERY OF 10 OR MORE HEAD, UP TO 500 MILES veterinarian up to 60 days post sale and buyer be owned refunded for Elite heifers palpated Heifers and $5.00/head managed under Heifer guidelines since 12 • Heifers are qualified for Phase 1 Cost-Share Programs  All heifers guaranteed pregnant 60 days post sale. Heifers may be

Sale 6:00 PM E.D.T.

veterinarian up to 60 daysKY post sale and buyer be refunded $5.00/h Sale Location: Paris Stockyards, US 68 North, Paris, 40361 

Sponsored by: Information Contact: Sale Location: For More Kentucky Bank Paris1-888-317-2555 Stockyards Bourbon County Extension Office: 859-987-1895 or Toll Free: Southern States – Paris US 68 North Sale Day Phone: 859-987-1977 Farm Credit-Frankfort, KY

Please visit http://bit.ly/fragipan to view the video.

®Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

52

COW COUNTRY •

Heifers are qualified for Phase 1 Cost-Share Programs

(Restaurant Open)

NOVEMBER

2018

Sponsored Central KY Peoples Ex

(Restaurant Open)

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Bourbon County Extension Office – 859-987-1895 or Toll Free 1-88 SALE DAY PHONE: 859-987-1977


FEATURE

NCBA TO REITERATE UNWAVERING SUPPORT FOR USDA OVERSIGHT OF LAB-GROWN FAKE MEAT WASHINGTON (October 23, 2018) – The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) will highlight the food safety and product labeling expertise of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) during a two-day public meeting on labgrown fake meat. The public meeting, hosted jointly by USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), takes place October 23-24. The meeting agenda lists a wide range of topics for consideration, including potential production hazards, food labeling, and marketing claims. NCBA President Kevin Kester and President-Elect Jennifer Houston are scheduled to deliver remarks during the open comment periods of the session. Houston will explain why USDA is well-positioned to apply current food safety processes to lab-grown fake meat products. Two-thirds of the facilities already overseen by USDA

are “processing-only” facilities where harvesting of animals does not take place. “Ensuring lab-grown fake meat products are subject to strong, daily inspection by USDA’s trained professionals is essential,” she said. “The health of consumers is on the line, and USDA is far better suited to ensure the safety of lab-grown products.” Kester will focus his comments on how USDA oversight provides protects consumers against false and misleading marketing claims. “USDA can be trusted to enforce truthful, transparent labeling of the products under its jurisdiction,” he said. “Beef producers welcome competition, but product labels and marketing must be based on sound science, not the misleading claims of anti-animal agriculture activists.”

Holiday Bazaar Saturday, November 17 10:00 am—4:00 pm LIVESTOCK MARKETING GROUP Blue Grass Albany 1274 Hwy 90 W Albany, KY 42602 606-387-4681 Bret Carver, Manager 270-459-0724

Blue Grass East-Mt. Sterling 3025 Owingsville Road Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-9625 Tim Gayheart, Manager 859-229-4437

Blue Grass Campbellsville 265 Airport Road Campbellsville, KY 42719 270-465-4051 Ronnie Choate, Manager 270-766-8240

Blue Grass Internet Sales PO Box 1023 Lexington, KY 40588 859-255-7701 Adam Menker, Manager 419-310-5344

#wearebluegrass

Blue Grass Lexington 4561 Iron Works Pike Lexington, KY 40511 859-255-7701 Jeremy Shryock, Manager 859-967-6479 Fall Holstein Sale Tuesday, November 6 @ 11:00 am Special Horse Sale Saturday, November 10 @ 11:30 am

Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Rd. • Danville, KY 40422 Office:859/236-4591 (C)859/238-3195 • tdievert@dievertsales.com Logan Goggin • 859/516-3199 www.dievertsales.com

Catalogs or more information available by contacting Tim Dievert or Logan Goggin.

CKAA 56th ANNUAL FALL

FEMALE SALE Saturday, November 10, 2018 CKAA Sale Pavilion, Danville, KY See ad on inside front cover for details. HERITAGE FARMS PRODUCTION SALE Sunday, November 18, 2018 At the Farm, Shelbyville, KY See ad on page 25 for details.

ATTENTION KY ANGUS BREEDERS: Entires are due soon for the CKAA Winter Sale and KY Angus Sweepstakes!

Blue Grass Maysville 7124 AA Hwy E Maysville, KY 41056 606-759-7280 Corey Story, Manager 606-209-1543 Stone Gate Graded Angus Feeder Sale Wednesday, November 14 @ 7:00 pm Blue Grass Richmond 348 K Street Richmond, KY 40475 859-623-1280 Jim Dause, Manager 859-314-7211 Richmond CPH Sale Tuesday, December 11 @ 6:00 pm

Special Dispersal Sale Rose—Shell Farm—Asbery Saturday, November 17 @ 1:00 pm

Blue Grass South-Stanford 277 Cordier Lane Stanford, KY 40484 606-365-0665 David Holt, Manager 502-680-0797

Blue Ribbon Bred Heifer Sale Thursday, December 6 @ 6:30 pm

Fall Holstein Sale Monday, November 5 @ 10:30 am

Lexington CPH Sale Wednesday, December 12 @ 5:30 pm

KY Certified Hereford Influence Sale Thursday, November 29 @ 10:30 am

bgstockyards.com COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

LIVESTOCK GROUPS PETITION DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Katie Pratt

WASHINGTON (October 15, 2018) – Today organizations representing livestock, bee, and fish haulers across the country submitted a petition to the Department of Transportation (DOT) requesting additional flexibility on Hours of Service (HOS) requirements. The petition asks for a five-year exemption from certain HOS requirements for livestock haulers and encourages DOT to work with the livestock industry to implement additional fatiguemanagement practices. Current rules limit drive time to 11 hours and limit on-duty hours to 14. Instead, the organizations request that livestock haulers be granted approval to drive up to 15 hours with a 16-hour on-duty period, following a 10-hour consecutive rest period. Any livestock hauler wishing to operate under the extended drive time would be required to complete pre-trip planning and increased fatigue-management training. “We are concerned that the 11- and 14-hour rules were not drafted with livestock haulers

794 Port Royal Road Campbellsburg, KY 40011 502-667-0142 Matt 502-667-0415 Roy

in mind and thus do not accommodate the unique character of their loads and nature of their trips,” the organizations wrote. The current requirements “place the well-being of livestock at risk during transport and impose significant burdens on livestock haulers, particularly in rural communities across the country.” The strong safety record of livestock haulers demonstrates their ability to ensure the well-being of both live animals and other drivers on the road. A 2014 analysis by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration found that livestock haulers were underrepresented in truckinvolved fatal crashes. Data cited in the petition also shows that, between 2013 and 2015, livestock haulers accounted for 6.6 percent of all commercial drivers but less than one percent of crashes involving large trucks. Australia already implements rules for livestock haulers that focus on safety outcomes, not prescriptive limits. The

petition encourages DOT to work with industry to develop and implement similar measures.

impacted by livestock transportation. Animals are hauled into and out of markets every day. It is one of LMA’s primary goals that such movement be accomplished in a safe manner for livestock and motorists alike. We feel this petition is yet another step toward necessary flexibilities for our haulers while taking proactive measures to preserve safety.” - Tom Frey, Livestock Marketing Association President and owner of the Creston Livestock Auction of Creston, Iowa

The petition was signed by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Livestock Marketing Association, American Farm Bureau Federation, American Beekeeping Federation, American Honey Producers Association, and the National Aquaculture Association. Key Quotes: “Livestock haulers are highly-trained professionals who take careful steps to ensure the safety of everyone on the road. Through this petition, we hope to work with DOT to build on our industry’s strong safety record and provide haulers with some additional relief from overlyrestrictive Hours of Service requirements.” – Kevin Kester, fifth-generation California rancher and president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association “Livestock auction markets are particularly

“When livestock and other live animals are transported, it’s important to get them to their destination safely and without delay or disruption. Safety for the driver and others on the road is a priority. That is why we are petitioning DOT to adopt modern fatigue-management practices that provide the same or greater level of safety while avoiding unintended and unnecessary stress on the animals entrusted to our care.” – Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation President

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20

-

SIM/ANGUS BULLS E17

8/16/2017

United

Steel Force

9.9

0.7

73.8

118.1

14.4

50

E37

9/21/2017

Lookout

Built Right

12.6

0.5

51.2

74.3

23.9

50

E39

9/21/2017

Upgrade

Montana Black

8.6

2.9

74.7

112.8

16.6

PB

www.realityfarmsllc.com 54

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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55


FEATURE



KENTUCKY CORN YIELD MAY SET A RECORD LOUISVILLE, KY – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the October Crop Production report today, showing a potential record yield forecasts for corn. “Based on producer reports, Kentucky corn are forecast at 180 bushels per acre, up 2 bushels from the record high set last year,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “The soybean yield forecast remained at 57 bushels per acre this month, which would also be a record high. Unfortunately, heavy rains in September took a toll on burley tobacco, dropping the yield 300 pounds per acre.” Corn production in Kentucky is forecast at 223 million bushels, up 4 percent 56

Sivas Kangal

from the September forecast and up 3 percent from the previous crop. Yield was estimated at 180 bushels per acre, up 3 bushels from last month and up 2 bushels from the 2017 level. Acres for harvest as grain were estimated at 1.24 million acres, up 20,000 acres from 2017. The U.S. corn production is forecast at 14.8 billion bushels, down slightly from the September forecast and up 1 percent from 2017. Based on conditions as of October 1, yields are expected to average 180.7 bushels per acre, down 0.6 bushels from last month and up 4.1 bushels from 2017. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 81.8 million acres, down slightly from the September forecast and down 1 percent from 2017.

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Soybean production for Kentucky is COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

For more information contact: Elisabeth Jensen (859) 940-3381 | jensenguilfoil@gmail.com | www.EvansMillCattleCo.com

2018

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forecast at 113 million bushels, down 5 percent from the September forecast and up 10 percent from 2017. Yield was estimated at 57 bushels per acre, unchanged from last month and up 4.0 bushels from a year ago. Acreage for harvest as beans was estimated at 1.99 million acres, up 50,000 acres from the previous year. U.S. soybean production is forecast at 4.69 billion bushels, down slightly from the September forecast and up 6 percent from last year. Based on October 1 conditions, yields are expected to average 53.1 bushels per acre, up 0.3 bushels from last month and up 3.8 bushels from last year. Area for harvest is forecast at 88.3 million acres, down 1 percent from the September forecast and down 1 percent from 2017. Kentucky burley tobacco production is forecast at 90.1 million pounds, down 15 percent from the September forecast and down 30 percent from 2017. Yield was projected at 1,700 pounds per acre, down 300 pounds from last month and down 350 pounds from the 2017 crop. Harvested acreage was estimated at 53,000 acres, down 10,000 acres from last year’s crop. For the burley producing states production is forecast at 113 million pounds, down 30 percent from last year. Burley growers plan to harvest 64,800 acres, down 20 percent from 2017. Yields were expected to average 1,743 pounds per acre, down 234 pounds from last year. Production of Kentucky dark fire-cured tobacco is forecast at 35.2 million pounds, unchanged from the September forecast and down 7 percent from the previous year. Dark air-cured tobacco production is forecast at 19.4 million pounds, unchanged from the September forecast and up 20 percent from last year. Alfalfa hay production by Kentucky farmers is forecast at 518,000 tons, down 1 percent the 2017 level. Other hay production is estimated at 5.25 million tons, up 9 percent from last year. NASS gathered data for the October Agricultural Yield Survey earlier this month. “We recognize this is a hectic time for farmers, but the information they provide helps Kentucky and U.S. agriculture remain viable and capable,” Knopf said. All reports are available on the NASS website: http://bit.ly/2AmwNJe For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Kentucky Field Office at (800) 928-5277, or visit http:// bit.ly/2yupj5z COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

60 Lots Selling at the

Boys from the South Bull Sale Gelbvieh • Balancer® • Angus Bulls Saturday, december 8, 2018 • 1:00 Pm ct JameS e. Ward ag center, Lebanon, tn

Green Hills Gelbvieh • Butler Creek Farm Offering Includes: coming 2-year olds • 13-16 month olds 30 Gelbvieh Influenced Females GHGF Trigger Finger 31E2 ET

GHGF Lexus E21

AMGV 1391119 • BA50 Homo Black • Homo Polled Sire: Silveiras Style 9303 Dam: GHGF Lexie 2U1 MGS: Post Rock I-Back 50P2

GHGF Fortune Teller E7

AMGV 1391137 • BA75 Homo Black • Homo Polled

AMGV 1391116 • BA75 Homo Black • Homo Polled

Sire: GHGF Young Gun C310 Dam: HHF S31 • MGS: B C Matrix 4132

Sire: GHGF Young Gun C310 Dam: GHGF Lady Fortune 7U MGS: Minerts Fortune 2000

3/4 sib to 2015 NWSS Balancer Gr. Champ Female GHGF Ashley 31A

RAAB Hillbilly 130E

RAAB Brillance 218E ET

RAAB Brillance 220E ET

RAAB Butlers Blue Boy 321E

AMGV 1410029 • BA63 Red • Homo Polled

AMGV 1410889 • BA38 Double Black • Homo Polled

AMGV 1410030 • BA38 Double Black • Polled

AMGV 1410966 • Purebred Homo Black • Homo Polled

Sire: BCFG Butlers Hillbilly Hero 71 Dam: BCFG Butlers Beauty 730B

Sire: S A V Brilliance 8077 Dam: BCFG Butlers Ms Impact 70Z

Sire: S A V Brilliance 8077 Dam: BCFG Butlers Ms Impact 70Z

Sire: FMGF Blue’s Impact 001X Dam: BCFG Butlers Lulu 549A

Catalogs by Request. Contact:

Butler Creek Farm Milton, TN

Michael, Barbi & Ethan 615.286.2799 (H) 615.351.1071 (C)

Zach & Autumn 615.286.1017 (H) 615.308.8628 (C)

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Walter & Lee Teeter

1380 French Belk Rd. Mt. Ulla, NC 28125 (704) 664-5784 Lee’s Cell (704) 267-4638 Walter’s Cell (704) 236-7980 Justin’s Cell (704) 267-4074

57


FEATURE

UK OFFERS INFORMATION ON TICKS & ALPHA-GAL SYNDROME Katie Pratt

It is one reason why Pennington attended an alpha-gal educational meeting held at the Adair County office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service. “Once diagnosed, many individuals have contacted our office looking for additional information about alpha-gal and tick bite prevention,” said Nick Roy, Adair County agriculture and natural resources extension agent and meeting organizer. “Through our resources in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and relationships with local leaders, I felt we possessed the resources and expertise to address these topics through educational programming.”

“Alpha-gal is different than other food allergies in that it is caused by an allergic reaction to a sugar molecule, whereas most other food allergies are the result of

58

“Really the best way to keep from getting alphagal is to reduce your exposure to ticks,” said Lee Townsend, extension entomologist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment who also spoke at the meeting. “You will not know if you are susceptible until you have a reaction after being bitten.” The meeting was a chance for Pennington to connect with and listen to others who have alpha-gal.

New Sale Date!

The Best Red Angus Females from R.A. Brown’s Elite Cooperator Herds

A7046 is just one of several RAB donor dams selling that have placed bulls into the front end of the legendary R.A. Brown Ranch bull sale.

“While I would not wish this on anyone, it has helped me to know there are others with this syndrome, and I’m not alone,” she said. “It is interesting to hear about other people’s experiences, because we all have different reactions and triggers.”

The Roots of Our Success Sale Saturday, December 15th • noon online bidding through Donor Dams, Fall Calving Pairs, Spring Calving 3-n-1 packages, open and bred heifers

Tick bite prevention information is available in UK’s publication ENTFACT-618: Ticks and Disease in Kentucky. It is available online at https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ ef618 or through local offices of the UK Cooperative Extension Service.

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

BR

OW N R A

N

CH

In 2009, medical researchers identified the reaction to galactose-alpha-1,3galactose, a sugar found in mammalian meats. These include beef, pork, lamb and venison. Reactions occur after ingesting meat and can include skin irritations, hives, digestive tract issues and breathing problems. Researchers traced the cause of the reaction to bites from the lone star tick.

The lone star tick is found throughout Kentucky and most of the eastern United States. It is prevalent in south-central Kentucky and in the Green River area. It gets its name from the iconic white spot found on the female’s back. The tick needs three blood meals for survival during its lifetime. Individuals who spend a lot of time outdoors in tick-prone areas, such as tall grass and forests are at an increased risk for tick bites.

.

“Since I was diagnosed in 2014, I have researched recipes and support options every day,” Pennington said. “I eat pretty much a vegan diet now.”

an allergic reaction to a protein,” said Dr. Wes Sublett, an allergist who presented at the meeting. “Another difference is, with most food allergies, the reaction is immediate for the patient. With alphagal, the reaction is delayed, typically three to six hours after ingestion.”

R.A

COLUMBIA, KY - Alpha-gal syndrome, an allergic reaction also known as the “red-meat allergy” that some people develop after a tick bite, is a life-changing diagnosis. Mackie Jo Pennington of Adair County knows that to be too true.

Donnell & Kelli Brown Throckmorton, TX 940-849-0611 RABrownRanch.com

2018

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VISIT US TODAY!

Fall Female Opportunity Sale

ALL AGES WELCOME • SCHEDULE A GROUP VISIT AND CHOOSE YOUR LESSON PLAN • CATERING IS AVAILABLE

November 30, 2018 in Michie, TN

LEXINGTON , KENTUC KY EST. 2017

THE YARDS is an

education center focusing on the science and practices of the beef industry. Educational opportunities provide

EPF Ms Predestined 512

+*18319434

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 Dam: GAR Predestined 2578

BW +2.9, WW +76, YW +146, Milk +26, CW +72, MARB +.90 RE +1.12, FAT -.029, $W +68.92, $F +120.01, $G +51.69, $B +193.68

Crazy K Arkdale Pride 7199

*18890911

Sire: VAR Discovery 2240 Dam: EXAR Consensus 3252

BW +4.1, WW +83, YW +146, Milk +21, CW +49, MARB +1.01 RE +.23, FAT -.004, $W +72.22, $F +111.17, $G +49.21, $B +157.03

a unique learning experience based on its location in the Blue Grass Regional Stockyards Marketplace. This environment fosters complex thinking, experiential learning, and life skill application.

NELLIS@KYCATTLE.ORG (859) 382-4303

Selling 19 Fall Yearling Angus Bulls

Tennessee Agriculture Enhancement Program approved

Selling 11 Commercial Spring Bred Heifers

Tennessee Agriculture Enhancement Program approved

Selling 74 Registered Angus Fall pairs, Fall yearlings, Spring bred cows, and Spring bred heifers

CRAZY K RANCH Sammy and Sherry Kiser, Owners • 833 North Prather Road • Michie, TN 38357 Charlie Adkins, Manager • Phone 731-439-7350 • crazykranch@hotmail.com

www.crazykranch.com COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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59


FEATURE

PLANNING FOR TAX FILING TIME ON THE FARM OR RANCH Dan Childs

In December 2017, the United States Congress passed what has become known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), which was then signed by the president, making it the law of the land. This law is the largest piece of tax legislation enacted in more than 30 years. It will affect individuals and businesses in significant ways during its expected eight-year life. Some provisions are permanent, but many will expire Dec. 31, 2025. It will be prudent for each taxpayer and business owner to become somewhat familiar with how this legislation will impact their individual and business income and expense reporting. Provision Changes A couple of the provisions in the new law that garnered much of the press were the change in the corporate tax rate and the 199A deduction. The big news for corporations was that the TCJA removed the 15-to-35-percent tax rate range and replaced it with one flat tax of 21 percent. This will actually increase taxes for a number of smaller corporations that usually were taxed at the lower corporate rates. But it will substantially reduce the tax for larger corporations that were paying tax at the 35 percent rate. In order to also provide some tax relief for businesses that are not corporations, Congress created the 199A deduction. After a couple of attempts, Congress finally settled on the language currently in the law. The deduction applies to all pass-through business entities, such as S corporations, limited liability companies taxed as partnerships, and partnerships plus sole proprietorships filing Schedule C’s and F’s. The deduction basically allows an exemption of 20 percent of a business’s qualified business income. However, calculating the actual amount of the deduction is far from simple because of several limitations, exclusions and exemptions. Another major change for agricultural producers is in the way a deduction can be taken for the expense of a depreciable 60

asset placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017. Granted, this is a bit of an odd date, but that is the way the legislation is written. The total expense of all business assets placed in service after the September 2017 date and before Jan. 1, 2023, is deducted as bonus depreciation. The 100 percent level is gradually reduced after 2022 in 20 percent increments, winding up at zero after 2026. As in the prior law, bonus depreciation applies unless the taxpayer elects out. A taxpayer can do so by asset class. Another change to bonus depreciation is that it also applies to fruit-bearing plants and nuts that are planted or grafted. In addition, previous bonus depreciation rules applied to new property only, but the TCJA allows bonus depreciation of used property if it was acquired in an arm’s length transaction and the taxpayer did not use the asset before the acquisition. For trade-ins, the bonus depreciation only applies to boot paid or the amount in excess of the adjusted basis of the replaced asset. The Section 179 expensing deduction has been popular with business owners for many years. The challenge has been that it has fluctuated from $10,000 to $500,000 depending on the year. In December 2015, Congress set the deduction at $500,000. The TCJA increased the limit to $1 million for assets placed in service after Dec. 31, 2017. It will continue to be $1 million until Congress acts to change it. Also increased — to $2.5 million — was the phase-out threshold amount, meaning a taxpayer can spend up to $2.5 million to purchase qualifying property before additional purchases will begin to reduce the deduction dollar-for-dollar but not below zero. Keep in mind that a farmer cannot create a farming loss with a Section 179 deduction, but it can be used to offset W-2 wages. One other note about depreciation: The TCJA repeals the requirement that farmers use the 150 percent declining balance method and allows use of the 200 percent declining method for assets

COW COUNTRY •

that depreciated during a time period of 10 years or less. The TCJA also shortens the recovery period from seven years to five years for new machinery purchased and used in a farming business. Assets that you purchased used will continue to depreciate over seven years.

filers. The 15 percent capital gains tax rate applies to capital gains above the 0 percent amount and up to $479,000. The 20 percent capital gains rate applies to capital gains amounts over $479,000. All of these threshold amounts apply to joint filers.

Capital Gains Tax Rates

The additional 3.8 percent tax rate on net investment income for adjusted net capital gains amounts over $479,000 is still applicable in 2018.

There is a small change in the way the capital gains tax rates apply for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017. Instead of the capital gains rate being correlated to the income tax rates as in pre-2018, the rate applies to adjusted net capital gain amounts. Therefore, in 2018, the 0 percent capital gains rate applies to capital gains amounts up to $77,200 for joint

NOVEMBER

2018

There are many more provisions in the tax legislation passed in December 2017 than what has been discussed here. Many apply to individuals, and many more apply to businesses. Start having a conversation with your tax preparer. The dialogue could prove to be very beneficial.

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A LE S N IO T C U D O R P L A U N N A AN D 1 4T H AN NU AL A LE G E N E T IC FO R C E B U L L S

NOVEMBER 17, 2018

NOON • SATURDAY nset Ridge Deer Lodge™ Su at ld he be ll wi le sa s ar’ ye This

of productive ge bulls and an outstanding set A powerful lineup of breeding-a bred heifers, nt ng elite heifer calves, excelle females will be selling — includi s. fall cow-calf pair spring cow-calf pairs, as well as

CED +4

BW +1.9

WW +76

YW +135

SR Royal Lady 608 SC +.25

MILK +22

Marb +.48

RE +.88

$B +172.63

A special highlight of this year’s sale offering will be the opportunity to select a confirmed heifer calf pregnancy from this powerful donor sired by Deer Valley Growth Fund.

CED +13

BW +1.0

WW +70

YW +121

SR Blackbird 7566 SC +.43

MILK +18

Marb +.69

RE +.74

An excellent set of fall yearling heifers will sell, including this daughter of S Whitlock 179 from a dam by Ten X and her next dam by Weigh Up.

$B +153.19

This four-year-old Connealy Black Granite daughter sells with a fall bull calf at side.

CED +15

BW +0

WW +74

YW +126

SC +.74

SR Pride 7505 MILK +36

Marb +.65

RE +.52

$B +154.02

This unique Baldridge Bronc daughter from a dam by Ten X sells.

CED +4

BW +4.1

WW +66

YW +115

SR Beauty 4514

SC +1.48

MILK +17

Marb +.19

RE +.66

$B +136.78

Call to request a sale book! P.O. Box 98 Jamestown, TN 38556 Gaye Smith, Owner (931) 863-5864 Justin Beaty, Manager (931) 704-3456

CED +6

BW +1.8

WW +59

SR Forever Lady 5562 YW +111

SC +1.27

MILK +19

Marb +1.14

RE +.61

$B +167.64

This top-performing Ten X daughter from a dam by TC Total 410 sells with an excellent Jindra Acclaim heifer calf at side. sunset ridge aj 11-18_9.5x9.5.indd 1

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

EPDs as of 10/2/18 10/22/18 12:06 PM

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61


FEATURE

THE CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF ® BRAND MARKS 40TH ANNIVERSARY WITH BARN PAINTINGS

WOOSTER, Ohio – Sept. 21, 2018 – On Sept. 19, guests, family and friends gathered at Stone Gate Farms, Flemingsburg, Ky., to celebrate the painting of its barn with the Certified Angus Beef® brand logo – the 35th stop of a cross-country journey. Farmers, family members, neighbors and other special guests shared a meal with the Cannon family as they watched paint dry. The gathering was one of 40 planned in 2018, as the Certified Angus Beef® brand celebrates 40 years of bringing the best Angus beef to consumers. Painting the brand’s familiar logo on 40 barns across America is not just an old-school marketing approach, but a tip of the hat to the farmers and ranchers who created the brand in 1978 and lead it today, and a way to celebrate connections and community. “This effort is a tangible symbol of the valuable, and interconnected, roles our partners play in guiding the Certified Angus Beef ® brand from farm to table,” says Tracey Erickson, vice president of marketing. “It’s an honor for us to join 62

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2018

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their efforts in honoring our roots: family farmers and ranchers who have always been at the heart of this brand.” Few symbols represent vintage Americana like a barn, where farm life is centered from generation to generation and, oftentimes, celebrations held. Each barn has a unique story, much like the Certified Angus Beef® brand and family farmers and ranchers who raise Angus cattle. The Cannons are representative of this heritage. Started in 1952 with three Angus heifers, the Cannon family thought it just wanted to raise cattle for 4-H projects, but thanks to the quality of those heifers and the family’s desire to go a step further, a purebred herd was born. Stone Gate Farms became a member of the American Angus Association® in 1967, and in 1974, Charles Cannon was elected to the Association’s board of directors, later becoming president. While Charles was serving, he also became one of the

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

founding fathers of the Certified Angus Beef® brand at the age of 36. “I’m fortunate to have been asked to serve on the Certified Angus Beef® brand board, and it’s just been one of the best things that’s happened to me,” Charles says. The logo on their barn is a reminder of the 40 years of success the brand, and its collection of family farmers and ranchers, have achieved thanks to the men like Charles who started it all. The Cannons’ barn was painted by Troy Freeman, of Free Sky Studios of Springfield, Ill. Freeman is an experienced mural and large-scale painter for businesses, cities and townships, amusement parks, schools, residences and more, as well as the illustrator of 15 books and the founder of a graphics and web design business. While painting barns for the Certified Angus Beef® brand, he enjoys meeting farming families and learning more about their unique stories, while celebrating their shared goals and values.

Painting takes two to three days at each barn site. The first barn was painted the week of Jan. 15 in Ocala, Florida, at Baldwin Angus Ranch, located along the well-traveled Interstate 75. The next barns to be painted will be in Oregon and Pennsylvania, with the journey ultimately concluding in October near the brand’s headquarters in Wooster, Ohio. About the Certified Angus Beef® brand Since 1978, the Certified Angus Beef® brand has signified a mark of distinction on restaurant menus and in grocery store meat cases. It all began 40 years ago with a group of family farmers and ranchers determined to create and, still today, bring the best Angus beef to the table. To celebrate their vision and dedication to quality, we’re painting 40 barns in rural communities across the country with the brand’s logo – celebrating both the milestone and people at the center of the brand’s success. Visit CertifiedAngusBeef. com, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to follow the #BrandtheBarn journey.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

Large scale paintings, such as barns, require a unique skill set – starting with artistic talent. By the time Troy Freeman was in high school, he’d painted his school’s, and its rivals’, mascots in the gym, and was fielding calls from other schools, farmers and businesses requesting their own paintings. Staying hands-on creatively is a priority for Troy, regardless of project. He views each one as an opportunity to further his creative calling, as well as his faith, which he credits as the true source of his abilities. While painting barns for the Certified Angus Beef® brand, Troy looks forward to meeting farming families and learning about their unique stories. Troy and his wife, Dr. Billie Jarvis-Freeman, a professor at Lincoln Christian University, are the proud parents of two “bookend” daughters: a 7-year-old, and the eldest, serving in the U.S. Navy.

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VALUE IT, PROTECT IT, IMPROVE IT.

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www.tornadowire.com

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

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FEATURE

UK BASEBALL’S NEW STADIUM NAMED KENTUCKY PROUD PARK Uk, Kentucky Farm Bureau Partner To Honor Kentucky Farmers, Businesses

LEXINGTON – The new home of Kentucky baseball has been officially named Kentucky Proud Park after approval by the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees on Friday. The name is a tribute to farmers and businesses of the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the Big Blue Nation.

Kentucky Proud members, I would like to express my gratitude to Kentucky Farm Bureau for sponsoring the Kentucky Proud Park name. This will enable us to raise awareness across Big Blue Nation that Kentucky Proud is the brand for fresh, local products for every Kentucky family.”

“Farmers and their families are deeply woven into the culture and heritage of our state,” Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart said. “As the Commonwealth’s flagship university, we are thrilled to honor that through the name of our new baseball stadium and pleased to have a partner in Kentucky Farm Bureau that feels the same way. We look forward to many, many wins in Kentucky Proud Park.”

The UK Board of Trustees approved the naming at its regularly scheduled board meeting on Friday.

Kentucky Farm Bureau secured the rights to name the stadium from JMI Sports, UK Athletics’ multimedia rights partner. In turn, Kentucky Farm Bureau elected to name the stadium for Kentucky Proud, the state’s official agricultural marketing program housed at the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. No state taxpayer dollars were used in funding the agreement. “The Kentucky Department of Agriculture appreciates the opportunity to stamp the Kentucky Proud brand as a fixture in this magnificent new facility,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “On behalf of our more than 7,000 COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

“Agriculture is the backbone of Kentucky’s economy. And it is part of the very foundation of what this university has been part of for more than 150 years. We were, in fact, created to help sustain and strengthen Kentucky’s farm economy,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “This partnership – among UK Athletics, the Department of Agriculture and the Kentucky Farm Bureau – is a powerful symbol to those ties and our shared commitment to the Commonwealth.” The Kentucky Proud program is funded through the generosity of the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund. The fund is directed by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board and administered by the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy. “Kentucky Farm Bureau is proud to be a long-time supporter of University of Kentucky Athletics, but today we found

a truly unique way to draw our worlds a little closer together,” said Mark Haney, president of Kentucky Farm Bureau. “Naming the university’s brand-new baseball stadium Kentucky Proud Park allows us to highlight our own deep agricultural roots while also sharing the spotlight with so many of our members who grow and raise the products marketed under the Kentucky Proud banner. This partnership is a home run for Kentucky agriculture and a great way to further our support of UK Athletics.” Construction, which began last year, has been completed on Kentucky Proud Park. The $49 million stadium gives Kentucky one of the best facilities in college baseball. Complete with permanent seating for 2,500 as well as stone terraces, grass berms and a 360-degree concourse that will bring its regular-season capacity to approximately 5,000, Kentucky Proud Park’s team areas give players and coaches everything they need to succeed while creating an ideal place for fans to support them. “This is an exciting day for our program,” UK baseball head coach Nick Mingione said. “We are incredibly grateful to have the support of Kentucky Farm Bureau, the Department of Agriculture and Kentucky Proud, who are committed to Kentucky and the people of the Commonwealth. We talk about ‘We Are UK’ all the time and that extends beyond

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our university to the people who make us proud to represent this state. Being able to showcase Kentucky Proud Park is an honor we don’t take lightly.” The naming of Kentucky Proud Park represents an expansion of Kentucky Farm Bureau’s long-standing partnership with UK Athletics through an agreement with JMI Sports, UK’s multimedia rights partner. The naming rights agreement to Kentucky Proud Park is signed to a term of up to 15 years, running through 2033. “This new facility is a shining example of the power of partnership. Legislative approval and faith in our capacity made it possible,” said Jennifer Y. Barber, chair of the UK Athletics Committee of the Board of Trustees. “Generous donors helped make it a reality. And the Kentucky Farm Bureau and the Department of Agriculture have helped reinforce through this naming opportunity the importance of Kentucky’s farm families and the agricultural economy to our state and its future.” UK’s multimedia rights agreement with JMI Sports – signed in June 2014 – grants naming rights to athletic facilities. The multimedia rights agreement pays UK Athletics $210 million over 15 years, including a signing bonus of $29.4 million built in to help fund important capital projects like the construction of Kentucky Proud Park.

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2019 CONVENTION January 17 - 18, 2019 Owensboro Convention Center

KCA CONVENTION REGISTRATION FORM Event

Number Attending

Cost

Totals

Pre-Registration (Includes Trade Show & Business Meetings)

$75

x

=

Trade Show Only

$10

x

=

Junior Registration

$10

x

=

x

=

Names as they should appear on badges. Please only one family or individual per registration form. NAME

NAME

NAME

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

COUNTY (Required)

PHONE

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17 Beef Efficiency Conference (8:30-11:30)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18

EMAIL

Industry Breakfast (free with Registration Fee or Trade Show Only)

x

=

Evening Banquet

$50

x

=

Banquet Preferred Seating (Table of Ten)

$600

x

=

Ladies Program

$15

x

=

CREDIT CARD TYPE

CREDIT CARD NO.

EXPIRATION DATE

SIGNATURE

Mail to: KCA Convention Registration 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, Kentucky 40503

Total Amount Due

66

COW COUNTRY •

Or Fax: (859) 260-2060

NOVEMBER

2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 1:00-4:00

Trade Show Move-in

Exhibition Hall

4:00

KCA - KCA Executive Committee Meeting

Meeting Room 220

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17 7:00-6:00

Registration Hours

Registration Booth

7:00-11:00

Trade Show Move-in

Exhibition Hall

KCA - Beef Efficiency Conference “Successful Heifer Development & Utilization of Crop Residues for the Beef Herd” 8:30-11:30

Heifer Development Decisions, Dr. Glenn Rogers

West Ballroom A-C

Custom Heifer Development Strategies, Patsy Houghton Integrating Crop & Beef Production, Dr. Jim MacDonald 11:00

Trade Show Opens

Exhibition Hall

11:30

KCA - Welcome Lunch

Exhibition Hall

1:30-3:00

KCA - Opening General Business Session

West Ballroom A-C

3:30

KCA - KCA Foundation Meeting

Meeting Room 220

4:00

KBC/KCA - Rib-eye Cook-off

Exhibition Hall Stage

5:00

KCA - County President’s Awards Night (Invitation Only)

7:00 - 10:00

KCA - Allied Industry Game Night

10:00

Trade Show Closes

Exhibition Hall

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 6:30-6:00

Registration Hours

Registration Booth

7:00

Trade Show Opens

Exhibition Hall

7:00-9:00

Ag Industry Breakfast

Exhibition Hall Stage

8:30-4:00

KCA - Silent Auction

9:00-11:00

KCA - Regional Meetings KCA - Closing Business Section National Cattlemen’s Beef Association KCA Treasurer’s Report

12:30-2:30

East Ballroom A-D

KCA Membership Awards KCA Communications Report KCA Annual Report

5:00-6:00

KCA - KCA Leadership Alumni & Past President’s Reception (Invitation Only)

6:00

Trade Show Closes KCA - Evening Banquet

6:00

KCA & KBC Awards

East Ballroom A-D

2019 KCA Hall of Fame Inductions Foundation Auction

HOTEL RESERVATIONS Hampton Inn & Suites Downtown Owensboro/Waterfront 401 W 2nd Street Owensboro KY 42301 270-685-2005 http://bit.ly/KCAHampton Rate: $119 Cutoff Date for Rate: 12/18/2018

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

Holiday Inn & Suites 701 West First Street Owensboro KY 42301 270-683-1111 Rate: $115 http://bit.ly/KCAHolidayInn (enter dates for rates) Group Code: KCA Cut Off Date for Rate: January 2, 2019

Hampton Inn South 615 Salem Drive 270-926-2006 Rate $109 http://bit.ly/KCAHamptonS

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Courtyard Owensboro 3120 Highland Pointe Drive 270-685-4140 Rate: $112 Last day to book: 12/16/18 http://bit.ly/KCACourtyard

67


FEATURE

LOCAL MARKET SEES SUCCESS WITH FARMERS ELITE PROGRAM Carey Brown

When marketing your cattle in Kentucky there are always several ways to take care of business. What works for one doesn’t always work for another. Each farm is different and all farmers manage their business differently. Farmers Regional Livestock Market of Glasgow recently added to that mix with a new sale called Farmers Elite Program. The livestock market was purchased in March 2017 by Darrell Loy, Gary Seals, Jon Anderson and Riley Livestock. The first order of business was hiring new managers. They found an enthusiastic young team in managers Ryne and Brad Towe. The brothers grew up on a small cattle farm in Kentucky and both worked at the livestock market in Bowling Green over the years, with Ryne serving as manager for five years. Office manager, Scott Broyles started working there in August 2016 and stayed on under the new owners. Together they wanted to provide new marketing opportunities for producers in the area so they created the Farmers Elite Program in August 2017. They had some experience with programs like it from other markets. The goal was to have a niche market that no one else was offering so they added traceability. Through the current program, buyers are guaranteed to be purchasing graded, commingled cattle that have been weaned 60 days, had their shots and be able to trace back to problems if they arise. Ryne and Brad spend a lot of time prior to the sales visiting farms and looking over the cattle. The graded sales include the following requirements (Table 1): • Cattle must be weaned a minimum of 60 days • Need all birth months/dates for cattle • Cattle must be castrated and completely healed • All cattle must be dehorned behind the ear • All calves must be vaccinated (list includes disease and vaccine needed) • Dewormed

68

(Cydectin,

Ivomec,

Dectomax, Eprinex) • EID tags will be furnished by FRLM • Certificate with shot record and vaccines with expiration dates will be provides by FRLM • All Heifers MUST be guaranteed open • $200 per head plus vet fees will be paid by seller to buyer IF pregnant The first sale was held in September with about 100 head and two producers. During this sale, the producers received a premium of about $20 cwt. In January another sale was held and over 1600 head were sold this time. Since then they have been offering a sale on the first Monday of each month and have continued to have high numbers and included up to 40 producers in some sales. They have also partnered with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) to offer the traceability portion of the requirements. The Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) program is a coordinated approach to the mandatory identification of animals moving interstate. This program is run through the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s State Vet department. The KDA provided all of the necessary equipment including wands and ear tags for the program and is currently the only feeder cattle program they work with. Cattle identification and animal descriptions are kept in their database. KDA staff is on-hand for sales days to help scan the cattle and collect the data. They hope to eventually be able to use the traceability portion of the program to garner extra premiums for producers. Buyers at the sale really like the traceability that the program offers. Being located in Barren County, the largest cow/calf county in Kentucky, gives the market access to lots of producers and cattle. “Our goal is to make more money for producers,” stated Brad, “Eventually we would like to be able to offer carcass data and anything else that helps them improve their herd and continue to make money.” By grouping cattle into load lots, smaller COW COUNTRY •

Table 1 ROUND 1

ROUND 2

OPTION 1

OPTION 1

Inforce 3 Intra Nasal

Bovi Shield Gold 5

One shot with BVD, pasturella

Ultra Bac 7 (somnus optional)

Ultra Bac 7 (somnus optional)

OPTION 2

OPTION 2

Pyramid 5

Pyramid 5

CHOOSE 1

CHOOSE 1

Alpha 7

Alpha 7

Ultra Bac 8

Ultra Bac 8

CHOOSE 1

CHOOSE 1

Pulma Guard PHM

Pulma Guard PHM

Presponse HM

Presponse HM

producers can gain the benefits of load lots. Currently premiums in the sales range from $8-$20/cwt which is great for producers. Randy Payne farms in the area and currently has about 400 cows. He has farmed full-time his whole life and has marketed his cattle many different ways over the years. He is currently selling cattle through this program and is happy with the program and his premiums. “To me it is an opportunity,” Payne stated, “That animal isn’t any better when you put that yellow tag in its ear, but it is branding the calf and improving the reputation of our cattle.” Randy is encouraged by the results of each sale and hopes that the program continues to grow. He acknowledges that it is a little more work but knows that the added premium and reputation will be worth it for all producers in the area going into the future.

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2018

Another producer in the area who participates in the sale is Danny Bartley. He runs a farm along with his two brothers, Doug and Donald, and their father, Turner. “We did have to change the way we vaccinate our cattle in order to enroll in the program and it cost us a little more, but the premiums have outweighed the cost for us so far,” claimed Bartley. Danny is happy with the results and how the staff has worked to make each sale better than the last. Both staff at the markets and producers agree that they would love to continue to build the program. For those who are already vaccinating their cattle this could be an easy step to adding value to your calves. “When you are making a living off of the farm, you are always looking for a way to make a better living, so every little bit helps,” stated Brad, “And we are happy to help give producers the opportunity.”

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


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FEATURE

LOOK FOR THESE SOIL HEALTH INDICATORS IN THE FIELD Jeff Goodwin

Soil health is often defined as “the continued capacity of the soil to function as a vital, living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals and humans.” We often think of soil health management as a new strategy, but it’s actually not. Healthy soils, with effective nutrient and hydrologic cycles, were functioning well before man decided to manage them. Agriculture in the early 1900s tended to focus more on plowing up the prairie soils with industrial technology and machinery rather than focusing on the soil’s ecology, thus soils were largely viewed as a medium to grow crops. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s changed our perception of how we view soil. For some, the Dust Bowl of the 1930s changed our perception of how we view soil. For instance in 1949, Aldo Leopold

in A Sand County Almanac stated, “Land, then, is not merely soil; it is a fountain of energy flowing through a circuit of soils, plants and animals.” Leopold went on to state, “When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” Fast forward to 2018 and much has changed in how we view the soil. What has not changed is our responsibility as land stewards, and that process starts with how we see the soil. Soil Health Indicators You can use the following five indicators of soil health on any farm with just a shovel, your eyes and your nose. The next time you’re out for a trip across the pasture, take some time to look beyond what’s growing on the surface. Look down, dig a hole and see what your soil

West Kentucky Select BRED HEIFER SALE Selling 250 Spring Calving Bred Heifers

Saturday, November 17, 2018 12 noon Central Time Kentucky-Tennessee Livestock Market Guthrie, Kentucky

For more information contact: Kevin Laurent, University of Kentucky (270) 365-7541 ext. 226 Mark Barnett, KY-TN Livestock Market (270) 483-2504 All heifers are guaranteed bred to bulls with known EPDs and have met stringent requirements for health, quality and pelvic measurements.

See these heifers at: www.kyheifersale.com All heifers qualify for KY Cost Share (CAIP) Most qualify for TN Cost Share (TAEP)

Sponsored by the Univ. of Kentucky and the Univ. of Tennessee Cooperative Extension Service and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture

70

COW COUNTRY •

is telling you. One: Soil Color Soil color provides a tremendous amount of information. Soil color can tell us the amount and state of organic matter and iron oxide, age, and other physical processes. In general, the darker the soil, the higher the organic matter content. Soil is typically darkest in the uppermost layers of the soil profile, and it lightens as depth increases. Soil organic matter and soil organic carbon are primary drivers in biologically active soil systems. In some cases, the dark color can be due to the presence of reduced iron and manganese in our deep prairie soils. Today, we use soil color to not only gain a general sense of organic matter but to classify soils across the globe with a standard soil color system. Albert H. Munsell first standardized the soil color system as we know it today based on a system with three components: hue, value and chroma. It was primarily standardized for use in industry as a way for companies to order standard, consistent colors for materials. The U.S. Department of Agriculture later adopted the Munsell system as its official classification of soil colors. Following much success in its use by soil scientists, the USDA later helped develop the

NOVEMBER

2018

industry-standard Munsell Soil Color Book. “When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” — Aldo Leopold Soil structure is the arrangement of soil particles in different sizes and shapes. Structure often determines the amount of pore space between particles. Pore space is the space between soil aggregates, which the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service define as “groups of soil particles that bind to each other more strongly than to adjacent particles.” More pore space allows for greater water infiltration. The ability of a soil to hold its particles together and form soil structure is referred to as “aggregate stability.” Soil aggregation can occur by physical processes, such as when positively charged cations bind with clay particles. Soil aggregation can also occur biologically by organic adhesives. These organic adhesives are created by soil microbes decomposing organic matter or by sugars excreted from plant roots. The amount of organic matter in a soil is a primary driver of aggregate stability. Commonly, aggregate stability increases as the percentage of soil organic matter increases.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Soil texture, or the amount of sand, silt or clay content, also plays a large role. Generally, soils with higher clay content inherently have greater amounts of organic matter. Thus, soil aggregation and structure are much more easily achieved. It is more difficult for sandy soils to build soil structure largely due to lower organic matter concentrations. Three: Presence of Biological Activity Healthy soils are biologically active soils. The presence of biological activity can give you insight into the soil’s state of health. Essentially, we are referring to the presence of earthworms, earthworm castings, dung beetles, etc., or evidence of their activity. Earthworms are not only major decomposers of organic material, they are underground engineers. Earthworms create burrows through the soil profile, which increases porosity, enables water to move down and creates channels for roots. Earthworm excrement, known as castings, help increase nutrient cycling because pound-for-pound they contain significant amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Dung beetles are another indicator of

biological activity. Dung beetles are found on every continent except Antarctica, and they provide tremendous ecological services. These beetles take dung from the soil surface, roll it into a ball, lay their eggs in it and bury it deep in the soil. This creates a food source for their young and brings nutrient-rich organic material into the soil profile, which increases nutrient cycling and availability. Four: Rooting Resistance When looking at a soil profile or even a shovel slice, we can often see evidence of layers of resistance. These resistance layers can be seen in the soil structure with the presence of platy structure or horizontal layers. A couple of common sources of this effect are the continuous compaction of a soil from the soil surface and previous tillage creating what is known as a plow pan. Both of these restrictive layers limit root penetration and water infiltration. One common indicator of a resistance layer can be found in the plant roots themselves, specifically in taproot species. On these sites, taproot plants will show signs of “J” rooting, which means a plant root grows down to the resistance layer and turns 90 degrees because it

cannot penetrate the resistance layer. In extreme cases, water infiltration is also halted at this layer, which limits the soil’s water holding capacity and ultimately exacerbates the effects of drought. Five: Soil Smell The fifth indicator isn’t visual, but it depends on another one of our senses: smell. The earthy smell of a biologically healthy and active soil is the presence of an organic compound called geosmin. In 1965, American scientists isolated the primary odor of soil to a single compound, which they called geosmin from the Greek, geo (earth) and osme (odor). Geosmin is an organic product produced by active soil bacteria. Essentially, if your soils are cycling organic matter, they will have that fragrant earthy smell. Soils can have other smells, but they are not associated with soil health. Soils absent of oxygen can have a rotten egg or sulfur smell. This is often a sign of poor drainage. Soil Health Measures In order to better see the soil, we need to know what we are looking for. Recently,

the Soil Health Institute released its Tier 1 soil health measures, all of which are considered effective indicators of soil health: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Organic carbon pH Water-stable aggregation Crop yield Texture Penetration resistance Cation exchange capacity Electrical conductivity Nitrogen Phosphorus Potassium Carbon mineralization Nitrogen mineralization Erosion rating Base saturation Bulk density Available water holding capacity Infiltration rate Micronutrients

All 19 of these indicators provide valuable insight into the health of the soil system. While many of these measures require laboratory analysis, there are ways to get an idea of your soil’s health just by looking at it.

Free to Attend! Join the American Gelbvieh Association for an educational symposium featuring industry-leading speakers.

Thursday, November 29

Provided Lunch 12:30 p.m. Symposium 1:30 p.m. Nashville Airport Marriott Nashville, Tennessee

All cattlemen and women are invited to join the American Gelbvieh Association and attend this FREE educational symposium and provided lunch. Listen to industry leading speakers provide insight on adding value to your cow herd from conception to consumption. Visit www.gelbvieh.org for more information.

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

71


FEATURE

the country to hear from industry and producers directly.

USDA OUTLINES NEXT STEPS FOR ADVANCING ANIMAL DISEASE TRACEABILITY

USDA recognizes that some sectors of the livestock industry have already invested a lot of infrastructure into developing their traceability programs. These new goals complement what those sectors are already doing, and will help increase traceability across the entire industry. USDA is committed to continued discussion and collaboration to ensure we coordinate traceability efforts across the country.

WASHINGTON, September 25, 2018 – Today, Greg Ibach, Under Secretary for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs, announced USDA’s four overarching goals for advancing animal disease traceability to protect the long-term health, marketability and economic viability of the U.S. livestock industry. “The landscape surrounding animal disease traceability has changed dramatically in the past decade, and producers across the nation recognize that a comprehensive system is the best protection against a devastating disease outbreak like foot-and-mouth disease” Ibach said. “We have a responsibility to these producers and American agriculture as a whole to make animal

disease traceability what it should be—a modern system that tracks animals from birth to slaughter using affordable technology that allows USDA to quickly trace sick and exposed animals to stop disease spread.” USDA’s four overarching goals for increasing traceability are: • Advance the electronic sharing of data among federal and state animal health officials, veterinarians and industry; including sharing basic animal disease traceability data with the federal animal health events repository (AHER). • Use electronic ID tags for animals requiring individual identification in order to make the transmission of data

more efficient; • Enhance the ability to track animals from birth to slaughter through a system that allows tracking data points to be connected; and • Elevate the discussion with States and industry to work toward a system where animal health certificates are electronically transmitted from private veterinarians to state animal health officials. These goals reflect the core themes resulting from a State and Federal Animal Disease Traceability Working Group that developed 14 key points for advancing traceability. They are also in keeping with feedback APHIS received at stakeholder meetings held across

While electronic ID is critical for advancing traceability, it’s important to emphasize USDA will not dictate the use of a specific tag technology. Different industries prefer different tag types (low frequency vs. ultra high frequency) and choice will continue to be a cornerstone of USDA’s program, giving producers the ability to decide what works best for their operations. Not only will electronic ID allow animals to move more quickly through ports, markets and sales, it will also help ensure rapid response when a disease event strikes. To assist with the transition to electronic ID, USDA is ending the free metal tags program and instead offering a cost-share for electronic tags. This is something stakeholders have repeatedly told us they need to help transition to electronic ID. “Another key component of our plan is sharing a few key data elements from existing state and industry animal movement databases with our animal health events repository,” said Ibach. “That way, if an outbreak occurs, we can quickly find the information we need to locate and identify potentially diseased or at-risk animals. This helps avoid unnecessary quarantines that could impact producers’ livelihoods. And by linking to that information instead of housing it ourselves, we maintain our stakeholders’ privacy.” Moving forward, USDA wants to continue to build on the current momentum around animal disease traceability, and will begin implementing these ADT goals starting in fiscal year 2019. USDA will work with our state partners and industry to establish appropriate benchmarks to meet to show progress. USDA will also ensure all new traceability cooperative agreements will be contingent on measurable advancements toward these four goals.

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COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


61 25

8E

E

He Sells!

COW COUNTRY •

He Sells!

NOVEMBER 2018

611 5E

73

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

He Sells!

73


MEMBERSHIP DIVISION 1 (151+ MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Adair

198

288

-90

DIVISION 2 (76-150 MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Metcalfe

64

130

-66

59

108

-49

Lincoln

170

237

-67

Pulaski

Barren

160

500

-340

Northern Kentucky

56

149

-93

Breckinridge

137

571

-434

Trimble

49

104

-55

Jessamine

125

160

-35

Fleming

49

105

-56

Shelby

125

353

-228

Edmonson

49

91

-42

Madison

118

249

-131

Monroe

48

148

-100

Marion

117

329

-212

Northeast Area

46

123

-77

-110

Caldwell-Lyon

Clark Grayson

107 100

217 268

43

90

-47

Daviess

43

132

-89

306

-211

Logan

84

286

-202

Larue

74

190 198

-114 -124

Hardin

72

202

-130

Laurel

62

159

-97

Henry

62

159

-97

Mercer

55

185

-130

Warren

53

172

-119

Hart

47

224

-177

Washington

45

204

-159

Green

45

153

-108

Harrison Bracken

38 37

166 189 172

-142

Meade

27

165

-138

167

40

122

-82

-155

2017

Difference

Fayette

45

75

-30

Muhlenberg

34

75

-41

Out of State

34

67

-33

Woodford

30

57

-27

Taylor

28

67

-39 -13

Highlands

27

40

Nicholas

26

39

-13

Oldham

26

59

-33

Ohio

25

62

-37

Mason

22

71

-49

Bullitt

22

31

-9

Todd

21

67

-46

Twin Lakes

20

69

-49

Clay

20

28

-8

Union

20

45

-25

Rockcastle

19

51

-32

Carroll

19

42

-23

McCreary

18

34

-16

Hancock

18

48

-30

Wayne

17

39

-22

Lewis

16

36

-20

Simpson

15

42

-27

Nelson

14

65

-51

Webster

14

70

-56

Butler

14

36

-22

38

107

-69

Purchase Area

38

84

-46

Louisville Area

38

86

-48

Scott

37

105

-68

Estill

14

44

-30

Calloway

14

27

-13

Trigg

37

106

-69

Montgomery

12

53

-41

Menifee

12

28

-16

Bourbon

36

85

-49

Russell

35

88

-53

Mountain

35

81

-46

Anderson

31

109

-78

Garrard

31

89

-58

Campbell

29

77

-48

Owen

28

83

-55

Clinton-Cumberland

28

81

-53

Totals as of: October 15, 2018

2018

2017

Difference

4034

10861

-6827

If you need anything for membership, please contact Nikki Whitaker at (859) 278-0899 or nwhitaker@kycattle.org 74

2018

Jackson

-152

30

12

Franklin

-128

Casey

Allen

-44

Boyle

95

76

89

-168

Bath

Christian

45

DIVISION 3 (UP TO 75 MEMBERS)

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

Livingston

11

23

-12

Pendleton

10

57

-47

Whitley

9

51

-42

McLean

9

23

-14 -13

Hopkins

8

21

Crittenden

8

23

-15

Robertson

8

20

-12

Grant

6

75

-69

Magoffin

5

8

-3

Powell

5

8

-3

Henderson

3

10

-7

Eastern Foothills

3

9

-6

River Hills

2

9

-7

Pike

1

7

-6

Bell

1

1

0

Knox

0

6

-6

Harlan

0

2

-2

Gallatin

0

0

0

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


2018-19 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION * MEMBERSHIP YEAR 10/1/18– 9/30/19

NAME

SPOUSE NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

COUNTY

RECRUITED BY

PHONE

FAX

EMAIL

ZIP

*Payments of KCA membership dues are tax deductible for most members as an ordinary and necessary business expense. However, charitable contributions of gifts to KCA are not tax deductible for Federal Income Tax purposes. Due to new IRS regulations, $2.24 of your dues would not be deductible. Approximately $12 of your dues will go towards the monthly publication Cow Country News. PLEASE CHECK THE MEMBERSHIP(S) YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN: KCA MEMBERSHIP ($30/YR) Membership dues are $30 unless otherwise listed below

NEW

RENEWAL

NEW

RENEWAL

KCA COUPLE MEMBERSHIP To add your spouse, please add $15 to your KCA Membership KENTUCKY JUNIOR CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION ($10/YR)

I WOULD LIKE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE YOUNG PRODUCER’S COUNCIL TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: KCA

KJCA

$

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS: CATTLEMEN’S FOUNDATION DONATION (voluntary)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: ALL DONATIONS TO KCF ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE

COW COUNTRY •

$

NOVEMBER 2018

Allen ................................$40 Anderson ........................$25 Bourbon ..........................$20 Boyle ...............................$35 Bullitt ...............................$20 Butler ..............................$25 Franklin ...........................$25 Highlands .......................$20 (Boyd, Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, & Martin)

Hopkins ...........................$35 Laurel ..............................$35 Lewis ..............................$35 Lincoln ............................$25 Louisville Area ................$20 (Jefferson, & Spencer) McCreary ........................$25 Magoffin ..........................$20 Menifee ...........................$25

Mountain........................$25 (Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Morgan, Owsley, Perry & Wolfe) Oldham ...........................$35 Taylor ..............................$20 Twin Lakes ......................$20 Warren ............................$40 Wayne .............................$25 Whitley ............................$25 Woodford ........................$25

IF YOU WOULD ALSO LIKE TO JOIN THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION The NCBA is now a State Marketing Partner with the KCA. You can pay your dues to both organizations with one check, at the same time. # HEAD 1-100

$

COUNTY DUES Dues are $30 except for the counties listed below.

DUES $150

# HEAD 1,001-1,250

DUES $1,150

101-250

$300

1,251-1,500

$1,400

251-500

$450

1,501-1,750

$1,650

501-750

$650

1,751-2,000

$1,900

751-1000

$650

> 2,000

$1,900 + .38/HD

Complete and return to: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 176 Pasadena Drive • Suite 4 • Lexington, KY 40503 For faster service, join online at www.kycattle.org

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KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL ALISON SMITH KBC Retail & Foodservice Contractor As I sat down to write my article this month, I kept thinking about Thanksgiving and what feelings and emotions this time of year evokes in us. It’s during this time we see a lot of signs saying “Thankful” or we see social media campaigns that say “Thank a Farmer”. Well, the more and more I think about them, the more and more I think we need to revisit them. Being thankful is something that begins when we are tiny tots. We’re encouraged to say “please” and “thank you” after someone meets our needs, and it sticks with us as we grow into adults – I hope! However, I believe there is a point where thankfulness turns into gratefulness. Don’t get me wrong, we definitely need to be thankful, but that’s just the first step– gratefulness is going deeper. Gratefulness comes from deep within someone. I am thankful that I have the opportunity to work with wonderful farmers and talk to shoppers about beef. But I am grateful for the farmers who give up their Saturdays with their families to come and sample beef because they believe in a program and they genuinely want to help! I am grateful that families open up their farms to strangers who want to feel the smallest connection to the amazing people who raise their food. I am grateful that retailers are willing to promote, chefs make delicious beef dishes, bloggers want to tell others all about farmers, dieticians see the nutritional value in beef, and consumers love the taste. I am beyond grateful – I am blessed to have such wonderful co-workers and understanding family. Gratefulness comes from years of being a part of this wonderful organization and making great memories with remarkable people. Being thankful is wonderful, but being grateful is amazing. It makes you want to live life feeling as though you are blessed. So, this month I want to thank YOU, but I also want to tell you how grateful I am for YOU! My life and many others are richer because of what you do each and every day. Please don’t let it stop there, though! Pass that gratefulness on. Make a list if you need to – a gratitude journal. Let’s go deeper and experience the difference! Blessed!

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CHECKIN’ ON THE CHECKOFF Celebrating Family Meals: Over 200 of Kroger’s Little Clinics in 10 different state (38 in KY) celebrated National Family Meals Month with beef-centric educational recipe booklets and personal shopping experiences in which Kroger Dieticians guided shoppers through the meat case highlighting beef’s nutritional benefits. BEEF IT UP PROMOTION From mid-July to mid-August, Kroger merchandised their USDA Choice Family Pack Strip steaks and USDA Choice Family Pack Thin Sliced Ribeye in their Family Pack section as well as their Butcher Shoppes as part of a promotion with the Kentucky Beef Council. Each store was charged with a goal to increase tonnage by ten percent. At the end of the promotion, the 100+ stores realized an 18 percent increase, which was a little over 40,000 pounds. The promotion was enhanced by summer grilling brochures, print advertisement, and social media

Share More Nutritious Meals Together

CHUCK KNOWS BEEF In October, your Kentucky Beef Checkoff team met with other state beef council staff from across the nation for the Partners in Action conference in Denver. The team convened with partners at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Cattlemen’s Beef Board to plan for upcoming campaigns and programs and met the newest addition to the Beef Checkoff team - Chuck. From recipes to cuts to cooking tips and more, Chuck Knows Beef is your go-to guy - or robot - for all the beefy answers. Powered by Google Artificial Intelligence, Chuck can provide all the information found on Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. through the ease of your computer, mobile phone, Amazon Alexa, or Google Home Assistant. Here are the five things you need to know about Chuck, or meet him for yourself at ChuckKnowsBeef.com. Spoiler alert, he even tells dad jokes.

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

TIPS & RECIPES FROM

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KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

DO YOU HAVE A BQA NUMBER? BECKY THOMPSON Director of Kentucky Beef Network

Background Is your Beef Quality Assurance or, in Kentucky, Beef Quality and Care Assurance training up to date? If you don’t have a number or it is has expired please consider going through the training process to enroll or renew your number. We are beginning to see announcements from some packers they will only purchase fed cattle from feedyards that are Beef Quality Assurance trained. This comes as a result of restaurants and fast food chains beginning to only source a large percent of their beef from BQA trained suppliers. To date National Packing and Tyson have announced that beginning January 1, 2019 they would source 100% of their fed cattle supply from Beef Quality Assurance certified feedyards. Cargill has also made a commitment to source 90% of their fed cattle supply from feedyards that are BQA certified. Who does this apply to? Today this only applies to fed cattle being marketed directly to one of the above mentioned packers either directly or through an auction market. To market fed cattle in these markets, a producer must be able to supply their BQA or BQCA certification number to the direct buyer, or have their number on file with the auction market.

Currently, cow/calf producers are not required to have a BQA number to market calves to a feedyard or backgrounder. But keep in mind having a current training number is the right thing to do for your operation and shows your commitment to good stewardship practices. Beef Quality Assurance Certification Options Option 1: National Beef Quality Assurance The national BQA program is an online training platform that can be access at www.bqa.org/certification and is tailored to each segment of the industry. After registering, participants are taken through an online interactive training module. Participants will receive a training certificate, valid for three years. Option 2: Kentucky Beef Quality and Care Assurance In Kentucky we have taken the BQA practices one step further and added a cattle handling and care component to our training model. Educational modules have been developed to educate farmers on best management practices for handling cattle and providing for their well-being while also training on the core principles of BQA. Upon completion of the program

participants will receive the option of a farm gate sign and a training card valid for three years. Where are the Kentucky Beef Quality and Care Assurance classes? Kentucky Agriculture Extension Agents and Kentucky Beef Network field associates can provide training opportunities at the local level. Please contact your local county extension office to see when their next training is scheduled. If you are interested in hosting a training session for your customers please contact the Kentucky Beef Network to schedule training at your business with one of our trainers.

WHAT IS BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE? Beef Quality Assurance is a national program that raises consumer confidence through offering proper management techniques and a commitment to quality within every segment of the beef industry. Through implementation of Beef Quality Assurance best management practices on your farm it assures their market steers, heifers, cows, and bulls are the best they can be. Today, the stakes are higher because of increased public attention on animal welfare. BQA is valuable to all beef and dairy producers because it: • Demonstrates commitment to food safety and quality.

Beef Quality Assurance Transportation

• Safeguards the public image of the dairy industry.

If you do sell fed calves and are hauling your calves directly to the packer please note you will also need to have a BQA Transportation certification. This certification can only be completed online at http:// bit.ly/BQATransportation.

• Upholds consumer confidence in valuable beef products.

Getting your BQA or BQCA number is great way to may an investment in your beef operation; it shows your commitment to consumers and your animal’s well-being. You can take an online course or attend an in person training in an effort to get yourself and your employees trained.

• Enhances herd profitability better management.

• Protects the beef industry from additional and burdensome government regulation. • Improves sale value of marketed beef cattle. through

Beef Checkoff supported BQA programs bring it all together. While the BQA Manual provides a framework for program consistency, the states still determine the best programs for their producers. “Because the beef industry is so diversified, we wanted to allow states the opportunity to provide what is best for their producers. The BQA [Manual is the] overarching [protocol], providing some consistency across the state programs. They are good production practices to guarantee the quality of beef products,” comments Dr. Dee Griffin, DVM. (www.bqa.org)

K E N T U CK Y B E E F N E T W O R K F ACI L I T AT O R S

Ben Lloyd

Whitesville, KY (270) 993-1074 strridge@aol.com 78

Charles Embry

Cave City, KY (270) 646-5939 dale.embry@yahoo.com

Jacob Settles

Springfield, KY (859) 805-0724 jacob.settles4@yahoo.com COW COUNTRY •

Ron Shrout

Winchester, KY (606) 205-6143 ronshrout@bellsouth.net

NOVEMBER

2018

Tim Graves

Springfield, KY (859) 481-3954 gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Jeff Stephens

Ewing, KY (606) 782-7640 stephensbeef@gmail.com

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

EDEN SHALE FARM UPDATE DAN MILLER KBN Industry Coordinator

I really do miss the good ol’ days when we used to have seasons. The last several years we seemed to have just skipped right over spring and fall, arguably the best two seasons. Hopefully the rest of this fall season will be easy on us and we don’t get too much winter weather until after the first of the year.

The Eden Shale Open House Field Day was held on Oct 13th at the farm in Owen County. There were 110 producers in attendance from 33 different Kentucky counties, coming from as far as Webster and Whitley counties. The field day included discussion on livestock barn renovations, water harvesting techniques, winter feeding structures, and the debut of the Large Bale Feeder. Attendees also got to look at the cow herd and monitor their improvement over years prior. If you couldn’t attend the field day, please follow the blog at www. edenshalefarm.com to take an aerial tour of the farm, as well as watch for updates as we use these infrastructure projects this winter.

Another issue we have had to deal with this fall has been the wet weather. It allowed us to get a third cutting on our sorghum sudan grass which put us at having more wet wrapped hay than dry hay this year. This will be the last year for putting up the wet wrapped hay at Eden Shale. After baling the 20 acres of sudan, we drilled in a dry hay mix of alfalfa, fescue, and orchard grass. I am looking forward to being able to bale all the hay at the same time, and not have to rent the drill and hay wrapper three times a year to get the wet hay put up. The wet weather the past month has also made it a challenge to finish the construction of our large bale feeder. The project is now completed and will wait to get used until after the first of the year when we start feeding hay. The feeder is designed to hold 32 round bales and the cattle will self feed through the bales using a custom made feed rack that rolls down a track to the back of the structure. This design that Dr. Higgins created focuses on efficiency and minimizing the inputs that a farmer has

to make during the winter feeding months. The complex also has a tire water tank that will provide clean water to the cows during the hay feeding months. For more info on the large bale feeder, go to the blog at www. edenshalefarm.com to see how the feeder operates this winter during heavy use. Last month we also wrapped up our weaning trial at the farm with our steer calves. The steers were broken into three different groups and confined to the barn for 30 days post weaning. Each group was fed a different ration at the same rate to see which one performed better. Dr. Lehmkuhler created the rations that were used for the trial. Two were custom rations (one with oats, one with cotton seed hulls) and the third one was a common 3-way feed. All three rations performed very similar with average daily gains right at 2.5 lbs/day. The market did hold this year as well and we made money by backgrounding these calves for 30 days post weaning. We will continue to feed these calves and market them through a CPH sale around the first of December. Despite the muddy fall we have had, it was a good year for growing grass and the cattle are in good shape because of it going into the winter. It may have made the hay season difficult, but I will take the rain every year. Lets just hope we don’t continue to break records with our snow fall this winter…

CPH SALE DATES December December 4, Steers and Heifers, Guthrie December 4, Steers and Heifers, Paris December 5, Steers and Heifers, Springfield December 6, Steers and Heifers, Owensboro December 11, Steers and Heifers, Richmond December 12, Steers and Heifers, Lexington January January 29, Steers and Heifers, Guthrie February February 21, Steers and Heifers, Owensboro

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NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

PASTURE, RANGELAND AND FORAGE INSURANCE

USDA-NASS ANNOUNCES THE 2017 CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE RESPONSE RATE, DATA RELEASE DETAILS, AND UPCOMING SPECIAL STUDIES United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) concluded data collection for the 2017 Census of Agriculture with a 71.5 percent national response rate. The Census, conducted once every five years, was mailed to more than 3 million known and potential farms and ranches across the United States late last year. Data collection ended this July. Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories will receive their Census of Agriculture questionnaires in January 2019. “We thank each and every producer who took the time to respond to the Census,� said NASS Administrator Hubert Hamer. “The Census of Agriculture is an important part of U.S. history that remains as relevant today as it was in 1840 when it was first conducted. The Census gives voice and opportunity to all farmers and ranchers in America to tell the changing story of agriculture over the years and identify emerging trends and needs.� Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue also offered his thanks to producers for taking part in the Census, via a video message that can be viewed at www.nass. usda.gov. The 71.5 percent response rate for 2017 came in below the 74.5 percent response rate for the 2012 Census of Agriculture.* “We modernized elements of our data collection for this Census to make it easier for those filling out questionnaires,� said Hamer. “However, it is unrealistic to think that everyone will respond to any survey, regardless of improvements and benefits. To account for certain levels of non-response, we use accepted statistical methods and practices in our data analyses. We look forward to sharing the results of the Census when our analyses are complete.� Data from the 2017 Census of Agriculture is scheduled to be released starting on February 21, 2019, in conjunction with the 2019 Agricultural Outlook Forum and continue on a staggered 80

schedule through the spring of 2019. The results of the Census will be available in aggregate form, ensuring that no individual operation or producer can be identified, as required by Federal law. All Census data products will be available on NASS’ recently merged NASS/Ag Census website at www.nass.usda.gov/ AgCensus. Watch for additional news about the Ag Census on USDA-NASS social media. Two Census special studies will also be conducted this winter: the 2018 Census of Aquaculture and the 2018 Irrigation and Water Management Survey. These questionnaires will be mailed in December and January, respectively, to the farms that reported these activities in the 2017 Census of Agriculture. For more information about these upcoming special studies, visit www.nass.usda.gov/ AgCensus. The Census of Agriculture provides the only source of comprehensive agricultural data for every State and county in the nation. As such, the data are widely-used by local and national decision-makers to help shape agricultural research and education programs, inform farm programs, boost rural infrastructure, determine disaster relief needs, and more. * NASS updated its procedures in how forms returned that were determined to be “out of scope� are handled in response rate calculations for the 2017 Census of Agriculture, in line with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) guidance. Returned forms that do not meet the Census of Agriculture definition of a farm or ranch are now excluded from the response rate calculation. The recalculated response rate from this procedural change resulted in a 2012 Census of Agriculture response rate of 74.5 percent instead of the previously reported 80.1 percent. The response rate for the 2007 Census after recalculation was 78.2 percent instead of the previously reported 85.2 percent.

COW COUNTRY •

Last day to sign up is

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NOVEMBER

Shelby Insurance Agency, Inc. David Mathis 0DLQ6WUHHWÂ&#x2021;6KHOE\YLOOH.<

VKHOE\LQVXUDQFHDJHQF\FRPÂ&#x2021;VLD#LJORXFRP 3URWHFW\RXULQFRPHFRQWDFWXVWRGD\IRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ

Call 1-800-353-6108

Dairy Revenue Protection Sign-ups start October 9 and coverage begins January 1

2018

Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer

â&#x20AC;˘ A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S A S S O C I AT I O N


COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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KENTUCKY

North American International Livestock Expo Eastern National Gelbvieh & Balancer Shows

GELBVIEH

Kentucky Fair & Expo Center-Louisville, Kentucky Junior Heifer Show Sunday, November 11, 1018 Shows start at 8:00 a.m. (ET)-Order to be posted

A S S O C I AT I O N

Open Shows & Breeder’s Choice Heifer Futurity Thursday, November 15, 2018 @ 8:00 a.m. (ET) 2018 NAILE Showcase Gelbvieh & Balancer Sale Internet bidding on GelbviehAuction.com Close out on Wednesday night, November 14, 2018 (Time TBD)

David Slaughter, President..........................(270)-556-4259 Joe Piles, Vice President..............................(502) 507-3845 Pat Tilghman, Secretary/Treasurer...............(270) 678-5695 CLIFFORD FARMS

3459 KY HWY 1284E Cynthiana, KY 41031 Since 1937 (859) 234-6956

Cattle for sale at all times.

Superintendent: Joe Piles (502-507-3845) Futurity and Sale Contact: David Slaughter (270-556-4259)

MULLINS FARM

Randy & Wanda Wade (859) 234-4803 Mike, Shelley & Ronin Meyer (859) 298-9931 Kevin, Shannon, & Kamber Farrell (859) 588-9121

TRAVIS MULLINS 2440 FISHING CREEK RD 606.282.3869 YOSEMITE, KY 42566 Gelbvieh Cattle for Sale

Gelbvieh, Simmental, & Commercial Cattle

Brian W. Dyer DVM

Owner/Manager GELBVIEH/BALANCERS

2050 Glasgow Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Brian, Lauren, Kristen Barry, Emily & Julia

Bar IV Livestock

Barry, Beth & Ben Racke • Brad Racke 7416 Tippenhauer Rd. • Cold Spring, KY 41076 Phone (859) 635-3832 • Barry cell (859) 991-1992 Brad cell (859) 393-3677 • Ben cell (859) 393-3730 Fax (859) 635-3832 • bar4@twc.com

Bee Lick Gelbviehs

Eddie Reynolds 277 Old Bee Lick Rd. Crab Orchard, KY 40419 606-379-2281(H) 606-305-1972(C) Bulls & Females for sale

Full Circle Farms

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Brad Burke 989 Metcalf Mill Rd. • Ewing, KY 41039 (H) 606-267-5609 • (C) 606-782-1367 gbb789@windstream.net

Pleasant Meadows Farm

Kilbourne Gelbvieh East Bernstadt, KY 606-843-6583 cell 606-309-4662

Gary & Pat Tilghman Lindsey Tilghman Jones Family Carrie & Daryl Derossett Family 690 Lick Branch Road Glasgow, KY 42141

Black Replacement Heifers & Bulls Availble Embryo transplant & AI sired calves

270.678.5695 pleasantmeadowsfarm@hotmail.

Mockingbird Hill Farms Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Shane Wells 10172 Provo Rd. Rochester, KY H: 270-934-2198 C: 270-791-8196 swells@logantele.com

GELBVIEH & BALANCER

®

Smart. Reliable. Profitable. Gelbvieh and Balancer® genetics offer more pounds of calf weaned, added fertility, and greater cow herd longevity.

Larry Clark & Sons LLC

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle 1153 Robert Landis Road-Greensburg, KY 42743 Larry Clark, Owner & Operator (270) 299-5167 (270) 337-2801 Lpclarkandsons@msn.com

Single Tree Farm

jbgarmon@yahoo.com Jay, Bethany, Cooper and Piper Garmon

Clayton & Debbie Cash 1214 Ottawa School Road Brodhead, KY 40409

Gelbvieh-Balancer Bulls & Heifers For Sale by Private Treaty

82

(606)-308-3247 (606)-758-8995

76 Miller Cemetery Rd. Russell Springs, KY 42642 270-858-4939 Home 270-670-5250 Cell 270-590-1189 Cell

GELBVIEH & BALANCER CATTLE AQHA PERFORMANCE HORSES

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

gelbvieh.org

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AMERICAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES THE TEN KENTUCKY BREEDERS WHO REGISTERED THE MOST ANGUS The 10 producers who registered the most Angus beef cattle in the state of Kentucky recorded a total of 1491 Angus with the American Angus Association® during fiscal year 2018, which ended Sept. 30, according to Allen Moczygemba, Association chief executive officer.

to demonstrate strong demand for Angus genetics and solidifies our longheld position as a leader in the beef cattle industry,” Moczygemba says. “These results underscore our members’ commitment to providing genetic solutions to the beef cattle industry.”

The 10 top recorders in Kentucky are: Oak Hollow, Smiths Grove; Branch View Angus, Hustonville; Stone Gate Farms, Flemingsburg; Jere L & Mary J Cannon, Flemingsburg; Smithland Farm, Russell Spgs; Chris Alexander, Burkesville; Rock Ridge, Lawrenceburg; AdamLeigh Farm, Somerset; Heritage Farm, Shelbyville; Solid Rock Angus LLC, Winchester.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. The American Angus Association is the nation’s largest beef breed organization, serving nearly 25,000 members across the United States, Canada and several other countries. The Association provides programs and services to farmers, ranchers and others who rely on Angus to produce quality genetics for the beef industry and quality beef for consumers. For more information about Angus cattle and the Association, visit www.ANGUS.org.

Angus breeders across the nation in 2018 registered 327,067 head of Angus cattle. “Our growth this fiscal year continues

DEERE ANNOUNCES MY 19 UPDATES FOR 5R UTILITY TRACTORS John Deere announces model year 2019 updates for its 90- to 125-horsepower 5R Utility Tractors. The updates put features and options typically found in larger tractors into a premium utility tractor that livestock, hay and small-acreage producers can use. Updated John Deere 5R Series Utility Tractors include the 5090R, 5100R, 5115R and 5125R. For the first time in a 5 Series Utility Tractor, factory-installed, integrated AutoTrac™ and JDLink™ can be ordered and includes the new John Deere 4240 Display and the StarFire™ 6000 Receiver. Other factory-installed options include a suspended front axle, variable-ratio steering, reconfigurable joystick, new front hitch and PTO. For model year 2019 the tractors will also be able to connect to ISOBUS compatible implements. “These updates and new features improve tractor maneuverability, minimize costs, improve visibility from the cab and enhance operator comfort,” said John Doyle, product marketing manager for John Deere. An industry exclusive 7.4-foot (2.25 m) wheelbase, 60-degree steering angle and COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

12.1-foot (3.69 m) turning radius make it easier to maneuver in small hay fields or to mow, rake or bale. “Turns are eight percent tighter than the next closest competitor and four inches shorter than the 5M. This provides an extra 17 degrees of steering angle,” Doyle said. Variableratio steering decreases the number of steering-wheel turns by 50 percent to achieve the tractor’s maximum steering angle. “This reduces operator fatigue and improves the tractor’s productivity and maneuverability to help get the work done more efficiently,” Doyle said. Upward visibility for loader applications is 80 percent better with the Panorama cab option when compared to current 5M premium cab models. A reconfigurable joystick allows operators to easily switch the function of the loader joystick from controlling the mid SCVs to the rear SCVs. “It’s easy to switch from controlling the loader to controlling the hydraulic functions of an implement – for example, opening and closing the gate on a baler,” Doyle explained. Optional JDLink provides remote access to monitor critical tractor systems and functions. Machine information and

BIOZYME® OFFERS NEW HAY TESTING TOOL BioZyme® Inc., makers of VitaFerm® has developed and launched its Hay Testing Tool. The online tool is just one way that producers can help calculate the supplements they will need to accompany their forages, with the ultimate goal of saving producers money. According to Lindsey Grimes-Hall, Nutrition and Field Sales Manager at BioZyme, the online tool is simple and free to use. Once a producer has had his or her forages tested and knows the nutritional values, he or she will enter three pieces of information into the calculator: crude protein, total digestible nutrients (TDN) and the month projected to start calving. Then, the online tool will make calculations for the producer. “This tool was developed with a lot of research since 2015, when we had a similar year to this year,” GrimesHall said. “That year, we had an extremely wet year, where forage availability was limited, but the producers assumed the forages they were feeding were of average quality, when actually they were below average. This calculator isn’t designed to tell producers what to do but helps

programmed custom alerts can prevent downtime by helping customers avoid equipment failures. When JDLink is combined with Remote Display Access (RDA), producers can give their dealer remote access to the machine to troubleshoot potential problems, provide faster repairs or schedule routine maintenance. “Remote Access is especially beneficial for commerciallivestock and hay producers who need to monitor machine functionality and keep operating costs low,” Doyle said. Operator comfort on the 5R gives utility tractor customers many of the same features found on larger tractors. “An optional CommandARM™ with electrohydraulic SCVs has been adopted from larger John Deere 7R Tractors and puts more hydraulic functions at the

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them gauge the supplements they might need during the future months with the forages they have available, therefore saving them money.” Once the producers’ data is input, line graphs are generated to give the producer a visual aid showing the percentage of protein and energy your hay is currently providing vs the recommended amount for optimal performance, based on the Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle from NRC. Then, bar charts are created to show what months since calving producers should supplement with protein and/or energy to achieve maximum performance goals. Green bars on the charts indicate that the forage is at or above recommended NRC levels, and those months, no alternative protein or energy supplements are needed, saving the producer money. In addition to the calculator with supplemental recommendations, the page also makes product recommendations with specific commodities to add to the cattle’s diets and supplements from the VitaFerm line of products. To learn more about the calculator or the VitaFerm brand, visit: http:// vitaferm.com.

fingertips of the operator,” Doyle stated. Fitted under the 5R is an optional suspended front axle that adapts to changing terrain conditions, puts more power to the ground and provides superior ride comfort. For added precision, the suspension can be locked. “The MY19 updates offered for the 5R Utility Tractors give producers features that are traditionally available in larger row-crop tractors,” Doyle said. “Livestock and hay producers will notice how nimble these machines are, especially when working in small fields or other confined spaces where maneuverability is important,” Doyle said. For more information about the MY 19 5R Utility Tractors, visit your local John Deere dealer, or JohnDeere.com for details. 83


For More Information: Commercial cattlemen trust registered seedstock breeders to make documented genetic improvements that provide them the opportunity to succeed.

In the pasture

From 2004-2014, the 2015 AICA National Cattle Evaluation Genetic Trend illustrates Charolais seedstock breeders are doing their job!

Lower birth weight ■ MORE LIVE CALVES Increased weaning weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT WEANING

The trend shows dramatic improvements in every trait of economic importance.

In the feedlot

2004-2014 NCE Charolais Genetic Trends BW

WW

YW

CE

CW

REA Marb

2004 0.8 19.1 33.7 1.6 11.4 .18 .01 2014 0.4 26.8 49.0 3.4 16.9 .32 .04

More pounds. More profits. Charolais keep it real. © American-International Charolais Association 2016

KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

kins Ad Farms

Higher yearling weight ■ MORE POUNDS, EFFICIENTLY

At harvest

Increased carcass weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT HARVEST Larger ribeye ■ BETTER YIELD GRADES More marbling ■ HIGHER QUALITY GRADES

■ Southeast Field Representative ■ Floyd Wampler (423) 612-2144

NEWS & EVENTS:

6.5x3.75 bw-Cow Country News.indd 1

TJ Adkins: 606-875-5094 Sherman & Phyllis Adkins: 606-379-5129 279 Bullock Rd. Eubank, KY 42567 AdkinsFarms@hotmail.com

Montgomery Charolais

NORTH AMERICAN INT’L LIVESTOCK SHOW • LOUISVILLE, KY

CHRISTMAS PARTY

Junior Show on November 10, 2018 at 8 AM

December 1, 2018 at 6 PM

Open Show (After Sim. show) on November 14, 2018 at 8 AM

Claudia Sanders Dinner House

Board Meeting following Open Show

Shelbyville, KY

LEANING PINE FARMS, LLC John Bruner

606-271-0582 473 Edward Meece Road Science Hill, KY 42553

Amburgey Charolais Farm

jeffries charolais

Cox Charolais

1194 Smith Ridge Road • Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-465-7584 (H) 270-403-4562 Bulls & Select Heifers for Sale

Harrod Farms THE NEXT GENERATION

Becca, Jenna and Jake 645 Evergreen Rd. Frankfort, KY 40601 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Charolais, Hereford & Commercial Cattle

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12/2/15 7:30 AM

Darby Montgomery 36 Thompson Road • Lancaster, KY 40444 859-339-3922 BULLS FOR SALE

Polled Breeding Since 1966 Robert Amburgey, Jr. 3171 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-2764 (Home) 859-404-3751 (Mobile)

Kentucky Charolais Association Chuck Druin 2291 Drane Lane Eminence, KY 40019 502-321-1160 or 502-321-5919 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Jacob Miller: 502-507-4987

paul r. jeffries 606-510-4537

1590 jeffries lane

hustonville, ky. 40437 chris cooper 606-669-9009 chris jeffries 606-669-2426

Jimmy & Linda Evans 960 Vallandingham Road Dry Ridge, KY 41035 859-428-2740

Allison Charolais John Allison

545 Eminence Road New Castle, KY 40050

502-845-2806 502-220-3170

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

Bulls & Heifers For Sale at the Farm

2018

S A N D U S K Y FA R M S

David, Rhonda, Michael & Nicholas 3200 St. Rose Road Lebannon, KY 40033 270-692-7793

Hayden Farm 4430 Bloomfield Rd. Bardstown, KY 40004 James Hayden

Home: Office: Mobile: 502-349-0128 502-349-0005 502-507-4984 jhayden@haydensteel.com

Candy Sullivan 3440 Ruddles Mill Road Paris, KY 40361

859-338-0170 Sullivan Charolais

Quality Charolais Cattle in the Heart of the Bluegrass

Floyd’s Charolais

2039 Nina Ridge Road Lancaster, KY 40444 Home: 859-792-2956 • Cell: 859-339-2653 floydj@windstream.net

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FEATURE

WHAT TO DO WHEN PREG CHECK DOESN’T GO YOUR WAY You think you’re doing everything possible to prepare for a great pregnancy check, but are you seeing the payoff? Are you hitting a 90 to 95 percent pregnancy rate? If your results are average or below, it’s time to pinpoint the reason. “Lots of things could contribute to disappointing preg check results,” says Doug Hawkins, Ph.D., technical support specialist for Purina Animal Nutrition. “Is it nutrition? Health? The bull? Identifying the culprit starts with the process of elimination.” Many factors contribute to breeding success, but your herd’s nutrition is the easiest to manage. Nutrition’s role in breeding “Start thinking about preg checking a year in advance,” suggests Hawkins. “Once you preg check, there’s not much you can do to impact results. It has to be a year-round focus.” The recruitment of oocytes on the surface of the ovary occurs 3 to 4 months before a cow ovulates, so nutrition’s impact on fertility and conception is critical before you ever turn out a bull. Breeding success or failure can also be compounded by a cow’s energy requirements. “Most of the time, cows are lactating, have a calf at side and are trying to meet their own nutritional requirements,” says Hawkins. “The bottom line is cow nutrition requirements are high at the time of breeding, and cows need adequate nutrition to get pregnant.” Ruling out nutritional culprits “If nutrition is not up to par, you’ll likely see less-than-desirable results on preg check day,” says Hawkins. “Then, it’s time to start evaluating.” Some common questions to ask: • Did cows have sufficient forage before and during the breeding period? • Were cows consuming mineral and protein supplements at target intake

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

levels? • Did the supplement(s) have enough energy to meet cow requirements? If you answered ‘no’ to any of these questions, you may have found your culprit. However, if you answered ‘yes’, you’ll need to dive deeper into nutrition and other management areas. Playing the long game Ensuring cows have what they need yearround is the key to breeding success. “First, look at your forage situation,” says Hawkins. “Whether your forage is a round bale of hay or you have cows grazing, make sure you have forage to meet a cow’s roughage needs.” Next, consider a cow’s energy and protein needs. “Meet energy and protein requirements by using a self-fed supplementation program,” adds Hawkins. “These programs allow cows to consume the energy and protein they need when they need it.” If cows need more energy or protein, they’ll consume more supplement. If they are getting adequate energy and protein from forages, they’ll eat less supplement. “Last but not least, you need to provide a quality mineral,” says Hawkins. “Make sure cows are receiving the vitamins and minerals they need for breeding success.” A pen-to-paper plan If you want to try to achieve better than average breeding results next year, now is the time to strategize. “Have a written plan in place to achieve a 90 to 95 percent pregnancy rate,” recommends Hawkins. “For the nutrition part of the breeding equation, cover energy, protein and mineral requirements. And, don’t forget to plan other parts of the equation, like animal health.” Visit purinamills.com/breeding to learn more.

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Kentucky Hereford Association KHA Invites any Hereford Breeder to Become a Member! Dues are $25. Send to 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 Upcoming Events: KHA Officers

President: Tim Wolf Secretary/ Treasurer: Earlene Thomas 859-623-5734 thomasep@roadrunner.com

-HEREFORDS -

Codee Guffey • 1815 Grassy Springs Road Versailles, Kentucky 40383 Phone: 502-598-6355 Email: rockridgeherefords@gmail.com www.rockridgeherefords.com

KY HEREFORD AUTUMN HARVEST SALE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2018 • NOON CHENAULT AGRICULTURAL CENTER MT STERLING, KY Wells Farm

Joe B. Gray 10787 New Bowling Green Road Smiths Grove, KY 52171

270-590-4579

WOLF FARM

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Females for sale Tim & Peggy Wolf 12939 Peach Grove Rd. Alexandria, KY 41001 Home: 859-635-0899 Ÿ Cell: 859-991-3484

Peyton’s Well Polled Herefords The Lowell Atwood Family 133 Edgewood Drive Stanford, KY (606) 365-2520 home/fax (606) 669-1455 cell

Victor- influenced cattle bred for performance on grass.

“Black cows need a good Hereford Bull”

BECKLEY HEREFORDS L.W. Beckley D.V.M L. Wayne Beckley 284 Pyrse Lane 1420 Fitchburg Rd. Irvine, KY 40336 Ravenna, KY 40472 Cell: 859-779-1419 Home: 606-723-3021 Clinic: 606-726-0000 Cell: 859-779-0962 www.beckleyherefords.com

86

K3CATTLE@YAHOO.COM

198 HICKS PIKE CYNTHIANA, KY 41031

Registered Polled Herefords 8103 Bill Moss Road • White House, TN 37188 Home/Fax: 615-672-4483 Cell: 615-478-4483 billy@jacksonfarms.com ® “Farming the Same Land Since 1834”

Registered Polled Herefords

Paul L. Hancock 8559 KY 56 Owensboro, KY 42301 270-771-4194

Boyd Beef Cattle

6077 Helena Road • Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II · 606-584-5194 Annual Bull Sale second Saturday in March Hereford and Angus Bulls

Chambliss Hereford Farms Brad, Carla, Clay and Clint Chambliss 916 Winchester Blvd. Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Home (270) 982-3905 • Cell (270) 668-7126 fax 270-735-9922 www.chamblissherefordfarms.com

WCN Polled Herefords Since 1961 Bill & Libby Norris 2220 Celina Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Phone (270) 433-7256 Cell (270) 433-1525 “Every calf needs a white face”

Sweet T Farm

Pile Stock Farm

TK4 Herefords

Registered Polled Herefords

Pete & Gayla Szak 1040 Hick Hardy Rd. Cynthiana, KY (859) 484-2265

Hansell Pile, Jr. 12045 St. John Rd. Cecilia, KY 42724 270-735-5192•270-862-4462 12 miles West of Elizabethtown

Tony & Kathy Staples 992 Knotts Road Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-4220 tstaples@bbtel.com

Windy Hills Farm

Bulls • Heifers • Show

TS

Jackie D. Perkins II 367 Mt. Pisgah Rd. • Bremen, KY 42325 270-543-3586 Breeding to produce good cows since 1981.

859-588-4531

Jackson Farms

MPH Farms

Thomas Farm

“Cattle for sale at all times”

K3 CATTLE REGISTERED HEREFORDS KYLE BUSH

Polled Herefords 439 Flatwoods Frozen Camp Road • Corbin, KY 40701 Kevin, Angela, Bobby & Brenda Wells Kenlea & Kyler Murray 606-523-0569 - Home 606-528-1691 - Home 606-344-0417 - Cell 606-682-8143 - Cell wells_farm@yahoo.com

Polled Hereford and Gelbvieh Cattle 3459 KY Hwy. 1284 E. Cythiana, KY 41031 (859) 234-6956 Ben, Jane, Shelby and Lincoln Eric & Ronnie Thomas 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 623-5734 • Eric’s Cell (859) 314-8256

Contact Earlene Thomas for more information: 859-623-5734 www.kentuckyhereford.org

F

TS TS Tucker Stock Farms F F

“Registered Angus and Polled Herefords”

TUCKER STOCK FARMS TUCKER STOCK FARMS

TUCKER STOCK FARMS

“Breeding Polled Herefords for over 58 Years” John Tucker “Registered Angus and Polled “Registered AngusHerefords” andIIPolled Herefords” 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Breeding cattle for sale at all times. John A. Tucker II John A. Tucker II Hudson, KY 40145 HiddenHerefords” Valley Lane 1999 Walnut Hill Rd. • Lexington, KY “Registered 40515 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Angus and 1790 Polled 270-617-0301 Hudson, KY 40145 Hudson, KY 40145 (859) 271-9086 • cell (859)533-3790 (270) 257-8548 (270) 257-8548 Offi 257-8167 Office for (270) 257-8167 John A. Tucker IIce (270) “Bulls always Sale”

Old Fall Creek Farms AHA & KHA member • Proven bloodlines

Popplewell’s Herefords

Registered Hereford & Angus Farm

Hudson, KY 40145 (270) 257-8548 Office (270) 257-8167

Polled LINEBRED Hereford Bulls For Sale Private treaty sales • Visitors 18-month-old always welcome Angus & LINEBRED VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE

Service Age Bulls Open and Bred Females For Sale Vince, Tracy & Alex Home (270) 866-4480 1526 Clearfork Rd. Cell (270) 566-1852 Russell Springs, KY 42642

COW COUNTRY •

1790 Hidden18-month-old Valley 18-month-old AngusLane & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale Angus & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale

NOVEMBER

1874 Old Fall Creek Road • Monticello, KY 42633

Reed Bertram 606-348-7486 David Bertram 606-278-3630 www.ofcfarms.com

2018

Multi-Trait Multi-Trait Selection Selection Fertility Disposition

Danny Miller

Fertility Calving Ease Calving Ease Disposition Milking Ability Milking Ability

www.jmsvictordomino.com 4850 Ridge Rd. 4850 Caldwell RidgeCaldwell Rd. Knifley, KY 42753 Knifley, KY 42753 270-465-6984 270-465-6984

270-465-6984 • 270-566-2694

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PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM State and National Beef Promotion and Research Programs Information is required by 7 CRF 1260.201. Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential per 7 CRF 1260.203.

TODAY’S DATE

ID NUMBER (IF KNOWN)

SELLER’S NAME

BUYER’S NAME

ADDRESS

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

CITY

SELLER’S SIGNATURE

STATE

ZIP

BUYER’S SIGNATURE

Both the seller and the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Kentucky Beef Council. DATE OF SALE

STATE OF ORIGIN*

TOTAL NUMBER OF CATTLE SOLD

X

$1.OO per Head Federal Checkoff

$

X

$1.OO per Head State Checkoff

$

Total Checkoff Payment for Federal and State

PERSON REMITTING FORM

+ =

BUYER

SELLER

PHONE

*If the cattle purchased came from another state within the last 30 days, indicate from which state the cattle were purchased.

$

Send Report and Remittance to: Kentucky Beef Council 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 For additional information: call 859-278-0899 or email beef@kycattle.org According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0581-0093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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ANGUS THE BUSINESS BREED

2018-19 KAA OFFICERS

President: Gil Ray Cowles, Rockfield, KY Vice President: Jason Crowe, Irvine, KY Secretary/Treasurer: Anne DeMott, Lexington, KY Past President: Tim Jeffries, Canmer, KY

C ont ac t Anne D eMott to p ay you r Ke ntu cky Ang us Ass o c i at ion D ues 1 • BOYD BEEF CATTLE 6077 Helena Rd. Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II: 606-584-5194 • Blake Boyd: 606-375-3718 www.boydbeef.com • email: cboyd2@maysvilleky.net

12 • FALL CREEK ANGUS 448 Corder Farm Road Monticello, KY 42633 Ronnie Corder 606/348-6588

23 • PLEASANT HILL FARMS Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles 500 Rockfield Richpond Road Rockfield, KY 42274 270/843-9021 • Fax 270/843-9005 Located 7 miles west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80

2 • BRANCH VIEW ANGUS 927 Old Liberty Pike • Hustonville, KY 40437 859/238-0771 • www.branchviewangus.com James S. & LuAnn Coffey, Donald & Donna Coffey Evelyn Hoskins Annual Production Sale- 2nd Saturday in April

13 • HAINES ANGUS FARMS 5294 Park City- Glasgow Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Kenneth Haines, Jr. 270/749-8862

24 • RAGS ANGUS FARM Richard and Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240 Home- (270)885-4352 Cell- (270)839-2442 rstallons@bellsouth.net

3 • BURKS CATTLE CO. 531 Rick Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Eddie Burks • 270-991-6398 www.burkscattle.com

14 • HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY 502-633-1634, home • 502-633-5100, work 502-655-0164, cell

25 • SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, KY 42748 Cell: 270-769-8260 www.shawfamilyangus.com Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975

4 • BURTON & SONS ANGUS Joe D. or Karen Burton • Bryan Carman, Partner, Ridgeview Angus 480 Hominy Hill Rd. Nancy, KY 42544 Joe: 606-305-3081 • Bryan: 606-875-3453 Located 15 miles West of Somerset klburton01@windstream.net

15 • HIGHVIEW FARMS 827 West Main Street Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718 Ben T. Cox DVM 270-469-5517 Registered Angus Cattle

5 • CARDINAL HILL FARMS 405 Cedar Grove Rd. • Glasgow, KY 42141 Mike Elmore: (270) 404-6589 Bob Johnson: ( 270 ) 427-1410 www. cardinalhillfarms.com • mike@cardinalhillfarms.com

16 • HILL VIEW FARMS Jimmy Gilles 5160 Lee Rudy Road Owensboro, KY 42301 270/686-8876 270/929-5370

27 • ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED ANGUS Eric & Sherry St. Clair 13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY 40119 (H) 270-257-2965 (C) 270-617-1079 www.stclairangus.com

6 • CLAIREBROOK FARMS, LLC PO Box 192, Carlisle, KY 40311 Paul B. Mulhollem, 217/621-3123 Chad Daugherty, 217/369-0466 Watch for our consignments in upcoming KY sales!

17 • JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS Angus Bulls & Females Slaughters, KY Keith: 270-635-0723 Reese: 270-635-1137

28 • TAMME VALLEY FARM Jacob Tamme, Owner-Operator 859-583-7134 jacob.tamme@gmail.com www.tammevalley.com & Find us on Facebook!

7 • COFFEY ANGUS FARMS 661 Hopewell Road Liberty, KY 42539 Matt Coffey - (270) 799-6288 Dewey Coffey - (606) 787-2620 Genetics for Maximum Profitability since 1984

18 • LEGACY FARMS Daniel and Lindsey Reynolds 1709 South Jackson Highway Hardyville, KY 42746 270-528-6275/270-528-6120 www.legacyfarmsangus.com

29 • TWIN CREEK FARM Shawn, Melissa, Devin & Dylan Gibson 270/337-3072 or 270/692-5304 Dennis & Emily 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338

8 • COOL SPRINGS CREEK FARM Guy & Aline Babin 269 Paul Coomer Rd Gradyville, KY 42742 270-205-1669 www.coolspringscreekfarm.com • gdbabin@outlook.com

19 • MILLERS RUN FARM William N. Offutt IV 3790 Paris Road Georgetown, KY 40324 Phone: (859) 533-2020 Email: millersrunfarm@aol.com Website: www.millersrunfarm.com Heifers for sale

9 • COUNTY LINE ANGUS Ottis Wright 150 Busy Baker Road Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-469-0339 • Registered Angus Bulls

20 • MUD RIVER ANGUS 10 Oak Hill Drive Russellville, KY 42276 Wayne Johnson 270/303-6354 Gary Johnson 270/498/7208

10 • D&D LONGVIEW ANGUS Danny & Debbie Burris 550 Willie Nell Road Columbia, KY 42728 270-348-5766 • 270-250-3701 • 270-250-1277

21 • FOUR KINGS ANGUS 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Cary & Kim King Email: Carymking@yahoo.com • Fourkingsangus.com Cary Cell - 859-613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager

11 • EAGLE REST PLANTATION Jimmy Don Robinson 7665 Paducah Road Kevil, KY 42053 270-462-2150

22 • OLD BARK FARM 370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716 Kenley Conner 270/358-8057 Registered Angus Cattle

Bulls & females sold private treaty. Inquiries Welcome. Sell only what we would buy.

89 5880 68 5 4

26 • SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642 Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith 270/866-3898 Henry & Melissa Smith 270/866-2311

Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April 2016

Watch for us in Branch View Production Sale in April

KY ANGUS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

OLD BARK FARM

CITY

STATE

PHONE 1

PHONE 2

ZIP

EMAIL

Return to: Anne DeMott • 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, KY 40509 • Annual Dues $35

OO WC C O U N T Y •V U S AP PU UB BLLLIIIC CAT ATIIIO ON NO OF HE EK KE EN NT UC CK KY YC CAT ATT EM ME EN N’’’S SA AS SS SO OC CIIIAT ATIIIO ON N CO U N TNC R Y •R ET M EN RET 222000111888 ••• A CW OCWC C OO UW TC RO YU •NT O CA O R Y •G M AY C O W O U NN T RO Y •U JBU A P U B C AT O N O FF T TTH H E K E N TTU U C K Y C AT TTLLLE E M E N S A S S O C AT O N


KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION NEWS Anne Stewart DeMott, Secretary/Treasurer PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE We are in the full effect of our Fall Season in The Commonwealth with cooler temperatures and vibrant foliage colors! Most everyone has completed their fall calving and are making ready for the onset of winter! Kentucky in November is the location of one of the largest livestock expositions in the world! The North American International Livestock Exposition is absolutely a “bucket list” activity. If you have never been, I would urge you to attend this tremendous event. You can see so many breeds within several species of livestock. Many of the Beef Cattle breeds have their national business meetings during the NAILE in Louisville. There are vendor displays and educational seminars throughout the Expo. The North American International Livestock Exposition is something that we as Kentuckians need to be extremely proud of and welcome with open arms the opportunity to host such an event. Please make sure and attend if possible. Additionally, let us always make all of our visitors feel welcome and full with Kentucky hospitality! Thank you to everyone that has attended any Angus event over the past couple of months. The Angus sales have been strong and well attended. There is no doubt that Angus cattle in The Bluegrass State are making progress and being sought out by buyers across the country!

TENNESSEE STATE FAIR CHAMPIONS

EVENTS: Christmas Party December 1st 6:00 pm (EST) Tim & Amy White’s Farm Lexington, KY

Happy Thanksgiving! Gil Cowles President, KY Angus Association to subscribe to email updates, please contact us at kyangusassociation@gmail.com

@KyAngusAssoc

@KyAngus Assoc

@kyangusassociation www.kentuckyangus.org kyangusassociation@gmail.com

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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Roy, Jessica and Cooper Canada 600 Cumberland Drive • Morehead, KY 40351 859-227-7323 racekannon@hotmail.com

Swain Select Simmental

12113 Green Valley Dr. • Louisville, KY 40243 frederickswain@bellsouth.net • www.swainselect.com

Fred & Phyllis 502-245-3866 502-599-4560

Chi & Angie 502-477-9727 502-287-2116

Judy and Rondal Dawson 1156 Buzzard Roost Road Shelbyville, KY 40065 502-593-5136 jrdawson22@outlook.com

RC C

Kentucky Simmental Officers

President: Chris Allen 222 Stourbridge St Versailles, KY 40383 859-351-4486

Vice President: Brian Swain 3906 Pottertown Rd Murray, KY 42071

Secretary/Treasurer: Lindsay Phillips 8308 Orangeburg Rd Maysville, KY 41056

KENTUCKY SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME ___________________________ ____________ FARM NAME__________________________________ ADDRESS_____________________________________ CITY_________________STATE_____ ZIP__________ PHONE (BUSINESS)___________________________

Call or visit one of these Simmental breeders for cattle that work!

www.kysimmental.com

100 Carpenter Ridge Salyersville KY, 41465 docrat2@yahoo.com Jim Ratliff 606.496-6522

“UNBELIEVABULL SIMMENTALS” Graves Grandview Simmental Farm Timothy Graves 560 Rudd Lane Springfield, KY 40069 (859) 481-3954 • gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Brian & Heather Swain 3906 Pottertown Road Murray, KY 42071 270-293-4440 wksbswain@murray-ky.net

Simmental and SimAngus Bulls for Sale

Send application to: Lindsay Phillips, 8308 Orangeburg Rd, Maysville, KY 41056 Membership Fee is $25.00

(HOME)______________________________________

90

Ratliff Cattle Company

WAYWARD HILL FARM

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

1939 Huntertown Road Versailles, KY 40383 Bulls for Sale Chris Allen 859-351-4486 callenuky@hotmail.com Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755

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MARKET REPORT

SOUTHEAST FEEDER CATTLE PRICES 19 OCTOBER 2018 STEER weights

HEIFER

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

9-10

134-140

138-144

130-136

133-139

134-140

136-142

8-9

140-148

140-148

136-144

139-147

140-148

137-145

7-8

144-152

142-150

141-149

144-152

144-152

146-154

135-143

134-142

132-140

135-143

135-143

128-136

6-7

144-154

144-154

142-152

144-154

144-154

143-153

133-143

132-142

132-142

134-144

133-143

128-136

5-6

152-164

158-170

150-162

152-164

153-165

152-164

133-145

133-145

130-142

133-145

133-145

136-148

4-5

161-175

161-175

166-180

161-175

161-175

152-166

136-150

136-150

134-148

136-150

139-153

140-154

COWS weights

UTIL

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

44-50

44-50

42-46

44-51

44-51

47-53

CN/CUT

41-46

42-46

38-43

40-46

38-44

44-48

BULLS

70-76

66-76

63-73

72-79

72-82

79-84

MONTHLY MARKET BEEF UPDATE! Feeder cattle traded steady to $2 higher this week. Calves were steady to $5 lower. Market cows were steady to $2 higher. -Troy Applehans

SALERS

The Balanced Breed STRINGER FARMS Bruce Stringer 128 Teresa Avenue Ÿ Somerset, KY 42501 606-875-3553 COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

DIAMOND J SALERS Donald Johnson 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564 606-379-1558

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WILLIS FARMS • Danny Willis 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 502-803-5011 • drwc21@aol.com Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821 91


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

General

October 30- Nov. 15 North American Int’l Livestock Expo, Louisville, KY November 3-5 Angus Convention, Columbus, OH November 29 Cattlemen’s Profit Roundup, Nashville, TN, See ad on pg. 71 January 17-18 KCA Convention and Ag Industry Trade Show, Owensboro, KY, See ad on pg. 66 January 30-Feb 1 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, New Orleans, LA, See ad on pg. 41

Angus

October 29 Oak Hollow Fall Angus Bull Sale, Smiths Grove, KY, See ad on pg. 4 October 29 Stone Gate Farms Fall Sale, Flemingsburg, KY, See ad on pg. 11 November 2 ZWT Ranch Angus Sale, Crossville, TN November 3 Decades of Excellence Angus Sale, Union, TN November 8 Legacy Farms Online Female Sale, See ad on pg. 19 November 9 Stonewall Ridge Farms Inaugural Angus Female Sale, Shelbyville, TN November 10 Deer Valley Farms Angus Sale, Fayetteville, TN November 10 CKAA Fall Female Sale, Danville, KY, See ad on pg. 2 November 11 C&L Angus Complete Dispersal Sale, Glendale, KY, See ad on pg. 10 November 17 Ginger Hill Angus Bull & Female Sale, Culpeper, VA, See ad on pg. 55 November 17 Sunset Ridge Bull and Female Sale, Deer Lodge, TN, See ad on pg. 61 November 18 Heritage Farm Production Sale, Shelbyville, KY, See ad on pg. 25 December 1 Allison Angus and Arrowhead Ranch Annual Production Sale, Hurricane Mills, TN, See ad on pg. 13

Black Hereford

November 10 American Black Hereford Association National Show and Sale, Sedalia, MO

Gelbvieh

November 3 TJB Gelbvieh Annual Bull Sale, Chickamauga, GA, See ad on pg. 73

Hereford

November 3 Burns Farm Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Pikeville, TN November 17 Dogwood Farm Open House Sale, LaCenter, KY, See ad on pg. 31 November 29 KY Certified Hereford Influence Sale, Stanford, KY, See ad on pg. 53 December 1 Kentucky Hereford Autumn Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg. 32

Multi-Breed

November 3 New Day Genetics Bull and Female Sale, Butler, MO November 3 Green River Area “Best of the Best” Bred Heifer Sale, Owensboro, KY November 3 Central Kentucky Premier Heifer Sale, Lebanon, KY, See ad on pg. 8 November 3 Red Reward Fall Edition Bull and Female Sale, Humanscille, MO November 3 Laurel Co. Cattlemens Fall Sale, London, KY November 5 Elite Bred Heifer Sale, Paris, KY November 10 Gibbs Farms Replacement Female Sale, Ranburne, AL November 10 C-Cross Cattle Co. Bull & Female Production Sale, Biscoe, NC, See ad on pg. 37 November 17 Seedstock Plus Influence Bull and Female Sale, Kingsville, MO

November 17 West Kentucky Select Bred Heifer Sale, Guthrie, KY, See ad on pg. 70 November 24 Breeding for the Future Bull & Female Sale, Rockfield, KY, See ad on pg. 42,56 November 30 Total Performance Bull Sale, Red House, VA November 30 Crazy K Ranch Fall Female Opportunity Sale, Michie, TN, See ad on pg. 59 December 4 CPH Sale, Paris, KY December 4 CPH Sale, Gurthrie, KY December 5 CPH Sale, Springfield, KY December 6 CPH Sale, Owensboro, KY December 7 Meadows Creek Annual Black and White Bull Sale, Montgomery, AL, See ad on pg. 33 December 8 Boys From the South Bull Sale, Lebanon, TN, See ad on pg. 57 December 11 CPH Sale, Richmond, KY December 12 CPH Sale, Lexington, KY January 29 CPH Sale, Guthrie, KY February 16 Yon Family Farms Spring Sale, Ridge Spring, SC February 21 CPH Sale, Owensboro, KY March 16 Red Hill Farms More Than a Bull Sale, Lafayette, TN

Red Angus

December 15 Cedar Hill Red Angus The Roots of Our Success Sale, Throckmorton, TX, See ad on pg. 58

AD INDEX Allison Farms.......................................... 13 Alltech.....................................................35 American Angus Assoc......................... 20 American Gelbvieh Assoc...................... 71 Bayer..................................................20, 21 Biozyme...................................................27 Blue Grass Stockyards............................53 Bourbon Co. Livestock...........................52 Boys from the South Bull Sale...............57 Breeding for the Future.................... 42,56 Burkmann Feeds................................... 20 Byron Seeds............................................23 C-Cross Cattle Co....................................37 CKAA Annual Fall Sale............................2 Cargill......................................................24 Cedar Hill Red Angus.............................58 Central KY Premier Heifer Sale...............8 Coles Bend Cattle.................................... 18

92

CPH 45..................................................... 81 Crazy K Ranch........................................59 Danny Vallandingham.............................8 Dievert.....................................................43 Dogwood Farm....................................... 31 Don Franklin Ford Lincoln LLC............95 E & B Farms..............................................7 Evans Mill Cattle Company...................57 Ginger Hill Angus ..................................55 Golden Age Farms.................................. 16 Green River Fence................................. 40 Hayes Trailer Sales, Inc......................... 40 Heritage Farms.......................................25 Hinton Mills............................................96 Jaggers Angus......................................... 10 John Deere................................................3 Kentucky Angus Assoc.................... 88, 89 Kentucky Charolais Assoc..................... 84

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER

2018

Kentucky Gelbvieh Assoc.......................82 Kentucky Hereford Assoc................ 32, 86 Kentucky Salers...................................... 91 Kentucky Simmental Assoc.................. 90 Kentucky Stud ........................................ 12 Knoll Crest Farms.....................................9 Legacy Farms.......................................... 19 Leitchfield Truck & Trailer.................... 30 Limousin Breeders of the Bluegrass......85 McBurney’s Equipment .........................58 Meadows Creek Farm.............................33 Mid South Ag............................................8 Oak Hollow................................................5 Pasture Management Systems, Inc....... 15 Reality Farms..........................................54 Ridley, Inc. - Sweetlix...............................4 Rocking P Livestock................................11

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HELP WANTED

STOCKMAN’S Pay starting at $10/hour ASSOCIATION ooking for honest dependable part CATTLE PRODUCTION me personnel to help promote beef at SALE Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Registered Bulls - Bred Heifers - Open Heifers Y. Currently taking applications for cashiers, food prep and cooks. Sale Location: REGISTERED NGUS BULLS FOR SALE March 11, 2017 ontact Maxine BrackenAAt Kentucky Eva Hawes We have only 4 bulls remaining out of the Ag Expo Building attlemen’s Association food service. Sale Time original offering. Yearlings and coming year olds. Angusor source DNA tested. Morgantown Phone two #502-773-3702 1:00 p.m. CST Top EPD’s on CED, DNI, $EN. Excellent City Park email maxinebracken@gmail.com condition. Hand fed since weaning on top Morgantown, KY nutritional program. All bulls will be semen with a resume.

WWW.DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM

RED ANGUS • RED SIMMENTAL RED TO SIM-ANGUS • FARM FRESH BEEF - $15 FOR 4 LINES AND $5 FOR EACH ADDITIONAL LINE PLACE AN AD CALL (859) 278-0899

COW COUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

tested before leaving our ranch. Over 51 years in the business of Registered Angus Cattle. Buy with confidence. ACH Holdings - Haynes Farms Brookhill Angus in Flemingsburg, KY. B Low llblood & Purebred Embryos & First come first served. 606-782-1769.

&

Jeff, Michelle Nolan Pettit

Catalog Will be Available Feb 2017

Registered Red Angus Bulls For Sale

5745 US HWY 41 SOUTH, SEBREE, KY 42455

• Free Delivery HEREFORD BULLS 270-836-2963 • JP@DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM Four Winds Farm birth weight and high growth. New Castle, KY BSE Tested. 18 months old. Semen WWW.DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM ephen Haynes - E 270-799-8685 Sweet T Farm. 859-684-1509 ST. 1967 RED ANGUS • RED SIMMENTAL RED SIM-ANGUS • FARM FRESH BEEF REGISTERED GELBVIEH BULLS 760 Emily Court 6 registered Gelbvieh bulls. Passed Bowling Green, KY 42101 www.achhlimousin.com BSE. Ready for service. 14-20 months old. Calving ease, BULLS low birth achhlimousin@twc.com FOR-MOST CHUTE AND BALE UNROLLER REGISTERED GELBVIEH & HEIFERS PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS 125 FOR-MOST CHUTE WITH SMITHS GROVE, FOR SALE 25MODEL BLACK-CROSS HEIFERS weight, docileLOCATED bulls. IN Starting price KY at Facebook: ACHH BULLS LIMOUSIN MODEL 30 HEADGATE. PRICE $1600. BALE CONTACT TRENT JONES CALL 270/202-7186 FOR MORE INFO OR Calves by side. Some calves $2,250. Trent Jones. COMPREHENSIVE NUTRIENT UNROLLER, PERFECT CONDITION. 270-590-5266 CHECK OUT WWW.OAKHOLLOWANGUS.COM weighing up to 300-400 lbs. 270-590-5266 ANAGEMENT PLANS (CNMPs) PRICE $600. 502-477-2637 FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITY. 859-481-5143 CHAROLAIS BULLS FOR SALE Financial assistance available REGISTERED BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SIMMENTAL BULLS FOR SALE Harmon Charolais 812-738-7958 rough NRCS EQIP orFOR KySALE Div of 11 REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE EXCELLENT EPD’S. SEMEN TESTED. Black and polled.OF18 Performance tested All Breeds Bulls onservation RCPP. Ben Koostra, AVOID THE PRESSURE THE months-2 SALE RING AND DELIVERY AVAILABLE. MAXIMIZE YOUR PB ANGUS HEIFER SIRED BY SON OF SYDEN olds. Semen $2,500 http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/ibep/ exington, KY VISIT THE FARM. CAIPchecked. CERTIFIED. TOP EPDS. PROFIT WITH PROVEN PERFORMANCE. year CC &- 7NRCS AND OUTTechnical OF COW BY GARDEN’S Bowling KY BALANCED 270-529-9215 812-279-8554 rvice Provider - 859-559-4662 HEIFERGreen, ACCEPTABLE, TRAIT & ADAM WHEATLEY 502-349-2665 PRIME TOUCH. BORN 8/23/17. $1600. HIGHRED PRODUCTIVITY. CONDITION. MCCRORY FARMS. 270-527-3767 MAIN, ANGUSEXCELLENT FOR SALE SPREADERS REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS 1516LIME-LITTER-FERTILIZER HAND-FED DAILY. DOCILE. FULLY VACCINATED. OVER 20 BREEDING AGE HEREFORD BULLS BENTON, KY 42025 Bulls: Yearlings and 2 Year Olds, In Stock Stoltzfus Brand John Deere months. Vet Checked. $2,000. SEMEN-TESTED ON Bred DELIVERY DAY. QUALITY FOR SALE Open and Heifers Skean Angus, Alvaton, KY 6400 - cab loader -wd NOT QUANTITY. 606-724-5524. OVER 60 YEARS OF LINE 1 HEREFORD FOR SALE Contact: Johnnie Cundiff www.redbarnandassociates.com 70-535-4123. Call Tim or see GENETICS. ALSO SELLING 30 HEIFERS.CHAMBLISS TRIPLE P ANGUS. IN ROBERTSON COUNTY, KY. 19-20 MONTH OLD POLLED HEREFORD BULLS. 606-305-6443 or 606-871-7438 Call Charlie: 859-608-9745 ulls @ www.skeanangus.com HEREFORD FARMS. 270-668-7126 GOOD SELECTION.

502-296-1044

LOW BIRTHWEIGHT, MEDIUM FRAME. FREE DELIVERY AVAILABLE. JMS POLLED HEREFORDS, KNIFLEY, KY DANNY 270-566-2694 • TRENT 270-566-2000

SALERS

JOHN DEERE 5603 4WD CAB- LDR - $40,000 JOHN DEERE 7800 2WD CAB - $38,000 JOHN DEERE 7410 2WD CAB -$28,000 STOLTZFUS SPREADERS STARTING AT $17,000 FARMCO FEEDER WAGONS - $3,500 NEW HOLLAND 1409 DISKBINE - $11,400 GREAT PLAINS DRILLS STARTING @ $10,000 HORNING 3-ROW SILAGE HEADER @ $20,000 WWW.REDBARNANDASDOCIATES.COM CALL CHARLIE: 859-608-9745

FOUNDATION SALE V OCTOBER 5, 2019 UNITED PRODUCERS, BOWLING GREEN, KY SELLING FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN GENETICS FOR INFO CALL : A C H HOLDINGS, LLC STEPHEN HAYNES 270-799-8685 DIAMOND J SALERS

BLACK SIM-ANGUS BULLS 15 MONTHS OLD. QUALITY BACKED BY 35 YEARS OF AI BREEDING. EXCELLENT CHOICE FOR CROSSBREEDING DUE TO CALVING EASY AND GROWTH EPDS. MUST SEE TO FULLY APPRECIATE. 502-604-1757 OR 502-839-6651

SEE YOUR AD HERE! REACH OVER 10,600 CATTLEMEN EACH MONTH. ADS AS LOW AS $15 PER MONTH. FOR AD PLACEMENT CONTACT JACOB REDWAY

859-278-0899

REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS CALVING EASE AND GROWTH. AGES 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. BW AND EPD’S AVAILABLE. BREMER BROS., METROPOLIS, IL 618-638-7693 SORTING POLES - PADDLES - FLAGS POLES WITH YOUR 8” DECAL. $6.20 EACH PER 50. SORTING FLAG, $10.50. SORTING PADDLES $9. KERNDT LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 800-207-3115 GELBVIEH & BALANCER BULLS $3000. BLACK POLLED BULLS BRED FOR CALVING EASE AND PERFORMANCE. FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT MCINTOSH BROTHERS AT 502-867-3132. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE MEADOWBROOK ANGUS - FRANKLIN, KY ESTABLISHED 1951 DAVE NEELY, 270-7762831 OR CHUCK NEELY, 270-791-7503

The Balanced Breed

REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS COST-SHARE QUALIFIED. LOW CALVING WEIGHTS. EPD RECORDS. READY FOR SERVICE. MUNDAY’S FARM. CALL ANNE M.J. BAKKE.• 559-348-3818 OR EMAIL WILLIS&FARMS Danny Willis DAIRYNUTR@AOL.COM FALL 2016 BULLS FOR SALE 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 Donald Johnson REGISTERED RED ANGUS FOR SALE 502-803-5011 • drwc21@aol.com 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564GELBVIEH/ANGUS BALANCER REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS & BULLS. HOMO BLACK AND BLACK. BREEDING BULLS: YEARLINGS AND606-379-1558 2-YEAR-OLDS. Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821 HEIFERS SOUNDNESS EVALUATION. BVD AND OPEN HEIFERS. SHOW HEIFER PROSPECTS. BULLS (GREAT SELECTION, 14-28 MONTHS SEMEN TESTED. CALVING EASE EPDS. CONTACT: JOHNNIE CUNDIFF OLD) ARE EASY CALVING, COST SHARE HUNTINGBURG, IN J&D KERSTIENS 606-305-6443 OR 606-871-7438 w Country News, February 2017, A publication of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 117 ELIGIBLE. HEIFERS (7-15 MONTHS OLD). 812-482-2688 OR DUANE CASSIDY AT MONTICELLO, KY. GEORGE HORTON: 606-348812-661-8005 7334 OR 606-278-2327. HORTONSHEREFORDS@GMAIL.COM COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

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FEATURE

BAD THINGS CAN HAPPEN TO GOOD PEOPLE DR. ROY BURRIS UK Extension Beef Specialist It is difficult to watch when people that you like and respect have problems. However, farming in general and beef production in particular is very risky businesses. In any biological system things can “go south” in a hurry. Our cattle producers risk a good deal of money for generally marginal returns. Beef cattle producers deserve the best but bad things do happen sometimes. One such thing happened many years ago to one of the finest men I’ve ever met. It all started when there was a lot of “buzz” about treating low quality dry hay with ammonia to improve its quality. This practice was never approved by the FDA and maybe there’s good reason. But the decision was made to ammoniate some high-moisture wheat hay. Maybe it would help preserve it. What could go wrong? The first time the producer fed the hay, the cattle reacted strangely and several injured themselves. I volunteered to send a trailer for a roll of hay and feed it to cattle on the experiment station so that I could see and record the results. However, not long after they consumed some of the suspect hay, they began to twitch their ears and then just bolted into a dead run, hitting fences and injuring themselves. We quickly removed the hay and began to figure out what had just happened. We learned that in the presence of soluble carbohydrates, ammonia can convert to 4-methylimidazole, a compound with hallucinogenic properties – like LSD. I had to tell the producer that this batch of hay was not suitable for cattle feed. To make matters worse, he soon had a barn fire due to spontaneous combustion that destroyed his “inside” hay, tractor and barn. This fine gentleman couldn’t withstand the financial loss and sold out. I was so sorry to see a man’s dream literally go up in smoke. In another instance during the farm crisis of 1981, I knew a producer that had a beautiful small farm and was very proud to be in the registered Angus business. He had gone to all of the “top” breeders 94

in the Angus business at that time and purchased breeding stock from each of them – expecting them to return the favor. Times were rough and payments were due, but he was ready to have his first production sale. He was confident that things were going to turn his way because these big-name breeders would be there to support him. I won’t soon forget the day he walked into my office with his glossy print sales catalog and exclaimed that he was going to have a sale the likes of which no one around here had ever seen. He said the big time breeders would all be there and they would be “trading a lot of six dollar cats for twelve dollar dogs”: I had a feeling that this was not going to end well. The day of the sale arrived and most of the prominent breeders were there. However, they bought their cattle back at a fraction of their original cost and went home. It was the “flattest” sale that I seen. Times were tough – so tough that this farm went up for public auction a few months later. Another dream was dashed. I had a call a few years ago from a gentleman who was wanting to get into the purebred business – starting at the top. It seems he had made some money as a bridge builder and could afford to have a cattle operation that was a show place. I told the fellow that “I’ve been planning to retire from this business and I thought I’d become a bridge builder!” He was kind of indignant and told me that “there is a lot to know about building bridges”. I replied that there’s “a lot to know about the purebred cattle business and you’re about to get an expensive lesson”. Farming and the cattle enterprise is a great business but it requires a lot of land, labor and capital and more knowledge and management skills than most people imagine. Success doesn’t just happen. It requires a lot of blood, sweat and tears. But as Frank Sinatra would croon “if you can make it here, you can make it anywhere”. Good luck out there!

COW COUNTRY •

TIMELY TIPS FOR NOVEMBER Spring-calving cow herd Evaluate body condition of cows. Sort thin (less than CS5) cows away from the cow herd and feed to improve their condition. Two and three-year olds may need extra attention now. These cattle can use the extra grass that has accumulated in this exceptional growing season. Dry cows in good condition can utilize crop residues and lower quality hay now (but don’t let them lose any more body condition). Save higher quality feed until calving time. Keep a good mineral supplement with vitamin A available. Extend grazing for as long as possible to decrease the amount of stored feed needed. Culling decisions should be made prior to winter feeding for best use of feed resources. Consider open, poorproducing and aged cows as candidates for culling. Replacement heifers require attention during the winter, too. Weaned heifer calves should gain at an adequate rate to attain their “target” breeding weight (2/3 of their mature weight) by May 1. If you need to replace cows, consider buying bred heifers in some of the Kentucky Certified Replacement Heifer sales which are being held across the state this month. A postweaning feeding period will allow you to put rapid, economical gains on weaned calves, keep them through the fall “runs” and allow you to participate in Kentucky CPH-45 sales. Consider this health and marketing program which is designed for producers which are doing a good job of producing high quality feeder calves.

NOVEMBER

2018

Fall-calving herd Continue to watch fall-calving cows. Catch up on processing of calves including identification, castration and vaccinations. Cows that have calved need to go to the best pastures now! Help them maintain body condition prior to breeding in December. Vaccinate the cows while they are open and prior to the breeding season. Move cows to accumulated pasture or increase feed now. Start the breeding season in late November or early December for calving to begin in September of 2019. If you are using AI and/or estrous synchronization, get your supplies together now. Don’t forget Breeding Soundness Evaluations (BSE) on your bulls. Make final selection of replacement heifers now. General Don’t waste your feed resources. Avoid excessive mud in the feeding area. Hay feeding areas can be constructed by putting rock on geotextile fabric. Feed those large round bales in hay “rings” to avoid waste. Concrete feeding pads could be in your long range plans. This is a good time to freeze-brand bred yearling heifers and additions to the breeding herd. Take soil tests and make fertility adjustments (phosphate, potash and lime) to your pastures. Have your hay supply analyzed for nutritive quality and estimate the amount of supplementation needed. Consider purchasing feed now. Graze alfalfa this month after a “freezedown” (24 degrees for a few hours).

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B F E C Facet 167F

ACHH DIAMOND 82D ET x MAGS ZEMINDAR CED BW WW YW MK CEM 9 1.9 62 94 24 5

2/16/2018, 75% Lim-Flex, Black, Double Polled Sold for $28,000 in A C H Holdings’ The Foundation Sale IV

ACHH DIAMOND 82D ET POSTHAVEN POLLED YELLOWSTONE x CCPV POLLED UTOPIA CED BW WW YW MK CEM SC DOC 5 4.4 66 96 18 3 -.24 2 3/1/2016, Sire to 167F, Homo Polled, Red Full Blood Limousin, Semen Available

Semen Available for these herd sires: EXAR Ben Hur 6579B*

AUTO Direct Deposit 105D ET

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Top 2% WW, Top 4% YW, Top 15% CED, Top 15% DOC, Top 10% CWT, Top 25% REA, Top 4% $B *sire pictured

ACHH Polled CruzeWonder 163B ET

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Contact Byron Evans for your Limousin & Angus Cattle needs and for your next HARD-WORKING FARM TRUCK.

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Byron Evans, Fleet Director Government & Commercial Sales Director Cell: 859.509.8046

B.F. Evans Cattle Co.

B.F. Evans Cattle Co. Byron Evans, Owner Byron Evans, Owner 614 Central Avenue Lexington, Kentucky PO Box 150940502 Cell: 859.509.8046 • Versailles, KY 40383 byron.evans59@yahoo.com Cell: 859.509.8046 bfevanscattlecompany@gmail.com

DON FRANKLIN FORD LINCOLN

Make a deal with Byron and mention this ad for another $250 off your next purchase! *offer only good through Byron Evans

COW COUNTRY •

NOVEMBER 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Don Franklin Ford Lincoln LLC 388 W Hwy 192 London, KY 40741 Byron Evans, Fleet Director Don Franklin Auto Group

23 Locations across Central Kentucky Sales Director • Cell: 859.509.8046

95


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Cow Country News - November 2018  
Cow Country News - November 2018  
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