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PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT:

SEVEN SPRINGS FARM PAGE 60


s to me Kentucky lk ta e n o e m o s n e h W “ CATTLEMEN: ... s s ra g e ry w e n a t u o b a “Due to dry

I don’t even listen!”

“I have used Marshall ryegrass for more than 28 years. This year it proved its worth to me again. We had a dry late summer and fall, then the rain came and Marshall came on strong, which saved my operation. I know what it can do under stress and without Marshall I would be in a “world of hurt”. I know what Marshall can do under the most extreme conditions.”

G U A R A N TE ED e

Genuin

Rodney Hilley TM

Powder Creek Cattle

weather last year we had no grass to cut for hay. We planted Marshall in September and the cattle were grazing in 6-8 weeks. We rotated 60 pairs on five acres paddocks. Marshall came on so strong that we didn't have to feed hay. Later we cut and rolled seven rolls per acre. Marshall really saved us this year and works for my cattle.” Donald Russelburg Morganfield, Kentucky

“We have been using Marshall ryegrass for ten years. We have tried other ryegrasses like Prime Cut, but they just didn't compare to Marshall. Marshall is by far the best ryegrass we have tried. This year we ran 86 pairs on 56 acres for six weeks, then we cut and baled five rolls per acre with rolls weighing 1800 lbs. each. We also noticed that our beans and corn planted after Marshall have increased their yields. Marshall is our ryegrass.” Bill & Jerry Thomas Morganfield, Kentucky

Marshall... America’s #1 Ryegrass!

*

®

Turner Seed Inc. of Kentucky Winchester, Kentucky 877 350 7331 The Wax Company 888 CALL WAX *For grazing. According to university grazing studies - AL AR LA MS ©2017 The Wax Company, LLC

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Seeds for Southern Soils

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


America’s #1 Name in Farm, Ranch and Rodeo Equipment for Fifty Years

Best Deals of the Year!

Equipment & Livestock Demos!

Thursday September 6th 9:00 am CPC Production Facility

Food Music Prizes

Title Sponsors

270.618.6455 • cpcfeeds.com COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Stock Up Event!

HUGE Discounts!

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Weaning is Stressful

TABLE OF CONTENTS PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT: SEVEN SPRINGS FARM PG. 60

Medicated and Non-Medicated Raaons Available To Help Increase Appeete and Improve Immune Response

COLUMNISTS 7 Bobby Foree: President’s Thoughts 8 Ryan Quarles: Take Advantage of Forage Testing 10 Dave Maples: Keep Current on the Issues in the Beef Industry 12 Baxter Black: A Close Call 24 Chris Teutsch: Winter Grazing Options 38 Dr. Michelle Arnold: Is That Weed Poisonous? What You Don’t Want Your

Cattle to Eat 91 Dr. Roy Burris: KY CPH-45 - It’s Still the One!

In Glasgow: 1-800-786-2875 In Danville: 1-800-859-2174

FEATURE STORIES 14

More Than $7 Million Invested in Kentucky Agricultural Development Funds

20

Cattlemen’s Education Series

22

Management Perspectives: No Hype: EPDs Work

26

NCBA Responds to Canadian Tariff Hikes on US Beef Products

28

Kentucky Soybean Acreage Reaches New High

32

Kentucky Winter Wheat Yield Down 15 Bushels from June

34

Cattlemen Press for USDA Oversight at Public Meeting on Lab-Grown Fake Meat

36

Kentucky Dairies Find Market

44

Stockpiling for Fall and Winter Pasture

47

NCBA Applauds U.S. House Motion to Begin Farm Bill Conference Committee

48

A Lifetime of Service, A Legacy Unmatched

52

Grazing Green Corn

54

Nebraska Youth Beef Leadership Symposium Now Taking Applications

60

Producer Spotlight: Seven Spring Farm

64

Why Roots Matter to Soil, Plants, and You

66

May Beef Exports Shatter Value Record; Pork Exports Trend Lower

68

KFB Marketbasket Survey Shows Increase in Food Ptices for Second Straight

Quarter 72

25 Reasons You Don’t Want to Miss the State Fair This August 16-18

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County News

30-31

Economic & Policy Update

71

KJCA

75-77

Membership

78-79

Kentucky Beef Council

80-81

Kentucky Beef Network

83

News Releases

89

Kentucky Angus Association News

91

Market Report

92

Calendar of Events

Advertisers Index

93

Classifieds

Bowling Green - Columbia - Edmonton - Hardinsburg - Lebanon London - Rineyville - Shelbyville - Winchester

Central Kentucky “Top of the Crop” Replacement Heifer Sale

th Monday, , 2012 2018 MondayOctober October 15 15,

BlueGrass GrassStockyards StockyardsofofRichmond, Richmond,L.L.C. LLC Blue Richmond, KY • 6:00 p.m. Richmond, Ky • 6:30 p.m.

Approximately Approximately 175125 BredHead HeifersSelling Selling 

Ÿ Heifers are guaranteed BVD-PI negative and many are calfhood vaccinated Ÿ Bred heifers guaranteed safe in calf for 30 days after sale and are cost share approved (CAIP) Ÿ Inspected by local screening committee and KDA representative  Ÿ Heifers were born and raised on consignors farm or they are source verified Ÿ Heifers are bred to calving ease bulls with their EPD’s listed in sale catalog Ÿ Pelvic area measured and developed under strict guidelines for health,  conformation and disposition  Ÿ Heifers will sell in lots ranging from 1 to 4 head per lot. Most will be 2 to 4 head per lot

Sale Sponsored by:

Madison Co. Beef Cattle Association, Ky. Department of  Agriculture, Madison County Cooperative Extension Service &  Blue Grass Stockyards of Richmond LLC

For more information, contact: For more information, contact:

Madison County Cooperative Extension Service (859) 623-4072  Darrell Tate (859) 893-8283 • Jim Dause (859) 314-7211  Email: brandon.sears@uky.edu  Website: http://ces.ca.uky.edu/madison/AgNaturalResources  Video of heifers available at www.bgstockyards.com

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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OAK HOLLOW

COMMERCIAL AND REGISTERED BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE ID 1713 1722 1723 1731 1781 1673

AAA # CED 18715408 15 18833994 8 18834003 13 18833868 18 18833911 11 18410945 15

BW -0.4 -0.5 0.0 -3.2 -0.6 -0.3

WW 65 54 65 42 46 46

MILK 25 22 28 22 30 27

YW 115 87 107 80 86 82

$W $67.92 $61.58 $76.02 $50.79 $59.81 $54.96

Over 100 Oak Hollow commercial and registered heifers were bred to the listed Oak Hollow calving ease bulls. We will be pregnancy checking the beginning of August and heifers will be available following. Contact us to reserve your group of heifers today.

By spending nearly four decades focusing on commercial cow-calf profitability through maternal selection we are able to now increase revenue by pushing growth and carcass without increasing cost of production. There is constant focus on complimentary sire lines that give an opportunity for commercial cattlemen to increase post weaning merit while maintaining maternal efficiency. Increased growth and carcass quality is coupled with maternal selction for both environmentally adapted females and high performance on a 365day calving interval. Kenneth D. Lowe (270) 202-7186 Joe K. Lowe II (270) 202-4399

www.OakHollowAngus.com - Smiths Grove, Kentucky COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION 2018 LEADERSHIP KCA REGIONAL DIRECTORS: REGION 1

Daniel Hayden, Vice President*(270) 570-2815 Bobby Bell................................(270) 547-8547 Gary Woodall...........................(270) 725-0819 Ricky Haynes..................................................... Keith Johnson..........................(270) 635-0723 Wayne Johnson.......................(270) 726-7896 John Walpole..........................(270) 542-4240 Martin Hayden........................(270) 281-4076 JJ Tucker.................................(270) 257-8548 Dennis Wilson.........................(270) 952-1714 Caleb Jenkin...........................(270) 952-0767

REGION 2

KCA 2018 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OFFICERS: PRESIDENT

TREASURER

Bobby Foree 2440 Eminence Road Eminence, KY 40019 (502) 845-4947

Ken Adams 90 E Horseshoe Ave. Upton, KY 42784 (270) 734-1443

PRESIDENT ELECT

PAST PRESIDENT

Tim White 3660 Military Pike Lexington KY 40513 (859) 223-0326

Chuck Crutcher 4364 Berrytown Rd. Rineyville, KY 40162 (270) 877-0239

VICE PRESIDENT Steve Dunning 8200 Antioch Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 498-8180

KCA PROGRAM CHAIRMAN Chris Cooper 2140 Tates Creek Rd. Richmond, KY 40475

(859) 200-7711 KBC CHAIRMAN Andy Bishop 6135 High Grove Road Cox’s Creek, KY 40013 (502) 275-6177

KBN CHAIRMAN

Joe Lowe, Vice President*.......(270) 202-4399 Craig Thompson......................(270) 590-5174 Mark Thomas...........................(270) 723-6175 Joe Stults..................................(270) 735-3229 Joe Mike Moore........................(270) 670-7493 Frank Rowland........................(270) 646-0882 Reva Richardson.....................(270) 735-2959 Steve Webb..............................(270) 646-8277 Dr. Kenneth Green..................(270) 879-0229 Richie Thompson....................(270) 617-2710 Kirk Cecil.................................(270) 692-7698 Hunter Galloway....................(270) 745-5972 Donald Reynolds.....................(270) 528-5239 Gerry Bowman........................(270) 427-6922 Adam Estes..............................(270) 528-3904

REGION 3

Jon Bednarski, Vice President*...(502) 649-8706 Danny Cooper.........................(606) 782-1361 Nathan Lawson.......................(502) 836-3879 Dallas McCutchen...................(502) 255-7020

Cary King 250 Bright Leaf Drive Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 734-2173

Jere Caldwell† - Boyle Smith T. Powell† - Lincoln Larry Lovell - Union John Masters† - Mason Seldon Hail† - Laurel Bob Vickery† - Wayne Glenn Mackie - Bourbon Dale Lovell - Muhlenberg Steve Henshaw† - Union Jerry Fraim - Grayson Glen Massengale† - Wayne Dell King - Christian Kenneth Lowe - Warren Dr. J.L.Cole - Monroe Harvey Mitchell - Mercer Jim Naive† - Spencer Shelby Hughes - Logan Hoppy Lovell - Barren

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Charles Miller - Jessamine Larry Clay - Perry Jack Kimbrough† - Shelby Mark Williams - Crittenden Paul Napier - Lincoln Eddie Young - Washington Greg Ritter† - Barren Don Pemberton - Christian Billy Glenn Turpin - Madison Scotty Parsons - Christian Corinne Kephart - Shelby Greg Robey - Mercer Mike Bach - Bath Don Reynolds - Hart Steve Downs - Marion Gary Woodall - Logan David Lemaster - Clark Chuck Crutcher - Hardin †(Deceased)

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REGION 4

Jeremy Jones*.........................(859) 749-2233 Mickey Staton..........................(606) 674-2195 David Lemaster.......................(859) 749-0258 Ron Ray...................................(859) 825-8516 Bo Tate....................................(859) 661-2325 Larry Swetnam........................(859) 293-5600 Jason Sandefur.......................(859) 987-0336 Danielle Harmon....................(606) 748-8059 Ronnie Lowe...........................(606) 782-5058 Clay Wills.................................(859) 749-8248 Jason Crowe............................(606) 723-6062

REGION 5

Gary Ford, Vice President*......(270) 402-2194 Steve Devine............................(859) 583-7824 Steve Downs...........................(270) 865-2611 Brent Woodrum......................(859) 583-3193 Ian Thomas..............................(859) 613-2453 Anne Bays................................(615) 478-8450 Larry Parman..........................(606) 878-7516 Greg Robey...............................(859) 734-0067 Eddie Young.............................(859) 262-5682 Adam Chunglo.........................(859) 613-2985 Brenda Williams......................(606) 669-2909 Tommy Glasscock....................(270) 692-4336 * Denotes member of Executive committee

VOLUME 31 • ISSUE 8 176 PASADENA DRIVE • LEXINGTON, KY 40503 PHONE: (859) 278-0899 • FAX: (859) 260-2060 WWW.KYCATTLE.ORG • INFO@KYCATTLE.ORG

KCA’S PAST PRESIDENTS: 1972-73 1974-77 1978-79 1980-82 1983-85 1986-87 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

John Ellegood.........................(502) 532-7573 Kevin Perkins..........................(502) 269-7189 Larry Bryant............................(502) 845-4615 Wanda Hawkins......................(502) 321-5602 Jerry Oak.................................(502) 255-7502 Phillip Douglas.........................(502) 845-4620 Lincoln Clifford........................(859) 954-0102

Executive Vice President Dave Maples

KBC Director of Product Development Katelyn Hawkins

Communication & Special Project Coordinator Emilee Wendorf

Membership Coordinator Nikki Whitaker

Staff Accountant Kelly Tucker

Communications Manager Jacob Redway

Director of Kentucky Beef Network Becky Thompson

Publication Coordinator Carey Brown

KBN Industry Coordinator Dan Miller

Graphic Designer Todd Brown

KBC Director of Consumer Affairs Kiah Twisselman KBC Director of Education Niki Ellis

National Advertising Sales, Livestock Advertising Network, Debby Nichols, (859) 321-8770 Bernie Scheer, (859) 421-5783

COW COUNTRY NEWS is published monthly by THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any material which he feels is unsuitable for the publication. Although the highest journalistic ethics will be maintained, the KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION limits its responsibilities for any errors, inaccuracies, or misprints in advertising or editorial copy. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements made against the publisher.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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PRESIDENT’S THOUGHTS BOBBY FOREE Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association President KCA continues to be a priority in my weekly activities. Since my last article, I have attended a couple of county meetings, spoken to a group at the YARDS, authored an article for Farmer’s Pride, and worked to obtain a second GFSI-certified facility in the state. Late in June, I traveled to Bath County to speak at their annual summer picnic. A great big thank you goes to County President Mickey Staton and Randy and Tammy Warner, who work tirelessly for the Bath County association and who coordinated a wonderful meal and meeting! The ladies of Bath County are to be commended on one of the most bountiful potluck meals I’ve ever eaten! The meeting sponsor was Blue Grass Stockyards, with Larry and Eric Barber in attendance to represent the company. Following the meeting, Mike and Mary Bach gave my wife, Jean Kaye, and me a tour of their large farming operation. Included in the tour were corn and soybean test plots, hundreds of acres of corn, soybeans, and wheat (the last of which was to be harvested the following day for planting to doublecrop soybeans), a couple hundred black cows with part Gelbvieh calves at side, and several large hoop barns filled with 2018-cut rolls. Mike, Mary, and their son Steven, continue to operate with no outside labor – which is quite impressive when one sees the scope of their operation! I also gave a KCA update at a Henry County Cattlemen’s meeting where Blue Grass Stockyards also sponsored the meal. Jeremy Shyrock and Jim Akers represented Blue Grass Stockyards, with Jim giving the 100 in attendance an outstanding overview of the current markets and Blue Grass’ role in them. This past week, I spoke to a group of Purchase-area cattle producers who toured our YARDS classroom and other bluegrass region sites. The group also heard from Niki Ellis and Katelyn

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Hawkins about Lexington’s Burger Week and other aspects of our association. All were impressed with the YARDS’ mission; and everyone was eager to have a more active cattlemen’s association in their area. The group admitted, however, that it is difficult to muster enthusiasm for cattle-related endeavors in the Purchase area since cattle often come second to grain in far western Kentucky. Several from Marshall, Ballard and Hickman counties commented they are extremely thankful for the Riley-owned markets in their area; otherwise, there would be little opportunity to obtain a fair price for their livestock.

a great demand for heifers developed in such a manner; which seems to be an underused marketing option in our area. For my monthly legal discussion, I am often asked to what extent farmers can be held liable when they allow hunting, fishing, swimming, and other recreational activities on their property. Our Kentucky legislature passed a statute years ago to encourage owners of land to make land and water areas available to the public for recreational purposes by limiting their liability. KRS 411.190(3) states “…an owner of land owes no duty of care to keep the premises safe for entry or use by others for recreational purposes, or to give any warning of a dangerous condition, use, structure, or activity on the premises to persons entering for such purposes.” But the foregoing protections only apply in the absence of a land owner’s willful or malicious failure to warn against a dangerous condition

or in the absence of a landowner charging individuals for use of his/her land. Further, the statute expands the definition of “owner” to include a tenant or any person in control of the premises. Thus, one must weigh risks of liability versus a fee when deciding whether to charge for hunting rights, etc. To end, I’m thinking of a herd bull that had pushed through a barn door – only to be standing in our yard when I awoke this morning. By coincidence, there just happened to be multiple taxus clippings in our yard from where my daughter had trimmed our shrubbery the day before. Luckily, the bull did not consume any clippings; but this is a reminder to protect livestock from such clippings – since taxus is deadly poisonous to cattle. As my neighbor once said, “The dead ones never gain very well!”

Moving to other KCA projects, our Beef Solutions’ ground beef project surpassed $200,000 in cow purchases this past month, with demand continuing to grow for the end product. Our KCA projects on UK’s Eden Shale Farm also continue to be a hit with farmers, with over 100 in attendance at the recent open house. I understand more details of both projects are elsewhere in this issue of Cow Country. And speaking of Cow Country, not only has Carey Brown turned the publication into (in my opinion) the leading monthly farm publication, but they also sell advertising for 16 other publications across the Southeast. Last year Carey and her team surpassed $1 million in advertising sales for Livestock Advertising Network! Congratulations go to Carey and her team! Turning to our farm, we have now completed our second cuttings, rolled and wrapped the first cutting of pearl millet, gained control of a pinkeye outbreak, and sold all 2017 fall-born steers. We decided to sell our fall-born steers early -- thinking possible tariff wars would weaken the markets (which hasn’t occurred as of this writing). All herd bulls will soon come out from the springbred herds, and we continue to develop all bred heifers to meet all KDA “Herd Builder” guidelines. We find there to be

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COMMISSIONER’S CORNER

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FORAGE TESTING RYAN QUARLES Commissioner of Agriculture The Forage Testing Program at the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) helps Kentucky beef and forage producers get the highest quality and profitability out of their products. This popular program is still around, and the cost is the same low price that it’s been for many years. To give you the most value for your hard-earned money, and so the department can live within its means, we’ve made some changes to the way the program is run. Tough budgetary times come with some changes. As of July 1, the KDA is no longer collecting samples directly from the farm. To have your forages tested, you must collect samples and ship them to the KDA lab in Frankfort for testing.

You may purchase a hay probe and pull samples on your own, or your county Extension agent may help you with collecting and shipping samples. The fee is unchanged at only $10 per lot (same field, same cutting). That fee covers the cost of the test. You will receive the same comprehensive analysis of the forage’s nutritional value that you have received in the past, along with the “Interpreting Forage Quality Report” guide. If you are a livestock producer, these materials will help you provide your animals the feed they need to stay healthy and maximize growth while keeping your feeding costs under control. If you grow forage – for your own operation or for sale – you can use this

data to track the quality of your product from year to year and adapt your forage management practices as needed. The Forage Sales Directory/Tested Hay webpage is a KDA service where producers may post forages for sale or look for forages to buy. You may search the forage database by any combination of county, relative feed value (RFV), bale size, or type of hay crop. You can find the directory at kyagr.com/marketing/hay/ hay-search.aspx. You also may use the Hay Hotline to buy or sell hay. For more information, including a current list of producers with hay for sale, go to kyagr.com/marketing/ hay-hotline.html. The KDA’s Forage Testing Program is certified by the National Forage Testing Association. For more information about the Forage Testing Program, go to kyagr. com/marketing/forage-program.html. You always want to run your operation as efficiently as possible, but in another year of sluggish commodity prices, it’s more important than ever to get the most bang for your buck. If you are a livestock or forage producer, I hope you will take advantage of this valuable service.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. Alex Tolbert, Regional Manager Kentucky Ohio Tennessee 273 Chinn Lane Harrodsburg, KY 40330 706.338.8733 atolbert@angus.org

A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. Contact Alex Tolbert to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you. To subscribe to the Angus Journal, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST.

3201 Frederick Ave. | St. Joseph, MO 64506 816.383.5100 | www.ANGUS.org © 2017-2018 American Angus Association

RM_Tolbert_1-8_BW_Kentuckycow_2017.indd 1

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

8/29/17 1:38 PM

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CENTRAL KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION

16 th Annual Ladies Day Sale

Saturday • September

8, 2018 • 1 PM (EDT)

Central Kentucky Angus Sales Pavilion Ÿ Danville, KY

4 miles NE of Danville just off of Hwy 34 on Chenault Bridge Road and then Fork Church Road GPS Address: 2286 Fork Church Road, Lancaster, KY 40444

Selling 100 Head - 78 Lots

Featuring a large selection of outstanding pedigrees, numbers and performance! 21 Cow/Calf Pairs: Including many 3-n-1 packages 30 Bred Cows: 18 due this fall, 12 in spring of 2019 18 Bred Heifers and 9 Open Heifers: Foundation female quality in this group

Consignments Include the following:

Complete dispersion of the Tom Colson Estate herd 6 bred heifers from Smithland Angus • 5 cows and 2 bred heifers from Hidden Springs Farm • 8 lots from McMahan Farms • 2 feature lots from CDL Farms in Hoopestown, IL • Consignments from B & K, Blugrass, Cliffside, Green Oaks Farm, Heritage, Horn, John McDonald, Myers Angus, Toll Angus and Windward Oaks

SALE SPONSOR: Central Kentucky Angus Association President: Henry Bryan Smith, Russell Springs, KY Vice President: Adam Chunglo, Harrodsburg, KY Treasurer: John Goggin, Danville, KY Secretary: Joe Goggin, Danville, KY Jr Advisor: Ann & Diana Covell, Harrodsburg, KY Past President: Bob Clark, Harrodsburg, KY

September 8, 2018: Ladies Day 2018 November 10, 2018: 56th Annual Fall Heifer Sale January 26, 2019: 55th Annual Winter Sale April 20, 2019: 54th Annual Spring Sale June 2019: 29th Annual Junior Show and Picnic

39th Annual Fall Cow Sale and 217th overall sale sponsored by Central Kentucky Angus Association Reg. No. 18959903

SAF Forever Lady D268

WW 74, YW 138, Sired by Fortress. Due by sale day to 3 F Epic.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Auctioneer: Eddie Burks

SALE DAY PHONES: 859/238-3195 or 859/583-0364

Central Kentucky Angus Association 2018-19 Calendar:

BF Lucy 617

She sells due to calve in September to 3 F Epic Direct maternal descendent of Basin Lucy 178E

MTM Frontier 1539

A Power Cow! Progeny ratios: BW 4 @ 99, WW 4 @ 109, YW 2 @ 108

SALE MANAGER:

Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Road Danville, KY 40422 Office: 859-236-4591 Mobile: 859-238-3195 E-mail: tdievertdievertsales.com Logan Goggin: 859-516-3199 Details and online catalogs available at www.dievertsales.com after 8-15-18

Reg. No. 18959915

Reg. No. 18959902

SAF Penelope D267

SAF Everelda Entense D266

WW 70, YW 113 CED 13. By FORTRESS. Due in September to 3 F Epic.

WW 72, YW 114. By TRACTION. Due in September to FORTRESS.

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WOF Grade 10X Phylis

Top 1% EPDs for YW, YH, SC, MW, MH, & $F

Reg. No. 18959914

SAF Blackcap D263 Marb +1.09 TEN X daughter due in September to TAHOE.

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FROM DAVE’S DESK

KEEP CURRENT ON THE ISSUES IN THE BEEF INDUSTRY DAVE MAPLES Executive Vice President The month of July has always been an interesting time for the office. There is a lot of farm work going on so there are not that many calls. The schools are out for summer break and vacation time is at its peak. But there are big events that happen during this time of the year regardless. I have a son that is a junior at West Florida University and a daughter that will be a senior in high school as well as a wife that grew up on the Alabama Gulf Coast. With that it was explained to me that I would be spending time on the beach this summer. This year the down time was great because I got to spend quality time with my family but I also got to spend time reading and catching up on my record keeping with my small herd of cattle. And on the way back to Kentucky I had the opportunity to stop and visit with my mom and dad and actually got to drive the tractor for a day. My brother and nephew applied the pressure by just watching me load round bales two high with a new modern tractor. The technologies in today’s tractors are different from what I grew up with. My journey started the day after the June KCA board meeting. Historically, the June board meeting is a planning meeting. This year the staff did a couple of different exercises to try to dig out the thoughts of the industry participants and board. This year the questions were expanded to the Kentucky beef industry. I was pleased to see as many responses as we got. I am pleased that your organization takes the time to ask the questions about what is important and the areas that you want the Association to work on or in. We are still evaluating the answers but there are themes that are easy to see. Input cost, markets, trade and education are a few of those that will need to be evaluated deeper. Also, during this time period the senate voted on their version of the farm bill and FDA convened a public meeting

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to discuss lab grown meats. As for the farm bill the language that I was most concerned about dealt with checkoff programs. The concerning point is that it is not the unhappy producers that are after the checkoff this time, it is the animal rights groups, like HSUS. They have developed a understanding of how the checkoffs work and they see the checkoff as the root of their problem because as the old saying goes, “follow the money.” The funds to battle meatless Monday’s and other programs to slow down their desire to end animal agriculture are most readily available in the checkoff programs. The sad part is that cattlemen and equine producers that have had an issue in the past are helping educate the very organizations that are trying to end animal agriculture. I am sure that the battle over the checkoffs is not over. The other was the public meeting to discuss lab grown meats. You can only imagine the reaction and confusion that came to the table. The views were anything but uniform. The conversation started and will never end on what to call the product. The names like “cultured tissue,’ “clean meat” but then is beef “dirty meat” what about “fake meat” or “artificial meat,” supporters of the product talk about safe, pure, clean. The war to define lab based proteins won’t end with just one meeting. Also which government entity will regulate the emerging industry? All I know is that I was in Kroger last night and they had two plant based products side-by-side with the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground beef products. A couple of months ago there was none, then one product popped up a couple of weeks ago, and now there are two.

Dean Foods has been in Kentucky news a lot over the past couple of months in regards to dropping Kentucky dairy farmer’s contracts. But I see where they just increased their ownership and have taken a majority stake in Good Karma Foods, the leading brand of flaxseedbased milk and yogurt alternatives. The Kroger Co., Hy-Vee Inc. and Albertson Cos. Inc are the latest to accuse Tyson and other chicken producers of an alleged conspiracy to fix broiler chicken prices. The grocery chains sued Tyson Foods Inc., Koch Foods Inc., Perdue Foods LLC and 15 other companies, claiming they used their power over the $30 billion chicken industry to operate a nearly decade-long anti-competitive scheme. Sometime the “grass may be greener on the other side of the fence” but other industries are dealing with as many issues as the beef industry. My last comments are from John Nalivka’s market outlook for the last half of the year.

His comments were, “if every year in the cattle business could be as easy as 2014 and 2015 cow–calf operating margins hovered around $500 per head while cash feeding margins were around $200 per head”. He is projecting cow-calf margins, feeding and packer margins for 2018 at $125, $50 and $138 per head respectively.” He goes on to talk about how the last ten years in the beef industry supply chain have provided valuable lessons that can apply to risk management strategies going forward. The strategies apply to the learning that we are getting from our Kentucky beef industry surveys as well as the education that we are getting with the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground beef supply chain project. “And that is producing the “right cattle for the right market.” The “right” market is a branded market that requires a dependable flow of cattle with the right specifications for the customer with quality at the top of the list. How better to manage risk than a simultaneous buy-sell transaction with a premium attached? Are you one of those suppliers?”

Woodford Feed Company

A couple of other interesting points that I have observed this month were that four big tobacco barns were taken down in my community on three different farms within a couple of miles of each other.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Fall Booking Specials

Purina Mineral and Purina® Accuration Hi-Fat Tubs

Free Hay Testing and Analysis Woodford Feed Company • Versailles, KY Greg Dotson at 859-873-4811

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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COMMENTARY

A CLOSE CALL BAXTER BLACK, DVM On the Edge of Common Sense

Talk about takin’ a beating. I stood on the porch at Dale’s horse farm and soaked up the view. It was deep springtime in west Tennessee. The grass was so green it hurt your eyes. The dogwoods were in bloom and two sleek and shiny horses grazed in the picture. It looked like a cover off the Quarter Horse Journal. “Nice fence,” I said, commenting on the pole fence circling his pasture. “Thanks,” said Dale, “But we had a heckuva scare buildin’ it. See that post...” I noted a stout post at the end of the driveway. The harrowing tale unfolded. Dale had decided to build this fence and finally got around to it in December. He

enlisted the aid of two friends, Chuck and Phil. They all dressed warmly since it was twenty degrees the day they started. At the particular post in question, the boys were havin’ trouble diggin’ the hole. It was close to the paved road and the ground was hard. Dale backed his tractor up to the future hole and poised the posthole auger over the designated spot like an ovipositing wasp. The auger spun on the surface of the frozen ground. Chuck, who’s big as a skinned mule, pulled down on the gearbox. No luck, Chuck. So Phil stepped between the auger and the tractor and leaned his weight on the horizontal arm supporting the auger. Now, Phil had come prepared to work in

the cold. He had on his hat with Elmer Fudd earflaps, mudboots, socks, undies, long johns, jeans, undershirt, wool shirt and Carharts. Carharts, for you tropical cowboys, are insulated coveralls made out of canvas and tough as a nylon tutu. Phil gave Dale the go-ahead. Dale engaged the PTO. The auger clanked and started to turn. Suddenly Phil seemed to explode in front of Dale’s eyes! Dale engaged the clutch immediately and everything stopped. Phil stood before them naked. I said naked. Not quite. He had on his hat and his boots and his belt, still through the beltloops. The jeans had been ripped off his body from the pockets down, leaving only a small piece containing the

fly. It flapped like Geronimo’s loincloth. As explanation, Phil’s pantleg had brushed up against the extended arm of the PTO. In a split second, as fast as Superman could skin a grapefruit, the PTO had torn all the clothes off Phil’s body. In less than three minutes his body turned blue. Nothing was broken but he was as bruised as the top avocado at the supermarket. Chuck commented later that he looked like he’s been run through a hay conditioner. I figger he was the blazing example of that expression, “...he looked like he’d been drug through a knothole.” www.baxterblack.com

Minerich Land and Cattle is offering a tremendous opportunity to progressive cattle breeders.

Wulfs Compliant

L7 Bar 6070D

We have 40 Fall bred heifers and 40 Fall coming yearling heifers for sale immediately. These LimFlex and Limousin influence females can be sorted into any size group the buyer desires, from 5 to 40. The Fall Bred females are bred to calving ease bulls, pregnancy checked and will start calving around Sept. 5th. The Open Females have been handled on grass and will be perfect to turn with bulls this fall. Priced to sell, these cattle are all farm raised and farm fresh. Contact Bob Minerich for details or better yet, stop by and look them over, you won’t be disappointed. Bob and Gwen Minerich, Owners (859) 582-6888, Bob’s Cell 2003 Barnes Mill Rd • Richmond, KY 40475 Office (859) 328-7118 Mark Smith, Cattle Consultant (515) 229-5227

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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PELPHREY CATTLE CO PRODUCTION SALE WARD RATLIFF

8989 Rockwell Rd, Lexington, KY

Friday • September 21, 2018 • 5 p.m.

BW +2.8 WW +69 YW +123 Milk +25 CW +55 MARB +1.04 RE +.82 FAT +0 $W +61.86 $F +94.56 $G +52.41 $B +180.10

BW +2.0 WW +68 YW +111 Milk +31 CW +58 MARB +1.00 RE +.69 FAT -.009 $W +75.65 $F +68.08 $G +50.66 $B +174.14

Selling choice in two heifer pregnancies from the newest addition to the Ward Ratliff Cattle Company program, Blackcap 4021 sired by the popular Playbook and the $B leader and ABS headliner, Black Magic. Blackcap 4021 joined the Ward Ratliff program as the $45,000 top-selling female of the 2017 Banner Elite Genetics Sale and her progeny headlined the 2018 Crazy K Ranch Sale including: the $52,500 selection of Express Ranches, Blackcap 7360; the $50,000 selection of Vintage Angus Ranch, Blackcap 7362; and the $50,000 Blackcap 7363 selected by 44 Farms.

Vintage Blackcap 4021

Angus Hill P158

Offered by Ward Ratliff Cattle Company

Offered by Pelphrey Cattle Company

Selling half interest in P158 the direct daughter of the $4 million producer and legendary Hillhouse Angus and Angus Hill donor, Rita 6108 (above) sired by the most popular sire of the spring sale season, Playbook 5437. P158 sells as the lead-off female of the first Pelphrey Cattle Company and Ward Ratliff Female Sale and offers a sensational opportunity to join Pelphrey Cattle Company in exploring the unlimited potential of one of the great daughters of the matriarch, Rita 6108.

BW +1.2 WW +76 YW +132 Milk +33 CW +53 MARB +.85 RE +.48 FAT -.025 $W +82.06 $F +88.81 $G +46.91 $B +156.10

BW +4.1 WW +81 YW +145 Milk +24 CW +65 MARB +.03 RE +1.08 FAT -.026 $W +68.91 $F +123.36 $G +15.26 $B +157.48

Henrietta Pride 5104 is a powerful bred heifer sired by the RE leader and featured PVF Sire, Insight. She stems from the longtime headliner of the Ward Ratliff program, Henrietta Pride 5162 (Pictured to left). Henrietta Pride 5104 sells due on 10/30/18 to EXAR Monumental 6056B along with maternal sisters by the multi-trait leader, Rampage, the calving-ease specialist, Confidence 0100 and the low-birth sire, Journey.

WRCC Henrietta Pride 5104 Offered by Ward Ratliff Cattle Company

Quaker Hill Blackcap 4EX1 Offered by Pelphrey Cattle Company

Owned with Banner Elite Genetics, Eagleville, TN. Selling full interest in this prolific donor and maternal sister to the multi-trait leader, Rampage sired by the record-selling Denver. Blackcap 4EX1 sells due on 1/13/19 to Payweight 1682 along with a daughter by the calvingease specialist, Bronc and pregnancies by Black Magic and Acclaim. SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374

www.cotton-associates.com

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Peydon Pelphrey 8771 Rockwell Rd. Winchester, KY 40391 859-361-0034 pelphreycc@outlook.com www.PelphreyCattleCompany.com

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David Ward 606-424-5037 Alicia Ward 606-496-7410 Richard Ward 606-872-3180 Dr. James Ratliff II 606-496-6522 wrcc@wardratliffcattlecompany.com www.wardratliffcattlecompany.com

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FEATURE

MORE THAN $7 MILLION INVESTED IN KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS

The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board approved $7,166,371 in 17 agricultural diversification and rural development projects across the Commonwealth at its monthly board meeting. STATE INVESTMENTS Demolition Projects at the Kentucky State Fair and Exposition Center Kentucky State Fair Board was approved for up to $5,000,000 in State funds to demolish Cardinal Stadium and up to $1,000,000 in State funds to demolish the old Department of Transportation building at the Kentucky State Fair and Exposition Center. For more information on these projects, contact Sam Ruth at (502) 367-5120 or sam.ruth@kyvenues. com.

Grain Bin Rescue Equipment Hancock County Farm Bureau was approved for up to $1,800 in Hancock County funds to purchase four sets of grain bin rescue equipment. For more information on this project, contact Evan Tate at (270) 668-3167 or evan.tate@ uky.edu. 14

WE HAVE YOUR BASES

COVERED.

Sutherland

CED

9

YG

-0.32

BW

2.1

CW

-9

Small Animal Livestock Pens

WW

46

REA

0.11

Mercer County 4-H Council, Inc. was approved for up to $1,500 in Mercer County funds to purchase gates to build pens for small livestock. For more information on this project, contact Dana Anderson at (859) 734-4378 or dana.anderson@uky.edu..

YW

67

MB

0.04

MK

24

FT

-0.09

TM

47

$CEZ 31.39

CEM

3

$BMI 119.61

ST

14

Small Animal Livestock Pens Hancock County Fair Board, Inc. was approved for up to $600 in Hancock County funds to purchase small animal holding pens. For more information on this project, contact Franklin Powers at (270) 792-9143 or evan.tate@uky.edu.

On-Farm Investments The County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP) offers 11 investment areas that give Kentucky agricultural producers the ability to increase net farm COUNTY INVESTMENTS income, add value to their products and diversify their operation. CAIP benefits Cattle Scales and enhances agriculture across the state The Berry Center, Inc. was approved for by stimulating markets for Kentucky up to $5,000 in Henry County funds to agricultural products. Seven CAIPs purchase mobile cattle scales for use by were approved by the board totaling its Home Place Meat cattle producers. $1,020,867 for Allen ($109,505), Boyle For more information on this project, ($113,000), Edmonson ($70,000), contact Katie Ellis at (859) 583-6786 or Elliott ($129,128), Gallatin ($150,000), katieellis@berrycenter.org. Nicholas ($239,234) and Shelby ($210,000) counties. Agricultural Education Jessamine County FFA Alumni Association, Inc. was approved for up to $5,000 in Jessamine County funds to expand an existing educational walking trail.  For more information on this project, contact Carl Waits at (859) 9485527.

From commercial bulls, bred heifers, semen and Junior projects...

In addition to these new approvals, an additional $124,104 was approved to enhance an existing CAIP in Greenup ($52,738) and Magoffin ($71,366) counties. Environmental Stewardship

Seme availa n ble!

Revlon 343E

*xAR4259873 Sire: Sutherland Merle 208 A Dam: Sutherland Cherrly 187A Thank you Mike DiGiuro for purchasing half interest in Sutherland Revlon 343E. Semen will be available in Louisville at the 2018 North American International Livestock Exposition.

Sutherland

Son Daugs and hters of this availa bull ble!

$F

50.67

Sutherland

Cherry 187A Cherry 187A was Champion Cow/Calf Pair at NAILE 15-16, ShorthornPlus Champion Cow/Calf Pair NAILE 2017.

Lynnwood 257E

Customer’s Shorthorn Plus half blood. Result of a White Shorthorn bull on Angus cows.

As KY Proud Members, our show hefiers are eligible for extra premium money. Pictured left: Josie Fitzgerald, Henry Co., showing Sutherland Prima Bell, a Sept. Shorthorn Plus heifer calf, born and bred at Sutherland Shorthorns.

The Deceased Farm Animal Removal Program serves as a measure to facilitate the coordination of environmentally sound and cost effective disposal of deceased livestock for Kentucky producers. One Deceased Farm Animal Removal Program totaling $7,500 was approved for Boyle County.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Ragsdale - Sutherland Shorthorns

David Ragsdale 3100 Locke Lane • Prospect, KY 40059 502.396.6533 • jdavybeef@gmail.com www.sutherlandshorthorns.com Find us on Facebook at J Davy Farm Products and John David Ragsdale • A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


In a world full of nails, bring the hammer.

When long lists of chores stretch out in front of you, hit them head on with some big muscle. That’s where the 6M comes in. It’s the mid-spec utility tractor built to stand toe to toe with big jobs on hardworking beef and dairy operations. No complaints, no quitting, no slowing down. Get up to 10,696 (4850 kg) pounds of hitch lift capacity, a maximum of 30 gpm (113 lpm) of pressure and flow compensated hydraulic power that  cycles heavy loads fast, and a heavy-duty, full-frame chassis designed to lift, load, and carry the toughest stuff out there.

More power. More getting work done. The 6M.

The rugged 6M. Available in 110 to 195 engine horsepower. With three transmission choices – including the CommandQuad™ – and the option of cab, open station, 2WD and MFWD. Talk to your dealer about getting more done with America’s Tractor.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018 70582-14_9.5x9.5.indd 1

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JohnDeere.com/6M

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6/22/18 4:23 AM


COUNTY NEWS FLEMING COUNTY

BARREN COUNTY

Fleming County Cattlemen cooking team serving 1,200 ribeye sandwiches in 3 hours for the People’s Bank customer appreciation day.

The Barren County Cattlemen’s Association awarded the Elden C. Berry Memorial Scholarship to Cailee Carter from Caverna High School. Presenting the award is Gerry Bowman President of the local Association.

Fleming County Cattlemen cooking team serving 175 directors and employees at Fleming Mason Rural Electric Cooperation Co-op.

Miss Mattie Williams, a graduate of Barren County High School, was awarded the Dr JJ Crouch Memorial Scholarship. Presenting her award is Gerry Bowman, President of Barren County Cattlemen’s 16

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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COUNTY NEWS MARION COUNTY

JACKSON COUNTY

Nicholas Sandusky was the recipient of the 2018 Gene Lanham Memorial Scholarship. Montrude Lanham, wife of the late Gene Lanham, presents Nicholas with his $1000.00 check. Sandusky will be going to the University of Kentucky.

Submitted by Ginger McQueen The Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association hosts a field day in which Jason Hamilton, Vermeer Territory Sales Rep from Morristown, TN, and Mark Branderhorst, Vermeer Product Specialist from Pella, IA, discuss the usage and mechanisms of various pieces of farm equipment. A special thanks to Southeastern Farm Supply for sponsoring the wonderful ribeyes. Also, to Tim Anderson, for his preparations of the venue.

At the July Marion County Cattlemen meeting, Steve Downs, president of MCCA, presents Lisa Nally-Martin a $750.00 check for The Autism Foundation. The cattlemen grilled ribeye, burgers and hotdogs as a fundraiser for the Autism Spectrum. COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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COUNTY NEWS TWIN LAKES

METCALFE COUNTY Submitted by Moe Hensley

Submitted by Steve Peddicord

The Metcalfe County Cattlemen met on June 11 at the Metcalfe County Extension Office. Ribeyes were on the menu prepared by The Cooking Crew. The meal was sponsored by Farm Credit-Mid America. Give Farm Credit a call for all your home and farm loan questions.

The Twin Lakes Assn. proudly announces the recipients of this year’s $500 scholarship awards to Jaxon Hadley and Carly Upchurch both from Clinton County High school. Hadley plans to pursue a degree in Agriculture from Eastern Ky. University and Upchurch plans will take her to Western Kentucky University. Both have been active in their respective family cattle operations over the years as well as regularly attending local Twin Lakes quarterly meetings. Our association wishes the best of luck to two well deserving recipients.

Brandon Bell talked about the Beef Bash in September and took signups for for those interested in attending this very fun and informative field day. Metcalfe and Barren counties will be chartering a bus for the trip.

Pictured (left to right). Ben Prewitt Clinton County Vo-Ag and FFA teacher, Jaxon Hadley recipient, Carly Upchurch recipient, and Steve Peddicord, President Twin Lakes Association.

The 2018 scholarship worth $500 was awarded to Brilee Tucker. The scholarship is co-sponsored by the Metcalfe County Cattlemen and The Cooking Crew. Brilee will be attending WKU in the fall and will be studying animal science. Christi Wilson and Mousy Loyd present Brilee with her check.

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Central Kentucky Premier Heifer Sale

November 3rd, 2018 • 1:00 PM EST Marion County Fairgrounds • Lebanon, KY

• Approximately 150 heifers will sell from producers in Marion, Nelson and Washington Counties. • Bred to calve in the spring starting Febuary - March 2019. • Guaranteed bred to bulls with known EPDs and have met stringent requirements for health, quality and pelvic measurements. • Guaranteed pregnant 30 days past sale. • Some heifers are synchronized and artificially bred. • All consignors are certified Master Cattlemen. • Free delivery of 10 head or more up to 100 miles.

For More Information Visit www.heifersales.com or Contact: Steve Downs Lebanon 270-402-3672

Todd Harned Boston 502-249-2354

David Sandusky Lebanon 270-692-7793

Terry Geoghegan Bardstown 502-827-0771

4th Annual Production Sale NEW DATE

10-6-18 Dennis Craig & Randy Sparks, Owners Sammy Ayres, Manager • 859-983-9488 2661 Clintonville Road Winchester, KY 40391 www.solidrockangus.com COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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THE SLEEPING GIANT

HAS AWAKENED. There was a time when Kentucky 31 fescue was the basis of every beef pasture and hay field. The beef industry had to live with: • 50% conception rates • Fescue foot • Low ADG of 0.8 lbs./day • An industry loss estimated at $1B annually

But we understand now that our success depends on quality forages. Beef farmers are renovating KY31 fields and planting improved grasses, quality alfalfas and clovers.

THE CHANGE IS REMARKABLE.

• Conception rates over 80% • ADG rates of 1.5—2.2 lbs./day • Lower vet bills • More money in pocket

Byron Seeds LLC has been helping farmers select

the right forages for almost 25 years. Why not call and speak to one of our Forage Specialists about how we can help you make the change to quality forage?

855-897-9010

The NCBA Producer Education team is pleased to announce the Cattlemen’s Education Series (CES) grant program for state and breed affiliates. The CES is a partnership between the National Corn Growers Association and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The mission of the CES is to provide cutting-edge information to beef producers that contributes to increased knowledge, profitability and sustainability. The Kentucky Beef Council applied for a grant and is happy to be able to present the Lunch and Learn series at The YARDS. The series is open to all producers and will be on the 3rd Tuesday of each month, from September through December. Topics will include farm business planning, cash flow management, barn design, improving existing facilities, farm design/layout, value added marketing, market reports/futures. Watch The YARDS facebook page and Cow Country News for all upcoming sessions. Also part of the grant will be the Value Added Symposium on September 7-8. This two day meeting will look at the latest in value-added marketing programs. Some of those programs include Certified Hereford, Top Dollar Angus, Angus Link, GeneSeek, CPH45, NHTC and will also include a trade show. Purebred breeders will be the focus of the first day and cow-calf producers and backgrounder programs will be covered the second day. For more information contact Niki Ellis at nellis@kycattle.org or call 859-382-4303. More information can be found in this issue on page 85.

20

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Triangle® has always been our choice vaccine; it can be used on a wide range of cows at any time. – Addison Hooks, 4th-generation farmer at Evans Hooks Cattle Company, Inc.

With a diversified beef cattle operation, Addison Hooks knows the importance of combination vaccines to protect against reproductive diseases. “We follow strict vaccination protocols, which gets the animals healthy from the start,” states Hooks. As a killed vaccine, TRIANGLE is safe for all ages and stages of cattle, and now offers protection against urinary shedding of Lepto hardjo-bovis. So, trust TRIANGLE to protect your herd. For more information, visit TriangleVaccines.com or contact your local Boehringer Ingelheim representative today.

Triangle is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. ©2018 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. BOV-0952-RESP0118

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

21


FEATURE

MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES: NO HYPE: EPDS WORK By Dr. Bob Hough, WLJ Correspondent

Due to objective genetic predictions such as EPDs (expected progeny differences) and indexes, the cattle industry has made tremendous progress in production and efficiency. However, as the models that produce the predictions become more sophisticated and producers understand less of the mathematics behind them, some people are turning off from the technology. This is a problem because, although calculation of modern genetic predictions have become complicated, the precision and reliability of the EPDs has likewise improved. An EPD is defined as the difference in expected performance of future progeny of an individual, compared with expected performance at some base point for the population. EPDs are estimated from phenotypic and genomic merit of an individual and all its relatives. They are generally reported in units of measurement for the trait (e.g., lb., cm., etc.). EPDs are best used for comparing the relative genetic transmission differences to progeny between individuals. What it boils down to is EPDs let a producer sort out genetic differences between animals, eliminating the “noise” of the environment. Some producers think they can do this better with their eyes or just a simple set of scales. This has been soundly proven wrong. The most glaring example of this occurred in Red Angus. The breed was founded based on performance principles in 1954 with performance reporting as a requirement for registration from the very beginning. Although all Red Angus breeders had weights and measures from the beginning, the breed made no genetic progress for over 20 years. That all changed when it began converting this data into information in the form of EPDs. Since the breed started calculating EPDs, the genetic trend for traits measured has improved linearly. Red Angus also studied the phenotypes for various traits and how they 22

compared to the genetic predictions of the population. An example is weaning weight EPDs, which have been increasing linearly. This lines up perfectly with the breed’s adjusted weaning weights, which have improved at the same rate as the EPDs. EPDs have also allowed the breed to beat genetic antagonisms like increasing weaning weights without increasing birth weight.

the American Simmental Association’s cattle by going back and adding two years of data at a time. They then observed the differences in how cattle’s genetic predictions changed as they went from pedigree estimates through being proven sires. Animals changed up and down as the possible change chart indicated they would, as more information was added to the genetic predictions. They equally moved either up or down demonstrating no bias in the model producing the genetic predictions. If the model was biased, the predictions would tend to move in only one direction. The basic input into genetic predictions is contemporary group deviations, and the models assume there is no environment by genotype interaction. Cornell also

“Although calculation of modern genetic predictions have become complicated, the precision and reliability of the EPDs has likewise improved.” Indexes are an even more powerful tool for genetic improvement. Certified Angus Beef studied when cows were flushed to either low or high $B ($Beef terminal index) bulls and all progeny were fed out and harvested. The progeny out of the high $B bulls were significantly better for all input traits into the index including weight per day of age, age at harvest, carcass weight, quality grade, and yield grade. The progeny of the high $B sires had $48.65 lower feedlot production costs and produced carcasses with $166.82 more value for a total financial benefit of $215.47. The prediction models have also been proven to be unbiased. Cornell University did a retrospective study of

studied this in the Simmental population, and the assumption was validated as true. That the models have been improving over time only makes the genetic predictions and indexes even that much more valuable. Genetic predictions using field data were first introduced to the industry with the 1971 Simmental Sire Summary, but those early models were fraught with problems. The early models were based on sires and all dams were assumed to have equal genetic merit, which of course is not correct. Early models also didn’t account for mating bias. The most common case of mating bias occurs when high-

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

priced artificial insemination sires are only mated to producers’ top cows, so accounting for this bias is important. Over time, these and many more problems have been eliminated. However, with these improvements, the models have become ever more complicated and more of a challenge for the layperson to understand how they work. This brings us to today’s modern genomic models, which are light years better than the old models, but the complicated statistics that go into the genetic predictions are admittedly hard to understand. The goal of the genetic predictions has always been to sort out what is genetic—thus will be transmitted to progeny—from what is due to environment. Marker-assisted selection is the ultimate way to determine genetic value because, by definition, genomics are not influenced by environment. Adding genomics to traditional information that goes into genetic predictions—like contemporary group deviations, heritability, and trait correlations—all adds up to predictions that are more precise and reliable. They do a much better job of establishing genetic relationship between animals, as well as identifying markers associated with causative genes, all to improve accuracy of genetic predictions. The whole goal to animal breeding is to improve cattle genetically. This means different things to different people— some are looking to optimize genetics to their environments while others are looking to maximize the genetic potential for traits. Whatever a producer’s goal, EPDs and indexes are the best way to achieve it. Today’s prediction models do an unprecedented job of removing all the noise from EPDs and indexes, allowing producers to make the most informed genetic selection decisions possible. It has been demonstrated time and again that visual evaluation and simple weights and measures are inferior substitutes for modern genetic prediction. Those who ignore objective genetic predictions do so at the long-term peril of their business’ ability to compete. Performance pioneer Don Vaniman summed it up nicely in 1978 when he wrote, “Is it those who feel cattle that look good must perform, or those who accept that animals that perform look good?”

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


EASIER CALVING. MORE GROWTH. BETTER MARBLING.

USDA analysis shows the superiority of Angus at every stage.

BREED

BW

YW MARB

Angus

1.3 5.6 1.2 5.1

91 50 53 80

Hereford

That’s the power of the reliable, registered Angus bull.

Red Angus Simmental

0.59 -0.22 0.18 -0.20

Average 2014-born bulls, adj. to Angus base, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center Across-breed EPD Adjustments, BIF 2016. b Here’s the Premium study, 2014, Certified Angus Beef LLC c Packer Premium Survey, 2015, Certified Angus Beef LLC a

Some breeds talk about superior genetic merit. Registered Angus bulls prove it. They simply outperform the competition in calving ease, growth and marbling, according to USDA research.a That’s proof that the registered Angus bull you purchase comes with power and predictability, backed by a better balance of the traits you need to get profitable results.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018 easier calving_1pg_4c_KentuckyCowCountry.indd 1

An extensive, multi-year study shows Angus calves earn you more at sale time than similar calves of all other breeds – nearly $7/cwt.b more, on average. In fact, packers pay Angus producers $1 million in premiums per week.c

To subscribe to the Angus Journal®, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report 7:30 a.m. CST every Monday on RFD-TV.

That’s a lot of value brought to you by reliable, registered Angus bulls. Anything else is just hype.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

3201 Frederick Ave. | St. Joseph, MO 64506 www.ANGUS.org © 2017-2018 American Angus Association®

23 8/24/17 9:33 AM


FORAGES

WINTER GRAZING OPTIONS CHRIS D. TEUTSCH UK Research and Education Center at Princeton

Feed and specifically winter feeding is the single highest expense in cow-calf production systems. In many cases it can make up more than 50% of the total cow-calf budget. Traditionally, hay is the main feed that is used during the winter months. Producing hay that is high enough in forage quality to meet the nutritional needs of lactating brood cows can be difficult. Feeding that hay during the cold, wet, and muddy winter months can also be a challenge, especially if you work off the farm since it is dark when you leave and dark when you get home. In contrast to hay, allowing animals to graze during the winter months can significantly reduce winter feed costs. There are two primary options for extending grazing into the winter months, stockpiling perennial forages like tall fescue or planting winter annual forages like small grains and annual ryegrass. This article will discuss both options, providing management tips that will help to improve the use of each option. STOCKPILING PERENNIAL GRASSES Stockpiling is simply allowing forage growth to accumulate during one part of the year and using that growth for deferred grazing at a later date. In transition zone states like Kentucky, cool-season pasture growth is commonly stockpiled in late summer to extend grazing during the winter months. Tall fescue is by far the best adapted grass for stockpiling. Tall fescue stockpiled for winter grazing is almost always higher in nutritional value than most of the hay that we make in Kentucky and will in most cases meet the requirements of a fall calving cow. In addition, grazing stockpiled grass costs about half as much as feeding hay that is supplemented. The following steps will help to optimize your stockpiling program. Choose a strong tall fescue sod in a field that is well drained. To get the maximum yield response to nitrogen applications you will need a healthy stand of tall fescue. Choosing a field that is well-drained will 24

chris.teutsch@uky.edu

help to ensure that the stockpile can be grazed with minimal pugging damage during the wet winter months. Clip pastures that will be stockpiled to 3-4 inches prior to applying nitrogen. Clipping pastures removes old growth and increases the forage quality of the stockpiled grass. Apply 60-80 lb of nitrogen per acre in mid-August to early-September. Applying nitrogen too early can stimulate warm-season grass growth in pastures, while applying nitrogen too late decreases dry matter yield. When applying nitrogen in early to mid-September, decrease application rates to 60 lb/A. Allow growth to accumulate until mid-December before grazing. If limited grazing is available, feed hay during late summer and fall to allow pastures to stockpile. Graze stockpiled pastures that contain legumes first. Legumes deteriorate at faster rate than grass and should be grazed first to minimize losses. Strip graze tall fescue to maximize grazing days. Ideally, allocating only enough stockpiled grass for 2-3 days will increase grazing days per acre by 30 to 40%. However, if you work off the farm, it may make more sense to allocate 7 days of grass. This would allow you move fences on days off. Frost seed legumes on grazed areas. Closely grazed stockpile provides an excellent opportunity to establish legumes in grass dominated pastures. Broadcasting the seed as the pasture is being grazed can enhance soil-seed contact and increase overseeding success. COOL-SEASON ANNUAL GRASSES Cool-season annual forages that can be used for winter and early spring grazing include small grains and annual ryegrass. Crimson clover, an annual clover, can be grown in a mixture with both the small grains and annual ryegrass. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one

of the most versatile small grains for a farming operation. Due to its excellent winter hardiness, wheat can be sown later in the fall than barley has good potential for pasture, silage or hay production. Wheat will withstand wetter soils than barley or oats, but tends to be less tolerant of poorly drained soils than rye and triticale. Managed properly, wheat can be grazed in the fall, again in early spring, and finally harvested for grain, hay or silage. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is generally more susceptible to winterkill than wheat, especially when it has been overgrazed. It should not be grazed as short or as late into the fall as wheat. Barley does best on fertile, welldrained soils. It is sensitive to acidic soil conditions and poor fertility. Barley produces high quality silage or hay with a higher digestibility than other small grains, but lower yields. Good quality grazing can be obtained from early seeded barley. Triticale (X Triticosecale) is a high yielding forage crop that is gaining popularity. Triticale generally has a higher forage yield, but lower quality than wheat. It is a cross between rye and wheat. As such, it is adapted to a wide range of soils. Tolerance to low pH is better than wheat, but not as good as rye. Rye (Secale cereale) is the most cold tolerant and least exacting in its soil and moisture requirements of all small grains. Like wheat, rye can be sown in late August to provide fall grazing, excellent winter ground cover, and spring grazing. The rapid growth of rye, both in the fall and spring, makes it the most productive of the small grains for pasture. Rye is also the earliest maturing of the small grains. Rye tends to be a more consistent producer of spring pasture than wheat, although it quickly becomes stemmy and unpalatable in late spring. Winter Oats (Avena sativa) produce very palatable forage and are best adapted to well-drained soils. They do not perform as well under extremely dry or wet conditions as wheat or rye.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Although oats produce high quality forage, yields tend to be lower than the other small grains. As a rule, the hardiest winter oat variety (Kenoat) is considerably less winter hardy than common wheat and barley varieties. In Kentucky, oats will usually overwinter 50% of the time. Similar to barley, winter oats must be seeded in mid-September to be well established before cold weather arrives. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) is a cool-season annual that can provide late fall, winter, and early spring grazing. Attributes of annual ryegrass include ease of establishment, high yields, high nutritive value, and later maturing than the small grains. In contrast to small grains, annual ryegrass continues to regrow in the spring until high temperatures limit growth in early summer. Annual ryegrass is commonly used to overseed summer pastures, thereby extending the useful season of this land area. It is adapted to all soil types and grows best at a pH of 5.7 or higher. The highest yields are obtained on fertile and well-drained soils with nitrogen fertilization. While winter annuals can provide ample and high quality forage in late fall, winter, and early spring, they tend to be a more expensive option than stockpiling perennial grasses for winter grazing. However, they can fill certain niches within grazing systems. For example, they could be used to thicken thin coolseason pastures, grown in a rotation with a summer annual forage, used to overseed a warm-season perennial forages such as bermudagrass, or used in a renovation sequence. The following tips will help you optimize cool-season annual use in your grazing system. Planting date. Cool-season annuals can be seeded from mid-August to midOctober. If fall grazing is desired, plant by early September. Later plantings will provide little grazing in the fall and winter. Planting method. Winter annuals can be planted on a conventional seedbed

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


or no-till seeded. No-till seedings tend to support winter grazing better than conventional seedings.

FEATURED PUBLICATION

Seeding depth. Seeding depth should be 1-2 inches for small grains and ½ to 1 inch for annual ryegrass.

This month’s featured publication is: “Stockpiling for Winter Grazing” by Garry Lacefield, Ray Smith, Jimmy Henning, John Johns, and Roy Burris. You can access it via the link below, or by visiting your local extension office.

Seeding rates. Small grains seeded alone should be planted at a rate of 90150 lb/A. Annual ryegrass seeded alone should be planted at a rate of 25 lb/A. A mixture of small grain and annual ryegrass should be seeded at a rate of 90 and 15 lb/A, respectively. If fall grazing is desired, use the higher end of the seeding rates. Crimson clover can be added at a rate of 10 lb/A. Soil fertility. Apply phosphorus, potassium, and lime according to soil test results. If fall grazing is desired, apply 40-60 lb nitrogen/A at seeding. An additional 40-50 lb nitrogen/A should be applied in early-March to stimulate spring growth. For annual ryegrass only, an additional 40-50 lb nitrogen can be applied in mid-April.

FEATURED UPCOMING EVENT

Eastern Kentucky Forage Field Day Derrickson Agricultural Complex - Morehead State University September 7, 2018 Register on-line at https://18KFGCFieldDayEast.eventbrite.com or call the

https://bit.ly/2L69Dxu

Rowan County Extension office at 606-784-5457

FORAGE MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR AUGUST annuals should be rotationally stocked. Grazing can begin once the seedlings are well anchored and have reached a height of 8-10 inches. Grazing should be stopped when a residual height of 3-4 inches has been reached. For more information on stockpiling and winter grazing, please contact your local Cooperative Extension office.

Grazing management. Ideally, winter

Make plans to attend Eastern Kentucky Forage Field Day at Morehead State University

Summer annuals can be difficult to cure. Wilting summer annuals to 50 to 60% moisture and wrapping as baleage allows for timely harvest and the production of a high quality stored feed.

Slow grazing rotation for coolseason pastures to allow more rest time.

Do NOT overgraze cool-season pastures during the summer months. Feed hay in a sacrifice area if pastures have not regrown.

Identify pastures that will be stockpiled for winter grazing. Graze or clip these pastures and apply 60-80 lb N/A in midAugust.

Stock summer annuals high to stay ahead of rapid growth.

Plant winter annuals starting in mid-August.

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25


FEATURE

NCBA RESPONDS TO CANADIAN TARIFF HIKES ON US BEEF PRODUCTS CATTLE PRODUCERS WILL BE TRADE WAR CASUALTIES, NCBA SAYS WASHINGTON (June 29, 2018) - Kent Bacus, Director of International Trade and Market Access for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, today released the following statement in response to Canada’s announcement of higher tariffs on U.S. beef products beginning on Sunday, July 1: “For the past few weeks Canada has threatened to retaliate against the United States by slapping a tariff on $170 million worth of U.S. beef products in direct response to the steel and aluminum tariffs. Today, they made good on that threat. These retaliatory tariffs were and still are clearly avoidable, and the unfortunate casualties will be Canadian consumers and America’s cattlemen and cattlewomen. We may not know the Items subject to 25 percent Iron and non-alloy steel in ingots or other primary forms, including semi-finished products, flat-rolled products, bars and rods and wire. Stainless steel ingots or other primary forms, including semi-finished products, flat-rolled products of stainless steel, bars and rods, angles, shapes and sections, and wire. Other alloy steel in ingots or other primary forms, including semi-finished products, flat-rolled products, bars and rods, angles, shapes and sections, hollow drill bars and rods, wire. Tubes and pipes, sheet piling, railway or tramway track construction material, pipe for oil or gas pipelines, casing or tubing used in drilling for oil or gas. Items subject to 10 percent Food products, including yogurt, roasted coffee that is not decaffeinated, prepared meals of fowl or beef. Sweets, including maple sugar and syrup, licorice candy, toffee, other sugar confectionery, including white chocolate, not containing cocoa, other chocolate in blocks — slabs or bar, filled or not filled. Other foods, including pizza and quiche,

extent of the damage these tariffs may have on our producers, but we believe that cooperation is a better path forward than escalation. As Canadians gather to celebrate Canada Day and we prepare to celebrate American Independence, we encourage our government and the Canadian government to remember that we are allies and we rely on each other for future economic prosperity.” The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has represented America’s cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 1-866-BEEF-USA or membership@beef.org.

cucumbers and gherkins, jams, jellies, strawberry jam, nut purees and pastes, berry purees, and other fruit purees other than banana puree. Condiments, including soy sauce, tomato ketchup and other tomato sauces, prepared mustard, mayonnaise, salad dressing, mixed condiments and mixed seasonings, other sauces.

NOTHING BUT

SERIOUS

POWER!

ELECTRIC FENCE SYSTEMS

YOUR LAND IS A VALUABLE RESOURCE. Get the most out of it by using temporary electric

Soups and broths, mineral waters and aerated waters, containing added sugar or other sweetening matter or flavour.

fence for pasture rotation

Whiskey. Personal grooming products, including manicure or pedicure preparations, hair spray, shaving and after-shave preparations, soaps and other skin washing products. Household products, including room deodorizers, automatic dishwasher detergents, candles and tapers, other than those for birthdays, Christmas or other festive occasions; glues or adhesives sold in containers of under a kilogram, tableware and kitchenware, plastic household articles and hygienic or toilet articles, of plastic, toilet paper, handkerchiefs, cleansing or facial tissues and towels, tablecloths and serviettes, printed or illustrated postcards or greeting cards.

www.speedrite.com Photo courtesy of American Grazing Lands Services LLC

26

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

i9c2A r e 1 1

E AD

IN

ce Amsin

27


FEATURE

Kentucky Planted 2017

United States Harvested

2018

2017

Planted

2018

2017

Harve sted

1

2018

2017

20182

1,000 Acres Corn

1,320

1,130

1,1220

1,210

90,167

89,128

82, 703

81,770

Soybeans

1,950

2,100

1,940

2,090

90,142

89,557

89,522

88,862

480

460

310

350

32,696

32,732

25,291

24,831

All

--

--

2,150

2,240

--

--

53,784

55,068

Alfalfa

--

--

150

140

--

--

16,563

17,351

Other, All

--

--

2,000

2,100

--

--

37,221

37,717

Hay

Wheat, Winter3

Tobacco

Acres

1

All

--

--

80,500

72,000

--

--

321,470

303,680

Burley

--

--

63,000

55,000

--

--

81,500

69,800

DF-Cured

--

--

11,500

11,000

--

--

19,270

18,080

DA-Cured

--

--

6,000

6,000

--

--

7,600

7,500

Commodities with planted estimates not available are denoted by “--”. 2 Forecasted. 3 Includes area planted in preceding fall

KENTUCKY SOYBEAN ACREAGE REACHES NEW HIGH LOUISVILLE, KY – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the Acreage and Grain Stocks reports today, showing the Commonwealth’s 2018 soybean planted acreage is a record high. “Soybean acreage has nearly doubled since 2007,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “The crop is a good fit for the current market and agronomic conditions. This year soybeans are planted on 34 percent of the principal field crop acreage. On the other hand, corn planted acreage is at the lowest level since 2009. Much of the decrease results from the shift to soybeans and other land uses.”

28

Soybeans planted in Kentucky were estimated at 2.10 million acres, up 150,000 acres from 2017. Acres harvested for grain, at 2.09 million acres, was 150,000 acres above acres a year ago. U.S. soybean planted area for 2018 was estimated at 89.6 million acres, down one percent from last year. Area for harvest, at 88.9 million acres, is down one percent from 2017. Acreage planted to corn in Kentucky was estimated at 1.31 million acres, down 10,000 acres from 2017. Acres harvested for grain was estimated at 1.21 million acres, down 10,000 acres from last year. The U.S. corn planted for all purposes in 2018 was estimated at 89.1 million acres, down one percent from last year. Growers expect to harvest 81.8 million acres for

grain, down one percent from last year. Farmers in Kentucky intend to set an estimated 55,000 acres of burley tobacco for harvest. This was down 8,000 from the 2017 level. Dark fire-cured tobacco acreage set was estimated at 11,000 acres, down 500 acres from the previous year. Dark air-cured tobacco acreage was estimated at 6,000 acres, unchanged from a year ago. Burley producing states acreage for harvest was estimated at 69,800 acres, 14 percent below last year. Winter wheat seeded acreage in Kentucky was estimated at 460,000 acres, 20,000 acres below the previous year. Acreage harvested for grain was estimated at 350,000 acres, 40,000 acres above 2017. The U.S. Winter wheat planted area was estimated at 32.7

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

million acres, up slightly from 2017. Area harvested for grain was forecast at 24.8 million acres, down two percent from last year. Alfalfa hay acreage in Kentucky was estimated at 140,000 acres, down 10,000 from the 2017 crop. All other hay was estimated at 2.10 million acres, up 100,000 from a year ago. The U.S. All hay acreage was estimated at 55.1 million acres, up two percent from 2017. To view the complete Acreage report, visit https://release.nass.usda.gov/reports/ acrg0618.pdf. To view the complete Grain Stocks report, visit https://release.nass. usda.gov/reports/grst0618.pdf. For more information, call the NASS Kentucky Field Office at (800) 928-5277.

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

2018 FARM BILL ADVANCES William M. Snell

After a period of uncertainty, the 2018 Farm Bill is back on track with both chambers passing their versions of the nation’s comprehensive farm/food policy legislation. On mainly a partisan vote, the House narrowly passed their version of the bill 213-211 on June 20th, following the defeat of a similar bill in May. The Senate overwhelmingly voted in favor of their farm bill 86-11 on June 28th. Now negotiations between an appointed conference committee will settle the differences among the House and Senate versions as legislators attempt to get a 2018 farm bill signed into law prior to the September 30, 2018 expiration of the 2014 farm bill. If this materializes, it would represent the first time a farm bill has passed on time in more than 20 years. In the midst of a depressed farm economy and trade tensions, leaders in both chambers have expressed their desires that conferees meet immediately after the July 4th recess to merge the two bills and send it to White House for President Trump’s signature prior to the August recess. Structurally, both bills are very similar to the 2014 farm bill, which introduced the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) as the centerpiece of farm program safety net. The House farm bill allows for a onetime election of PLC vs ARC covering the 2019 -2023 crop years, while the Senate bill would permit farmers to change their election in the 2021 crop year following their 2019 election. The Senate bill also contains language to pave the way for legalization of industrial hemp by removing it from the federal list of controlled substances. States would be KY Federal Farm Program Direct Payments1

the primary regulators for the crop, and the bill also allows hemp researchers to apply for USDA competitive grants and hemp farmers to be eligible for federal crop insurance. The Senate bill also gave greater attention to programs that promote organic agriculture and local foods and increased trade promotion efforts. The controversial crop insurance and sugar programs come out of the farm bill debate in both chambers relatively unscathed. In reality, work requirement provisions as part of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, better known as the food stamp program) remain the major difference between the two bills. The House farm bill contains eligibility requirements that able-bodied adults (ages 18 to 59), without children under the age of 6 to either work or participate in a free work training program for a minimum of 20 hours per week in order to receive SNAP benefits. The House bill limits SNAP eligibility to individuals with incomes that are no more than 30% above the federal poverty level. The Senate version contains no language addressing work requirements, instead focused on efforts to reduce fraud within SNAP. In recent farm bills, SNAP has accounted for 70 to 80% of total farm bill expenditures. Kentucky farmers overwhelmingly signed up for the ARC program (vs the PLC) program under the 2014 farm bill given the level of projected payments and the established reference prices for PLC. In 2015, Kentucky farmers received $49.8 million dollars of ARC payments (7.8% of net farm income) and $59.1 million (13% of net farm income) in

2015

Price Loss Coverage

$49.8

$59.1

--

$3.8

Conservation Payments

$62.5

$60.3

Total Direct Farm Program Payments (% of Net Farm Income)

$127.7 (7.8%)

$128.9 (13.0%)

1. Source ERS/USDA - Official data for 2017 become available in August 2018

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be significantly lower due to the structure of the ARC program calculations. Given current and projected price levels, it appears more farmers will give greater attention to the PLC program in future crop years if the current structure of the 2018 farm becomes law.

Selected Ag Provisions of the House and Senate Farm Bills2 Provision

House

Senate

Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC)

Adopts using RMA (crop insurance) yields vs NASS (survey) yields. Revenue calculations based on county location of the farm, not the operator’s home county. Eliminates ARC - Individual

Similar to House version, except Senate version maintains both ARC-County and ARC-Individual options. Increases substitute yield for calculating revenue guarantee under ARC.

Price Loss Coverage (PLC)

Allows for reference prices to adjust to changing market conditions

No changes to PLC

Payment Limitations

Maintains $125,000 individual payment limitation, but removes loan deficiency payments (LDP) and marketing loan gains from the $125,000 payment cap. Expands the definition of family member (for purposes of payment limits) to include first cousins, nieces and nephews and allows owners of LLCs and S corporations to qualify for the $125,000 payment limit.

Tightens payment limitations by redefining managers that are “actively engaged” in the farming operation. Reduces the adjusted gross income (AGI) eligibility to receive commodity and conservation payments from the existing $900,000 level to $700,000.

Dairy

The Margin Protection Program (MPP) is renamed the Dairy Risk Management (DRM) program. Adjusts coverage and premium levels, reevaluates feed costs calculations and allows for insurance coverage on milk production not covered under the DRM.

The Margin Protection Program (MPP) is renamed the Dairy Risk Coverage program and increases coverage levels to $9/cwt, with premium discounts for smaller to mid-sized dairies.

Crop Insurance

Maintained with minor changes.

Maintained with minor changes. Allows a producer to establish a single enterprise unit by combining enterprise units in one or more other counties. Hemp becomes eligible for crop insurance along with incentives for cover crops and insurance agents to sell whole-farm policies.

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)

Increases from 24 million acres to 29 million acres, while capping rental rates at 80% of the county rental rate average.

Increases from 24 million to 25 million acres, while capping rates at 88.5% of the county rental rate average. Allows landowners to cut hay or graze land enrolled in CRP.

Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP)

Eliminated wqith previous signups remaning intact. Certain provisions merged into the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).

Retained, but cuts CSP enrollment cap from 10 million acres a year to 8.8 million annually.

2016 million dollars

Average Crop Revenue (ARC)

2016. Last October, the Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) indicated that 32,787 Kentucky farms that enrolled in safety-net programs established by the 2014 Farm Bill received $90.5 million in 2017, which covered the 2016 crop year. Preliminary indications are that payments in 2018 for the 2017 crop will

2. A House Agriculture Committee summary of their farm bill can be accessed at https:// agriculture.house.gov/uploadedfiles/agriculture_and_nutrition_act_short_summary.pdf , while the Senate bill can be found at https://www.agriculture.senate.gov/2018-farm-bill. For details on the ARC/PLC programs/calculations and other 2014 Farm Bill programs see 2014 Farm Bill Fact Sheet.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES

HAVING THE TOUGH TALKS Tarrah D. Hardin

Steve Isaacs

A common observation among employers is that their employees don’t seem to be motivated to perform at the level they (the employer) expect. “I pay them well… I treat them right… they oughta work harder…” seems to be a common refrain. Motivating others has long been an issue in labor management circles. “How do I motivate employees?” is the unsolvable problem for many employers. Susan Fowler of the Ken Blanchard Companies is one of the latest management experts to address this issue in her book, “Why motivating people doesn’t work…and what does.” Fowler contends that people are already motivated. The question is whether their motivation is “optimal” or “suboptimal.” One of the levels of motivation she describes is “disinterested.” That is a motivation….but a suboptimal one. Disinterested employees don’t know, don’t care, and don’t want to be here. They are motivated, just in a very bad way. She describes five other levels of motivation along a spectrum from suboptimal to optimal. The next one up the scale from disinterested is “external.” For the folks who think they can motivate someone else, this is the typical strategy. External motivators can be positive (pay and rewards) or negative (threats and punishment). External motivators are among the most commonly used and some of the least effective. Their effects are often short run and do little to affect the internal motivation of employees. Her third suboptimal level is “Imposed.” This level is often derived from pressure, guilt, or obligation. It’s an improvement from disinterested or external, but is often based on expectations – someone else’s – rather than an internal motivation to perform at a high level. It’s still suboptimal. Fowler’s three optimal levels of motivation are: Aligned, Integrated,

and Inherent. These three levels reflect a higher level of internal motivation and are more likely to meet the psychological needs of employees…they are internally rewarding. Aligned employees “see what we’re doing here” and can see why it’s important. They are the engaged employees who buy into the task at hand feel like they might even learn something useful for the future. They are the ones who are looking for a better way and feel the freedom to make constructive suggestions. Integrated employees are the ones who will describe the organization in terms of “we” rather than “they” and feel a strong sense of belonging. Integrated employees have a feeling that what “we’re” doing is not only important to the company, but it’s important to “me” and that “I’m making a difference.” Inherent motivation describes the state of doing something that you really enjoy. “This job is fun. Shoot, I’d do it for free.” This is the motivation that describes someone who is passionate about what they are doing. In fact, the risk (for some business owners) is that they would do it for free. So, how do managers create an environment to support the optimal levels and avoid the suboptimal levels? Fowler suggests that three basic psychological needs must be met: Autonomy, Relatedness, and Competence. Employees need to feel that they have some level of control and freedom to make decisions… that’s the autonomy. They also need to feel related to what’s going on. We are social creatures who thrive in an environment of recognition and appropriate praise. Employees need to feel like they will be heard when they have something to contribute. Finally, employees need the training and guidance to develop skills and abilities that enable them to perform at a high level, i.e. competence.

Across the state there are many farmers having tough conversations that no one wants to have or looks forward to when it has to happen. These conversations are not only taking place with family members around the kitchen table but at their lender’s office. The past couple years of low grain and livestock prices have forced producers to take a very detailed look their finances, both farm and non-farm. When looking at the non-farm side of things the first thing examined is how much family living is drawing out of the farm operation. Over the past few years when commodity prices were high, the total amount from the farm kept growing larger each year. Now prices has dropped and family living has not followed suit, putting a strain on family dynamics at times. From these talks decisions might be made in order to decrease the amount of family living taken out, or to decide if there needs to be a source of non-farm income to help with family expenses. Both of these can be difficult to come to grips with but could be the outcome. For some being completely open and honest with their lender can be difficult; however, it does not need to

be. Conversations with financial officers are some of the most important talks taking place right now among stakeholders within the operation. At times like these, financial officers need to know all the facts (projected budgets, commodity contracts, etc.) in order to help the farmer to the best of their abilities. Not having this information or not having the correct information can mislead the lender into letting the farmer borrow more than needed. Even in distressed situations, most lenders want to be able to help the farmer keep farming but in order to do that the farmer must be honest. At times knowing what the family dynamics are can be very helpful, especially if there are multiple people invested in one operation. Having tough conversations about finances is not a task that someone puts first on his/her to-do list for the week, however at times it needs to be. Commodity prices have forced producers to take a hard look at their finances and their balance sheets and as a result, tough conversations are happening. This could be a very trying time on farms across the state but with open communication with all parties involved, the tough talks about reality will become easier.

PUREBRED SIMMENTAL • PUREBRED ANGUS • SIM/ANGUS

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We strive to provide our customers with a superior product with personal attention to innovation, professionalism, and integrity. www.BandLfarmcattle.com

The Agricultural Economics Department publishes the Economic and Policy Update towards the end of each month.  Each issue features articles written by extension personnel within the department and other experts across the country. 

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Topics will vary greatly but regularly include marketing, management, policy, natural resources, and rural development issues. If you would like to recieve this newsletter by email, please contact Kenny Burdine at kburdine@uky.edu.

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You can also view current and past issues online at http://www.ca.uky.edu/agecon/index.php?p=209 Co-editors: Kenny Burdine, Alison Davis, and Greg Halich

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FEATURE

KENTUCKY WINTER WHEAT YIELD DOWN 15 BUSHELS FROM JUNE LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released its July Crop Production report today, based on the Agricultural Yield survey conducted at the beginning of month. The report includes information on Kentucky’s winter wheat crop. “The winter wheat crop experienced above average temperatures and varied precipitation during the month of June,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “Harvest started ahead of

normal and remained that way. As combining wraps up, progress is very similar to last year’s season, which finished about a week ahead of the fiveyear average.”

460,000 acres last fall with 350,000 acres to be harvested for grain. Acres for other uses totaled 110,000 acres and will be used as a cover crop for tobacco or cut as silage or hay.

Kentucky farmers expect to harvest 22.8 million bushels of winter wheat during 2018, down five percent from the previous year. The forecast was based on crop conditions as of July 1 and decreased five percent from the June forecast. Growers expect a yield of 65 bushels per acre, down 12 bushels from 2017 and down 15 bushels from June. Farmers seeded

“The decline in winter wheat yields from previous forecasts may be attributed to extreme heat and humidity, precipitation and standing water, and storms,” Knopf said. Winter wheat production for the nation was forecast at 1.19 billion bushels, down slightly from the June 1 forecast

and down six percent from 2017. Based on July 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 48 bushels per acre, down 0.4 bushels from last month and down 2.2 bushels from last year. The expected area to be harvested for grain or seed totals 24.8 million acres, down two percent from last year. To view the complete report, visit https:// bit.ly/2uNETqh For more information, call the NASS Kentucky Field Office at (800) 928-5277.

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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CONVENTION

The 2018 Angus Convention in Columbus, Ohio, provides unparalleled opportunities to connect with the Angus family and for the beef industry to celebrate the Angus breed’s significant milestones: the 135th Annual Convention of Delegates and the 40th anniversary of the Certified Angus Beef ® brand.

Celebrate with us as we share the greatest success story in the beef business, the Certified Angus Beef ® brand.

It’s what’s on the inside that defines us. You know it, and we know it. Because we share the same values. Ingenuity, commitment, sense of pride… These are the values that built this country; They are the values that built this company. Ritchie, proud to be a partner

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

CELEBRATE SUCCESS. CHART A COURSE FOR THE FUTURE.

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33


FEATURE

CATTLEMEN PRESS FOR USDA OVERSIGHT AT PUBLIC MEETING ON LAB-GROWN FAKE MEAT WASHINGTON (July 12, 2018) - Today Danielle Beck, director of government affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, used remarks at a public meeting to advocate for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) oversight of labgrown fake meat products. Hosted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the stated goal of the public meeting was to provide interested parties and the public with an opportunity to comment on the technology and regulations related to labgrown fake meat technology. However, despite existing federal laws which designate USDA as the primary oversight body of lab-grown fake meat, USDA was not afforded a role in the public meeting. “NCBA applauds the pointed questions FDA has posed regarding risks, hazards and manufacturing methods of lab-

34

grown meat food products,” said Beck. “However, the appropriate agency to ask the questions under discussion today is the agency that will ultimately have jurisdiction over lab-grown meat food products. Any fair reading of the law places lab-grown meat food products within the primary jurisdiction of the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.” Beck also explained why USDA jurisdiction is crucial for ensuring that lab-grown fake meat products are safe for consumers. Continuous inspection that draws on the scientific expertise of USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service provides the most stringent oversight of any perishable meat food product. “Critical food safety oversight objectives can only be accomplished if USDA

complies with the law and asserts jurisdiction over cultured meat food products,” Beck added. Many promoters of lab-grown fake meat have claimed that USDA oversight of labgrown fake meat is unnecessary because animals are not being harvested. In fact, USDA inspection is required for all federal meat plants, whether harvesting occurs or not. USDA inspectors provide daily oversight in facilities where meat is processed into products such as ground beef, hot dogs or deli meats. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has represented America’s cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 1-866-BEEFUSA or membership@beef.org.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Rd. • Danville, KY 40422 Office:859/236-4591 (C)859/238-3195 • tdievert@dievertsales.com Logan Goggin • 859/516-3199 www.dievertsales.com

Catalogs or more information available by contacting Tim Dievert or Logan Goggin. CKAA LADIES DAY 2018 SALE Saturday, September 8, 2018 CKAA Sale Pavilion, Danville, KY See ad on page 9 CKAA 56th ANNUAL FALL FEMALE SALE Saturday, November 10, 2018 CKAA Sale Pavilion, Danville, KY ATTENTION KY ANGUS BREEDERS Consignments for the CKAA Fall Sale are DUE NOW!

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September 21, 2018 Friday • 1:00 PM EST

Hosted at Blue Lake Cattle Ranch, Carlisle, KY

FEATURING OVER 60 HEAD

Bred & Open Heifers, Bred & Open Cows, Pregnancies and more

BW -1.4 WW +44 YW +79 Milk +22 CW +25 MARB +.57 RE +.47 FAT -.004 $W +47.46 $F +32.38 $G +40.18 $B +100.48

BW -1.1 WW +70 YW +123 Milk +27 CW +54 MARB +.86 RE +.64 FAT -.032 $W +79.98 $F +81.97 $G +48.99 $B +162.91

BLUE LAKE BLACKCAP 3230 Reg# 18978822 Featuring a direct daughter of the $90,000 valued Deer Valley Blackcap 5824 sired by Plattemere Weigh Up K360.

SS 5 PEPPERS MISS LUCY C235

Selling a heifer pregnancy sired by 3F Epic 4631 out of the $80,000 valued donor dam, Miss Lucy C235 who is a full sister to the ABS Global sire, KCF Bennett Absolute.

BW +1.4 WW +42 YW +78 Milk +23 CW +39 MARB +1.02 RE +.74 FAT +.018 $W +44.15 $F +40.14 $G +51.94 $B +149.99

BW I+1.8 WW I+64 YW I+114 Milk I+32 CW I+49 MARB I+1.05 RE I+.43 FAT I+.049 $W +70.54 $F +76.16 $G +45.26 $B +155.85

Selling choice of heifer pregnancies out of Queenie X092 sired by Baldridge Colonel C251 and Basin Payweight 1682.

A daughter of Basin Payweight 1682 from JLM Lucy W333 (above) who traces to the $110,000 valued Basin Lucy 3859. Due Spring 2019 to FF Rito Righteous 6R41.

DEANS QUEENIE X092

Danny Lynn 573-721-6660 www.blackgoldgenetics.net

Visit our sale website www.bluegrasstrifecta.com for updates, videos and more

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

4SF-RHI LUCY 0328E (EPDS ABOVE)

Dr. Kevin Poe 859-948-2582 www.bluelakecattleranch.com

BW I+2.1 WW I+66 YW I+122 Milk I+29 CW I+45 MARB I+.82 RE I+.81 FAT I-.034 $W +66.01 $F +80.39 $G +50.49 $B +147.52

BGG HENRIETTA PRIDE R596 (EPDS ABOVE)

Selling a direct daughter of Henrietta Pride 2912 (pictured above) sired by the proven growth and Marb. sire, Discovery. Henrietta Pride R596 sells due 9/24/18 to VAR Legend 5019.

BW -.3 WW +68 YW +132 Milk +30 CW +45 MARB +.96 RE +.47 FAT+.010 $W +71.10 $F +95.20 $G +48.00 $B +145.63

XAG ANGELS ENVY 1701

Offering one-half interest and full possession in this full sister to the $75,000 valued Select Sires roster member ACC Bourbon 0115. Due Spring 2019 to TEX Playbook 5347.

Jimmy Armstrong 931-224-2772 www.decadesgenetics.com

Steve Judy 859-221-5198 SALE MANAGED BY:

Jordan Anesi - Breeding Mgr 615-522-7777 Derek Keen - Farm Mgr 270-622-0378

Mike Thornton 859-983-3871 www.rumorhasitfarms.com

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Shawn Gannon 859-361-4157

131 Robin Ct. Howell, MI 48855 517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

35


FEATURE

KENTUCKY DAIRIES FIND MARKET

Get high yield, superior grazing tolerance, and unmatched persistence with

Patriot white clover FRANKFORT, KY (July 6, 2018) The Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy (GOAP) is pleased to announce that 11 of the 19 dairy farms whose contracts were canceled by Dean Foods have found a market for their milk. Scioto Milk Producers Cooperative from Hillsboro, Ohio; United Dairy, Inc. in Charleston, West Virginia; and, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) Southeast Area Council in Kansas City, Kansas have signed new contracts with the remaining dairies. The other eight dairies involved have made the decision to sell their herds privately. “Dairy farming involves milking twice a day, seven days a week and is as much a lifestyle as it is a method of farming,” said Warren Beeler, GOAP executive director. “These eleven producers can now continue their family dairies thanks to Scioto, United Dairy, Inc. and DFA Southeast.” The newly contracted producers will begin milk pickup on July 16, 2018. For more information about Kentucky’s dairy industry, contact the Kentucky 36

Dairy Development Council at (859) 516-1129 or visit the KDDC webpage at kydairy.org. Great strides continue being made toward lessening Kentucky’s dependence on tobacco production while revitalizing the farm economy by investing a portion of Kentucky’s Master Settlement Agreement Funds into the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund. To date, Kentucky has invested nearly $550 million in an array of county, regional and state projects designed to increase net farm income and create sustainable new farm-based business enterprises. These funding approvals, made possible by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, represent just a few of the nearly 5,600 projects approved, since the inception of the program in January 2001. “Like” us at www.facebook.com/ kyagpolicy to receive updates and information from the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy.

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Join or Renew your Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Membership

MARCH 2, 2018

OCTOBER 2018 FRIDAY, 1PM19, (Central) FRIDAY, 1PM (Central) BULL SALE!

As the largest cattle producing state east of the Mississippi River, Kentucky is home to over 1.1 million beef cows and ranks 5th nationally in total number of farms. KCA’s mission is to provide a strong, proactive voice for all of Kentucky’s Beef Farm Families, serve as a resource for information and education for producers, consumers and the industry and be a catalyst for enhancing producer profitability. NOW IS THE TIME to join or renew your Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association. Unite and become a unified voice for all cattle producers.

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Catalog, pictures andvideos videos on myerscircle.com. Catalog, pictures and onFacebook, Facebook, myerscircle.com. Online bidding available via Superior Productions. Online bidding available via Superior Productions. CallGreg GregMyers Myers at at (270) (270) 265 Call 265- -1070 1070ororemail email myerscircleag@gmail.com for myerscircleag@gmail.com formore moreinformation. information.

(859) 278-0899 COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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37


FEATURE

IS THAT WEED POISONOUS? WHAT YOU DON’T WANT YOUR CATTLE TO EAT MICHELLE ARNOLD DVM-Ruminant Extension Veterinarian, University of Kentucky

Poisonous plants are responsible for considerable losses in livestock although many cases go unrecognized and undiagnosed due to a lack of knowledge of which plants could be responsible and the wide range of symptoms that may result from consumption. The potential for poisoning depends on the availability and quantity of the toxic weed, the stage or maturity of plant growth, weather, and season of the year. Most weeds have an undesirable taste and cattle will not consume them unless they are baled up in hay or pasture is limited due to drought or overgrazing. However, if cattle have access to areas where toxic weeds predominate and little else to consume, the potential exists to eat enough of one particular plant to result in illness or death. Usually large quantities are required to cause problems but some are deadly with just a few mouthfuls. Plant poisoning should be considered a possibility in cattle on pasture with a sudden onset of unexplained symptoms such as diarrhea, salivation or slobbering, muscle weakness, trembling, incoordination, staggering, collapse, severe difficulty breathing or rapid death. Oftentimes plant poisonings only affect a few cattle in the herd and severity of symptoms primarily depends on the amount consumed over what period of time (rate of consumption). Many weeds retain toxicity when dried and are considered dangerous in hay. Seeds can be a potent source of toxin and may inadvertently end up in grains fed to cattle. Prevention of problems begins with learning to recognize poisonous plants; weeds frequently grow in fence rows, along creek or stream banks, near ponds and in the woods although some (such as cocklebur, horsenettle and pigweed) are found in pastures and hayfields. Do not overgraze pastures because animals will usually avoid weeds as long as there is plenty of hay or grass available. It is also important not to harvest toxic weeds in hay or silage since cattle often do not sort through these feeds and leave the weeds uneaten. Ultimately, prevention involves implementing effective weed control and offering supplemental forage or feed 38

when pasture is limited so cattle are not forced to graze toxic weeds. Where it is practical, use management practices to thicken the stand and improve the growth of desirable forages which can compete with the emergence and growth of annual weeds. The following page addresses the major poisonous weeds found in Kentucky pastures along with a few of lesser importance. These weeds were chosen because of their potential for some symptoms to result from consumption and they are relatively common so the risk of exposure is elevated. If available, information on the amount necessary to be toxic in cattle is included. Part II will cover toxic trees and shrubs. This series of articles will not address forage disorders such as grass staggers from mold, fescue toxicosis, slobbers from moldy clover, and will only briefly address nitrate and cyanide poisoning where applicable. UK Extension fact sheets are available on these and other forage disorders at the UK Extension Website https://bit. ly/2LaMWZj under the “Publications” tab or ask the county extension agent for this information. Pictures of many of the weeds and control options are available from the UK Extension publication “Broadleaf Weeds of KY Pastures” at https://bit.ly/2uzbdOj and more in-depth information regarding weed control may be found in the Extension publication entitled “Weed Management in Grass Pastures, Hayfields, and Other Farmstead Sites” at https://bit.ly/2L92TPx For help identifying weeds, individuals can submit unknown weed samples through the local county extension office. For plants that the local ANR agents are unable to identify, he or she will forward them on to the UK Weed Science Herbarium. Collect as much of plant as possible (roots, leaves, stems, flowers, etc.) for submission to the county extension agency. Two common weeds in Kentucky causing problems in livestock are perilla mint and poison hemlock. A severe type of pneumonia can result from ingestion

of the leaves and seeds of perilla mint (Perilla frutescens). This weed is also known as perilla, purple mint, mint weed, beefsteak plant, and wild coleus. Perilla thrives in late summer, when pastures are frequently dry and dormant, and cattle are looking for something to eat.

Poison hemlock

Perilla mint has a distinctinve mint aroma, dark green to purplish square stems and serrated leaves with a purple tine. Mature plants reach 2-3 feet tall and produce small, white to purple flowers with abundant seeds. The weed prefers shaded areas along creeks, in fence rows, and the edges of the woods and partially shaded pastures. Once it becomes established, perilla produces many seeds and large colonies can develop in succeeding years. The flowering or seed parts of perilla mint contain the highest concentration of perilla ketone, considered the most toxic agent involved. The perilla ketone is absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to the lungs where it damages the lung tissue. Affected animals are frequently found dead. Treatment is of limited value and severe cases seldom survive.

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Poison hemlock is growing everywhere in Kentucky. Cattle seldom eat poison hemlock but they will if no other forage is available or it is incorporated in hay or silage. Occasionally cattle in total confinement will break into an area with an overgrowth of poison hemlock and graze it down quickly simply because it is green. The toxins involved are conium alkaloids that have two major effects in cattle. A rapid, sometimes fatal effect on the nervous system can occur by ingesting as little as 0.2-0.5% of their body weight in green hemlock. Symptoms of poisoning can develop rapidly, anywhere within 30 minutes to 2 hours after consumption, and begin with slobbering, muscle tremors, and incoordination progressing to respiratory failure and death. Secondly, the alkaloids are teratogenic agents (causing birth defects) in calves if it is eaten by a cow during the first trimester of pregnancy. Fall calving cows are more frequently affected when they ingest young, green hemlock plants in the late winter and deliver calves in the fall with severe birth defects including crooked legs, deformed neck and spine, and cleft palate.

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Spiny Amaranth

Buttercup

Cocklebur

Horsenettle

Tall Ironweed

Hemp Dogbane

Poison Hemlock

Marshelder

Common Milkweed

Jimsonweed

Sericea Lespedeza

Maypop Passionflower

Buckhorn Plaintain

Perilla Mint

Multiflora Rose

Trumpetcreeper

Canada Thistle

Common Ragweed

Lanceleaf Ragweed

Wild Carrot

Bull Thistle

Musk Thistle

Curly Dock

Chicory

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PLANT

CLINICAL SIGNS

TOXIC AGENT

TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CATTLE

Distribution maps can be found in the Plants database: http://www.plants.usda.gov Ingestion of perilla mint causes “acute respiratory distress syndrome”, a sudden and dramatic onset of open-mouth breathing with the head and neck extended, nostrils dilated, a sway-back appearance, tongue protruding with foam coming from the mouth, an open-shouldered stance, and sometimes aggression. Breathing is shallow and rapid. Affected animals are frequently found dead. Mature cattle are most often affected but it can occur in yearlings and calves.

The flowering or seed parts of perilla mint contain the highest concentration of perilla ketone, considered the most toxic agent involved.The early pre-seed stage of the weed is of relatively low toxicity while the flowering and green seed stage plant is most toxic, especially the seeds themselves. Dried hay is less of a risk than green plants but still can be lethal while frosted plants have relatively low toxicity. The perilla ketone is absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to the lungs where it damages the lung tissue.

Severely affected animals usually die quickly but animals that live 48 hours typically survive although may develop chronic lung problems or heart failure. The stress of handling cattle can cause prompt death so treatment, if attempted, must be handled very cautiously. A dart gun may be necessary to avoid moving the animal to a treatment facility. Treatments administered or recommended by a veterinarian may include diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and corticosteroids used in an extra-label manner.Treatment is of limited value and severe cases seldom survive.

Sudden death. Increased respiratory rate, anxiety, trembling, muscle twitching, collapse, convulsion, death in minutes. Blood has a bright cherry red color . The signs of nitrate intoxication occur quickly and may be fatal within minutes to hours. Weakness, staggering, aggressive behavior , foamy salivation, and dark mucous membranes may be observed prior to death. Blood has a brown to chocolate color. Those pregnant cows that survive will likely abort.

Cyanogenic glycosides. When plant cells are crushed, chewed, wilted, frozen, chopped or otherwise ruptured, the enzymes in the plant can rapidly form free cyanide gas which is rapidly absorbed in the bloodstream from the rumen. Immature, < 2 feet tall, drought stressed, physically damaged, or frost damaged johnsongrass are forms at highest risk for poisoning. Cyanide prevents hemoglobin from releasing oxygen to tissues and the animal dies quickly from lack of oxygen. Johnsongrass may also be a nitrate accumulator under certain conditions. Nitrates are highest in the stems and lowest in the leaves and seeds. Excess nitrates result in formation of methemoglobin from hemoglobin in the blood, a form which cannot transport oxygen.

Sodium thiosulfate at 660mg/kg slowly IV as a 30% solution for cyanide toxicosis. For nitrate toxicity, treatemnt with Methylene Blue (1% solution) at a dose of 4-15mg/kg slowly by IV injection

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum)

Foliage has an unpleasant mouse urine-like odor, detectable when near the plant or when a stem or leaf is crushed. Livestock generally avoid it unless forage is scarce but it may be accidently consumed as a contaminant of hay or silage. Symptoms of poisoning can occur rapidly anywhere within 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the animal, quantity consumed, and toxicity depending on stage of plant growth. Signs include muscle weakness, incoordination, trembling, dilated pupils, salivation, weak heartbeat, mousy odor to breath and urine, death by paralysis of respiratory muscles

Contains 8 piperidine alkaloids; the two major ones are coniine (major alkaloid in the seed) and gammaconiceine (predominate in green, vegetative growth). There is considerable variation in the toxic alkaloid content of the plant depending on stage of growth, season, moisture, temperature, time of day, and geographical region. The conium alkaloids have two major effects: 1) rapid, sometimes fatal effects on the nervous system by acting as neuromuscular blocking agents and 2) they are teratogenic agents (causing birth defects in calves and pigs) if eaten during the first trimester of pregnancy. Cattle have died by eating as little as 0.2-0.5% of their body weight in green hemlock. Hay and grain contaminated with seeds are sources of poisoning.

No specific treatment for poisoning exists. If acute poisoning does not progress to respiratory failure and death, the prognosis for full recovery is good. Avoid overexcitement and stress that may exacerbate clinical signs and result in death.

White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima formerly known as Eupatorium rugosum)

Tremetol was originally associated with toxic effects but it is actually a mixture of compounds that make up Causes "trembles" in cattle due to acidosis and tremetol that cause metabolic impairment. Consumption ketonemia resulting from hypoglycemia. Gradual onset of green plant material at 5-10% of body weight is of depression, weakness, reluctance to move, muscle needed, either in small amounts over several weeks tremors, stiffness, constipation, acetone odor to breath, or large amounts over several days. Leaves, stems, and collapse. Signs may be in calf and not in the dam. green flower heads. Toxicity decreases with drying but still possible in hay. Cows can excrete tremetol in milk, protecting the cow but places calves and humans at risk.

Treatment involves good nursing care along with high quality feed, IV glucose to alleviate ketosis and acidosis, and activated charcoal to reduce absorption of toxin. Prolonged period of recovery.

Solanaceae (Nightshade family)

Horsenettle, Jimpsonweed, also black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). Potatoes are toxic if sprouted and skins turn green. Green tomato vines may cause poisoning if fed to livestock.

Horsenettle/ Bullnettle (Solanum carolinense)

Depression, loss of appetite, drowsiness, incoordination, trembling, weakness, grinding teeth, rapid breathing, constipation but followed by diarrhea. Calves may have have edema (swelling), ventral subcutaneous swelling, and abdominal fluid accumulation.

Toxin is primarily solanine, a tropane alkaloid, causing decreased intestinal motility, dilated pupils, fast heart Alleviation of clinical signs, possibly with physostigmine, rate and irritant effects in the digestive system.May have to treat anticholinergic poisoning additional cardiac (heart), neurologic and hepatic (liver) effects.

Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium)

Generally not a problem because is unpalatable. Consumption of small amounts cause reduced gut motility and decreased appetite. Dilated pupils, dry mucous membranes, and increased heart and respiratory rate. Depression, restlessness, irritability, constipation; if severe intoxication, ataxia and delirium, respiratory failure

Anticholinergic tropane alkaloids hyoscyamine and scopolamine. Entire plant, both green and dried in hay. Seed most toxic. Contamination with 1000 seeds /kg feed is cause for concern in adult cattle

Perilla Mint (Perilla frutescens)

Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)

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Activated charcoal given orally. Physostigmine is drug of choice for reversing anticholinergics.

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PLANT

CLINICAL SIGNS

TOXIC AGENT

TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CATTLE

Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium, X. pensylvanicum and other spp.) Primarily a Liver Toxin

Potent disruptor of cellular function leading to profound hypoglycemia, brain and liver tissue primarily affected. Excess salivation, tremors, ataxia (wobbly gait), seizures, , sometimes regurgitation and aggression may be seen.Rapid progression to death. Hepatotoxicity (liver damage) is a common finding but does not always cause death.

Carboxyatractyloside (CAT) is responsible for toxic effects, which is concentrated in embryonic and cotyledonary tissues so it is found only in seeds within the bur and the 2-leaf seedling stage. 2 leaf stage is lethal to calves at 1% of body weight. Seeds toxic and potential problem in hay, silage or grain. A dose of 0.14-0.2% body weight of seeds is toxic in calves.

No treatment to counteract effects. Activated charcoal and IV glucose may help but prognosis is poor.

Spiny Amaranth/ Pigweeds (Amaranthus spinosus, A. retroflexus and other spp)

After ingestion over several (5-10) days, signs of renal (kidney) disease develop including weakness, trembling, unsteadiness, knuckling, paralysis and death within 1-2 days. May see diarrhea with or without blood. The signs of nitrate intoxication occur quickly and may be fatal within minutes to hours. Weakness, staggering, aggressive behavior , foamy salivation, and dark mucous membranes may be observed prior to death. Those pregnant cows that survive will likely abort.

Appearance of the renal form of disease is with ingestion of fresh green plants. Some animals seem predisposed to seek out the weed and consume it. The cause of myocardial degeneration (heart muscle damage) and renal (kidney) disease are not known. Oxalates are suspected of causing the renal effects but other factors likely contribute. Oxalate levels are highest in leaves, lowest in stems and moderate in the seeds. Nitrate poisoning may be seen with fresh plant material but more likely in dried plants in hay. Nitrates are highest in the stems and lowest in the leaves and seeds. These weeds are predisposed to accumulate nitrates under certain conditions (heavy fertilization/ spray with 2,4 D). Excess nitrates result in formation of methemoglobin from hemoglobin in the blood, a form which cannot transport oxygen.

Renal form of the disease, goal of treatment is to allow recovery of function of the kidneys through general nursing care. Treatment with calcium is not useful. Prognosis for recovery is poor. Treatment for nitrate intoxication is 4-15 mg/kg body weight of a 1-2% solution of methylene blue IV. Extended withdrawal time of 2 years is necessary.

Curly Dock (Rumex crispus)

Abrupt onset (8-12 hours after beginning to graze new pasture), signs of depression, excess salivation, staggering gait, tremors, difficulty walking, collapse, labored breathing, death if left untreated.

Rare intoxication. Oxalate toxicosis and digestive tract irritation. Seldom a problem because plants are not eaten or eaten slowly due to bad taste.

Prompt treatment with calcium solutions will result in relief of symptoms. Relapses may occur.

Plants Affecting the Cardiovasular System

Plants affecting the cardiovascular system contain cardiac glycosides that cause heart and digestive disturbances. Heart problems include irregular heart rhythms and eventual heart block; digestive problems include abdominal pain and diarrhea.

Hemp Dogbane (Apocynum cannabium)

Diarrhea, sometimes with blood, weakness, slow heart rate. Very large amount required for intoxication of cattle

All plant parts, green or dried in hay, contain cardenolides which are toxic to the heart (cardiotoxic). Effects are similar to digitalis and may inhibit heart function. Also digestive disturbances.

Activated charcoal and other symptomatic treatment.

Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca and other spp.)

Signs develop within 8-10 hours with severity depending on amount consumed. Toxic effects include a fast heart rate, incoordination, weakness, trembling, muscle twitching, falling, seizures, paddling, bloat, groaning, salivation, respiratory failure and death.

Contain toxic cardenolides (cardiac glycosides) that affect the heart by affecting heart muscle conduction and contractility. Other glycosides and resinoids have direct effects on the nervous system. Milkweeds are most toxic during rapid growth and retain their toxicity when dried in hay. All parts of plant, consumed green or dried in hay, are toxic. Depending on the type of milkweed, 0.5-2% of animal's body weight in green plant can cause symptoms.

No specific treatment is available. Animals that do not consume a lethal dose should recover over several days but may be very weak during recovery. Activated charcoal along with sedatives to control convulsions may help. Atropine is indicated for cardiotoxic effects.

Plants Affecting the Digestive System

Excess Salivation (drooling, slobbering), and diarrhea are common signs

Buttercup (Ranunculus abortivus and other spp)

Blistering of the skin, mouth and digestive system. Irritation to mucous membranes of mouth and digestive system. Excess salivation (drooling, frothy saliva) and intestinal irritation that may result in gastroenteritis and diarrhea. Bitter taste can be passed in the milk.

Oily glycoside ranunculin converted to irritant protoanemonin by plant enzymes when plant is chewed. Stems and leaves; Plants are particularly irritating when flowering. Hay is safe.

Intestinal protectants such as mineral oil are beneficial.

Pokeweed/ Pokeberry (Phytolacca americana)

Oral irritation, excessive salivation, irritation of digestive tract, moderate to severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea (may be bloody), depression, death possible depending on amount consumed

All plant parts, esp. roots and seeds (berries), contain irritant saponins, oxalates and the alkaloid phytolacine. . Dairy cattle fed pokeweed in green chop developed severe diarrhea, drop in milk, and decreased body temperature the following day

Intestinal protectants (activated charcoal) to control absorption of toxins, fluids to correct dehydration and electrolytes

Oxalates consumed at a toxic level produce signs of Plants Primarily muscle tremors, weakness, tetany and recumbency, Affecting the Renal usually due to low blood calcium and magnesium from System (Kidneys) the kidney damage. Death is attributed to kidney failure.

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PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM State and National Beef Promotion and Research Programs Information is required by 7 CRF 1260.201. Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential per 7 CRF 1260.203.

TODAY’S DATE

ID NUMBER (IF KNOWN)

SELLER’S NAME

BUYER’S NAME

ADDRESS

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

CITY

SELLER’S SIGNATURE

STATE

ZIP

BUYER’S SIGNATURE

Both the seller and the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Kentucky Beef Council. DATE OF SALE

STATE OF ORIGIN*

TOTAL NUMBER OF CATTLE SOLD

X

$1.OO per Head Federal Checkoff

$

X

$1.OO per Head State Checkoff

$

Total Checkoff Payment for Federal and State

PERSON REMITTING FORM

+ =

BUYER

SELLER

PHONE

*If the cattle purchased came from another state within the last 30 days, indicate from which state the cattle were purchased.

$

Send Report and Remittance to: Kentucky Beef Council 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 For additional information: call 859-278-0899 or email beef@kycattle.org According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0581-0093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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FEATURE

CONSIDER MILLETS AS A HIGH QUALITY FORAGE University of Kentucky

During the hot summer months adding warm-season annuals to a grazing system can provide a high quality forage when cool-season grasses and legumes decrease in production and quality. One available warm-season annual that can be used in Kentucky is millet. Adding millets can reduce or end the need for feeding stored feeds, overgrazing of cool-season grasses when they are in the “summer slump”, and can increase field stocking density. Millets are smallseeded, fast-growing summer annual grasses used for hay, pasture, and silage. These warm-season annuals are often used as a temporary forage before doing fall pasture renovation. Even though there are several different types of millet, the two most popular in Kentucky are foxtail millet and pearl millet. Millets can produce high yielding, good quality forage in a short period of time, without the risk of prussic acid

poisoning. Prussic acid can be produce by sudangrass, forage sorghum, and sorghum-sudangrass crosses. Livestock may develop symptoms of prussic acid poisoning when these forages are pastured, or fed as green chop following a drought or frost. Because millets do not produce this toxic compound , they can be a safe alternative to sudangrass pastures. Foxtail millet is used primarily as a forage crop for silage or hay. Forage varieties can grow to over 40 inches in height, and be cut 75 to 90 days after seeding. Foxtail millet grows shorter than pearl millet and has a finer stem, making it easier to harvest as hay. This annual grass does not regrow after harvest, making it a good crop to use before no-till seeding another crop such as fescue, alfalfa or winter annuals. Foxtail millet has a shallow root system and not ideally suited for grazing. Pearl millet is better suited for grazing

as it higher yielding and will regrow after grazing. Pearl millet should start to be grazed once it reaches a height of 20 to 24 inches. It will regrow if 8 to 12 inches of stubble is left and you can re-graze it in 10 to 20 days, depending on growing conditions. Dwarf varieties are also available that are leafier and better suited for grazing. Brown midrib varieties of pearl millet are higher in digestibility and feed value due to lower levels of lignin, but they are often lower yielding. The time of year to plant these crops ranges from May 1 until the end of July. Later plantings reduce the number of harvests of pearl millet and yield potential of both types. Seed can be broadcast and cultipacked, planted with a grain drill into a firm, well-prepared seedbed, or seeded using a no-till drill. The suggested seeding rate for pearl millet is 15 to 20 lbs. per acre when broadcast and 8 to 10 lbs per acre when drilled. Foxtail millet

suggested seeding rate is 20 to 30 lbs. per acre when broadcast and 15 to 20 lbs. per acre when drilled. For optimum yield, lime, phosphorus, and potassium should be applied in accordance to the soil test results. Actual nitrogen should be applied at planting time at a rate of 60 to 100 lbs. per acre, and 40 to 60 lbs. per acre of actual nitrogen may be added after each harvest of pearl millet. Killing weeds prior to planting millet is essential because foxtails and Johnsongrass are extreme competitors. No significant diseases or insect problems occur with millet with the only exception being birds that can damage the grain. Millets provide a good source of feed for cattle, and can decrease the need for stored feed in the summer months. For more information on which variety may be best in your area contact your local extension agent.

BEEF BASH 2018 Thursday, September 20th, 2018

University of Kentucky Research and Education Center Princeton, KY 42445 Registration Begins at 8:30 AM Central Time This exciting field day will offer many demonstrations, commercial exhibits, educational exhibits and more. You’ll have opportunities for hands-on activities and, of course, the chance to visit with other Kentucky beef cattle producers, UK personnel and administration as well as KCA staff and leadership.

For More Information Visit: https://www.facebook.com/KyBeefIRM/ COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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FEATURE

STOCKPILING FOR FALL AND WINTER PASTURE Garry Lacefield, Ray Smith, Jimmy Henning, John Johns, and Roy Burris

Many cattle producers can take advantage of the late summer-fall growing conditions to obtain highquality pasture for fall and early winter grazing. This practice is called stockpiling. Management decisions for optimum stockpiling include selecting grass species, timing, fertilizing, grazing management or utilization, selecting classes of cattle, and designing grazing systems for efficient utilization. Grasses to Stockpile The best grass for stockpiling is a coolseason grass that will retain its green color and forage quality later into winter. In addition, the grass should be somewhat resistant to low temperatures and have the capabilities of forming a good sod. Kentucky has two adapted grasses that have these characteristics: tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass. Tall fescue produces more fall and winter growth than bluegrass (Table 1).

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Table 1. Yield and crude protein content of Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue produced from Aug. 15 to Dec. 1 under different levels of N fertilization at Lexington (average of three years). Nitrogen Applied lb/acre 0 45 90

Bluegrass Yield % lb/acre Protein 700 12.8 1600 15.5 2100 19.1

Fescue Yield lb/ % acre Protein 1700 11.1 2800 11.8 3900 14.8

Source: Taylor, T.H., and Templeton Jr., W.C. 1976. Agron. J. Vol. 68, Mar-Apr.

Time to Begin Stockpiling Late July-early August is the time to begin stockpiling for fall and winter use. Remove cattle in late July or early August, apply necessary fertilizer, and allow the grass to accumulate growth until November or December. Make sure that summer growth has been removed to 3 to 4 inches by grazing or clipping so that stockpile production comes from new grass regrowth. During the stockpiling period, August 1 to November 1, other available forages such as sorghum-sudan

hybrids, sudangrass, bermudagrass, grass-lespedeza, and grass-clover should be used. After frost, alfalfa-grass and clover-grass growth should be grazed first before moving to grass fields. Table 2. Effect of time of nitrogen application on production efficiency of KY 31 tall fescue. Date N Applied Aug 1 Aug 15 Sept 1 Oct 1

Nitrogen Efficiency lb DM*/lb N added 27.2 25.8 19.2 10.8

*Dry matter. Source: Murdock, Lloyd W. 1982. Agronomy Notes. Vol. 15, No. 2, April 1982.

Fertilizer Needed A soil test should be taken to determine the phosphorus, potassium, and lime necessary. Nitrogen should be topdressed at the rate of 40 to 60 pounds of actual N per acre on bluegrass and 40 to 100 pounds on tall fescue. When N was applied August 15 and yields were taken in December, Kentucky researchers have

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

shown that bluegrass fertilized with 45 pounds of nitrogen per acre had a yield increase of 20 pounds of dry matter for each pound of nitrogen applied. In the same study, tall fescue showed an even greater nitrogen use efficiency with 24.4 pounds of dry matter produced for each pound of nitrogen applied. Additional studies have shown that the greatest yield increases occur when N application occurs soon after August 1 (Table 2). Nitrogen applications before August 1 may encourage the growth of summer grasses such as crabgrass and foxtail and subsequently reduce the production of bluegrass and tall fescue. Source of nitrogen will also influence N use efficiency with urea 79 to 89% as effective as ammonium nitrate on an equivalent nitrogen basis (Table 3). These studies show that with wise use and timing of fertilizer, high production can be obtained during fall and early winter. The sugar content and digestibility of tall

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Table 3. Pounds of tall fascue 10 weeks after N application. Application Date

None

Early Aug Mid Aug Sept

786 741 372

lb/acre % Ammonium Nitrate 1683 1438 1076

Urea

U/N*

1406 1287 852

84 89 79

*Efficiency of urea compared to ammonium nitrate. Source: University of Kentucky.

fescue are also better during fall-early winter than any other time of the year. This increased quality in the fall has been shown in many studies including the data in Table 4 from the University of Kentucky. Table 4. Seasonal percentage changes in chemical composition and digestibility of tall fescue. Sugars Protein D.D.M.*

Spring 9.5 22 69

Summer 8.5 18 66

Fall 19 19 74

*Digestible dry matter. Source: Buckner, R.C. 1975. Univ. of Ky. Coop. Ext. AGR-44.

Utilization of Stockpiled Forages After frost, be sure to graze the grasslegume fields quickly before the plants deteriorate. After these fields are grazed, the stockpiled grass field or fields should be grazed. Light stocking will cause a lot of waste as a result of trampling. To make most efficient use of the high-quality feed in stockpiled fields, install a temporary electric fence across the field dividing it

so the area to be grazed first has a source of water and minerals. Once the animals have grazed this area off, move the fence back, opening up a new strip. Repeat this system until the entire field is grazed. What Classes of Cattle Benefit the Most From Stockpiled Grasses? Stockpiled grass is an excellent choice for fall-calving cows. It can be used after calving and during the breeding season when their nutritional needs are greatest. Spring-calving cows may benefit most from grazing stockpiled grasses if they are in thin body condition in the fall. They can regain condition while grazing and be in better shape going into the winter. Spring-calvers in mid-gestation that are in good body condition may not need as high a quality of feed and could use lowerquality feed. Over-conditioning cows in late gestation may increase birthweight of their calves.Growing, weaned cattle can also be grazed on stockpiledfescue. Backgrounders can lower the feed costs of their operations by utilizing stockpiled grasses. Animal Performance on Stockpiled Tall Fescue The high quality of stockpiled tall fescue (Figure 1) produces good gains on both weaned stock and mature cows. These gains are a response to the high crude

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protein and digestibility of the fall growth of tall fescue. In particular, the sugar content rises to very high levels in response to lower temperatures and shortening day length. This nutritional change does not take place overnight due to the first frost but is spread over time. Table 5. The effect of the endophyte on calf average daily gain (ADG) when grazing stockpiled tall fescue. ADG,lb Endophyte Level E+ EE+ and clover

Kentucky, 1986 Oklahoma, 1986 1.49 2.17 ---

1.85 2.47 2.02

Calf Gains Several factors affect gain of calves grazing fall stockpiled tall fescue, including the endophyte status of the fescue and the length of the grazing period. The presence of the fescue endophyte will decrease gain (Table 5) even with the cooler temperatures of fall. Calves grazing endophyte-infected stockpiled fescue gained 1.49 pounds daily in a Kentucky trial and 1.85 pounds in an Oklahoma trial (Table 5). Calves on endophyte-free tall fescue in the same trials gained 2.17 lb/day in Kentucky (45% increase) and

2.47 lb/day in Oklahoma (34% increase). In comparison, clover mixed with endophyte-infected tall fescue increased gains by only 9% in Oklahoma. In other studies where calves were grazed from early November to mid-December on endophyte-infected stockpiled tall fescue, gains ranged from 0.97 to 2.13 lb per day (Table 6). In conclusion, calf gains are higher when grazing endophyte-free tall fescue, but the detrimental effect of endophyte-infected tall fescue is much lower with late fall grazing in comparison to summer grazing. Table 6. Average daily gain (ADG) of calves grazing stockpiled tall fescue. Trial KY, 1982 KY, 1985 KY, 1986 OK, 1986 KY, 1990 IL, 1992

Grazing Days 59 57 56 42 63 56

ADG, lb 1.27 1.15 2.00 2.13 0.97 1.76

Cow Gains Another area where stockpiled tall fescue is helpful to the livestock producer is by extending the grazing season for the cow herd, thereby decreasing the need for stored feed. Studies have also shown that grazing stockpiled tall fescue can reduce

labor requirements up to 25% of that for conventional hay feeding. University of Kentucky researchers found stockpiled tall fescue produced 66 days of grazing per acre for dry, mature Angus beef cows and allowed the cows to gain 1.24

pounds per day. In the same study, hay requirements were only 564 pounds per cow during the period November 6 to February 10 (Table 7). Missouri data (Table 8) showed a reduction in wintering cost of $100.00 per cow.

Table 7. Performance of dry, pregnant cows* grazing stockpiled tall fescue (four-year average). Grazing Dates 11/6 to 2/10 Average Daily Gain 1.24 pounds Stockpiling rate 1.33 cows per acre Gain per cow 119 pounds Hay fed per cow (11/6 to 2/10) 564 *Mature Angus cows bred to calve in March. Source: Bradley, Neil, et al. 1984 Beef Cattle Research Report, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture Progress Report 282, pp. 11-12. Table 8. Wintering cost per cow. Winter feeding period from December 1 to April 10. Forage Source

Hay

Cornstalks

$/cow/day

$1.32

Days of use

130 hay

$0.05 60 stalks 70 hay $122

Wintering cost $172 Source: Gerrish, J. et al., University of Missouri.

Stockpiled Tall Fescue $0.31 90 graze 40 hay $70

Ryegrass + Cereal Rye $0.61 90 graze 40 hay $108

In summary, stockpiling of adapted cool-season grasses such as tall fescue and bluegrass extends the grazing season, reduces winter hay feeding, provides a good return of high-quality forage for each pound of nitrogen fertilizer applied (providing other nutrients are not lacking and the nitrogen is applied early), and provides the beef cow herd an ideal place for wintering and calving.

1 p.m. • Saturday, September 15, 2018 Knoxville Livestock Center Knoxville, Tennessee

with Guests Annual Production Sale

Offering Bulls, Females, Semen & Embryos Rays Power Surge B409 Featured Service Sire

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Auctioneer: May Smokester 9512 daughter

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Terry Baxter, Newport, TN (423) 608-0345 TN Lic #2301

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FEATURE

NCBA APPLAUDS U.S. HOUSE MOTION TO BEGIN FARM BILL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

Labor Day, Monday • Noon (CDT)

(Conveniently located one hour southeast of Nashville)

SEPTEMBER 3, 2018

Best

e h t h t i w o G At the farm, Bradyville, Tennessee

WASHINGTON (July 18, 2018) National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Kevin Kester today issued the following statement regarding the U.S. House of Representatives’ approval of a motion to proceed to a conference committee for the 2018 Farm Bill: “This is yet another step in the right direction toward a Farm Bill that delivers on the important priorities of America’s farmers and ranchers. We’re especially pleased to see significant bipartisan support for the motion to instruct conferees. This motion instructs the conferees to support permanent mandatory funding for the Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) Vaccine Bank and the other important programs included in the Animal Disease Preparedness Response requests in the bill. “We look forward to continuing our work with House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway (R-Texas), Ranking Member Collin Peterson (D-Minn.), and the rest of the conferees as the 2018 Farm Bill is finalized.”

125 HE A D SELL

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Request Your Sale Book Today! www.JDHMKT.com Jack D. Hedrick 904-613-4261 jdh@cableone.net

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FEATURE

A LIFETIME OF SERVICE, A LEGACY UNMATCHED By Dr. Les Anderson, Extension Professor, University of Kentucky

The Kentucky Beef Industry is entering a new era. In about a month, Dr. Roy Burris will retire from his Beef Extension position at the UK Princeton Research and Education Center. Undoubtedly, few Extension educators have influenced their industries as much as Dr. Burris. In 1995, the University of Kentucky established one of the first truly integrated teams to guide the development of the beef educational programs. Prior to this effort, the beef educational programs in Kentucky were unorganized, with no structured curriculum to help educate our producers and stimulate change. The UK Beef IRM Coordinating developed a “Blueprint for Success” with the mission stating they “…will change the Kentucky Beef Industry in a measurable, positive way by providing a dynamic educational program…” Arguably, the educational program developed by the UK Beef IRM Committee has had more impact on the Kentucky Beef Industry than any other Extension program in the US. The UK Beef IRM Committee was the brainchild of Dr. Roy Burris. Roy’s vision, his dedication, his leadership have revolutionized our Extension programs and will have a lasting impact on Kentucky’s beef industry. Dr. Burris’s true gift is that he understands the value of teamwork. Roy recognized that individual accomplishments were not going to “move the needle” and were not going to change an entire industry. He needed a team and wanted to work with a group whose focus was improving the industry rather than individual accomplishments. With the support of Dean C. Oran Little and Associate Dean for Extension Walter Walla, Roy founded the UK Beef IRM Coordinating Committee. This committee was charged by UK administration to change the beef industry. I joined the Coordinating Committee in 1997 and I quickly learned

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that this committee was different and had a different approach. The Committee function by consensus; all members had to agree with a proposal before it was adopted. It was a true team led by Dr. Burris. Roy wrote a grant and the UK Beef IRM Committee was awarded $750,000 by the USDA to fund the development of Master Cattleman and the Beef Leadership Conference. These two programs helped establish our first curriculum for beef education and prepared our group for our first submission to the Agricultural Development Board. Twenty years later, the Kentucky beef industry is vastly different, in part, because of Dr. Burris’s vision and leadership. Dr. Burris’s teamwork and leadership was not limited to his UK colleagues. Roy helped shape UK’s relationship with KCA. Roy fostered UK’s partnership with the Kentucky Beef Network to procure the funding necessary for the growth of our beef educational programs. Many states are envious of our close working relationship and our collective ability to obtain funding vital for progress. Roy always considered his main job was to work with beef producers, especially those in Western Kentucky. It’s easy to see why Dr. Burris has such an impact. Roy invested in his work and his clientele are his friends. Roy once told me “It’s not just about education, it’s about changing people’s lives”. If you know Dr. Burris, you know he practiced what he preached. Dr. Burris has been an incredible mentor. His selfless focus on young faculty made it much easier to develop a career. His guidance will be missed but not as much as his friendship. Dr. Roy Burris has dedicated his career to the Kentucky Beef Industry. His leadership, selflessness, and friendship will be greatly missed. Dr. Roy Burris, a lifetime of service, a legacy unmatched!

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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FEATURE

NEW TEST CAN DETERMINE NITROGEN LEVELS IN SOIL Sharon Durham

Nitrogen is the main nutrient added to cereal crops like corn, which makes them grow faster and stronger. But too much of a good thing could sometimes have negative outcomes. Too much nitrogen can run off with rainwater or leach through to soil and contaminate groundwater. Now, a simple, rapid and reliable test can determine the nitrogen amount in soil. For corn growers, the current assumption is that corn grain requires 1.2 pounds of nitrogen applied for every bushel produced. This works for some soils, but not exactly for others, as the assumption doesn’t factor in nitrogen from soil organic matter. Knowing the soil’s potential to mineralize nitrogen from organic matter, making it available

to plants, would help improve nitrogen fertilizer recommendations, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ecologist Alan Franzluebbers, lead investigator of this research. A series of experiments published in Soil Science Society of America Journal studied the effectiveness of this quick and inexpensive approach that can tell a farmer prior to the growing season how much nitrogen will be available by testing a soil sample. In the first experiment, Franzluebbers, with Agricultural Research Service’s (ARS) Plant Science Research Unit in Raleigh, North Carolina, and his colleagues illustrated how soil nitrogen mineralization can be predicted with a three-day analysis of soil-test biological activity (STBA).

Soil is not an inert, dead plot of dirt; it contains many living organisms that enhance the soil’s ability to make nutrients available to plants. Insects, bacteria and fungi play a part in making soil valuable for crop production. The STBA measures how much “life” is contained in soil and how much usable nitrogen is in soil. In the second experiment, Molly Pershing, a graduate student under Dr. Franzluebbers’ guidance, conducted greenhouse trials to determine if higher levels of STBA actually equated to plant uptake of nitrogen from soil. The researchers found that indeed greater STBA was associated with greater plant nitrogen uptake. Greenhouse-grown plants were not supplied any nutrients other than what was present in soil. More than three-fourths of the plant nitrogen uptake was from organic nitrogen that had to be mineralized, which was well predicted by the STBA level. In the third experiment, Franzluebbers asked farmers to participate in the research. Forty-seven fields were sampled in the spring for STBA. On those fields, different rates of nitrogen fertilizer

were applied to test which was most effective in optimizing corn yield. The higher the STBA level—indicating a large amount of “life” in the soil—the lower the need for additional nitrogen. The lower the STBA level, the greater the need for additional nitrogen. Adding too little nitrogen can lead to a smaller harvest—costing farmers the opportunity to make more money. Adding too much nitrogen costs farmers money in unnecessary input to soil. Applying nitrogen at the correct levels can optimize yield and profit while keeping excess nutrients out of rivers, lakes and groundwater. Using STBA, corn growers now have a preseason test that can more accurately determine the proper amount of nitrogen to apply for economically optimum yield. The Agricultural Research Service is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s chief scientific in-house research agency. Daily, ARS focuses on solutions to agricultural problems affecting America. Each dollar invested in agricultural research results in $20 of economic impact.

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Watch for Blue Grass Heifer Sales coming October—December!

STOCKYARDS Est. 1946

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bgstockyards.com COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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increase once the plant sets grain and reaches the milk/dough stage because of the weight and high energy content of the grain. So the question presented is, why would we want to graze corn before it fully matures?

FEATURE

GRAZING CORN University of Kentucky

Grazing Green Corn Several options exist to provide quality grazing during seasons when many common forages have gone dormant or are less productive. Non-traditional forages can provide high quality grazing throughout the hot summer months and into the fall. Corn is mainly used in Kentucky for grain or silage. Grazing green corn can be a valuable method to extending the grazing season and reduce stored feed needs without the expenses of harvesting and feeding equipment. Many Kentucky producers have grazed corn as a stockpiled forage with mature ears overwinter, but the focus of this article is grazing corn during the vegetative or leafy stage. The nutrients needed to produce a high yielding corn crop for grain are higher than most other forages used for grazing. The nitrogen requirements for corn generally range from 125-150 lbs. of nitrogen per

acre. If planting with the intention of grazing before grain development the fertilizer requirements can be lowered to similar recommendations of other warm season annual grasses that produce 3-5 tons dry matter. Soil tests need to be taken to determine the phosphorous and potassium needs for the specific location. Grazing corn in an early vegetative stage can provide a forage high in protein and digestible fiber. A demonstration conducted at the University of Wisconsin found that plants at a V9 stage (stalk with only 9 leaves) contained 18% crude protein and ADF of 36.6%. As the plant matures and begins to develop an ear, the percentage of protein will decrease to 12-15% at tasseling and around 8% once the plant reaches maturity. The fiber content in the plant will also increase as the plant matures and begins to produce an ear because a significant amount of the plant is stalk at this point. However, the total digestible nutrients (TDN)

The time frame to graze green corn is going to vary with growing degree days, date planted, and variety. A basic rule of thumb would be to plant by mid to late May, but corn can be planted later in the season if you want grazing for late summer. The number of days it takes to reach the tasseling stage is about 60 to75 days depending on the variety used and weather conditions. If planted mid to late May, corn should be tasseling in mid to late July, when cool-season grasses are struggling with “summer slump”. Grazing corn during this time will allow a producer to remove cattle from coolseason pastures and let them rest and regrow until temperatures are cooler and growing conditions are more favorable. Grazing corn while green may not provide the yield as mature corn, but it can still provide 4 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre. The Wisconsin research that produced this tonnage is based on using 30” rows and a 33,600 seeding

population. The corn yield produced in 75 days is as much or more than a tall fescue stand will produce in an entire year. In 2014, a demonstration at the University of Kentucky Princeton station used 15” rows and a 60,000 seeding rate. The green corn was grazed with growing beef heifers. The average daily gain (ADG) was 2.2 pounds per day from July 7 until September 22. According to other research, if these animals had been grazing infected tall fescue during this time frame, the ADG would have been 1 pound or less per day. Grazing green corn can be achieved during a time of the grazing season when other forages are not very productive, and need a rest period. The yield of green corn is less than mature corn, but is still impressive considering the short number of growing days it takes to reach tasseling. Another consideration when using corn is the opportunity it gives a producer to prepare a tall fescue based pasture for stockpiling for use later in the winter months. Using best management practices with any forage is important to maximize utilization and reduce waste. Strip grazing will maximize utilization and

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Contact Us Today! Derek Woods - 859-588-5416 or Toll Free - 877- 547-4738 www.silverstreamshelters.com 52

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make the diet more uniform as animals will be forced to graze both high and low quality parts of the plant rather than selectively grazing. This is especially important to aid in the prevention of acidosis or foundering. Trials have shown that providing 2 to 3 days of forage at a time is best. The area needed will vary depending on animal size, animal needs, and available forage. Temporary fencing is usually run through corn rows after driving down rows with an ATV and running poly wire or poly tape, supported by temporary fence posts, through this area in the field. When setting up the fence provide enough space between corn and the fence to eliminate the wind blowing corn down or cows from placing partially eaten plants on the fence causing it to short out. Many producers allow livestock access to other stockpiled species, such as tall fescue, as a supplement to graze corn. Access to a grass field is also important as it provides a bedding place, and a holding area

during wet conditions. A few precautions exist when grazing corn. First, depending on animal requirements, the corn plant may not supply sufficient protein as the plant matures and it may be necessary to supplement protein using soybean meal, dried distillers grains or other plant protein sources. Next, nitrate poisoning can be a risk when grazing drought stressed corn. Always test corn plants when high nitrate levels are suspected. In rare cases, founder has occurred in animals turned onto corn. Although green corn is not a traditional grazing crop, it can provide quality feed in times of the year when other common forages are deficient or dormant. This warm-season grass is actively growing while cool-season grasses have slowed or become dormant during the summer months.

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NEBRASKA YOUTH BEEF LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM

NYBLS NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS

The Kentucky Beef Council is pleased to announce an educational opportunity for five Kentucky High School students. This program is a joint venture with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and their Youth Beef Leadership Symposium. The dates for this program are November 1-4, 2018 and will be held at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus. Registration fee, air transportation, meals and lodging costs will be funded by the Kentucky Beef Council. Adult

chaperones will be traveling with the students. Also as part of the trip, an extra day will be taken to visit a feedlot, packing plant and farms in the surrounding area. We are now accepting applications for this program. Students must be high school juniors or seniors. They should have a desire for continuing their education and a strong interest to learn more about the beef cattle industry. Applications are being accepted and

NAME

must be postmarked by September 7, 2018. A personal interview will be required for the final selection process. We will notify applicants by phone to schedule their interview. Interviews will take place at the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association office in Lexington. Applications can be found on our website at www.kycattle.org under the NYBLS tab. If you have questions please email Niki Ellis at nellis@kycattle.org or call 859-382-4303.

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

PHONE

COUNTY

AGE

MAIL APPLICATION TO: KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION NYBLS 176 PASADENA DRIVE LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 40503

JUNIOR

EMAIL

GENDER

BIRTHDATE

SENIOR ACTIVITIES YOU ARE INVOLVED IN

LEADERSHIP ROLES

ACHIEVEMENTS/ACCOMPLISHMENTS

EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE (IF APPLICABLE)

HOBBIES

ESSAY: WHY DO YOU WANT TO ATTEND NYBLS AND WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO GAIN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE? IF YOU NEED EXTRA ROOM TO EXPAND IN ANY OF THE ABOVE AREAS, PLEASE USE ANOTHER SHEET OF PAPER. APPLICATIONS DUE BY SEPTEMBER 7, 2018. A PERSONAL INTERVIEW WILL BE REQUIRED FOR THE FINAL SELECTION PROCESS. WE WILL NOTIFY THE APPLICANTS BY PHONE TO SCHEDULE THEIR INTERVIEW. INTERVIEWS WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICE IN LEXINGTON.

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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3/1/2018 10:56:53 AM

55


H A L L O F FA M E AWA R D DO YOU KNOW AN OUTSTANDING CATTLEMAN OR CATTLEWOMAN? The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Hall of Fame is designed to honor a member of the organization that has given time, ser vice, and talent to the betterment of the Cattlemen’s Association at the county and/or state levels.

2 018 I N D U C T E E E S

2019 applications must be postmarked by August 31, 2018. Call Becky Thompson at (859) 278-0899 with questions. Application available at kycattle.org/halloffame.html

REGION 1

REGION 2

REGION 4

ROY BURRIS

HANSELL PILE

BILLY GLENN TURPIN

CALDWELL COUNTY

56

HARDIN COUNTY

MADISON COUNTY

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

REGION 5

JAY PRICE

CASEY COUNTY

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FEATURE

FALL FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS University of Kentucky

Fertilizer application is often needed for a healthy forage stand. Having a soil test done before applying fertilizer to pastures is strongly encouraged. Apply only what is needed according to the soil test results. The University of Kentucky recommends phosphorus (P) applications starting when the soil test P level drops below 60 lbs/acre and potassium (K) when soil test K drops below 300 lbs/acre. Ideal soil pH levels are dependent on the forage type and usually range between 6.0 and 5.5. Nitrogen application in late October to November is ideal to increase grass density, lateral spread, and color. According to Dr. Ray Smith, UK Forage Extension Specialist, if applied at this time, the forage stand will thicken by producing new tillers and spring growth will start earlier. Grasses will also stay greener further into the fall and early winter. Spring application can deplete carbohydrates, reduce root growth, and increase weed competition. Applying nitrogen in late October to November will benefit the forage without causing excessive top growth, a depletion of reserve carbohydrates, or weed invasion. The increase in grass density will allow for competition against spring weeds and the ability to better tolerate traffic. Nitrogen applied in early October will result in more top growth than November applications. Applying twice in the fall has proven to have many benefits. It is recommended that the first application of 30-40lbs/acre is applied the first of September and a second of 30-40lbs/ acre be applied the middle of October to early November. If applying nitrogen only once in the fall, apply 40-60 lbs/ acre in late October to early November.

Saturday, September 29, 2018 • 1:00 PM ET Chenault Ag Center • Mt. Sterling, KY

Selling 50% Embryo Interest in these Elite Donors. The final bid may be Doubled for Full Ownership!

Ms Fortune 63X is a homozygous black, homozygous polled donor out of the great Ms Highlight 767T donor. She has always produced top quality offspring with substance and eye appeal. Her flush to Black Impact will be sale features in the spring 2019 Bluegrass Invitational Sale. She is due to calf 11/8/2018 to Godfather 575C.

Selling spring possession of 3G Bandoleer 458B. Bandoleer 458B has proven to be a tremendous herd sire whose offspring excel in growth, structural correctness, and eye appeal. He is flawless in his makeup and youthful in the pasture.

Ms Highlight 64X is a homozygous black, homozygous polled donor that doesn’t miss. Her mating to Watchman produced the $9,750 Ms S & S Watchman 453B and and her mating to Alumni the $6,000 Ms S & S Alumni 572C. Note her grand dam is the $20,000 Ms Nero 121A donor. She is truly a female to build a program around. She is due to calf 11/6/2018 to Godfather 575C.

Selling 20 spring bred heifers. Many AI bred to Godfather 575C.

Sale managed by

Slaughter Sale Management For catalog or information contact:

David Slaughter

162 Hastings Lane Fredonia, KY 42411 Phone: (270) 556-4259 E-mail: hmslghtr@aol.com Like us on Facebook at Slaughter Sale Management

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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MARCH 2 - JULY 13

Average Hot Carcass Weight Price: $1.28 Hot Carcass Weight Price Range: $1.23 - $1.37 Total Head Processed: 230 cows Average Weekly Number of Cows: 12 Total Farm Gate Sales: $212,851 Total Pounds Packaged: 101,999 lbs Impacted Counties: 18 Impacted Farms: 28 FARM GATE SALES (X $1000)

NUMBER OF CATTLE PROCESSED

POUNDS PACKAGED (X 1000 LBS)

AVERAGE HOT CARCASS WEIGHT PRICE

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT

SEVEN SPRINGS FARM By Carey Brown

Seven Springs Farms is not your average Kentucky farm, nor do they strive to be average. However, one thing you can always count on in the farming industry is the people. People who are honest, hardworking, wise, humble and greet you with a smile on their face are what you can always rely on. Walking into their office near Cadiz, KY you are sure to see a flurry of people and activity, with red trucks coming and going, proudly displaying the Seven Springs logo on the door. A lot needs to be done when farming 30,000 acres of crops and backgrounding over 14,000 head of cattle each year. The farm, located near Cadiz, KY, was founded in 1994 and derived its name from springs located around the farm. What started as a farm equipment repair business and custom farming business has grown into a farming operation that includes corn, soybeans, wheat, barley, tobacco, cattle, a construction business and ownership in a local restaurant. The farm consists of 2609 owned acres and the remaining is cash rented in a total of 8 counties including Christian, Trigg, Caldwell, Crittenden, Lyon, Calloway, Livingston and Hopkins counties. While this may sound like a lot of counties, the majority of the farms are within a 40 acre radius around the office. They currently maintain 58 full-time employees plus 24 migrant workers from Mexico and South Africa. Managing partner, Joe Nichols focuses on the bottom line, because he has to as a first generation farmer. The hard work of him and his employees has obviously paid off in his relatively short, full-time farming career.

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The Roots After watching his family lose their farm his senior year of high school, Joe finished school and started working at Robinson Implement Company (a John Deere dealership) for Bill Robinson in Princeton, KY. Bill’s son, Joe, helped him immensely during this time. Joe taught him how to mechanic, and gave him the experience and training that he needed. “I worked hard for them and I think they saw that and I will always be thankful for the things they taught me,” stated Nichols. Joe eventually opened his own repair business for a few years before returning to become a General Manager of Hutson Ag Equipment the same JD dealership under new ownership by Dan C. Hutson II. He worked at that dealership from 1995 until 2000 when he decided to start farming full-time.

wheat and 110 acres of dark fire cured tobacco. All indicators for the other crops look great for 2018. For the row crops, the farm does practically all of the work themselves, from planting to spraying to harvest. They take advantage of the latest technologies as well. It helps them to make decisions, save money and in general, makes things easier. They typically do 1,000 acres of corn behind corn every year and the rest is a corn-wheat double crop soybean rotation. In the grain business, Joe really puts his farm mantra to work, “You never get a second chance to make the right decision”. The operations on the farm remain flexible and they aren’t afraid to make a last minute decision to switch

crops, if they think it is the right move. Joe loves calculators. To him, the calculator is the most important tool on the farm and to prove that he has 25 of the same model. Some are backups, but you can find them in the office or at his home. As he says, “If you have the data to put in the calculator, you can figure it out and make a decision based on that, and that is exactly what I do.” They are also continually making improvements where they can. More recently they have installed center pivots around the farm, including 2300 acres currently. They installed the first pivot in 2009, but mother-nature provided plenty of rain that year so they did not even need it. Since then, they have installed more and it pays off in drought years, giving them an extra 45-50 bushels per

Nichols credits Dan Hutson and Bobby Boggess with giving him a lot of skills he would need in the future to run his own business. “They gave me five years and every chance to learn and were really great people to work for,” claimed Nichols. “They basically gave me a Ph. D in Business Management.” While he enjoyed his work with the dealerships he ultimately decided he wanted to farm full-time and that is exactly what he did. Out in the Fields Joe just recently finished up his 25th wheat harvest and even though it may be one of his worst wheat crops ever, he knows that is just part of the risk of farming. In an average year the farm is raising 13,000 acres of corn, 10,000 acres of soybeans, up to 10,000 acres of COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT acre on corn and around 18 bushels per acre on soybeans. The land in the area can make it difficult to use because of the uneven terrain and access to water can be limiting in many areas. The benefits in dry periods pay off though and Joe testifies, “They will make your normal productive average soils that are always a week away from a drought or crop reduction in yield, produce with your class A soils. They will pay for themselves faster, on more marginal soils that do not have the water holding capacity of the best soils!” The grain storage capacity on the farm is capable of holding 2,600,000 bushels in grain bins and another 800,000 in grain bags for yellow corn on a concrete pad. A class in mechanical drawing during high school came in really handy for Joe. He has designed every building on the farm and drew the plans out the way he wanted them and in a location that made the most sense. He planned the grain bins on the farm himself and spent a lot of time at the location to look at the challenges they had and designed it with a solution in mind.

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PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT

Feeding Cattle The cattle side of the operation is a new venture, but one that has proved very successful since its inception in 2015. Local cattle farmer, Scott Jolly, had been farming his entire life. He grew crops and raised cattle but had been in the business long enough to see the ups and downs in the market and knew how fast it could all change. He decided in 2014 that it was time to get out. His children had chosen jobs in the medical field, prices were high and it just seemed like the right time to get out. After talking with Joe, Scott sold part of his farm to him. Joe doesn’t have a history with cattle farming so they worked out a deal that is beneficial for both. Scott now manages the cattle side of the operation for Seven Springs Farms. So far, it is working out really good. “I can sleep better at night and instead of the pressure of working by myself I get to work with a great crew of people that make the job so much easier and more efficient,” Scott confides. It is phenomenal how they have merged the grain and cattle operations together. It makes a lot of sense to run them together. The farm already had plenty of employees and the equipment to make it 62

work. They can now use bad grain and chopped silage plus Joe’s contacts on the grain side to feed the cattle. “To make money on the cattle side you really only need a few things,” expressed Jolly, “Cheap feed, cheap cost of gain, good health (death loss annually is .5% either way of 2%) annually and marketing are what it takes.” Byproducts of the grain operation are the perfect products for the cattle side. Since feed is so important to what they do, having such a large grain operation behind them works harmoniously. In addition to the grain, they have also used distillers grain to feed the cattle. They are currently getting whiskey mash from a distillery in Bardstown and this has proven worthwhile as it has cut their protein and energy costs in half. Seven Springs Farms is in an alliance with Frionia Industries, a relationship that Scott brought to the table because of his history in the cattle industry. Friona Industries, a feedlot company based out of Amarillo, TX, became the second largest cattle feeder in the United States in July 2018. The purchase of two Kansas based feedlots now gives them a capacity of 577,000 head of cattle. Frionia

Industries is a partner with Cargill, a leading U.S. meatpacker. The feedlot is willing to buy as many cattle as they can get and Seven Springs Farms plans to send them more cattle in the future. Seven Springs is also in an alliance with Riley Livestock out of Mayfield, KY, who purchase all of the cattle for them. Most cattle are bought through the auction markets around Kentucky and Tennessee. They focus on 450-500 pound heifers and then keep the cattle about 90 days. They typically add about 200-250 pounds to the cattle before they are shipped on to the feedlot.

Nearly all of their beef grades high choice or prime and they are determined to make a product that they can be proud of and that the consumer will enjoy. They market all of their beef as hormonefree and antibiotic-free and it is dry aged, something that can’t be found at supermarkets in the area.

There are shipments of cattle coming in almost daily and the health protocols are very important to get them all gaining weight as quickly as possible. All cattle are worked upon arrival and treated before being sent out in groups. They also PI test all of the cattle coming in and positives are grouped together and never sent on to the feedlot. Cattle that don’t fit the standard for Frionia and all of the PI cattle that come into the farm are finished and they use the beef to sell at their local retail market, country clubs and other restaurants they currently do business with.

Joe acknowledges that farming is a tough environment, especially without the generational equity behind you. “When you are just getting started, you are always one decision away from failure,” he plainly stated. “Generational farms can usually afford some mistakes, but when you are just getting started you don’t always get the luxury of making a bad decision.” Joe acknowledges the need for young farmers but also understands the challenges they face. High land, expensive equipment and no room for errors, make it a tough industry to survive in.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

So far, the cattle side is holding its own. The goal is to continue to increase the cattle numbers on the farm. It is proving that it can compete with the grain side of the business Day-to-Day Challenges

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PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT Another challenge on Seven Springs Farms and lots of other farms in rural Kentucky is the lack of access to technology. You can’t manage a farm without access to lots of information. Every morning Joe checks the markets, weather, and reads news from around the world. That news has the potential to affect decisions he makes so he watches it closely. The farm is located in rural Kentucky and getting access to modern internet connections proves to be challenging and costly. Currently they spend nearly $1,000 per month just to have T4 cable and that isn’t really fast enough for their needs. The rural infrastructure makes it difficult for many

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

farmers, but it is something that is a necessity on Seven Springs Farms.

find and wants them to be involved in the decisions on the farm.

Around the Office

His family is very involved on the farm as well. His oldest daughter, Heather works as the Office Manager and handles all of the FSA work. Heather’s husband Nick, works on the grain side focusing on technology, inputs, purchasing seeds and chemicals as well as the grainery. Joe’s youngest daughter, Macy, is working on the cattle side. All the while Joe’s wife Ashley is getting ready to start her 26th year teaching School and currently as a preschool teacher in Trigg County School System.

Dan Hutson taught Joe another thing that he will never forget. It’s people. Surround yourself with the very best. Every day I try to make one less decision on the farm. That empowers all of the employees to take ownership in their job and be more involved. A thoughtful decision making process is a very powerful tool in the Seven Springs Farms office. Our employees make decisions that aren’t just good for them, but good for the operation. Joe is quick to credit all of the farm employees for the success of the farm. He hires the best people he can

It makes him proud to have them involved on the farm and knows that

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ultimately they are why he works so hard now. He doesn’t want to spend his career building the farm for nothing. He wants to make it the best he can and hope that it is something his family will be able to continue for generations. Joe clearly acknowledges that it would have been easier to have been a doctor or a lawyer but it wouldn’t have been as enjoyable. He is doing exactly what he wants to do and he couldn’t be prouder of his family involvement and daily work his team gets done. His family is most important and he is dedicated to making sure they are involved and can continue to farm well into the future.

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FEATURE

WHY ROOTS MATTER TO SOIL, PLANTS, AND YOU By Larry York, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Noble Foundation

Imagine walking out into a crop field or pasture. What do you notice? Perhaps you see amber waves of grain out to the horizon or hear the leaves rustling in a cool breeze. But would you ever think about what’s beneath your feet? What lurks in that hidden world, and why does it matter to you? As you look at all the growth aboveground, you might consider that just as much plant mass is invested in roots. In fact, in the springtime in Oklahoma, 1 acre of grassland or pasture may have about 1,000 pounds of standing shoot mass aboveground but as much as 3,500 pounds of roots below ground, in the top foot of soil. Roots’ Role Plants are like a factory, using energy from sunlight to produce sugar in their leaves that provides the carbon backbones for making all the other molecules required for life. In order to build more leaves with their green chlorophyll, plants need to send their roots out into the soil to forage for water and mineral nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. These nutrients are required for making proteins, like chlorophyll, and to fuel the molecular energy system in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Also, DNA itself requires phosphorus. Once a new leaf is built, water from the soil is taken up by the roots and eventually evaporates from the leaves. Essentially, the whole plant is acting like a straw, with the tips of the roots taking up water from the soil. Improved Root Design When pondering how to optimize root systems, we have to think carefully. More roots are not always better. Roots are built from the carbon gained during photosynthesis, meaning they represent a construction cost. All those roots also require carbon for normal operations such as respiration, which is the maintenance cost. Therefore, optimizing root systems requires both engineering and economic principles about how to efficiently explore soil with as few roots as possible. In fact, many human factories use this marginal value theorem from economics to decide which parts of the factory to invest in, always maximizing the investment’s profit per unit cost.

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Designing better roots is an important avenue for helping people. With better roots, we can increase yield, reduce fertilizer use and pollution, and promote soil health. In basic research and breeding programs at the Noble Research Institute, we consider aspects of root system architecture including root angles, number of axial roots, lateral root branching density and root diameters. We use image-based plant measurement, or phenotyping, among many other approaches. Benefits of Better Roots However, roots don’t matter only to the plant. In fact, roots are central to soil health, which ultimately relies on the photosynthetic abilities of plants to provide food to the entire ecosystem. As roots explore, they release sugars, organic acids and other compounds into the soil during the exudation process. Through this process and others, soil around the roots becomes a special place called the rhizosphere (rhizo means root in Greek). These organic compounds can promote beneficial soil microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, and inhibit plant pathogens. Beneficial soil microbes increase carbon and nutrient cycling in the soil, ultimately benefiting plants. As roots die, the entire organ becomes dinner for the microbial community along with other soil creatures like worms and insects. All these root-derived inputs are fundamental to creating and storing soil carbon and are a driving force for soil health, as increased soil carbon allows for better water infiltration and storage in pastures and fields. Designing better roots is an important avenue for helping people. With better roots, we can increase yield, reduce fertilizer use and pollution, and promote soil health. At the Noble Research Institute, we are screening natural diversity for root traits in several crop and pasture species; with the creation of new knowledge, we will include these traits in breeding programs to release new cultivars with improved root systems. So, the next time you’re outside admiring the beauty aboveground, don’t forget there is an equally beautiful and complex world under your feet.

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FEATURE

MAY BEEF EXPORTS SHATTER VALUE RECORD; PORK EXPORTS TREND LOWER U.S. beef exports set a new value record in May while also increasing significantly year-over-year in volume, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). May pork exports were lower than a year ago, though January-May totals for U.S. pork remained ahead of last year’s pace.

May pork export volume was 217,209 mt, down 2 percent from a year ago and reflecting smaller exports of variety meats. Export value was $562.5 million, down 3.5 percent. For January through May, pork export volume was still 3 percent ahead of last year’s record pace at 1.08 million mt, while value increased 6 percent to $2.85 billion.

Beef export volume was 117,871 metric tons (mt) in May, the sixth-largest on record, valued at a remarkable $722.1 million, which surpassed the previous monthly high (March 2018) by a healthy 4 percent and was 24 percent higher than a year ago. Through the first five months of 2018, beef exports were up 10 percent in volume to 547,157 mt while export value was $3.32 billion, 21 percent above last year’s record pace.

Exports accounted for 27.8 percent of total pork production in May, down from 29.5 percent a year ago, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported fell about one percentage point to 24 percent. For January through May, the percentage of total production exported was slightly below last year at 27.5 percent, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported increased slightly to 23.7 percent.

Exports accounted for 13.6 percent of total beef production in May, up from 13 percent a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was 11.1 percent, up from 10 percent last year. For January through May, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total beef production and 10.9 percent for muscle cuts – up from 12.8 percent and 10 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value averaged $313.39 per head of fed slaughter in May, up 18 percent from a year ago. The JanuaryMay average was $317.69 per head, also up 18 percent. Following a record performance in April,

May pork export value averaged $55.05 per head slaughtered, down 6 percent from a year ago. The January-May perhead average was $55.57, up 2 percent from last year. Japan, Korea lead the way as global demand for U.S. beef continues to climb Japan and South Korea continue to be the pacesetters for U.S. beef export growth. In May, export volume to Japan totaled 30,117 mt (up 19 percent from a year ago) valued at $196.8 million (up 22 percent and the highest since August 2017). Through May, exports to Japan were up 4 percent from a year ago in volume at 128,207 mt while value increased 13

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percent to $822.9 million. This included a 6 percent increase in chilled beef volume to 61,178 mt, valued at $488 million (up 18 percent). May exports to Korea were up 46 percent from a year ago in volume (20,781 mt) and jumped 64 percent in value to a record $146.2 million. For January through May, exports to Korea climbed 34 percent to 91,875 mt, valued at $647.3 million – 49 percent above last year’s record pace. Chilled beef exports to Korea totaled 20,365 mt (up 30 percent) valued at $196 million (up 41 percent). “Despite the intense competition U.S. beef faces in Japan and Korea, these markets continue to display a terrific appetite for a growing range of cuts,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “Beef items that are traditionally popular in Asia continue to perform and other items more suitable for thick-cut steaks and barbecue concepts are gaining more traction, resulting in exceptional growth opportunities. But the enthusiasm for U.S. beef extends well beyond these two leading markets, and that’s how exports have reached this record-breaking pace.” For January through May, other highlights for U.S. beef include: In Mexico, exports were up 4 percent in volume (98,900 mt) and 13 percent higher in value ($427.9 million). Mexico is a critical market for U.S. rounds, shoulder clods and other muscle cuts which are typically undervalued in the U.S. market. It is also the leading destination for U.S. beef variety meat exports, which increased 15 percent from a year ago in value ($98.9 million) despite a 2 percent decline in volume (43,479 mt). Exports to China/Hong Kong increased 20 percent in volume (57,186 mt) and 47 percent in value to $442.2 million. May exports to China were the largest (834 mt) since the market opened in June of last year, pushing the January-May total to 3,133 mt valued at $28.7 million. However, effective July 6, China’s import duty rate on U.S. beef increased from 12 percent to 37 percent. The higher tariff

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

will make it difficult for end-users to profitably utilize U.S. beef, especially with U.S. beef already priced at a premium compared to imports from other suppliers and with Australian beef subject to a duty of just 7.2 percent through the ChinaAustralia Free Trade Agreement. Coming off a record performance in 2017, beef exports to Taiwan continue to gain momentum. Exports were up 31 percent from a year ago in volume (22,127 mt) and 43 percent higher in value ($209.9 million). Chilled exports increased 39 percent in volume (9,272 mt) and 52 percent in value ($116 million), as U.S. beef captured 74 percent of Taiwan’s chilled beef market. More reliable access to Indonesia has helped bolster beef exports to this promising market, with volume increasing 52 percent from a year ago to 6,247 mt and value nearly doubling to $28.7 million. Due in part to the United States successfully challenging Indonesia’s import restrictions at the World Trade Organization, U.S. beef now faces fewer obstacles and a more consistent regulatory environment. Indonesia’s strong performance and solid growth in the Philippines helped push exports to the ASEAN region 17 percent higher in volume (18,472 mt) and 28 percent higher in value ($102.4 million). Led by strong growth in Guatemala, Costa Rica and Panama, exports to Central America jumped 21 percent in volume (5,436 mt) from a year ago and 22 percent in value ($30.6 million). January-May highlights for U.S. pork include: As an outstanding destination for U.S. pork for further processing and valueadded items destined for the home meal replacement sector, exports to South Korea continue to achieve impressive growth. May exports climbed 44 percent from a year ago in volume (22,447 mt) and 47 percent in value ($64.4 million). For January through May, exports to Korea totaled 117,335 mt (up 44 percent), valued at $340.6 million (up 54 percent).

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Exports to leading value market Japan were 1 percent below last year in volume (167,294 mt) and steady in value ($689.6 million). This included a 4 percent decrease in chilled pork, with value down slightly at $424 million. Surging demand in Colombia and solid growth in Peru pushed pork exports to South America up 26 percent from a year ago in both volume (50,993 mt) and value ($125.4 million). Argentina officially opened to U.S. pork in April but it has taken some time for exporters to complete various regulatory processes. USMEF is optimistic that shipments to Argentina can begin soon. Exports to Australia and New Zealand were up 8 percent in volume (36,184 mt) and were 11 percent higher in value ($107 million) as the United States has gained market share in Oceania, an increasingly important market for U.S. hams.

ANNOUNCING THE COMPLETE & TOTAL DISPERSAL BLACK & RED ANGUS GENETICS

Shelby Cattle Company September 8, 2018 - Noon CST

Tennessee Livestock Producers, Columbia, TN Moderate Framed, Maternally Efficient, Easy-Fleshing, Perfect Udders & Deep Bodied Cattle Managed Strictly On Grass & Hay

Led by strong year-over-year growth in Honduras, Panama, El Salvador and Guatemala, pork exports to Central America climbed 18 percent from a year ago in volume (33,590 mt) and 20 percent in value ($79.7 million). Coming off a record year in 2017, exports to all seven Central American nations achieved double-digit growth in the first five months of 2018. Exports to the Dominican Republic, which were also record-large in 2017, increased 19 percent in both volume (19,102 mt) and value ($42.4 million) through May. For the Caribbean region, exports were up 13 percent in volume to 25,667 mt and 14 percent in value to $60.8 million. With solid growth in the Philippines and Vietnam offsetting lower shipments to Singapore, pork exports to the ASEAN region increased 12 percent in volume (20,630 mt) and 24 percent in value ($57.4 million). Pork variety meat exports to the ASEAN, which are especially important when shipments to China are declining, increased 50 percent in volume (6,827 mt) and 58 percent in value ($12.5 million).

Over 300 Head Sell! The Largest Collection of OCC, Sinclair, Beckton & Red Hill Genetics to Sell East of the Mississippi This Year. Spring Pair Splits • Fall Bred Cows & Pairs • Bred Heifers & Open Heifers Herd Bulls • Embryos • Semen

Call or Email For Your Free Sale Book

Sale Managed By

Ken Brubaker 540/908-5799 ken@brubakersales.com brubakersales.com

Shelby_July18KCC.indd 1

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Ronnie Shelby Ethridge, TN 615/300-3536 rsbeefman@aol.com shelbycattlecompany.com 6/16/18 8:30 AM

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Your #1 Choice for

FEATURE

KFB MARKETBASKET SURVEY SHOWS INCREASE IN FOOD PRICES FOR SECOND STRAIGHT QUARTER After two years of slight quarterly declines in food prices, the most recent Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) Marketbasket Survey indicates a food-cost increase for a second straight quarter. The survey, taken four times each year, price-checks 40 basic food items throughout the state in an effort to gauge current food-price trends. Since the end of 2016, surveyed food items had dropped by a total of $3.79 or just over three percent. That trend seems to have come to an end, at least for the first half of 2018. After a first quarter increase of 1.35 percent, the most recent survey shows a 2.19 percent jump. The total price of all 40 items came to $118.26. The latest Consumer Price Index report from May noted little movement nationally in most food categories over the last several months. There was an unadjusted, 12-month period increase of 1.2 percent in the all-food category. Foodat-home indices indicated a .2 percent decline for the month of May. Specifically, the CPI noted, “The index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs declined 0.7 percent, while the fruits and vegetables index fell 0.3 percent in May after increasing 1.0 percent in April. The indexes for other food at home, and dairy and related products also declined.” Marketbasket Survey specifics: These second quarter increases were spread out across all the surveyed food categories including, beef, pork, poultry, dairy, fruits and vegetables, and grains. The largest category increase came in pork products with a rise of 4.09 percent, followed by poultry with an increase of 3.69 percent. All other categories were at or below the two percent mark. The largest single item

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Superior Angus Forage Genetics CED +10 BW -1.4 WW +51 YW +97 SC +1.03 DOC +33 MILK +21 $B +106

increase was attributed to a 10-pound bag of Idaho potatoes, which rose by $.55 followed by whole smoked ham prices, which rose $.46 per pound. “Even though we are seeing small increases for the first two quarters of 2018, the surveyed food items are still below 2016 prices at the same time of year by nearly 1.6 percent,” said KFB Commodity Division Director Joe Cain. “In the case of pork and poultry increases, we saw pork prices drop by nearly four percent at the end of 2017 and poultry prices fell during the first quarter of this year. I think the shifts we are seeing now can be attributed to normal market fluctuations as opposed to any long-term changes in the market.” Agricultural Economics in Food Prices: Whether or not U.S. grocery prices fluctuate from one quarterly survey to the next, Kentuckians and all Americans continue to enjoy some of the lowest food prices in the world. Shoppers in the U.S. spend only about seven percent of their disposable income on food each year. Those costs remain far lower than any other country in the world thanks to many of the agricultural efficiencies utilized in America. Today the average U.S. farmer produces enough food and fiber to provide for about 154 people – a significant jump from an average of 19 people per farmer back in 1940. Yet while more food is now being produced on less land, the farmer’s share of the retail food dollar in America is down. According to the USDA’s Food Dollar Series, a farmer earns less than 15 cents per dollar spent on food, which is the lowest amount since the Food Dollar series began, and down significantly from the 31 cents earned in 1980.

Dutch Creek Forager 816 308

Reg.# 17751513

• 250 Pathfinder Angus cows in his extended pedigree, including both his dam and grandam.

• Line bred 28 times to Luria of Wye 1022, weaned nearly 5 tons

of calves in her lifetime and was known as the Angus breeds’ oldest living Pathfinder Angus cow at the time of her death. • Super slick hair coat – a must have for fescue-based pastures. At Dutch Creek Farms we place a high emphasis on producing calm natured, easy handling seed stock that are capable of performing at a high level in a low input, all forage environment. Therefore it came as no surprise that in searching the 2018 Angus Sire Evaluation database for the top Angus bulls for docility in combination with low birth weights, rapid growth to a year, and added carcass value, we discovered that Forager 308 ranks in the top 4 bulls of the Angus breed. Having a massive heart girth measurement now in excess of 100 inches, Forager 308 progeny have the ability to thrive and grow in a low cost, all forage environment.

Sons & Grandsons of 308 to go on sale Oct. 2018

100% FORAGE TESTED

18 months old Semen $20/straw All bulls qualify for State Cost Share Visit our website for upcoming video and pics of the bulls

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

DUTCH CREEK FARMS

Doug & Susan Schlosnagle

Pleasureville, KY 40057 Visit our website at dutchcreekangus.com Follow us on Facebook at Dutch Creek Farms Forage Genetics Home: 502-461-7882 • Cell: 502-706-0008 • 502-321-2727 • A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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MAKING SURE WE’RE WELCOME AT EVERY TABLE Research is changing the way consumers look at beef by showing them just how nutritious this total protein package can be. See all the other ways your investment is opening new doors at mybeefcheckoff.com/open 70

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Funded by the Beef Checkoff

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2018 KJCA OFFICERS President: Kathryn Goodman

KENTUC KY J UN IOR CA TTLEMEN 'S EVEN TS Vice-President: Will Blaydes Secretary: Kalli Flanders Treasurer: Reba Prather Reporter: Kailey Thompson KJCA Directors Directors at Large: Jessica Tucker, Jordan Stephens, Ryan Underwood, Savanna Hill, Mandy Cloe Region 1 Zach Imbruglio & Walter Steely Region 2 Megan Underwood & Abigal Smoot Region 3 Will Banks & Jeremy Miller

S UL LIVA N FARM

LOGA N C OUN TY A G AR EN A

50 0 0 SALOMA RD

255 JOHN PA U L R D

CAMP BE L LS VILLE, KY 4 2718

R U SSELLVILLE, K Y 42276

s e z i r p • d o o f • s game

Region 4 Addie White & Nelson Paul Region 5 Julia Weaber & Josh Netwon

M or e i n f o a t k y c a t t le . or g un der th e You th Ac ti vi ties tab

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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FEATURE

25 REASONS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THE KENTUCKY STATE FAIR THIS AUGUST The Kentucky State Fair is only 25 days away! Check out our list of 25 reasons you don’t want to miss the Fair this August.

4. Donut Burgers

1. Free Concerts

What is better than a burger? A burger between two donuts, of course!

This year at the fair, the Texas Roadhouse Concert Series is free with gate admission. Performers this year include country star Gary Allan, Casting Crowns, and much more!

7. World’s Championship Horse Show See the world’s most prestigious Saddlebred horses compete for over $1 million!

10. Divas Through the Decades It doesn’t matter if you’re a fan of Tina Turner or Taylor Swift. Divas through the Decades pays tribute to our Divas featuring songs from the 40s through today’s hits!

5. Inflatable Colon

2. Ducks at the Discovery Farm

Take a nice stroll through the educational colon located in Health Horizons. While you’re at it, local medical professionals will be on site to give free health screenings and assessments!

8. Largest Pumpkin Competition No Fairy Godmother needed here. Last year’s largest pumpkin weighed in at 1,223 lbs!

Seeing the little furry friends sliding, playing and making a splash will make anyone smile at the Discovery Farm in Agland.

3. Deep Fried Oreos How do you make something tastier? You fry it! You don’t want to miss all of the goodness that is a Deep Fried Oreo.

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6. Coca-Cola Talent Classic

9. Pride of the Counties

If you are age 13-21 and like to sing, dance, or have other awesome talents entering into the Coca-Cola Talent Classic may be for you! For more information about qualifying, click here.

Travel all over the Bluegrass without leaving the fairgrounds! Come discover what makes each county across Kentucky unique at Pride of the Counties.

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

11. DOGS – The Marvelous Mutts & Miller’s Border Collies All of our dog lovers out there; this one is for you! Enjoy the wowing talents of the Marvelous Mutts, or experience Miller’s Border Collies showcase herding techniques.

12. Arts in the Air Come to the Fair to see acts like you’ve never seen before. Watch our aerialists and acrobats spin hula hoops and climb a tower of chairs!

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13. Thrill Ville Make memories of a lifetime on nearly 100 rides!

17. Get your pic with Freddy Farm Bureau You can find our friendly farmer on the front porch of Freedom Hall! Take a photo and say hello; he may just talk back to you.

21. Make a furry friend From fluffy sheep to sweet, soft rabbits; meet our Fair furry friends that you will never forget!

14. Hanging out with the Fair Bear 22. Pogo Fred

The Fair Bear is back and better than ever! Come to the Fair and take a #selfie! 18. Ride the Ferris wheel What better way to end a perfect day at the fair than at the top of the Thrill Ville ferris wheel. Watch the sunset and see a stellar view of the fairgrounds!

Don’t miss out on seeing some awesome pogo stunts made by a Guinness World Record holder!

25. Spending Time with Friends and Family Whether you come to the fair for the acts, the food, or the thrills, there’s no better place to make lasting memories with friends and family than the Kentucky State Fair!

KENTUCKY STATE FAIR August 16-26 Hours of Operation Sunday-Thursday 7am Gates Open 9am-9pm Exhibit Halls Open 12am Thrill Ville Rides Close

15. Kentucky Crafted Products Don’t leave the Kentucky State Fair empty handed! Visit the local vendors in the South Wing and shop for handmade goods. 19. Music Lovers- music in every tent

23. Face Painting

Friday-Saturdays

Whether you want to be a puppy, fairy, or cat, become whatever you want and get your face painted.

7am- Gates Open 9am-10pm Exhibit Halls Open 12am Thrill Ville Rides Close

Come listen to an array of musical talents you won’t hear anywhere else. Download the excitement of the Kentucky State Fair with our free app! Personalize your visit to the Fair and create schedules for the music, food, exhibits, and shows you want to experience. The free app is packed

16. Showcasing Talent 24. Fresh Lemonade

Check out the blue ribbon winners from across the state. 20. Play bingo in Heritage Hall

There’s nothing like getting a fresh squeezed lemonade on a hot day at the fair!

with all kinds of interactive features. Download it through the app store by searching “Ky State Fair”.

Challenge your friends to a game of bingo in Heritage Hall! COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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FEATURE

FARM AND RANCH FAMILY STRESS AND DEPRESSION: A CHECKLIST AND GUIDE FOR MAKING REFERRALS Robert J. Fetsch, Human Development & Family Studies, Colorado State University

The last few years have been difficult for farm and ranch families. Many are experiencing financial and emotional stress as a result. There are several signs or symptoms when a farm family may be in need of help. These are signs that can be observed by friends, extended family members, neighbors, milk haulers, veterinarians, clergy persons, school personnel or health and human service workers. These signs include:

Change in routines. The rancher or ranch family stops attending church, drops out of 4-H, Home makers or other groups, or no longer stops in at the local coffee shop or feed mill. Care of livestock declines. Cattle may not be cared for in the usual way; they may lose condition, appear gaunt or show signs of neglect or physical abuse. Increase in illness. Farmers or farm family members may experience more upper respiratory illnesses (colds, flu) or other chronic conditions (aches, pains, persistent cough). Increase in farm or ranch accidents. The risk of farm accidents increases due to fatigue or loss of ability to concentrate; children may be at risk if there isn’t adequate childcare. Appearance of farmstead declines. The farm family no longer takes pride in the way farm buildings and grounds appear, or no longer has the time to do maintenance work. Childrenshowsignsofstress.Farmand ranch children may act out, decline in academic performance or be increasingly absent from school; they may also show signs of physical abuse or neglect.

When farm and ranch families are stressed out for long periods of time – chronic,

prolonged stress – they may experience a number of signs and symptoms. Watch for the following effects in farm families you see on a day-to-day basis (see table below). The greater the number of signs or symptoms a ranch or farm family is experiencing, the greater your concern should be. In addition, if family members are exhibiting the following signs of depression or suicidal intent, it is important that you connect them with professional help as soon as possible. All cries for help should be taken seriously. Signs of Depression

Appearance: Sad face, slow movements, unkempt look.

Unhappy feelings: Feeling sad, hopeless, discouraged, listless.

Negative thoughts: “I’m a failure,” “I’m no good,” “No one cares.”

Reduced activity and pleasure in usual activities: “Doing anything is just too much of an effort.”

People problems: “I don’t want anyone to see me,” “I feel so lonely.”

Physical problems: Sleeping problems, decreased sexual interest, headaches.

Guilt and low self esteem: “It’s all my fault,” “I should be punished.”

Signs of Suicidal Intent

Anxiety or depression: Severe, intense feelings of anxiety or depression.

Withdrawal or isolation: Withdrawn, alone, lack of friends and supports.

Helpless and hopeless: Sense of complete powerlessness, a hopeless feeling.

Alcohol abuse: There is often a link

between alcoholism and suicide.

Previous suicidal attempts: May have been previous attempts of low to high lethality.

Suicidal plan: Frequent or constant thoughts with a specific plan in mind.

Cries for help: Making a will, giving possessions away, making statements such as “I’m calling it quits,” or “Maybe my family would be better off without me.”

HOW TO REFER A PERSON FOR HELP 1.

Be aware of the agencies and resources available inyour community – what services they offer and what their limitations are.

2. Listen for signs and symptoms that the person or family needs help which you can’t provide, i.e., financial, legal or personal counseling. 3. Assess what agency or community resource would be most appropriate to address the person’s (or family’s) problems.

• Call

the agency and ask to speak to the intake worker (if there is one).

• Identify

yourself your relationship the person or family.

• State

what you think the person’s or family’s needs are (needs immediate protection from suicidal acts, needs an appointment for counseling, needs financial or legal advice).

• State

what you think the person’s or family’s needs are (needs immediate protection from suicidal acts, needs an appointment for counseling, needs financial or legal advice).

• Provide

the agency with background information (name, address and phone; age and gender; nature of current problem or crisis; any past history you’re aware of; further information as called for).

• Ask

the agency what low-up action they take:

folwill

4. Discuss the referral with the person or family (“It sounds/looks like you are feeling _____. I think _____ could help you deal with your situation.”)

 When will they act on the re-

5. Explore the individual’s or family’s willingness to initiate contact with the community resource (“How do you feel about seeking help from this person/agency?”)

 What

6. Where the person or family is unwilling to take the initiative or where ther is some danger if action is not taken, you should take the initiative:

ferral?

 Who

will be the person for you to contact later if necessary? will be the of the service fee/sliding scale)?

else to complete the referral?

7. Make sure the person or family and referral agency connect and get together. Make one or more follow-up contacts with the agency if called for by the situation.

Headaches • Ulcers • Backaches • Eating Irregularities • Sleep Disturbances • Frequent Sickness • Exhaustion

EMOTIONAL

Sadness • Depression • Bitterness • Anger • Anxiety • Loss of Spirit • Loss of Humor

BEHAVIORAL

Irritability • Backbiting • Acting Out • Withdrawal • Passive-Aggressiveness • Alcoholism • Violence

COGNITIVE

Memory Loss • Lack of Concentration • Inability to Make Decisions

SELF-ESTEEM

“I’m a failure.” • “I blew it” • “Why can’t I...” COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

cost (flat

 Do you need to do anything

PHYSICAL

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and with

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JOIN TODAY!

At KCA, we are powered by people. Since 1973, the Kentucky Cattlemen's Association has served as a resource for information and education for producers, consumers,  and the industry. Our membership is growing and  we need you to help us stay strong. Join KCA today! COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

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MEMBERSHIP

“KCA works hard every day to promote new markets and opportunities for our product. The educational programs offered are invaluable to today’s farmer.”– Cary and Kim King, Mercer County DIVISION 1 (151+ MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

DIVISION 2 (76-150 MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Barren

498

465

33

Allen

167

126

41

Breckinridge

438

523

-85

Laurel

159

128

31

Shelby

353

361

-8

Henry

157

141

16

Marion

323

332

-9

Northern Kentucky

149

138

11

Bath

304

257

47

Monroe

148

132

16

Adair

288

278

10

Daviess

132

131

1

Logan

286

273

13

Metcalfe

129

117

12

Grayson

268

283

-15

Northeast Area

123

115

8

Franklin

122

112

10

Madison

249

264

-15

Pulaski

108

114

-6

Lincoln

235

240

-5

Anderson

107

104

3

DIVISION 3 (UP TO 75 MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Trigg

104

63

41

Louisville Area

86

72

14

Grant

76

59

17

Mason

71

63

8

Todd

67

65

2

Out of State

67

72

-5

Twin Lakes

66

34

32

Nelson

65

69

-4

Ohio

62

63

-1

Woodford

57

71

-14

Oldham

57

56

1

Pendleton

56

53

3

Montgomery

55

35

20

Rockcastle

51

57

-6

Whitley

51

51

0

Hancock

48

56

-8

Estill

44

42

2

Union

44

39

5

Simpson

42

33

9

Carroll

41

44

-3

Highlands

40

47

-7

Wayne

39

44

-5

Nicholas

38

36

2

Butler

36

42

-6

Lewis

36

39

-3

McCreary

34

44

-10

Bullitt

31

26

5

Menifee

28

23

5

Clay

28

32

-4

Calloway

27

30

-3

Livingston

23

25

-2

Hart

221

194

27

Scott

105

111

-6

Clark

215

193

22

Fleming

105

133

-28

Hardin

202

183

19

Trimble

104

116

-12

Larue

201

210

-9

Jackson

104

100

4

Washington

200

205

-5

Garrard

91

103

-12

Christian

192

192

0

Boyle

90

95

-5

Bracken

189

156

33

Edmonson

90

97

-7 7

-3

-13

82

26

196

89

23

183

Caldwell-Lyon

McLean

Mercer

23

19

4

Casey

172

184

-12

Warren

171

169

2

Harrison

162

167

-5

Jessamine

161

159

2

Russell

88

83

5

Crittenden

Bourbon

85

80

5

Hopkins

21

22

-1

Purchase Area

84

89

-5

Clinton-Cumberland

82

77

5

Owen

81

87

-6

Meade

160

240

-80

Mountain

81

98

-17

Green

153

166

-13

Campbell

77

84

-7

2018

Totals as of: May 16, 2018

10684

2017

Difference

10668

16

If you need anything for membership, please contact Nikki Whitaker at (859) 278-0899 or nwhitaker@kycattle.org 76

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Robertson

20

39

-19

Henderson

10

16

-6

River Hills

9

8

1

Eastern Foothills

9

7

2

Magoffin

8

12

-4

Powell

8

7

1

Pike

7

4

3

Knox

6

6

0

Harlan

2

1

1

Bell

1

1

0

Gallatin

0

2

-2

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2017-18 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION * MEMBERSHIP YEAR 10/1/17– 9/30/18

NAME

SPOUSE NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

COUNTY

RECRUITED BY

PHONE

FAX

EMAIL

ZIP

*Payments of KCA membership dues are tax deductible for most members as an ordinary and necessary business expense. However, charitable contributions of gifts to KCA are not tax deductible for Federal Income Tax purposes. Due to new IRS regulations, $2.24 of your dues would not be deductible. Approximately $12 of your dues will go towards the monthly publication Cow Country News. PLEASE CHECK THE MEMBERSHIP(S) YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN: KCA MEMBERSHIP ($30/YR) Membership dues are $30 unless otherwise listed below

NEW

RENEWAL

NEW

RENEWAL

KCA COUPLE MEMBERSHIP To add your spouse, please add $15 to your KCA Membership KENTUCKY JUNIOR CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION ($10/YR)

I WOULD LIKE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE YOUNG PRODUCER’S COUNCIL TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: KCA

KJCA

$

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS: CATTLEMEN’S FOUNDATION DONATION (voluntary)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: ALL DONATIONS TO KCF ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE

$

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Allen ................................$40 Anderson ........................$25 Bourbon ..........................$20 Boyle ...............................$35 Bullitt ...............................$20 Butler ..............................$25 Franklin ...........................$25 Highlands .......................$20 (Boyd, Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, & Martin)

Hopkins ...........................$35 Laurel ..............................$35 Lewis ..............................$35 Lincoln ............................$25 Louisville Area ................$20 (Jefferson, & Spencer) McCreary ........................$25 Magoffin ..........................$20 Menifee ...........................$25

Mountain...................$25 (Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Morgan, Owsley, Perry & Wolfe) Oldham ...........................$35 Taylor ..............................$20 Twin Lakes ......................$20 Warren ............................$40 Wayne .............................$25 Whitley ............................$25 Woodford ........................$25

IF YOU WOULD ALSO LIKE TO JOIN THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION The NCBA is now a State Marketing Partner with the KCA. You can pay your dues to both organizations with one check, at the same time. # HEAD 1-100

$

COUNTY DUES Dues are $30 except for the counties listed below.

DUES $150

# HEAD 1,001-1,250

DUES $1,150

101-250

$300

1,251-1,500

$1,400

251-500

$450

1,501-1,750

$1,650

501-750

$650

1,751-2,000

$1,900

751-1000

$650

> 2,000

$1,900 + .38/HD

Complete and return to: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 176 Pasadena Drive • Suite 4 • Lexington, KY 40503 For faster service, join online at www.kycattle.org

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UK College of Ag

Kentucky State University

KYFB

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KEN TUCKY’S AG ENC IE stop in Ag Land, located in South In a one acre space, 18 agricultural TRAN S. STONE S sure toTOUCH KY DEPA RTMEN T OF CAB INET EN ER GY FISH & W ILD LIFE at ATIVES the front entrance. There you groups will collaborate together to bring Wing ACOOPER RESOURCES MS will see 35'ax 43'welcome table35'MSxthat you can a unified face and interactive experience 50' N ATION US AL ARM Y get a passport to guide you through the to our largest consumer facing event G UAR D CORPS. of the year. A part from other trade exhibit. This welcome table will be where associations theFFA Animal Discovery Farm, all visiting school groups will begin 4H Cloverville FFA exhibits will be their agriculture experience as well. The 180'and x 110' joining the group. Instead of agriculture MA RSYpassport urges those visitors to answer LEG. being spread out with such long walks for VETERAquestions about each commodity and RESEARC NS H truly gain agriculture knowledge. consumers to visit all exhibits, they will FIRE be given a chance to visit all of Kentucky COMM. Kentucky State Fair 2018 will be August MC DOW ELL Educational Exhibit agriculture within one space and gain 16-26. 119' x 80' a lasting impression of what Kentucky Farm Families do to provide food and

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KY Soybean Association

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With the opportunity presented with this new space, the Beef Council has been working for months on a new trade show display. We’re extremely proud of the layout and the ability we will have to re-use these pieces in other educational events, trade booths and even to display at our annual convention. With the launch of the Beef-It’s What’s Fine Arts For Dinner campaign we are centering 120' x 110' our message on the iconic phrase while bringing elements from Kentucky farms, recipes and nutritional facts to the space. The hook may be a national promotion campaign the message is still the Kentucky story: green pastures, rich soil, abundant water, and best management This year, however, the agriculture practices. Recipes will showcase favorites exhibits are getting a fresh face. This that can be found from Pikeville to year we will be partnering with other Paducah as well as information ranging AN D KU ENERG Y chart to protein values of a organizations like the Kentucky from aLG&Ecuts TARC MS 40' x 40' FINA NCE hoping to bring Department of Agriculture, Kentucky serving of beef. We are26'MS x 50' LABOR the beef message full circle in a very Farm Bureau, Kentucky Soybean Board, CAB INET SEC. OF STATE unique way. and others to bring to the public Ag Land, CU STOM S presented by Kentucky’s Farm Families. If you are coming to the fair this year be

Discovery Farm Southland Dairy

fiber for the rest of the state.

The Kentucky State Fair, to most in the agriculture community, ranks the same importance as birthdays or family vacations. With16'the beginning of any Aisle new calendar, most immediately turn to August and mark those 11 days as “busy”. I’ve seen social media posts throughout the entire year marking countdowns to fair kick off. Many farming families begin planning what livestock they may take or crops they may grow to enter as early as 4-H a year in advance. Exhibit Space Then there x 140' are those of 120' us on the trade association side that begin thinking about next year’s fair exhibit before the current fair is even over. It is a staple, a tradition, a mile marker, a rite of passage… but not much has changed in 30 years.

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KY Beef Council

KH EAA BU S

Welcome

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KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL

MINI MEATLOAVES FIVE WAYS!

Even though these Ground Beef meatloaves might be mini, they are chock-full of flavor and nutrients. Try a classic mini meatloaf, or one of four new varieties. Great for back to school lunches too! • 45 min • 6 SERVINGS • 217 Cal • 27 g Protein Test Kitchen Tips Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed Ground Beef. Ground Beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F. Color is not a reliable indicator of Ground Beef doneness. Ingredients: Base Meatloaf Recipe: • 1-1/2 pounds Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner) • 1/3 cup saltine or butter cracker crumbs or Panko bread crumbs • 1/3 cup finely chopped onion • 1/3 cup reduced-fat 2% milk • 1 egg, lightly beaten • 1 clove garlic, minced • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1/4 teaspoon pepper Toppings: • Ketchup or barbecue sauce and shredded Cheddar cheese Cooking: 1. Heat oven to 350°F. Combine all ingredients in large bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. 2. Shape beef mixture into 12 equal portions. Place into 12-cup standard muffin pan, lightly patting beef mixture to level top. Bake in 350°F oven 19 to 20 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 160°F. 3. Remove from oven. Garnish with Toppings, as desired. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Recipe Variations: Italian Mini Meatloaves: Add 1/2 cup chopped mushrooms, 1/2 cup pasta sauce and 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil to base meatloaf ingredients. Bake 22 to 24 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 160°F. Evenly top with shredded Parmesan cheese. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Serve with additional pasta sauce and garnish with additional chopped basil, as desired. Greek Mini Meatloaves: Add 3 tablespoons chopped Kalamata olives and 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano to base meatloaf ingredients. Bake 22 to 24 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 160°F. Evenly top with crumbled feta cheese. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Serve with prepared tzatiki sauce. Garnish with sliced cucumber, as desired. Asian Mini Meatloaves: Add 1/4 cup chopped green onions and 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger to base meatloaf ingredients. Bake 22 to 24 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 160°F. Evenly top with hoisin sauce or teriyaki glaze. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Garnish with chopped peanuts, sliced green onions or chopped cilantro, as desired. Spanish Mini Meatloaves: Add 1/2 cup finely chopped red bell pepper, 1/4 cup chopped Spanish olives and 1 teaspoon smoked paprika to base meatloaf ingredients. Bake 22 to 24 minutes, until internal temperature reaches 160°F. Evenly top with shredded manchego cheese. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Garnish with sliced Spanish olives, as desired. t

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

2018

BULL VALUE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM Ever wonder how to determine the best bull for your operation? TOPICS: Understanding and Utilizing Expected Progeny Differences, Matching Genetics to Your Management and Environment, Bull Breeding Soundness Exams, Proper Bull Nutrition and Health Programs, Tools for Selection, Selection Decisions for Different Marketing Options Two Part Educational Series: Classroom Education and Mock Auction (Must attend both sessions) Registration: $25/person. To Register Please Contact Ben Crites (benjamin.crites@uky.edu) or Online at https://www.eventbrite.com/o/university-of-kentucky-cooperative-extension-16891600267 All Programs Begin at 6:00 PM Local Time Five Regional Locations

WESTERN KY

Hopkins County Extension Office Session 1: October 9 Session 2: October 16

CENTRAL KY

Madison County Extension Office Session 1: October 11 Session 2: October 18

SOUTH CENTRAL KY Barren County Extension Office Session 1: October 22 Session 2: October 29

NORTH CENTRAL KY Shelby County Extension Office Session 1: October 23 Session 2: October 30

EASTERN KY

Fleming County Extension Office Session 1: November 1 Session 2: November 8

For More Information Visit: https://www.facebook.com/KyBeefIRM/

WEANING 101 WORKSHOP

ON-FARM WEANING PROGRAM

Date: September 12th Location: Eden Shale Farm Time: Registration begins at 8:30 am et

CALL KCA TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY! (859)-278-0899 LIMITED TO THE FIRST 30 PEOPLE

TOPICS

Vaccination protocols, Veterinary Feed Directive, Nutrition, Environmental Management, Feeder Cattle Grading, Economics of weaning calves on farm

Ke n t uc k y Be e f Ne t w o r k F a c i l i t a t o r s

Ben Lloyd

Whitesville, KY (270) 993-1074 strridge@aol.com 80

Charles Embry

Cave City, KY (270) 646-5939 dale.embry@yahoo.com

Jacob Settles

Springfield, KY (859) 805-0724 jacob.settles4@yahoo.com

Ron Shrout

Winchester, KY (606) 205-6143 ronshrout@bellsouth.net

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Tim Graves

Springfield, KY (859) 481-3954 gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Jeff Stephens

Ewing, KY (606) 782-7640 stephensbeef@gmail.com

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

EDEN SHALE FARM UPDATE DAN MILLER KBN Industry Coordinator

To a farmer the long days of summer simply means that there is more daylight to get work done. Never is this more apparent than during the months of June and July, and I can assure you that we have been taking full advantage of the long days at Eden Shale.

CPH SALE DATES August August 9, Steers & Heifers, Owensboro December December 6, Steers and Heifers, Owensboro

June allowed us great hay making weather and we were able to get all of the first cutting baled without it getting rained on. We have also baled and wrapped the first cutting of our sorghum sudan grass. We have baled a total of 306 bales so far this year. We typically need about 425 bales to get us through a normal year, so we are setting in good shape at this point in the season. Last month we purchased 24 cull cows that are grazing in the paddocks. They will be rotated through the paddocks for 60 days and then we will harvest them through Beef Solutions. We recently purchased 20 more cull cows that will be kept in the bull barn and bucket fed two different rations. The first group will be fed a standard 3-way commodity feed and the second group will be fed a custom mixed ration that Burkmann Nutrition put together for the trial. These cows will again be fed for 60 days and then harvested through Beef Solutions. These cattle will be harvested in August and early September and I will share the results once they have been processed. On July 9th we started work on three new

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construction projects with Dr. Higgins. One project will be a new option for winter feeding and the other two will be water harvesting projects, one of which will eliminate the need for an unreliable pond to water the cattle. We are very excited to get this new infrastructure added to the farm and I invite you to come to our Open House field day on October 13th where we will be showcasing these three new projects. July was also a busy month for having people at the farm. We hosted 9 different field day/tours that totaled 185 people from 30 different Kentucky Counties during the month of July. Most of the visitors were cattle producers from across the state, but we also hosted a group of High School Ag Teachers, and a group of inner city kids from Lexington. I would like to thank everyone who visited Eden Shale Farm, as well as Dr. Higgins for his time in helping to give the tours. I also need to thank our farm manager Greg and our intern Ben for keeping the production of the farm running while I spent time hosting these groups. These are the folks that continue to make Eden Shale Farm a success. I hope that producers in Kentucky see a value in the work that we are doing and continue pushing us to provide new and innovative ideas for the beef industry. Because at the end of the day, that is the ultimate goal for Eden Shale Farm.

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Roy, Jessica and Cooper Canada 600 Cumberland Drive • Morehead, KY 40351 859-227-7323 racekannon@hotmail.com

Swain Select Simmental

12113 Green Valley Dr. • Louisville, KY 40243 frederickswain@bellsouth.net • www.swainselect.com

Fred & Phyllis 502-245-3866 502-599-4560

Chi & Angie 502-477-9727 502-287-2116

Judy and Rondal Dawson 1156 Buzzard Roost Road Shelbyville, KY 40065 502-593-5136 jrdawson22@outlook.com

RC C

Kentucky Simmental Officers

President: Chris Allen 222 Stourbridge St Versailles, KY 40383 859-351-4486

Vice President: Brian Swain 3906 Pottertown Rd Murray, KY 42071

Secretary/Treasurer: Lindsay Phillips 8308 Orangeburg Rd Maysville, KY 41056

KENTUCKY SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME ___________________________ ____________ FARM NAME__________________________________ ADDRESS_____________________________________ CITY_________________STATE_____ ZIP__________ PHONE (BUSINESS)___________________________

Call or visit one of these Simmental breeders for cattle that work!

www.kysimmental.com

100 Carpenter Ridge Salyersville KY, 41465 docrat2@yahoo.com Jim Ratliff 606.496-6522

“UNBELIEVABULL SIMMENTALS” Graves Grandview Simmental Farm Timothy Graves 560 Rudd Lane Springfield, KY 40069 (859) 481-3954 • gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Brian & Heather Swain 3906 Pottertown Road Murray, KY 42071 270-293-4440 wksbswain@murray-ky.net

Simmental and SimAngus Bulls for Sale

Send application to: Lindsay Phillips, 8308 Orangeburg Rd, Maysville, KY 41056 Membership Fee is $25.00

(HOME)______________________________________

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Ratliff Cattle Company

WAYWARD HILL FARM

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

1939 Huntertown Road Versailles, KY 40383 Bulls for Sale Chris Allen 859-351-4486 callenuky@hotmail.com Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755

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HUTCHESON JOINS FARM CREDIT MID-AMERICA IN BOWLING GREEN Bowling Green, KY – Rod Hutcheson has been named Financial Officer for Farm Credit Mid- America in Bowling Green. Farm Credit is an agricultural lending cooperative serving farmers, rural residents and agribusinesses throughout Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee. Hutcheson will serve farmers in South Central Kentucky. Hutcheson brings a strong agricultural and financial background to Farm Credit. He earned a degree in Finance from Western Kentucky University. Hutcheson previously worked for Bayer and Pfizer Animal Health. He is a member of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, Rich Pond Baptist Church, and WKU Alumni Association. Hutcheson is also chapter advisor for the Zeta Epsilon chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha and Chairman of their Alumni Advisory Board. Additionally he is authorized by the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System to represent Farm Credit Mid- America as a Federal Mortgage Loan Originator. “We are proud to welcome Rod to the team,” said Brandon Garnett, regional vice president with Farm Credit. “Rod joins numerous other individuals who are dedicated to providing our area’s farmers and rural residents the best financial solutions for their unique situation. We invite anyone in the community to stop by and meet Rod and the rest of the team.” About Farm Credit Mid-America Farm Credit Mid-America is a financial services cooperative serving the credit needs of farmers, agribusinesses and rural residents across Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee for nearly a century. Backed by the strength of nearly 100,000 customers and $22 billion in assets, Farm Credit Mid-America provides loans for real estate, operating, equipment, housing and related services such as crop insurance, and vehicle, equipment and building leases. For more information, call 1-800-444-FARM or visit them on the web at www.e-farmcredit.com

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For More Information: Commercial cattlemen trust registered seedstock breeders to make documented genetic improvements that provide them the opportunity to succeed.

In the pasture

From 2004-2014, the 2015 AICA National Cattle Evaluation Genetic Trend illustrates Charolais seedstock breeders are doing their job!

Lower birth weight ■ MORE LIVE CALVES Increased weaning weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT WEANING

The trend shows dramatic improvements in every trait of economic importance.

In the feedlot

2004-2014 NCE Charolais Genetic Trends BW

WW

YW

CE

CW

REA Marb

2004 0.8 19.1 33.7 1.6 11.4 .18 .01 2014 0.4 26.8 49.0 3.4 16.9 .32 .04

More pounds. More profits. Charolais keep it real. © American-International Charolais Association 2016

KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

kins Ad Farms

Higher yearling weight ■ MORE POUNDS, EFFICIENTLY

Increased carcass weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT HARVEST Larger ribeye ■ BETTER YIELD GRADES More marbling ■ HIGHER QUALITY GRADES

■ Southeast Field Representative ■ Floyd Wampler (423) 612-2144

NEWS & EVENTS:

6.5x3.75 bw-Cow Country News.indd 1

TJ Adkins: 606-875-5094 Sherman & Phyllis Adkins: 606-379-5129 279 Bullock Rd. Eubank, KY 42567 AdkinsFarms@hotmail.com

Montgomery Charolais

12/2/15 7:30 AM

2018 CHAROLAIS SHOW AT THE KENTUCKY STATE FAIR Saturday, August 25 at 8 AM • Kentucky Expo Center • Louisville, KY Board Meeting at 1 PM

LEANING PINE FARMS, LLC John Bruner

Darby Montgomery 36 Thompson Road • Lancaster, KY 40444 859-339-3922 BULLS FOR SALE

606-271-0582 473 Edward Meece Road Science Hill, KY 42553

Amburgey Charolais Farm

jeffries charolais

Polled Breeding Since 1966 Robert Amburgey, Jr. 3171 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-2764 (Home) 859-404-3751 (Mobile)

Cox Charolais

1194 Smith Ridge Road • Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-465-7584 (H) 270-403-4562 Bulls & Select Heifers for Sale

Harrod Farms THE NEXT GENERATION

Becca, Jenna and Jake 645 Evergreen Rd. Frankfort, KY 40601 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Charolais, Hereford & Commercial Cattle

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At harvest

Kentucky Charolais Association Chuck Druin 2291 Drane Lane Eminence, KY 40019 502-321-1160 or 502-321-5919 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Jacob Miller: 502-507-4987

paul r. jeffries 606-510-4537

1590 jeffries lane

hustonville, ky. 40437 chris cooper 606-669-9009 chris jeffries 606-669-2426

Jimmy & Linda Evans 960 Vallandingham Road Dry Ridge, KY 41035 859-428-2740

Allison Charolais John Allison

545 Eminence Road New Castle, KY 40050

502-845-2806 502-220-3170

Bulls & Heifers For Sale at the Farm

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

S A N D U S K Y FA R M S

David, Rhonda, Michael & Nicholas 3200 St. Rose Road Lebannon, KY 40033 270-692-7793

Hayden Farm 4430 Bloomfield Rd. Bardstown, KY 40004 James Hayden

Home: Office: Mobile: 502-349-0128 502-349-0005 502-507-4984 jhayden@haydensteel.com

Candy Sullivan 3440 Ruddles Mill Road Paris, KY 40361

859-338-0170 Sullivan Charolais

Quality Charolais Cattle in the Heart of the Bluegrass

Floyd’s Charolais

2039 Nina Ridge Road Lancaster, KY 40444 Home: 859-792-2956 • Cell: 859-339-2653 floydj@windstream.net

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Seedstock Plus Showcase Sale XIII & 10th Annual Customer Appreciation Sale! September 15, 2018 * 1 p.m. Kingsville Livestock, Kingsville, MO These Elite Gelbvieh & Balancer individuals sold in the 2017 Showcase Sale! More like them will sell!

Fall Bull Sale

October 20, 2018 12 noon Joplin Regional Stockyards, Carthage, MO Selling 200 - 18 month old & yearling Angus Gelbvieh & Balancer bulls! ALL BLACK!

RED REWARD ‘Fall Edition’ Bull & Female Sale November 3, 2018 1 p.m. United Producers Humansville, MO Selling 40 RED bulls Gelbvieh, Balancer & Red Angus & 100 RED females

• Guaranteed Sight-Unseen Purchases! Let us help you find the bull to fit your program and needs! • Free Trucking on every bull! No fine print! • The best disposition & soundness sort! • Extensive Data & Genomic EPDs! • All Bulls Are Semen & Trich Tested! REQUEST YOUR CATALOGS • 120 RFI tested bulls sell in these sales! TODAY * 877-486-1160 • Videos of sale bulls on website the week john@seedstockplus.com before the sale! www.seedstockplus.com. COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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ANGUS THE BUSINESS BREED

2018-19 KAA OFFICERS

President: Gil Ray Cowles, Rockfield, KY Vice President: Jason Crowe, Irvine, KY Secretary/Treasurer: Anne DeMott, Lexington, KY Past President: Tim Jeffries, Canmer, KY

C ont ac t Anne D eMott to p ay you r Ke ntu cky Ang us Ass o c i at ion D ues 1 • BOYD BEEF CATTLE 6077 Helena Rd. Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II: 606-584-5194 • Blake Boyd: 606-375-3718 www.boydbeef.com • email: cboyd2@maysvilleky.net

12 • FALL CREEK ANGUS 448 Corder Farm Road Monticello, KY 42633 Ronnie Corder 606/348-6588

23 • PLEASANT HILL FARMS Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles 500 Rockfield Richpond Road Rockfield, KY 42274 270/843-9021 • Fax 270/843-9005 Located 7 miles west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80

2 • BRANCH VIEW ANGUS 927 Old Liberty Pike • Hustonville, KY 40437 859/238-0771 • www.branchviewangus.com James S. & LuAnn Coffey, Donald & Donna Coffey Evelyn Hoskins Annual Production Sale- 2nd Saturday in April

13 • HAINES ANGUS FARMS 5294 Park City- Glasgow Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Kenneth Haines, Jr. 270/749-8862

24 • RAGS ANGUS FARM Richard and Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240 Home- (270)885-4352 Cell- (270)839-2442 rstallons@bellsouth.net

3 • BURKS CATTLE CO. 531 Rick Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Eddie Burks • 270-991-6398 www.burkscattle.com

14 • HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY 502-633-1634, home • 502-633-5100, work 502-655-0164, cell

25 • SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, KY 42748 Cell: 270-769-8260 www.shawfamilyangus.com Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975

4 • BURTON & SONS ANGUS Joe D. or Karen Burton • Bryan Carman, Partner, Ridgeview Angus 480 Hominy Hill Rd. Nancy, KY 42544 Joe: 606-305-3081 • Bryan: 606-875-3453 Located 15 miles West of Somerset klburton01@windstream.net

15 • HIGHVIEW FARMS 827 West Main Street Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718 Ben T. Cox DVM 270-469-5517 Registered Angus Cattle

5 • CARDINAL HILL FARMS 405 Cedar Grove Rd. • Glasgow, KY 42141 Mike Elmore: (270) 404-6589 Bob Johnson: ( 270 ) 427-1410 www. cardinalhillfarms.com • mike@cardinalhillfarms.com

16 • HILL VIEW FARMS Jimmy Gilles 5160 Lee Rudy Road Owensboro, KY 42301 270/686-8876 270/929-5370

27 • ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED ANGUS Eric & Sherry St. Clair 13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY 40119 (H) 270-257-2965 (C) 270-617-1079 www.stclairangus.com

6 • CLAIREBROOK FARMS, LLC PO Box 192, Carlisle, KY 40311 Paul B. Mulhollem, 217/621-3123 Chad Daugherty, 217/369-0466 Watch for our consignments in upcoming KY sales!

17 • JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS Angus Bulls & Females Slaughters, KY Keith: 270-635-0723 Reese: 270-635-1137

28 • TAMME VALLEY FARM Jacob Tamme, Owner-Operator 859-583-7134 jacob.tamme@gmail.com www.tammevalley.com & Find us on Facebook!

7 • COFFEY ANGUS FARMS 661 Hopewell Road Liberty, KY 42539 Matt Coffey - (270) 799-6288 Dewey Coffey - (606) 787-2620 Genetics for Maximum Profitability since 1984

18 • LEGACY FARMS Daniel and Lindsey Reynolds 1709 South Jackson Highway Hardyville, KY 42746 270-528-6275/270-528-6120 www.legacyfarmsangus.com

29 • TWIN CREEK FARM Shawn, Melissa, Devin & Dylan Gibson 270/337-3072 or 270/692-5304 Dennis & Emily 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338

8 • COOL SPRINGS CREEK FARM Guy & Aline Babin 269 Paul Coomer Rd Gradyville, KY 42742 270-205-1669 www.coolspringscreekfarm.com • gdbabin@outlook.com

19 • MILLERS RUN FARM William N. Offutt IV 3790 Paris Road Georgetown, KY 40324 Phone: (859) 533-2020 Email: millersrunfarm@aol.com Website: www.millersrunfarm.com Heifers for sale

9 • COUNTY LINE ANGUS Ottis Wright 150 Busy Baker Road Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-469-0339 • Registered Angus Bulls

20 • MUD RIVER ANGUS 10 Oak Hill Drive Russellville, KY 42276 Wayne Johnson 270/303-6354 Gary Johnson 270/498/7208

10 • D&D LONGVIEW ANGUS Danny & Debbie Burris 550 Willie Nell Road Columbia, KY 42728 270-348-5766 • 270-250-3701 • 270-250-1277

21 • FOUR KINGS ANGUS 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Cary & Kim King Email: Carymking@yahoo.com • Fourkingsangus.com Cary Cell - 859-613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager

11 • EAGLE REST PLANTATION Jimmy Don Robinson 7665 Paducah Road Kevil, KY 42053 270-462-2150

22 • OLD BARK FARM 370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716 Kenley Conner 270/358-8057 Registered Angus Cattle

Bulls & females sold private treaty. Inquiries Welcome. Sell only what we would buy.

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26 • SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642 Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith 270/866-3898 Henry & Melissa Smith 270/866-2311

Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April 2016

Watch for us in Branch View Production Sale in April

KY ANGUS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

OLD BARK FARM

CITY

STATE

PHONE 1

PHONE 2

ZIP

EMAIL

Return to: Anne DeMott • 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, KY 40509 • Annual Dues $35

C OC WC C OC UC NO TU R Y • YA• U• G UN SET 2 AP PU UB BL CAT ATIIIO ON N O OF HE E K KE EN NT UC CK KY Y C CAT ATT EM ME EN N’’’S SA AS SS SO OC CIIIAT ATIIIO ON N M AY 220 001 118 88 ••• A A P U B LLIIIC C AT O N O FF T TTH H E K E N TTU U C K Y C AT TTL LLE E M E N S A S S O C AT O N OO WW O U NN TT RR Y JU


KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION NEWS Anne Stewart DeMott, Secretary/Treasurer

KENTUCKY JUNIOR ANGUS ASSOCIATION JUNIOR PREVIEW SHOW RESULTS PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE not pictured

Kentucky Angus Association Members and Beef Cattle Breeders, I just wanted to share the eyes of August from a ten-year-old’s perspective:

Champion Steer Lily Jeffries

Reserve Champion Steer Tyler Day

Champion B&O Cow/Calf Lily Jeffries

Champion Owned Cow/Calf Taylor Jeffries

Champion B&O Heifer Jacob Marksbury

Reserve B&O Heifer Caroline Cowles

Champion B&O Bull Taylor Jeffries

Reserve B&O Bull Kalli Flanders

The Kentucky State Fair Every August in Louisville, Kentucky There’s an event for you and for me It’s fun for all and all for fun It’s where all Kentuckians come together as one The Kentucky State Fair Rides all over and games galore On top of that, there’s so much more The food is always tasty and good I’d eat it all the time, if I could The Kentucky State Fair

Kentucky State Fair Schedule Champion Owned Heifer Kalli Flanders

Reserve Owned Heifer Catherine Cowles

KY ANGUS ASSOCAITON OPEN PREVIEW SHOW RESULTS

The state’s produce from all over is there To be displayed at our wonderful state fair Vegetables that are colored from dark to light Fruits that are all nice and ripe The Kentucky State Fair The livestock shows are also fun It’s every farm boy’s dream to be number one Sheep, goat, and pig shows, too But I like cattle shows best; that’s what I do The Kentucky State Fair The state fair is a great, great thing To me, fun is what it always brings It’s one of the best highlights of the year I love the state fair, the place of cheer The Kentucky State Fair I have always enjoyed this poem that my son, Corbin, wrote when he was about ten years old! I think that it sums up August really well! Gil Ray Cowles

Wednesday, 8/22 8:30 am - 4/H & FFA Steer Show, Broadbent Arena 11:00 am - 4/H & FFA Steer Showmanship

Champion Cow/Calf Tyler McGinnis

Reserve Cow/Calf Lily & Lucy Jeffries

1:00 pm - 4/H & FFA Heifer Showmanship Thursday, 8/23 8:00 am - 4/H & FFA Heifer Show, Broadbent Arena

Champion Female Jacob Marksbury

Reserve Champion Female Abigal Smoot

Champion Bull Anne Patton Schubert

Reserve Champion Bull Tim & Lucy Jeffries

@KyAngusAssoc

@KyAngusAssoc

Saturday, 8/25 8:00 am - Open Show

to subscribe to email updates, please contact us at kyangusassociation@gmail.com

@kyangusassociation

www.kentuckyangus.org kyangusassociation@gmail.com

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Kentucky Hereford Association KHA Invites any Hereford Breeder to Become a Member! Dues are $25. Send to 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 Upcoming Events: KHA Officers

President: L.W. Beckley President-elect: Tim Wolf Secretary/ Treasurer: Earlene Thomas 859-623-5734 thomasep@roadrunner.com

-HEREFORDS -

Codee Guffey • 1815 Grassy Springs Road Versailles, Kentucky 40383 Phone: 502-598-6355 Email: rockridgeherefords@gmail.com www.rockridgeherefords.com

2018 Hereford Show at the Kentucky State Fair 8 AM - Friday, August 24, 2018 Louisville, KY

Joe B. Gray 10787 New Bowling Green Road Smiths Grove, KY 52171

270-590-4579

WOLF FARM

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Females for sale Tim & Peggy Wolf 12939 Peach Grove Rd. Alexandria, KY 41001 Home: 859-635-0899 Ÿ Cell: 859-991-3484

Peyton’s Well Polled Herefords The Lowell Atwood Family 133 Edgewood Drive Stanford, KY (606) 365-2520 home/fax (606) 669-1455 cell

Victor- influenced cattle bred for performance on grass.

“Black cows need a good Hereford Bull”

BECKLEY HEREFORDS L.W. Beckley D.V.M L. Wayne Beckley 284 Pyrse Lane 1420 Fitchburg Rd. Irvine, KY 40336 Ravenna, KY 40472 Cell: 859-779-1419 Home: 606-723-3021 Clinic: 606-726-0000 Cell: 859-779-0962 www.beckleyherefords.com

90

K3 CATTLE REGISTERED HEREFORDS KYLE BUSH

Polled Herefords 439 Flatwoods Frozen Camp Road • Corbin, KY 40701 Kevin, Angela, Bobby & Brenda Wells Kenlea & Kyler Murray 606-523-0569 - Home 606-528-1691 - Home 606-344-0417 - Cell 606-682-8143 - Cell wells_farm@yahoo.com

K3CATTLE@YAHOO.COM

198 HICKS PIKE CYNTHIANA, KY 41031

Jackson Farms

Paul L. Hancock 8559 KY 56 Owensboro, KY 42301 270-771-4194

Boyd Beef Cattle

6077 Helena Road • Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II · 606-584-5194 Annual Bull Sale second Saturday in March Hereford and Angus Bulls

TK4 Herefords Tony & Kathy Staples 992 Knotts Road Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-4220 tstaples@bbtel.com

Chambliss Hereford Farms Brad, Carla, Clay and Clint Chambliss 916 Winchester Blvd. Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Home (270) 982-3905 • Cell (270) 668-7126 fax 270-735-9922 www.chamblissherefordfarms.com

Jackie D. Perkins II 367 Mt. Pisgah Rd. • Bremen, KY 42325 270-543-3586 Breeding to produce good cows since 1981.

WCN Polled Herefords Since 1961 Bill & Libby Norris 2220 Celina Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Phone (270) 433-7256 Cell (270) 433-1525 “Every calf needs a white face”

Sweet T Farm

Pile Stock Farm

Registered Polled Herefords

Pete & Gayla Szak 1040 Hick Hardy Rd. Cynthiana, KY (859) 484-2265

Hansell Pile, Jr. 12045 St. John Rd. Cecilia, KY 42724 270-735-5192•270-862-4462 12 miles West of Elizabethtown

Windy Hills Farm

859-588-4531

Registered Polled Herefords 8103 Bill Moss Road • White House, TN 37188 Home/Fax: 615-672-4483 Cell: 615-478-4483 billy@jacksonfarms.com ® “Farming the Same Land Since 1834”

Registered Polled Herefords

Thomas Farm

“Cattle for sale at all times”

Wells Farm

MPH Farms

Polled Hereford and Gelbvieh Cattle 3459 KY Hwy. 1284 E. Cythiana, KY 41031 (859) 234-6956 Ben, Jane, Shelby and Lincoln Eric & Ronnie Thomas 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 623-5734 • Eric’s Cell (859) 314-8256

Contact Earlene Thomas for more information: 859-623-5734 www.kentuckyhereford.org

Bulls • Heifers • Show

TS

F

TS TS Tucker Stock Farms F F

“Registered Angus and Polled Herefords”

TUCKER STOCK FARMS TUCKER STOCK FARMS

TUCKER STOCK FARMS

“Breeding Polled Herefords for over 58 Years” John Tucker “Registered Angus and Polled “Registered AngusHerefords” andIIPolled Herefords” 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Breeding cattle for sale at all times. John A. Tucker II John A. Tucker II Hudson, KY 40145 HiddenHerefords” Valley Lane 1999 Walnut Hill Rd. • Lexington, KY “Registered 40515 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Angus and 1790 Polled 270-617-0301 Hudson, KY 40145 Hudson, KY 40145 (859) 271-9086 • cell (859)533-3790 (270) 257-8548 (270) 257-8548 Offi 257-8167 Office for (270) 257-8167 John A. Tucker IIce (270) “Bulls always Sale”

Popplewell’s Herefords

Registered Hereford & Angus Farm

Service Age Bulls Open and Bred Females For Sale Vince, Tracy & Alex Home (270) 866-4480 1526 Clearfork Rd. Cell (270) 566-1852 Russell Springs, KY 42642

Old Fall Creek Farms AHA & KHA member • Proven bloodlines

1790 Hidden18-month-old Valley 18-month-old AngusLane & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale Angus & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale Hudson, KY 40145 (270) 257-8548 Office (270) 257-8167

Polled LINEBRED Hereford Bulls For Sale Private treaty sales • Visitors 18-month-old always welcome Angus & LINEBRED VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE

1874 Old Fall Creek Road • Monticello, KY 42633

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

Reed Bertram 606-348-7486 David Bertram 606-278-3630 www.ofcfarms.com

Multi-Trait Multi-Trait Selection Selection Fertility Disposition

Danny Miller

Fertility Calving Ease Calving Ease Disposition Milking Ability Milking Ability

www.jmsvictordomino.com 4850 Ridge Rd. 4850 Caldwell RidgeCaldwell Rd. Knifley, KY 42753 Knifley, KY 42753 270-465-6984 270-465-6984

270-465-6984 • 270-566-2694

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FEATURE

KY CPH-45 – IT’S STILL THE ONE! DR. ROY BURRIS UK Extension Beef Specialist Kentucky’s Certified Preconditioned for Health (CPH-45) feeder calf program is still the premier management program for weaned calves in the country. That’s a bold statement but I believe it to be true. Preconditioning (preweaning and vaccinating calves prior to marketing) has NOT always been an accepted practice. Certified Preconditioning programs have evolved over time with Kentucky’s program starting in 1979 when 9 other states also started programs. Southeastern calves, which were generally unweaned, unvaccinated, not dehorned, not dewormed and not castrated, were severely discounted but both producers and buyers were reluctant to change. It would require effort on the cow-calf producer’s part and require more money from the feedlots. Cattle feeders, until they could be proven wrong, preferred to buy high-risk calves at cheap prices and process them with their own crews. Did they worry about death losses? Of course, but they just built in about a 7% death loss and took it off the price they were willing to pay.

This new concept of “preconditioning” was going to be “a tough nut to crack” for Extension folks in the southeast region. Most states soon gave up but Kentucky kept plugging away because we believed strongly that it was the right thing to do for our state and the beef industry. Kentucky was fortunate to have producers who realized they needed a better market for their calves and who were willing to work toward that end. It was immediately obvious that special sales must also be held for these calves in order to have adequate numbers to merchandise and command a premium. We tried several sales over the years and the Pennyrile area was a good example of a continuous running sale and was an example of what could be done if all parties worked together. Mr. Dell King of King Livestock was committed to marketing quality feeder calves from Kentucky and put a lot of effort and money into these sales. The farmerfeeders of the Midwest were our best CONTINUED ON PAGE 94

MARKET REPORT

SOUTHEAST FEEDER CATTLE PRICES 20 JULY 2018 STEER weights

HEIFER

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

9-10

126-132

127-133

123-129

126-132

126-132

140-146

8-9

135-143

135-143

132-140

135-143

135-143

146-154

7-8

138-146

138-146

135-143

138-146

139-147

148-156

128-136

127-135

124-132

127-135

127-135

132-140

6-7

145-155

145-155

145-155

147-157

5-6

153-165

155-167

151-163

151-163

146-156

152-162

132-142

132-142

131-141

133-143

132-142

133-143

154-166

158-170

134-146

134-146

133-145

133-145

133-145

135-147

4-5

164-178

162-176

156-170

162-176

162-176

162-176

142-156

141-155

136-150

140-154

141-155

142-156

COWS weights

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

UTIL

51-59

50-57

54-58

53-62

47-55

54-59

CN/CUT

48-53

42-52

53-58

50-57

44-53

53-58

BULLS

79-84

74-80

77-82

82-89

75-85

82-92

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

MONTHLY MARKET BEEF UPDATE! Feeder cattle traded $1 higher to $4 lower this week. Calves traded steady to $4 lower. Market cows were steady to $2 lower. -Troy Applehans

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS General August 11 KJCA Back to School Social, Campbellsville, KY, See ad on pg. 65 August 16-26 Kentucky State Fair, Louisville, KY, See article on pg. 72 August 31 Hinton Mills 100th Anniversary Celebration Event, Plummers Landing, KY, See ad on pg. 11 September 6 CPC Fall Field Day, Fountain Run, KY, See ad on pg. 3 September 7 Eastern KY Forage Field Day, Morehead, KY, See ad on pg. 25 September 7-8 Blue Grass Value Added Symposium, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 85 September 20 Beef Bash 2018, Princeton, KY, See ad on pg. 43 September 28-30 KJCA Fall Classic, Logan Co., KY, See ad on pg. 71 Angus September 8 CKAA Ladies Day Sale, Danville, KY, See ad on pg. 9 September 8 Shelby Cattle Company Dispersal Sale, Columbia, TN, See ad on pg. 67 September 21 Ward Ratliff Cattle Company/Pelphrey Cattle CompanyAngus Female Sale, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 13 September 21 Bluegrass Trifecta Angus Production Sale, Carlisle, KY, See ad on pg. 35 September 22 Boyd Beef Cattle Angus Sale, Mays Lick, KY October 6 JAC’s Ranch 30th Annual Fall Angus Sale, Bentonville, AR October 6 Solid Rock Angus Female Sale, Winchester, KY, See ad on pg. 19 October 29 Oak Hollow Fall Angus Bull Sale, Smiths Grove, KY, See ad on pg. 7 November 2 ZWT Ranch Angus Sale, Crossville, TN November 3-5 Angus Convention, Columbus, OH, See ad on pg. 33 November 3 Decades of Excellence Angus Sale, Union, TN November 9 Stonewall Ridge Farms Inaugural Angus Female Sale, Shelbyville, TN November 10 Deer Valley Farms Angus Sale, Fayetteville, TN November 11 Sunset Ridge Bull and Female Sale, Deer Lodge, TN, See ad on pg. 44

AD INDEX September 29 Bluegrass Gelbvieh Invitational Bull and Female Sale, MT. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg. 57 November 3 TJB Gelbvieh Annual Bull Sale, Chickamauga, GA Hereford August 7 Summer Forage Field Day, LaCenter, KY, See ad on pg. 12 August 24 Hereford Show at the KY State Fair, Louisville, KY, See ad on pg. 90 August 25 East TN Hereford Kick-Off Classic Sale, White Pines, TN September 1 The Breeders Cup Sale at Boyd Beef Cattle, Mays Lick, KY, See ad on pg. 19 September 3 Parker Bros. Polled Hereford, Sale, Bradyville, TN, See ad on pg. 47 September 29 Burns Farms and Friends Hereford Sale, Pikeville, TN October 27 Debter Hereford Farms 46th Annual Bull Sale, Horton, AL November 3 Burns Farm Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Pikeville, TN November 29 KY Certified Hereford Influence Sale, Stanford, KY, See ad on pg. 51 December 1 Kentucky Hereford Autumn Harvest Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY Limousin October 6 The Foundation Sale, Bowling Green, KY

Charolais August 25 Charlais Show at the KY State Fair, Louisville, KY, See ad on pg. 42 September 15 Roy May & Son Charolais Sale, Knoxville, TN, See ad on pg. 46 October 6 Spirit of the Bluegrass Sale, Lexington, KY October 19 Myers Circle Farm Bull Sale, Trenton, KY, See ad on pg. 73

Multi-Breed August 9 CPH Sale, Owensboro, KY August 24 Internet Sale and BBQ, See ad on pg. 51 September 15 Seedstock Plus Showcase Sale, Kingsville, MO, see ad on page 87 October 15 Top of the Crop Replacement Heifer Sale, Richmond, KY, See ad on pg. 4 October 20 Seedstock Plus Fall Bull Sale, Carthage, MO, see ad on page 87 October 26 Capital Classic Premier Heifer Sale, Owenton, KY, See ad on pg. 18 October 26 Gateway Regional Bred Heifer Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg 65 October 27 Yon Family Farms Fall Sale, Ridge Spring, SC November 3 Green River Area “Best of the Best” Bred Heifer Sale, Owensboro, KY, See ad on pg. 65 November 3 Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Humansville, MO, see ad on page 87 November 3 Central Kentucky Premier Heifer Sale, Lebanon, KY, See ad on pg. 19 December 6 CPH Sale, Owensboro, KY December 12 CPH Sale, Lexington KY, See ad on pg. 51 February 16 Yon Family Farms Spring Sale, Ridge Spring, SC

Gelbvieh August 25 Gelbvieh Show at the KY State Fair, Louisville, KY, See ad on pg. 86

Simmental September 8 The Final Drive Silver Towne Farms Dispersal Sale, Winchester, IN, See ad on pg. 29

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COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

A.W. Graham Lumber............................54 ACI Distributers........................................8 American Angus Association...... 8, 23, 33 B & L Farm Cattle Co.............................. 31 Beef Bash 2018........................................43 Blue Grass Stockyards............................ 51 Bluegrass Gelbvieh Sale.........................57 Bluegrass Trifecta Sale...........................35 Bobcat......................................................45 Boehringer Ingelheim............................ 21 Boyd Beef Cattle...................................... 19 Burkmann Nutrition................................4 Byron Seeds........................................... 20 CKAA Ladies Day.....................................9 CPC Commodities.....................................3 CPH-45....................................................69 Capital Classic Heifer Sale...................... 18 Cargill......................................................55 Central Farm Supply..............................27 Central KY Ag Credit..............................96 Central KY Premier Heifer Sale............. 19 Dievert Sales Service..............................34 Dura Cast.................................................26 Dutch Creek Farm................................. 68 Gateway Regional Bred Heifer Sale.......65 Green River Area Heifer Sale.................65 Green River Livestock............................65 Hayes Trailer Sales.................................65 Hinton Mills.............................................11 John Deere.............................................. 15 Kentucky Angus Association................ 88 Kentucky Charolais Association........... 84 Kentucky Gelbvieh Association............ 86 Kentucky Hereford Association............ 90 Kentucky Salers Association..................94 Kentucky Simmental Association..........82 Kuhn North America..............................25 Kuhn Knight............................................50 Limousin Breeders of the Bluegrass......83 McBurney’s Livestock & Equip. ............59 Mid-South Ag..........................................34 Minerich Land & Cattle Co.................... 12 Myers Circle............................................73 Oak Hollow................................................5 Parker Bros. Polled Herefords...............47 Pasture Management Systems...............49 Pelphrey Cattle Company....................... 13 Pennington Seed.....................................36 Priefert.....................................................53 Red Barn & Associates............................66 Roy May & Son Charolais.......................46 Seedstock Plus..........................................87 Shady Bottom Ranch..............................34 Shelby Cattle Company..........................67 Silver Stream Shelters............................52 Silver Towne Farms................................29 Solid Rock Angus.................................... 19 Southern States.......................................32 Stone Gate Farms......................................7 Summit Livestock Facilities...................95 Sunset Ridge.......................................... 44 Sutherland Shorthorns........................... 14 Top of the Crop Sale..................................4 Tru-Test...................................................26 Walters Buildings................................... 18 Wax Company...........................................2 Wm. E. Fagaly & Son..............................33 Woodford Feed Co.................................. 10

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COW COUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AN AD CALL (859) 278-0899 - $15 FOR 4 LINES AND $5 FOR EACH ADDITIONAL LINE

WALCO FARMS WALCO ARNOLD

&

Jeff, Michelle Nolan Pettit 5745 US HWY 41 SOUTH, SEBREE, KY 42455 270-836-2963 • JP@DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM

WWW.DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM RED ANGUS • RED SIMMENTAL RED SIM-ANGUS • FARM FRESH BEEF

We have added new genetics to boost your profits even more!

40 YEARS OF CHIANGUS BREEDING

Bart L. Glass

Chiangus Manager 5645 KY HWY 300 Stanford, KY 40484 859-326-0590 (C) 859-854-6732 (O)

walcofarms.com

PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE CALL 270/202-7186 FOR MORE INFO OR CHECK OUT WWW.OAKHOLLOWANGUS.COM FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITY. ANGUS BULLS FOR LEASE OR SALE LOW BIRTHWEIGHT REGISTERED ANGUS & CHAROLAIS BULLS FOR LEASE OR SALE. STARTING AT $350. MCCRORY FARMS BENTON, KY 270-527-3767 FOR SALE 19-20 MONTH OLD POLLED HEREFORD BULLS. GOOD SELECTION. LOW BIRTHWEIGHT, MEDIUM FRAME. FREE DELIVERY AVAILABLE. JMS POLLED HEREFORDS, KNIFLEY, KY DANNY 270-566-2694 TRENT 270-566-2000 FOUNDATION SALE IV OCTOBER 6, 2018 UNITED PRODUCERS, BOWLING GREEN, KY SELLING FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN GENETICS FOR INFO CALL : A C H HOLDINGS, LLC STEPHEN HAYNES 270-799-8685 RED ANGUS FOR SALE BULLS: YEARLINGS AND 2-YEAR-OLDS. OPEN HEIFERS. SHOW HEIFER PROSPECTS. CONTACT: JOHNNIE CUNDIFF 606-305-6443 OR 606-871-7438 COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

CHIANGUS BULLS FOR SALE

Lost Bridge Cattle Company

Livestock Hauling Indiana Kentucky Ohio Tennessee 513-678-1042 Ryan Gries

SEE YOUR AD HERE! REACH OVER 10,600 CATTLEMEN EACH MONTH. ADS AS LOW AS $15 PER MONTH. FOR AD PLACEMENT CONTACT JACOB REDWAY

859-278-0899

REGISTERED GELBVIEH BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE LOCATED IN SMITHS GROVE, KY CONTACT TRENT JONES 270-590-5266

MODEL 125 FOR-MOST CHUTE WITH MODEL 30 HEADGATE LIKE NEW. ALSO SELLING 1 REGISTERED ANGUS BULL. 16 MONTHS OLD. 502-477-2637

REGISTERED BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS. EXCELLENT EPD’S. SEMEN TESTED. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. MAXIMIZE YOUR PROFIT WITH PROVEN PERFORMANCE. ADAM WHEATLEY 502-349-2665

HERD DISPERSAL SELLING REGISTERED ANGUS COWS, CALVES, & HEIFERS. RIDGEVIEW ANGUS. 606-787-7307

OVER 30 BREEDING AGE HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE OVER 60 YEARS OF LINE 1 HEREFORD GENETICS. ALSO SELLING 35 COWS. CHAMBLISS HEREFORD FARMS. 270-668-7126 JOHN DEERE 6415-LOADER-4WD - $45995 STOLTZFUS SPREADERS CU 80 - $21,000 RHINO 10 WHEEL HAY RAKE - $4,500 JOHN DEERE 2630 - $7,000 FARMCO FEEDER WAGONS - $3,500 CATERPILLAR 242B - $17,000 GREAT PLAINS DRILLS STARTING @ $10,000 WWW.REDBARNANDASDOCIATES.COM CALL CHARLIE 859-608-9745 FALL 2016 BULLS FOR SALE REGISTERED GELBVIEH/ANGUS BALANCER BULLS. HOMO BLACK AND BLACK. BREEDING SOUNDNESS EVALUATION. BVD AND SEMEN TESTED. CALVING EASE EPDS. ALSO FALL BRED FEMALES. HUNTINGBURG, IN J&D KERSTIENS 812-482-2688 OR DUANE CASSIDY AT 812-661-8005

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10 REGISGTERED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE. YEARLINGS AND TWO YEAR OLDS. ANGUS SOURCE DNA TESTED. TOP EPD’S ON CALVING EASE, DMI, $EN. EXCELLENT CONDITION, HAND FED SINCE WEANING ON TOP NUTRITIONAL PROGRAM. ALL BULLS WILL BE SEMEN TESTED BEFORE LEAVING RANCH. OVER 51 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS OF REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE. BUY WITH CONFIDENCE. BROOKHILL ANGUS IN FLEMINGSBURG, KY. 606-782-1769 MUNDAY’S FARM – NONESUCH, KY SHEYENNE BRED BULLS AVAILABLE FOR SERVICE FOR FALL BREEDING. COST-SHARE ELIGIBLE. CALL ANNE & M.J. BAKKE 559-348-3818 OR EMAIL DAIRYNUTR@AOL.COM. SORTING POLES-PADDLES-FLAGS POLES WITH YOUR 8” DECAL. $6.20 EACH PER 50. SORTING FLAG, $10.50. SORTING PADDLES $9. KERNDT LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 800-207-3115

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 91

customers at that time but the larger lots, especially in the southwest continued to reject the program. About that time one Texan explained to me why they didn’t buy Kentucky feeder calves – “they all get sick, they’re all straight breeds, the males aren’t castrated and the heifers must be born pregnant!” We had some work to do…and we did it. Texas researchers were slow to adopt the concept but came to agree that preweaning was a good practice and prevaccinating was also good. So why wouldn’t they be even better together? They would be. Soon, Dr. John McNeill of Texas A & M started their program called VAC-45 and had good results and the move was underway to get this concept accepted nationally once Texas got on board. The Pennyrile Area (see picture) and the Green River Area sales are long-running sales with a history of cattle producers, yards and Extension agents working together. Some folks still don’t believe that weaned calves will make rapid and efficient gains. They will. Try it! If you can get efficient gains, extend ownership and receive a better price for your calves; that should work for you. If the feeder can buy a load of “low risk” calves with increased immunity that will walk off the truck knowing how to eat and drink, and that have already been dehorned and castrated, that will work for them. It’s a win-win situation that we need to keep going. Individual sales committees can make additional requirements but the minimum requirements for a KY CPH-45 calf if shown below. These calves carry a blue tag that has a unique number. They represent your farm and th Kentucky CPH Requirements 1. Owned by a seller a minimum of 60 days. 2. Weaned a minimum of 45 days.

drink water from a trough. (Do not overfeed; fleshy calves should be avoided and are likely to be discounted.) 4. Dehorned and healed (no visible horns or scurs). 5. Males castrated and healed (knife castration is strongly recommended). Late castrated calves may lead to stags, which are discounted. The scrotal sac with testicles must have fallen off “banded” calves. 6. Treated for grubs and lice according to label recommendations for time of year. 7. Vaccinated for Clostridia subcutaneously in the neck.

(7-way)

8. Vaccinated and boostered for IBR, PI3, BVD, and BRSV (booster injection for viral diseases must be modified live vaccine). 9. Vaccinated for Manheimia haemolytica (pasteurella) 10. Note: All vaccines are boosters must be administered no more than 90 days and at least 14 days prior to sale. 11. All processing recorded on body map and chart on CPH certificate. 12. Identified with official Kentucky CPH tag. 13. Heifers are guaranteed open at time of sale and steers are guaranteed not to be bulls. Seller agrees to reimburse buyer $200.00 for pregnant heifers or intact bulls. All claims must be properly verified by a veterinarian within four (4) months of sale. 14. Calves must have access to a free choice mineral supplement which contains a minimum 1,400 ppm copper (no copper oxide), 26 ppm selenium, 3,000 ppm zinc, 3,000 ppm manganese and 18- 25% salt based on a 4 oz. daily intake. No other salt available. e Kentucky beef industry at the next level. There are lots of reasons to do it but let me just say that it is becoming the industry standard and it’s the right thing to do! Support your nearest CPH-45 feeder calf sale!

TIMELY TIPS FOR JUNE Spring-Calving Cow Herd

- calf puller

Fescue pastures don’t generally produce much this month, however rain in June and early July has given us some forage going into the usually dry months. Keep rotating pastures to permit calves to continue gaining weight. Keep minerals available at all times.

- castration equipment

Bulls should have been removed from the cow herd by now! They should be pastured away from the cow herd with a good fence and allowed to regain lost weight and condition. It is a good time to evaluate physical condition, especially feet and legs. Bulls can be given medical attention and still have plenty of time to recover, e.g., corns, abscesses, split hooves, etc. Repair and improve corrals for fall working and weaning. Consider having an area to wean calves and retain ownership for postweaning feeding rather than selling “green”, lightweight calves. Plan to participate in CPH-45 feeder calf sales in your area. Fall-Calving Cow Herd Dry cows should be moved to better pastures as calving time approaches. Cows should start calving next month. Yearling heifers may begin “headstart” calving later this month. Plan to move cows to stockpiled fescue for the breeding season, so it will soon be time to apply nitrogen fertilizer. Prepare for the fall-calving season (usually September). Get ready, be sure you have the following: - record book - eartags for identification

3. Trained to eat feed from a bunk and

General Provide shade and water! Cattle will need shade during the hot part of the day. Check water supply frequently – as much as 20 gallons may be required by high producing cows in very hot weather. Select pastures for stockpiling. Remove cattle and apply nitrogen when moisture conditions are favorable. Stockpiled fescues can be especially beneficial for fall-calving cows after calving. Avoid working cattle when temperatures are extremely high – especially those grazing highendophyte fescue. If cattle must be handled, do so in the early morning. Do not give up on fly control in late summer, especially if fly numbers are greater than about 50 flies per animal. You can use a different “type” of spray or pour-on to kill any resistant flies at the end of fly season. Keep a good mineral mix available at all times. The UK Beef IRM Basic CowCalf mineral is a good choice. Cattle may also be more prone to eat poisonous plants during periods of extreme temperature stress. They will stay in “wooded” areas and browse on plants that they would not normally consume. Consider putting a roll of hay in these areas and/or spraying plants like purple (perilla) mint which can be toxic. Take soil samples to determine pasture fertility needs. Fertilize as needed, this fall.

SALERS

The Balanced Breed STRINGER FARMS Bruce Stringer 128 Teresa Avenue Ÿ Somerset, KY 42501 606-875-3553 94

DIAMOND J SALERS Donald Johnson 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564 606-379-1558 COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

WILLIS FARMS • Danny Willis 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 502-803-5011 • drwc21@aol.com Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821

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DISCOVER

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SUMMITLIVESTOCK.COM/KY 800-213-0567

COW COUNTRY • AUGUST 2018

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Cow Country News - August  
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