Page 1

Don’t Forget Tetanus Prevention When Banding Bulls (page 34)

UK, Stakeholders Break Ground on Grain and Forage Center of Excellence (page 52)

Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef Hits Stores (page 72)


Improve

the

Health

BarOptima Plus E34

and

Sustainability

BARPENTA

BENEFICIAL ENDOPHYTE TALL FESCUE

of

Your

Operation.

HLR Orchardgrass

PREMIUM TIMOTHY GRASS

HIGH LEAF RATIO ORCHARDGRASS

High Forage Yield with Grazing Tolerance

Late Maturing Timothy With very High Yield

High Energy Orchardgrass

BarOptima PLUS E34TM is a high energy, high yielding variety or forage tall fescue bred with the revolutionary beneficial endophyte E34TM for superior pasture persistence. Unlike Kentucky 31, BarOptima PLUS E34 is safe so you can avoid the costly effects of “fescue toxicosis.”

Barpenta is a high yielding Timothy that has performed well in trials making it especially suited for hay production. Barpenta is a late maturing variety, but with exceptional spring development. It offers excellent disease resistance and persistence, making it a favorite with growers.

HLR Orchardgrass contains the best and latest orchardgrass varieties from Barenbrug’s breeding program. These varieties have been selected for high leaf to stem ratio which means improved digestibility and energy, HLR is tolerant to rust and other leaf diseases.

Proud Suppliers of Barenbrug Products: A & S LIVESTOCK & FEED • JAMESTOWN, KY • 270-343-4680

HOPKINSVILLE AG • HOPKINSVILLE, KY • 270-887-0083

AGRI CHEM • HOPKINSVILLE, KY • 270-886-0141

IHG SEED SOLUTIONS • CHAPLIN, KY • 502-507-5786

SOUTHERN STATES • FLEMINGSBURG, KY • 606-845-5811

ARNOLD FEED & SEED • CAMPBELLSVILLE, KY • 270-465-3659

JANES FERTILIZER • COLUMBIA, KY • 270-384-4964

SOUTHERN STATES • GEORGETOWN, KY • 606-863-3630

BARDSTOWN MILLS • BARDSTOWN, KY • 859-348-3949

JEFFRIES FEED & SEED • CAMPBELLSVILLE, KY • 270-789-3007

SOUTHERN STATES • LONDON, KY • 606-864-2514

CLORE AG SUPPLY • SHELBYVILLE, KY • 502-845-7143

KEN’S VALUE CENTER • BERRY, KY • 859-234-6233

SOUTHERN STATES • MAYSVILLE, KY • 606-759-0330

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • CECILLIA, KY • 270-862-3291

KENTUCKY FERTILIZER LLC • WINCHESTER, KY • 859-744-3759

SOUTHERN STATES • SOMERSET, KY • 606-679-1818

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • CLARKSON, KY 270-242-2621

MAYHAVEN FARM SEED • WAYNESBURG, KY • 606-365-9607

T & H FEED • LEBANON, KY • 270-692-2749

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • HODGENSVILLE, KY • 270-358-8447

MONROE FEED & SEED • TOMPKINSVILLE, KY • 270-487-6111

T & T FEED AND SEED LLC • BARDSTOWN, KY • 502-348-3058

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • SHELBYVILLE, KY • 502-633-4585

PECKS FARM STORE • SHARPSBURG, KY • 606-247-2421

THOMAS CAYCE FARM SUPPLY • PRINCETON, KY • 270-365-6920 TRI-COUNTY FERTILIZER • RICHMOND, KY • 859-623-1414

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • UPTON, KY • 270-369-7310

PHILLIPS AGRI • CAMPBELLSVILLE, KY • 270-789-3085

CROP PRODUCTION SERVICES • UNION CITY , TN • 731-885-5121

PLEASANT VIEW AG • SOUTH UNION, KY • 270-542-6606

WINCHESTER FEED • WINCHESTER, KY • 859-744-8022

FARMERS FERTILIZER • BOWLING GREEN, KY • 270-781-9799

POORCO FERTILIZER • ALBANY, KY • 606-387-6000

CHERRY FORK FARM SUPPLY • CHERRY FORK, OH • 937-695-0264

FARMERS FERTILIZER • BOWLING GREEN, KY • 270-842-2419

PRO AG SALES & SERVICE • DANVILLE, KY • 859-236-1445

SUPERIOR AG RESOURCES • BOONEVILLE, IN • 812-897-1100

FARMERS FERTILIZER • SMITHS GROVE, KY • 270-563-2277

RICE AGRI MARKETING • LIVERMORE, KY • 270-314-4317

SUPERIOR AG RESOURCES • CHRISNEY, IN • 812-362-7701

GOLDENROD FEEDS LLC • LIBERTY, KY • 606-787-1748

RIPS FARM CENTER • TOLLSBORO, KY • 606-798-3276

SUPERIOR AG RESOURCES • EVANSVILLE, IN • 812-423-6481

LOUISVILLE, KY bwhaley@caudillseed.com • 800-626-5357 MOREHEAD,

2

RIPS FARM CENTER • WEST LIBERTY, KY • 606-743-7773

KY mpickett@caudillseed.com • 877-775-7333

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


The progressive breeders below are bringing you the sale offering. Please contact them for a sale book or more information.

Bulls

PHF Insight 636

Tide Man 1760

AAA#18995470

ASA#3284805

Grand United 1757 ASA#3284807

Confidence 1767 ASA#3284797

Tide Man 1758E

Dealt Right 314D

ASA#3284797

ASA#3216927

Jason Stephenson

(502) 525 - 1874

Levi Stephenson

(502) 525 - 1873

Gil Cowles

(270) 843 - 9021

Corbin Cowles

(270) 991 - 2534

Harvey Mast

(270) 791 - 6873

Jason Smith

(256) 338 - 0023

Jim Faulkner

(615) 473 - 3759

Andrew Watts

(270) 887 - 2039

Bryan Creek

(270) 725 - 6467

Ronnie Creek

(270) 725 - 6730

All times EST • A complimentary supper will be served at 5:00 pm • Sale starts at 6:30 pm • See you on April 6!

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

3


TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNISTS

West Kentucky Select BRED HEIFER SALE Selling 250 Fall Calving Bred Heifers

7 Bobby Foree: President’s Thoughts 8 Ryan Quarles: Local Ground Beef Available Across Kentucky 10 Dave Maples: Ground Beef Project a Team Effort 12 Baxter Black: Heifer’s Hood Ornament 24 Chris Teutsch: Pugged Pastures: Challenges and Opportunities 34 Dr. Michelle Arnold: Don’t Forget Tetanus Prevention When Banding Bulls! 110 Roy Burris: This Is a Family Business?

FEATURE STORIES 18

Transition from Feed to Pasture

20

New Concepts for U.S. Beef and Pork Dishes Highlighted at Foodex Japan

21

Test Your Soil Before Applying Lime, Fertilizer

26

NCBA Applauds USDA’s Withdrawal of Organic Marketing Rule

33

National Farm Machinery Show Sets Record

37

Bipartisan Bill Backed by 85 Original Co-Sponsors

38

Kentucky Soybean Production Yield at Record Highs

40

Cattle Fly Control Options

42

Spring Weed Control in Grass Hay and Pasture

44

Preventing Grass Tetany

46

7 Guidelines to Help Cattle Producers Manage Through Drought Conditions

48

Multigenerational Success Shines in May’s Lick

50

January Exports Show Solid Start to 2018 For U.S. Beef, Pork

52

UK, Stakeholders Break Ground on Grain and Forage Center of Excellence

56

Spring Forage Management Reminders

58

NASS Still Accepting Completed Census Forms

60

Understanding Income, Expense and Cash Flow Statements

65

Buttercups in Grazed Pastures

69

Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech President and Founder, Dies at 73

72

Quarles, Other Farm Leaders, Kroger Introduce Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef

75

Beef Expo Sales Top $1M Again

76

The End of the Road

78

UK Extension Helps Livestock Producers Deter Black Vultures

90

4

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 7:00 pm Central Time Kentucky-Tennessee Livestock Market Guthrie, Kentucky

For more information contact: Kevin Laurent, University of Kentucky (270) 365-7541 ext. 226 Mark Barnett, KY-TN Livestock Market (270) 483-2504 All heifers are guaranteed bred to bulls with known EPDs and have met stringent requirements for health, quality and pelvic measurements.

See these heifers at: www.kyheifersale.com All heifers qualify for KY Cost Share (CAIP) Most qualify for TN Cost Share (TAEP)

Sponsored by the Univ. of Kentucky and the Univ. of Tennessee Cooperative Extension Service and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture

Summer Stocker Outlook for 2018 14-17

County News

28-30

Economic & Policy Update

83-85

Membership

86-87

Kentucky Beef Council

88-89

Kentucky Beef Network

97

Kentucky Angus Association News

99

News Releases

Market Report

100

Calendar of Events

Advertisers Index

101

Classifieds

ON THE COVER: A SPECIAL THANKS TO

THE LAWSON FAMILY FOR BEING THE FIRST FAMILY HIGHLIGHTED FOR THE NEW KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S GROUND BEEF PROJECT!

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


OAK HOLLOW

OAK HOLLOW 7709

Longevity

Oak Hollow animals are the most durable population of cattle regardless of breed. Whether bulls or females, Oak Hollow animals are rugged and hold up to even the most demanding conditions of the commercial cattleman. Females are moderate framed and easy fleshing. Their fleshing ability allows them to raise a good calf in drought years and a great calf in times of plenty. Structural soundness and udder integrity allow cows to continue high-end production past year 10 and marketable production past year 12. Over 40 years of thorough performance testing has shown this to be true time and time again of our females. Oak Hollow 7709 daughters are proof of that longevity.

Private Treaty Sales Registered Bulls Spring Pairs Fall Bred Cows Fall Bred Heifers Commercial Females Kenneth D. Lowe (270) 202-7186 Joe K. Lowe II (270) 202-4399

www.OakHollowAngus.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

5


KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION 2018 LEADERSHIP KCA REGIONAL DIRECTORS: REGION 1

Jeff Pettit, Vice President*.......(270) 836-2963 Bobby Bell................................(270) 547-8547 Gary Woodall...........................(270) 725-0819 Ricky Haynes..................................................... Keith Johnson..........................(270) 635-0723 Wayne Johnson.......................(270) 726-7896 John Walpole..........................(270) 542-4240 Martin Hayden........................(270) 281-4076 JJ Tucker.................................(270) 257-8548 Dennis Wilson.........................(270) 952-1714 Caleb Jenkin...........................(270) 952-0767

REGION 2

KCA 2018 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OFFICERS: PRESIDENT

TREASURER

Bobby Foree 2440 Eminence Road Eminence, KY 40019 (502) 845-4947

Ken Adams 90 E Horseshoe Ave. Upton, KY 42784 (270) 734-1443

PRESIDENT ELECT

PAST PRESIDENT

Tim White 3660 Military Pike Lexington KY 40513 (859) 223-0326

Chuck Crutcher 4364 Berrytown Rd. Rineyville, KY 40162 (270) 877-0239

VICE PRESIDENT Steve Dunning 8200 Antioch Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 498-8180

KCA PROGRAM CHAIRMAN Chris Cooper 2140 Tates Creek Rd. Richmond, KY 40475

(859) 200-7711 KBC CHAIRMAN Andy Bishop 6135 High Grove Road Cox’s Creek, KY 40013 (502) 275-6177

KBN CHAIRMAN

Joe Lowe, Vice President*........(270) 202-4399 Craig Thompson.......................(270) 590-5174 Mark Thomas...........................(270) 723-6175 Joe Stults..................................(270) 358-8182 Joe Mike Moore......................(270) 670-7493 Frank Rowland....................... (270) 646-0882 Reva Richardson.....................(270) 735-2959 Dr. Kenneth Green.................(270) 879-0229 Richie Thompson...................(270) 678-4000 Kirk Cecil................................(270) 692-7698 Hunter Galloway.....................(270) 745-5972 Donald Reynolds....................(270) 528-5239 Gerry Bowman.......................(270) 427-6922 Phyllis Gentry.........................(502) 549-3798 Adam Estes.............................(270) 528-3904

REGION 3

Jon Bednarski, Vice President*...(502) 649-8706 Danny Cooper..........................(606) 782-1361 Nathan Lawson.......................(859) 734-3765 Dallas McCutchen...................(502) 255-7020

Cary King 250 Bright Leaf Drive Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 734-2173

Jere Caldwell* - Boyle Smith T. Powell* - Lincoln Larry Lovell - Union John Masters* - Mason Seldon Hail* - Laurel Bob Vickery* - Wayne Glenn Mackie - Bourbon Dale Lovell - Muhlenberg Steve Henshaw* - Union Jerry Fraim - Grayson Glen Massengale* - Wayne Dell King - Christian Kenneth Lowe - Warren Dr. J.L.Cole - Monroe Harvey Mitchell - Mercer Jim Naive* - Spencer Shelby Hughes - Logan Hoppy Lovell - Barren

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Charles Miller - Jessamine Larry Clay - Perry Jack Kimbrough* - Shelby Mark Williams - Crittenden Paul Napier - Lincoln Eddie Young - Washington Greg Ritter* - Barren Don Pemberton - Christian Billy Glenn Turpin - Madison Scotty Parsons - Christian Corinne Kephart - Shelby Greg Robey - Mercer Mike Bach - Bath Don Reynolds - Hart Steve Downs - Marion Gary Woodall - Logan David Lemaster - Clark Chuck Crutcher - Hardin *(Deceased)

6

COW COUNTRY NEWS

REGION 4

Jeremy Jones*.........................(859) 749-2233 Mickey Staton..........................(606) 674-2195 David Lemaster.......................(859) 749-0258 Ron Ray...................................(859) 825-8516 Bo Tate....................................(859) 661-2325 Larry Swetnam........................(859) 293-5600 Jason Sandefur.......................(859) 987-0336 Danielle Harmon....................(606) 748-8059 Ronnie Lowe...........................(606) 782-5058 Clay Wills.................................(859) 749-8248 Jason Crowe............................(606) 723-6062

REGION 5

Gary Ford, Vice President*........(270) 402-2194 Steve Devine............................(859) 583-7824 Steve Downs...........................(270) 865-2611 Brent Woodrum......................(859) 583-3193 Ian Thomas..............................(859) 613-2453 Anne Bays................................(615) 478-8450 Larry Parman..........................(606) 878-7516 Greg Robey...............................(859) 734-0067 Eddie Young.............................(859) 262-5682 Adam Chunglo.........................(859) 613-2985 Brenda Williams......................(606) 669-2909 Tommy Glasscock....................(270) 692-4336 * Denotes member of Executive committee

VOLUME 31 • ISSUE 4 176 PASADENA DRIVE • LEXINGTON, KY 40503 PHONE: (859) 278-0899 • FAX: (859) 260-2060 WWW.KYCATTLE.ORG • INFO@KYCATTLE.ORG

KCA’S PAST PRESIDENTS: 1972-73 1974-77 1978-79 1980-82 1983-85 1986-87 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

John Ellegood.........................(502) 532-7573 Kevin Perkins..........................(502) 269-7189 Larry Bryant............................(502) 845-4615 Wanda Hawkins......................(502) 321-5602 Jerry Oak................................(502) 255-7502 Phillip Douglas........................(502) 845-4620 Lincoln Clifford.......................(859) 954-0102

Executive Vice President Dave Maples

KBC Director of Product Development Katelyn Hawkins

Communication & Special Project Coordinator Emilee Wendorf

Membership Coordinator Nikki Whitaker

Staff Accountant Kelly Tucker

Communications Manager Jacob Redway

Director of Kentucky Beef Network Becky Thompson

Publication Coordinator Carey Brown

KBN Industry Coordinator Dan Miller

Graphic Designer Todd Brown

KBC Director of Consumer Affairs Kiah Twisselman

National Advertising Sales, Livestock Advertising Network, Debby Nichols, (859) 321-8770

KBC Director of Education Niki Ellis COW COUNTRY NEWS is published monthly by THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any material which he feels is unsuitable for the publication. Although the highest journalistic ethics will be maintained, the KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION limits its responsibilities for any errors, inaccuracies, or misprints in advertising or editorial copy. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements made against the publisher. • APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


PRESIDENT’S THOUGHTS BOBBY FOREE Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association President I cannot tell you the pride and excitement I experienced a few nights ago when my wife, Jean Kaye, brought home two packages of our Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef from our local Kroger store. That excitement was only surpassed when Jean Kaye returned to that same Kroger market three days later to find our Kentucky Cattlemen’s product totally sold out! While every single member of our KCA staff has worked tirelessly for over 1½ years to bring to fruition the dream of marketing beef in Kroger, this month I want to highlight Alison Smith’s efforts. Alison’s tenacious efforts in navigating the Kroger databases are truly herculean in scale. I agree with Commissioner Ryan Quarles who says he believes this KCA venture will be the greatest single endeavor to affect Kentucky agriculture in 2018. Allison and our entire KCA staff are to be commended for changing the face of Kentucky’s beef cattle industry for years to come! As usual, it has been another busy month both on and off the farm! In early March, I flew to Washington D.C. representing the UK College of Agriculture. While there I visited Kentucky’s congressional delegation where I took the opportunity to discuss a multitude of issues facing Kentucky’s cattle industry. Foremost on everyone’s mind was a letter our dairy friends had received (i.e., the day before my Capitol Hill visits) announcing that Dean’s Milk would no longer purchase milk from 29 Kentucky dairies by early May. Since that time, several in our industry have attempted to assist our dairy-cattle producers by finding alternative enterprises. Please remember that dairymen are beef producers as well; and we need to support them during this critical time. When attending national agricultural conferences such as my recent D.C. event, it is always enjoyable to learn about cattle production in other parts of our nation. Several state cattlemen’s association CEO’s and/or state presidents were participants with me, as well as large ranchers. During one meeting, I sat beside a Montana cattlewoman whose ranching

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

operation consisted of 1800 cows on 50,000 acres. The lady’s husband was at home calving out 300 heifers – where the temperature that morning was -26°F with icy, blizzard conditions. Her husband had been up all-night unrolling straw in an effort to save newborns. Upon my return from Washington, I drove to the Rockcastle County Cattlemen’s Association annual meeting. The gathering was a super event with 40 or so dedicated beef producers proudly displaying their new “Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.” sign – with plans to purchase more. A meeting highlight was an indepth report of CAIP-funded projects in Rockcastle County. Members also showed tremendous interest in pre-enrolling their cows with Beef Solution’s Dan Miller for subsequent participation in our ground beef project.

involves Kentucky Inheritance taxes. This past month, two different clients mentioned leaving their farms to nieces and/or nephews. Neither farmer realized that nieces and nephews are Class B beneficiaries, making them subject to Kentucky Inheritance Taxes. For instance, a niece or nephew receiving a $1 million farm from a Kentucky resident would be liable for $150,960.00 in Kentucky Inheritance Taxes. Since most individuals leave their estates to Class A beneficiaries (i.e., a surviving spouse, parent, child, grandchild, brother, or sister) who are

exempt from Kentucky Inheritance taxes, few consider this often-overlooked tax on Class B and C beneficiaries. As always, consult your attorney for fact-specific advice. To close, my good friend and former KCA president, Mike Bach, recently relayed a quote which I have contemplated many times. Mike said, “Consider what you would have if you awoke tomorrow morning, and only had what you thanked God for today.” That is a simple reminder that we should not take our blessings for granted!

See the latest video news segments at kycattle.org

I also spoke briefly at the Henry County Cattlemen’s Association monthly meeting, where data was presented showing that injections of Vita-Min increased conception rates in mineral-deficient diets. Dr. Muncey Pryor also discussed the increasing resistance of worms to de-wormers. Interestingly, Dr. Pryor suggested that some well-conditioned cows should not be routinely de-wormed – thereby slowing resistance buildup. Another trip this month was to Princeton, Kentucky where I represented KCA at the ground-breaking ceremony for UK’s Grain and Forage Center of Excellence. As you may know, KCA contributed funds for a forage specialist position at UK’s Princeton farm, resulting in the inclusion of forages in the new center’s name. Our members can look forward to a cuttingedge research facility that will allow us to become even more efficient in utilizing Kentucky’s vast forage-based agriculture. Back home on the farm, we are in fullswing with spring calving and other farm chores. In my opinion, there is nothing more satisfying than watching a field full of newborns sprinting across a spring pasture! But with spring, there also comes the need for an occasional veterinary procedure. In the law office, I continue to address many agriculturalrelated issues. My legal tip for the month

Stop by for Us a tour of our facility Give A Call Today ~ Visitors(606) Always Welcome! 365-2654

Ÿ Complete Embryo Transfer and IVF Services ŸŸ Semen Semen Collection Collection (CSS Semen Available) (CSS Semen Available) Ÿ Artificial Insemination (AI) Ÿ And Reproductive Ultrasound Pregnancy Checks ŸŸ Carcass Carcass Ultrasound Ultrasound (UGC/CUP (UGC/CUP Lab Lab Certifi Certifi fied) ed)

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Stan Carnes, DVM

1540 KY40484 40484 1540Newlands NewlandsLane, Lane, Stanford, Stanford, KY (606) 365-2654 www.multigen.net

7


COMMISSIONER’S CORNER

LOCAL GROUND BEEF AVAILABLE ACROSS KENTUCKY RYAN QUARLES Commissioner of Agriculture On Ag Day, March 20, I had the pleasure of helping introduce Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef, a locally produced and processed beef product sold in 85 Kroger supermarkets across the Commonwealth. Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef is the brand for fresh, natural ground beef produced by Kentucky farm families. It’s a product of Beef Solutions, a limited liability company owned by the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association (KCA). The ground beef product – sold in one-pound packages and in two-pound packages of four patties each – was launched in Kroger stores in mid-March. Beef Solutions and Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef were years in the making

and involved lengthy discussions with the KCA, the Kentucky Beef Council, the Kentucky Beef Network, Kroger, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy, producers, and processors. The Chop Shop, a Kentucky Proud processor in Wolfe County, will process the cattle in the program, filling a void that has hampered previous efforts to develop an all-Kentucky beef product. Our friends at Louisville-based Creation Gardens are handling grinding and packaging. Kroger will distribute the product from its Louisville distribution center. Kentucky is the leading beef cattle state east of the Mississippi River, but the vast majority of our cattle are shipped

to feedlots out West for feeding and processing. Beef Solutions will keep the value of the beef right here at home. To find out more about Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef, go to kentuckycattlemensbeef.com. If you’d like to produce beef for Beef Solutions, host a sampling event, or get involved in some other way, contact the KCA at (859) 278-0899. ### I want to take a moment to recognize the passing of Dr. Pearse Lyons. Dr. Pearse Lyons brought boundless energy and a can-do spirit to the Bluegrass when he put down roots in Kentucky soil some 40 years ago. His startup company, Alltech,

became a global powerhouse and developed advances in animal nutrition as well as crop science and the food and beverage industry. He always saw the best in his adopted home state and promoted the Commonwealth to the world. He also brought the world to the Bluegrass for One: The Alltech Ideas Conference and the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games. For me, Dr. Lyons was a dear friend and a valued mentor who taught me the importance of continuous selfimprovement while serving as a role model and an inspiration. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife, Deidre; his children, Mark and Aoife; and the entire Alltech family.

Green River Livestock Campbellsville, KY

PolyDome Bulk Bins

Ÿ Translucent polyethylene allows you to see material level Ÿ Made from high-impact, UV stabilized polyethylene Ÿ Corrosion resistant Ÿ Easy cleaning Ÿ Smooth surface reduces bridging Ÿ Large, vented filler cap with pull rope for ground access Ÿ Sturdy outside ladder Ÿ 10 year warranty!

Low-Cost Farm Loans and Leases • Long Term, Fixed Rate Mortgages • Line of Credit under Prime Rate • Leases for Barns, Savings on Taxes Contact a local Sales Officer today!

Bins in Stock & Ready to Move!

Josh Dickson, Glasgow 270-670-4515 | Josh.Dickson@cgb.com Mike Eubanks, Madisonville 270-836-7790 | Mike.Eubanks@cgb.com

www.cgb-afs.com

Give Darrel a call for all of your feed bin & cattle handling equipment needs.

Darrel Eastridge Ÿ 270-469-5389 8

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


KNOLL CREST’S

TOTAL PERFORMANCE BULL SALE H SATURDAY • APRIL 14, 2018 H

Serving the beef industry since 1944!

Featuring

H ANGUS H SIRES: KCF Bennett Fortress KCF Bennett TheRock A473 Basin Payweight 1682 Plattemere Weigh Up K360 Thomas Baker Valley Montana Deep Well VAR Discovery 2240 GAR Sure Fire KCF Bennett Consent Y75 KCF Bennett Assertive

ANGUS Sale Bulls Average:

+10

DOC

+18

+0.4

MARB

+0.74

WW

+68

REA

+0.57

YW

+118

$W

+69.36

MILK

+27

$B

+146.77

CE BW

KCF Bennett Fortress

KCF Bennett TheRock A473

POLLED HEREFORD Sale Bulls Average: CE

+6.7

BW

+1.4

REA

WW

+62

MARB

+1.4 +0.54 +0.36

YW

+102

BMI INDEX

+$30

MILK

+29

SC

KCF Bennett Homeland C34

H GELBVIEHS H CE

+8

MILK

+30

BW

+0.8

REA

+0.78

WW

+83

MARB

-0.18

+120

FPI INDEX

+75.16

Nationwide Delivery Available 12 Month Unconditional Guarantee KCF Bennett Devout B716

H BALANCERS H SIRES: KCF Bennett B29 KCF Bennett Y6 KCF Bennett Y504 KCF Bennett Assertive

COW COUNTRY NEWS

BALANCER Sale Bulls Average: CE

+15

BW

MILK

+28

-1.3

REA

+0.65

WW

+77

MARB

+0.58

YW

+123

FPI INDEX +92.12

• APRIL 2018

KCF Bennett Y504

KCF Bennett Provident B284

GELBVIEH Sale Bulls Average:

YW

KCF Bennett Y6

Montana Deep Well

Hyalite On Target 936

SIRES: KHR 33A VRT Sam U451

KCF Bennett Citation

KCF Bennett Assertive

H POLLED HEREFORDS H SIRES: BEHM 100W Cuda 504C KCF Bennett Devout B716 KCF Bennett Provident B284 KCF Bennett Homeland C34 Gerber Anodyne 001A NJW 73S M326 Trust 100W Churchill Sensation 028X

Bred Heifers 100 Bulls 85 Commercial

James D. Bennett (434) 376-7299 Paul S. Bennett (434) 941-8245 Dalton G. Bennett (434) 664-7946

Every bull, of every breed, has genomically enhanced EPDs.

Serving the beef industry since 1944!

PO Box 117 Red House, VA 23963 Martha Johnson, Office Manager (434) 376-3567 • Fax (434) 376-7008 knollcrest@knollcrestfarm.com • www.knollcrestfarm.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Jim G. Bennett (434) 664-7935 Brian R. Bennett (434) 664-8309 Scott R. Bennett (434) 660-7268

9


FROM DAVE’S DESK

GROUND BEEF PROJECT A TEAM EFFORT DAVE MAPLES Executive Vice President Proud, yes I was proud. I was proud of the KCA team as I stood in front of the Kroger meat case with the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef on the top shelf of the Tate’s Creek Kroger in Lexington. This has been a long hard project that has touched everyone in our office. That reach goes miles further than Lexington. First Kroger has to be thanked for reaching out to KCA and asking the organization to facilitate the organization of a local ground beef project. The formation of a supply chain is well documented in the text books but actually forming a new supply chain is difficult. It all started with Kroger and the diagram was outlined with a hub. The hub is Beef Solutions, LLC which is a manager managed LLC with one member and the member is the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association. Beef Solutions, LLC is staffed by employees

in the KCA office and was started with funds from the Kentucky Agriculture Development Board. The chain starts with the Kentucky farmer and the qualifying animals. Animals must be identified and enrolled into the system. Thanks to the patience of the staff at Eastern Kentucky University. The EKU Meadowbrook farm supplied the first cattle for this project. The processing plant in the chain is the Chop Shop in Wolfe County in Eastern Kentucky. The Chop Shop had to go through some extensive and costly certifications in order to provide product to the Kroger system. The third party certifications were one area that are in place in order to provide food products to a major retailer. I can see the day that our auction markets and farms will be

required to have third party certifications. Many thanks go to the folks at the Chop Shop for all the pain they went through in order to get the certifications. Creation Gardens in Louisville has really stepped up to the plate with this project. They installed some state-ofthe-art equipment that was required by Kroger. This was not cheap equipment either so thanks to them and to the Ag Development Board for supporting the effort. I have not used personal names in the article but I have to recognize Tom Dawson because he is just a gentleman and a person that I respect. Many of you remember the Dawson and Baker Packing Plant in Louisville. Tom Dawson is still working with meat and is in charge of making sure that the product is correct. The project is lucky to have the many years of experience that Mr.

Dawson brings to the table. It is going to be interesting over the next couple of months to see if the consumer really wants local. The promotional material that is being used states that “local beef just got easier”. I hope this is what the consumer sees but I want you to know that “local is not easy” and it is not as efficient as the big processors. The supply chain is going to learn a great deal and there are going to be growing pains so please be patient with us as this project gets underway.

Take Control of

KILL YOUR FLIES THECreep Feeders

HERD HEALTH & PRODUCTIVITY

“EASY WAY”Creep Feeders A CHUTE SO GOOD WE CAN’T A CHUTE STOP SO GOOD TALKING WE CAN’T ABOUT STOPIT!

CATTLE EQUIPMENT CATTLE IS WHAT EQUIPMENT WE BUILD!

IS WHAT MANUAL WECHUTES BUILD! $

TALKING Silencer Hyd. Chutes ABOUT IT!

Starting At $9,500 Silencer Hyd. Chutes

Starting At $9,500 A More Cost Effective Alternative Heating Your Home A MoreToCost Effective Alternative To Heating Your Home

4,300

Starting At CHUTES MANUAL

4,300

$

BEXTRA Starting At

BALEBEXTRA FEEDERS! BALE FEEDERS! $675 FOB New Castle $675 FOB New Castle

with BVD-PI and Blood Pregnancy Testing

150 Bu. 70 Bu. Side Single

$3,500 $2,900 150 Bu. 70 Bu. Side Single $3,500 FEED $2,900 APACHE WAGONS

20' $4,400 • 24'WAGONS $5,200 APACHE FEED Apache Troughs 24' $5,200 $1,350 20' $4,400 • 24'

Apache Troughs 24' $1,350

Call Us For More Info COMPLETE $1,450 FOB NEW CASTLE Call Us For More Info

EMAILFOR FOR EMAIL CATALOG CATALOG

10

502.845.1160 502.667.3495

Chris McBurney

Chris McBurney 502.741.7088 502.741.7088 1494 Campbellsburg Campbellsburg Rd. Rd. 1494 New Castle, Castle, KY KY 40050 40050 New chris@cattleeq.com chris@cattleeq.com

We We Do Do Custom Custom Design Design On On Pens Pens && Chutes! Chutes!

Dependable Livestock Testing, llc

www.cattleeq.com COW COUNTRY NEWS

156 Vincent St • Smiths Grove, KY 42171 • 270-780- 8378 • office@dltkylab.com

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


11th Annual Production Sale Sunday • 1:30 pm

May 6, 2018

Selling: Fall Open Heifers, Bred Heifers, Spring Pairs, Fall Pairs, Bulls and Commercial Spring Pairs and Bred Females. Lawsons Lucy Z376

Bridgeview Lucy 1703 Reg. No. 19062172

Sire: MGR Treasure Dam: Bridgeview Lucy 1503 Headlining the Lucy Family will be an elegant Granddaughter sired by MGR Treasure from a RB Tour of Duty x Lawson Lucy Z376 dam.

Granddam

Bridgeview Lady 1603

Dam

Maternal Sister

Bridgeview Lady 1701

Reg. No. 19062113 Sire: Coleman Charlo 3212 Dam: 2T Sitz Upward 3021 Selling a look alike maternal sister by Coleman Charlo 3212.

EXAR Elba 2864

OAF CAM Rita 2067

Bridgeview/Ruber Rita 1705 You will like this MGR Treasure daughter out of the great OAF CAM Rita 2067. Front Pasture Genetics

With Guest Consignors: Triple C Farms, Ruber Farms and Hockensmith Cattle Co.

Dam Bridgeview Elba 1702

Reg. No. 19063150 Sire: Baldridge Bronc Dam: EXAR Elba 2864 Selling a Baldridge Bronc Heifer out of EXAR Elba 2864. Elba 2864 is the maternal sister to the REA leader Summitcrest Complete 1P55

The Sparrow Family Cory – 859.338.5826 sparrowcc@hotmail.com

Kyle – 502.330.8914 kylesparrow041@gmail.com

Kip – 859.608.7798 kcspar2@uky.edu

Roger – 859.333.2707 rsparrow@uky.edu

3264 Jones Lane • Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 COW COUNTRY NEWS bridgeview angus aj_9.5x9.5.indd 1

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Matt Jackson 502.667.0142

jacksonmarketingsolutions.com

EPDs as of 3/7/18

11

3/12/18 11:10 AM


mornin’ I went out to get a newborn calf from the little pen where he’d spent the night with his mother. As Albert opened the gate to let me in he cautioned, “She’s a little ringy, Doc.” I stepped back and flattered myself against the neighboring pen so she could come out into the alley. She breached the gate, spied me and charged!

COMMENTARY

HEIFER’S HOOD ORNAMENT BAXTER BLACK, DVM On the Edge of Common Sense I read somewhere that the average “practice life span” of a large animal vet is eight years. After they quit L.A. practice they go into small animal practice, government work, industry, university, research or some other less hazardous profession. Every L.A. veterinarian you know can tell “war stories” that curl your hair! Its not surprising when you realize whenever the vet is called out to look at a bull, a horse or a heifer, the critter is sick or hurting. And when it’s not, the vet is gonna do something to it that will hurt or make it uncomfortable!

12

Stockmen the world over suffer from the same hazards. Anybody who has handled much livestock has been bit, stomped, kicked, stepped on, gored, butted, rammed, spit on, run over or humiliated! All of which brings me to my story. I had been spending most of my nights in the calving barns, sleeping in a bedroll and getting up every hour or two to perform some miracle obstetrical procedure. I was tired to the bone and my eyes were sunk back in my head like a scourin’ calf! The weather was cold, clear and wet the

COW COUNTRY NEWS

I had my right arm up on the gate. She caught me in the ribs as she picked up speed and off we went down the alley! I was somehow balanced on her head like a hood ornament on a Mack Truck! In flight I reached out with my right hand and grabbed a passing gate. I picked up enough splinters to pick Donald Trump’s teeth and sunk an eight penny nail in my finger! Three days later I was putting a heifer back in her little pen. She was a new mother and a little wobbly as I walked her up the alley. Juan, the new exchange student from Chihuahua, didn’t get the

• APRIL 2018

gate closed in time. She came back out. I ran her back and forth several times but she wouldn’t go in. Finally she decided she’d had enough of my foolishness and got on the fight. She came at me and I set out on a high lope down the alley. My five buckles were splashing through the mud puddles and I was high steppin’ like a drum major! The heifer was right on my tail! I reached the gate at the end of the alley and flipped the latch, I turned back to look at the critter just in time to hear the latch fall back and lock. She hit me full speed in the same ribs and proceed to pound me into the wood. This was Juan’s first exposure to American veterinary medicine and he thought the whole thing was hilarious! The ribs have healed up and I’m getting’ to where I can see the humor in the situation. But, like a lot of you fellers, I notice as I get older some parts of my body wake up before others.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

13


COUNTY NEWS BARREN COUNTY

BRACKEN COUNTY

Submitted by Beth Moore

Submitted by James Bailey Cattlemen’s Meeting: The Barren County Cattlemen’s meeting was held Thursday evening, February 22nd at the Barren County High School Trojan Academy. During the meeting the Barren County FFA Chapter presented a program on the Student Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs. Those involved in the program were;(pictured in back row left to right) is; Dr. Andy Moore, FFA Advisor; Ryan Dearing, Chase Smith,

Ethan Smith, Matti Williams, Kelton Wyatt, Zach Caudill, Gracie Buchanon, Hollie Logsdon, Leland Glass of C&F Farm Supply, Gerry Bowman, President of the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association, and A.J. Mitchell, FFA Advisor. (Pictured in front row from left to right) Mattea Wyatt, Teryane Humphrey, Bethany Schalk, Selena Trejo, Brianna Ridlen, and Holly Thomas. A delicious steak dinner was served which was sponsored by C&F Farm Supply of Hiseville Kentucky. Cattlemen Community Award: During the Ky. State Cattlemen’s Convention which was held in Lexington, Ky. January 12th the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association won the Community Involvement Award for the largest County Associations. Those who were involved in filling out the applications were; (left) Cynthia Rowland and James W. Bailey. This was a very prestigious award.

The Bracken County Cattlemen’s Association held a meeting on February 13, 2018 at the local Extension Office (pictured above). A delicious meal of roast beef, green beans, and mashed potatoes was provided thanks to the generous sponsorship of Blue Grass Stockyards in Lexington, Kentucky and was served to the members by volunteers from FFA. There were more than 100 members and guests in attendance and it was announced by the membership committee that we

County Cattlemen. Nicole spoke about her experience attending the KCA leadership program, shared pictures of the places they visited, explained the benefits of attending the program and urged other members to attend. Kelli Rouse (right) from the Farm Service Agency in Maysville, Kentucky explained how the livestock indemnity program works for those who were not familiar and our President, Danny Cooper shared his experiences attending the KCA convention. Our Association was very proud to be able to present donation checks to the Bracken County 4-H and FFA. Guests from Harrison County who had assisted with transportation of donations that were made for the farmers in Texas due to the flooding earlier this year were also in attendance and introduced at the meeting. The next regular meeting of the Bracken County Cattlemen’s Association will be held on Thursday, April 26.

currently have 164 members total! The guest speaker for the evening was Nicole Goecke (above left), who is the current President-elect of the Bracken

Presentation of checks: (below L to R) Madison Goecke, FFA Secretary, Danny Cooper, BCCA President, and Ben Bush, 4-H Shooting Sports President.

Quality Buildings Since 1958

Suburban . Commercial . Agricultural . Commercial . Horse Barns & Arenas

Lawrenceburg, Kentucky Toll Free 800. 558. 7800 waltersbuildings.com 14

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COUNTY NEWS JACKSON COUNTY Submitted by Ginger McQueen The Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association collaborated with the Jackson County Bank and Clay, Jackson and Laurel County Extension Services on the three part series, “Planning for Profit.” During this event, the JCCA grilled steaks and helped with venue preparation. On February 19th, Mr. W. Curtis Smallwood of Smallwood Legal, PLLC, discussed estate planning and legal matters for the next generation of landowners.

On February 26th, Dr. Kenny Burdine, UK Department of Agriculture, discussed the current cattle market and investment planning. Lastly, on March 5th, Mr. Rick Brewer, Laurel Co. Deputy Judge Executive/ Finance Officer and Cattleman, discussed how to minimize and maximize the tax burdens on farmers. We would like to thank everyone who helped make this event a huge success.

METCALFE COUNTY Submitted by Moe Hensley The Metcalfe County Cattlemen met on March 12 at the Metcalfe County Extension Office. Several cattle men and women were on hand for the program sponsored by CPC. After the meal and routine business, Joe Lowe, 2nd Region VP of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association spoke to the group about boosting membership and all the things that KCA does for cattle producers. Teri Atkins and Eric Shaffer were also on hand to explain everything CPC has to offer. From products such as multiple

feed blends, to mineral tubs, to show feeds and now even purchasing cattle. Give CPC a try and you’ll see why they say, “Proven on our Farm--Made for Yours.” Also, the Cattlemen’s Scholarship Program was announced. Applications are due by the first of May. Contact any board member for more information. “If you don’t think fear can control you, you’ve never been chased by a mad mama cow.” (L to R, below) Joe Lowe, Eric Shaffer and Teri Atkins each spoke at the meeting.

Rockport, IN

(812) 649-2821 kenshourdsequipment.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

CALL FOR PRICES

15


COUNTY NEWS

Quintin Smith Family/Craigmore/Lanning/ ★ Papa Ganoush and Guests Angus Sale

N NTI SMIT UI

H

Q

TWIN LAKES

★ ★ ★ F

A

M

S

★ ★ I LY A N G

U

Quintin & Vicki Smith 5171 Cainsville Road Lebanon, TN 37090 (615) 444-8701 H (615) 207-0830 C www.quintinsmithfamilyangus.com

Sunday • April

22, 2018 • 1 p.m.

At the Horn Springs Sale Facility • 2135 Lebanon Road • Lebanon, TN

More125than 150 Head Sell Females • 25 Bulls • Embryos Featuring the hese T f o y n e g o r P ales Famous Fem

CHAMPION HILL GEORGINA 6174 Progeny WR 4@114 Featuring her daughter sired by SAV Recharge 3436 and embryos sired by Casino Bomber N33.

JKS MISS CHEYENNE 4209 JKS MISS CHEYENNE 2267 The 2012 ROV Cow of the Year who reigned as the 2011 North American International Grand Champion Cow/Calf.

The 2013 ROV Cow of the Year and 2013 ROV Dam of the Year who reigned as the 2012 North American International Grand Champion Cow/Calf.

Auctioneer: Mike Jones, TN Lic# 1807

Submitted by Steve Peddicord The Twin Lakes Association recently completed a working agreement with Burkmann Feeds of Glasgow to supply beef mineral and protein tubs at special pricing to members. Members purchased over 10,000 lbs. of cow/ calf basic, cow/calf hi-mag, and fly control mineral plus several protein supplement tubs. All minerals in the special pricing met or exceeded the University of Kentucky requirements for beef cattle minerals. The minerals and tubs were delivered to Warner Fertilizer plant in Albany where members picked up their orders. This is the 6th year the Twin Lakes Association has offered a mineral program to its members. Twice a year (Spring and Fall) all members have an opportunity to participate in this cost saving program.

QVS GEORGINA 2031

The 2014 ROV Reserve Cow of the Year named the 2013 All-American Grand Champion Cow/Calf and Grand Champion Udder award winner, and the 2013 American Royal Reserve Grand Champion Cow/Calf.

QVS GEORGINA 4142

The 2015 ROV Reserve Cow of the Year, named the Reserve Grand Champion Cow in 2014 at the North American International, American Royal, Atlantic National, All-American Junior Show and Tennessee State Fair.

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers, TOM BURKE/KURT SCHAFF/JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. Fax (816) 532-0851. E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com

16

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COUNTY NEWS OLDHAM COUNTY Submitted by Traci Missun The Oldham County Cattlemen’s Association held its annual meeting on February 10, 2018. Guest speakers included Katie Taylor of Farm Service Agency and Chris McBurney of McBurney Livestock Equipment.  Katie gave an overview of disaster assistance programs and Chris gave a presentation on installing and setting waterers to reduce the risk of them freezing.  Thanks to Oldham County Homemakers for a delicious breakfast, Ashlock Farms for donating farm fresh eggs for breakfast, and Oldham County Extension for providing a sponsorship.

1951

2018

CELEBRATING

66 Years

ROTARY CUTTERS

BUILT BUSH HOG ® TOUGH ... for superior performance

FLEX-WING

MULTI-SPINDLE Bush Hog’s entire line of multi-spindle rotary cutters is designed for heavy crop clearing, pasture maintenance, and other big jobs that require a durable, reliable machine. With cutting widths from 8 to 15 feet, and a range of hitch types and mounting options, these machines are built to withstand extreme duty and provide superior performance and productivity with minimal maintenance for many, many years.

Bush Hog’s flex-wing rotary cutters are available in cutting widths from 10 to 20 feet with cutting height from 2 to 14 inches. Flex-wings are legendary for their performance, durability and longevity. Wings float independently over uneven terrain for a uniform cutting appearance. So whether you’re maintaining a rolling pasture or orchard, or clearing heavy crops or overgrown roadsides, you’ll find a model that meets your needs and matches your tractor.

Trust in a company whose name has become synonymous with the task. That’s performance. That’s reputation. That’s Bush Hog®.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

APPAREL AND MERCHANDISE

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Since 1951, Bush Hog® has been making the finest quality farm implements with pride in Selma, Alabama!

17


FEATURE

TRANSITION FROM FEED TO PASTURE Pastures have greened up and are once again producing lush, high quality forages for grazing. Although it may be tempting to put livestock back on these pastures right away, certain precautions should be taken to protect the livestock and the new forage growth. In order to keep livestock gains and production from suffering, it can often be beneficial to make the transition from stored feed to the new pasture growth gradually. Making an immediate switch from dry hay to the early spring growth can sometimes negatively affect livestock performance. New growth is highly digestible and has lower fiber content than later growth and dry hay. Consuming this highly digestible feed can cause diarrhea, especially when livestock are quickly switched from a dry hay diet. Supplementing a higher fiber feed such as dry hay as a portion of the diet can reduce this issue by slowing rumen passage rates. Often, livestock are turned out onto pastures that have not grown to the recommended height and ground cover may be fairly sparse. Animals may not be getting a full mouth of feed and if there is increased traveling distance to reach adequate amounts of forage, gains and production may decrease. Increasing travel means less time grazing which can attribute to reduced gains. Mixing dry hay into the diet when shifting to early spring pastures can allow animals to become accustomed to the change in diet and can benefit herd health. Hay can be gradually removed from the diet. Another important aspect to herd health and performance in early spring grazing is to supply the livestock with adequate minerals. Minerals play a large role in animal health, growth, reproduction, and overall performance. These can either be fed free-choice or can be added to a supplemented feed. Minerals should complement the forages and other feed livestock is consuming. Location of free choice feeders can affect intake. Placing the feeder closer to a water source will increase mineral intake. High salt concentration in a mineral mix will decrease intake. In the early spring, a high magnesium, or high “Mg” mineral should be available to reduce the risk of grass tetany. This supplement should be available to livestock starting in December 18

or January and should continue until spring time when temperatures are consistently above 60F. 20 grams of magnesium need to be consumed daily to effectively prevent grass tetany. Freechoice minerals should contain 12 to 15% magnesium (from magnesium oxide) and cattle need to consume 4 ounces of the mineral. It is important that the livestock have minerals available daily whether minerals are available to them freechoice or being added to a supplemented feed. Consuming the correct minerals in adequate amounts will keep herd health and performance high. Early spring is a crucial time for forage and pasture management as it will affect the stands production throughout the grazing season. Spring growth should be at least 6 inches before grazing and animals should be removed when plants are grazed down to approximately 3 to 4 inches. Because early spring usually has high amounts of precipitation, it is important to protect forages and soils from possible damage during these wet conditions. Livestock should be rotated at a faster rate or put into a sacrifice or corral area during wet periods to keep damage to a minimum. Keeping livestock, forages, and soil in good condition in the early spring as pasture production starts to rapidly increase can benefit the performance of all throughout the grazing season. Drastically changing an animal’s diet can have negative effects of the animal’s health and performance. When changing a diet from stored feed to lush, new forage growth, gradually removing the hay from the diet can decrease negative effects. Supplying hay or other stored feed can also be beneficial if the new growth is sparse to keep gains (or milk production) high and to protect pastures from overgrazing at this time. Keeping animals supplied with the minerals needed at all times is crucial to animal performance. Supplying a high “Mg” mineral will protect against grass tetany. It is necessary to allow pastures to establish before heavy grazing. Protecting pastures during periods of extremely wet conditions can help to keep forages stands healthy and productive. Taking steps to keep livestock and pastures in good condition in the early spring will pay off with high production and performance throughout the grazing season. COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Hit blood-sucking parasites with the triple-barrel power ™ of New TRI-ZAP tags. When you go gunnin’ for horn flies, face flies, lice and ear ticks, make sure you’re packing the right weapons. New TRI-ZAP™ insecticide cattle ear tags from Y-TEX®. TRI-ZAP tags are the only tags on the market with three proven active ingredients to stop performance-robbing parasites dead in their tracks. Even those resistant to other tags. So ask your livestock products supplier for the triplebarrel power of TRI-ZAP insecticide cattle ear tags, or visit www.ytex.com to learn more.

Always read and follow label directions. TRI-ZAP is a trademark of Y-TEX Corporation. © 2018 Y-TEX Corporation

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

19


FEATURE

ANADA 200-591, Approved by FDA

NEW CONCEPTS FOR U.S. BEEF AND PORK DISHES HIGHLIGHTED AT FOODEX JAPAN For intramuscular and subcutaneous use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. BRIEF SUMMARY (For full Prescribing Information, see package insert.) INDICATIONS: Norfenicol is indicated for treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, and for the treatment of foot rot. Also, it is indicated for control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M.haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Do not use in animals that have shown hypersensitivity to florfenicol. NOT FOR HUMAN USE. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Can be irritating to skin and eyes. Avoid direct contact with skin, eyes, and clothing. In case of accidental eye exposure, flush with water for 15 minutes. In case of accidental skin exposure, wash with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. Consult physician if irritation persists. Accidental injection of this product may cause local irritation. Consult physician immediately. The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about Norfenicol with your veterinarian. For customer service, adverse effects reporting, or to obtain a copy of the MSDS or FDA-approved package insert, call 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: Not for use in animals intended for breeding. Effects on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which persists beyond 28 days. This may result in trim loss at slaughter. Tissue reaction at injection sites other than the neck is likely to be more severe. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows as such use may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. ADVERSE REACTIONS: Inappetence, decreased water consumption, or diarrhea may occur transiently. Manufactured by: Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland. The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol ® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.

20

Noting that booming meat demand among Japanese consumers continues to gain momentum, the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) seized the opportunity by introducing new and unique U.S. beef and pork dishes at Asia’s largest food trade show. USMEF’s efforts at Foodex Japan, which attracted more than 80,000 visitors over four days (March 6-9), were funded by the USDA Market Access Program (MAP), the Beef Checkoff Program, the Pork Checkoff and the Texas Beef Council. USMEF is a contractor to the beef checkoff. Set up inside the USA Pavilion, USMEF shared information and educated food buyers about the advantage of U.S. beef and pork over the products of competitors – many of whom also participated in Foodex. “Japan is one of the largest importers of food in the world and they also pay some of the highest premiums,” explained Greg Hanes, USMEF assistant vice president for international marketing and programs. “That’s why Foodex is such an important trade show. Exporters from Canada, Mexico, China, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and South America were there to try to capture a greater the share of the market.” USMEF’s booth included a dedicated area where U.S. red meat exporters could meet one-on-one with buyers, and a special kitchen area allowed USMEF chefs to prepare U.S. beef and pork tasting samples over the course of the event. “Exporters met with hundreds of buyers and representatives of Japan’s retail and foodservice industries and the samples we served attracted tremendous traffic,” said Hanes. “This year we were really focused on new trends and menu concepts. We brought in several companies that import food and educated them on these concepts, then let them taste the dishes for themselves. That’s an important step for winning new customers in Japan.” Because the U.S. pork industry sees an opportunity to move more loins in the Japanese market, USMEF highlighted a new dish called “pork cheese teji karubi,” a Korean-style barbecue dish traditionally made with chicken. USMEF developed the dish using thin-sliced U.S. pork.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Visitors to Foodex Japan line up for samples of U.S. beef and pork at the USMEF booth inside the USA Pavilion “It’s really taken off, and we got an excellent response to the dish during the show,” said Hanes. “We are hoping that the momentum carries over and restaurants and retail outlets will continue to pick up on it. This could be really big for U.S. pork loins.” On the beef side, U.S. pound steak was highlighted, along with new gourmet hamburger concepts and a soup made with U.S beef large intestine. “The catchphrase ‘pound steak’ is all about U.S. beef thick-cut steak, which is something we are trying to establish as a consumer food trend in Japan,” said Takemichi Yamashoji, USMEF-Japan director. “Typically, steaks in Japan are served in sizes from 6 to 8 ounces. Our idea is to convince foodservice operators and restaurants to serve steaks that are 15 to 16 ounces, which is equal to one pound – thus the ‘pound steak’ campaign, a way to enjoy the taste and quality of U.S. beef as thick-cut steak.” The gourmet hamburger concept, which has become popular in other Asian countries like South Korea and Taiwan, is also gaining popularity in Japan, said Hanes. “During Foodex, we showed buyers how to grind different cuts of U.S. beef and how to prepare these gourmet hamburgers – then,

• APRIL 2018

of course, we gave them samples to taste,” said Hanes. “This is something that could really move a lot of beef cuts, especially if the idea of grinding their own burgers catches on.” Promotion of U.S. beef large intestine at Foodex was part of an effort to sell more variety meat in this high-value market. “This is an opportunity to add value to an item that commands little attention at home,” noted Hanes, who said the large intestine was offered to Foodex visitors in a tasty soup. Foodex 2018 clearly demonstrated that Japan remains a hot market for red meat. “There was a steady stream of visitors to the USMEF booth, and it often seemed that it was one of the busiest places at the entire show,” said Hanes. “The mix of attendees was amazing. It ranged from representatives of small importers or restaurants all the way to the presidents of some of the largest food companies in the world.” Special visitors to the USMEF booth were USDA Under Secretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs Ted McKinney and U.S. Ambassador to Japan William Hagerty. Both spent time talking with international visitors and meeting with USMEF staff.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

TEST YOUR SOIL BEFORE APPLYING LIME, FERTILIZER Tabby Campbell, Ag Services and Research Operations Office Coordinator

Before applying lime and fertilizers, your first step should be taking a soil sample for testing. Testing offers information that can lead to more informed decision-making and ultimately greater productivity and profitability. We like to say, “Unless you test, it’s just a guess.” When should I sample my soil? Early spring is a good time to take soil samples for summer crops. Summer is a good time to sample for fall and winter crops. To assess nitrogen availability in the soil, sample as close to planting as possible. For lawns, spring (April) is a good time to sample for warm-season grass. This will ensure your test results will be back in time to fertilize in May. Summertime (mid-Au-

gust) is good for cool-season grasses. A Strategy for Collecting Samples Improperly collected soil samples are the weak link in the soil testing process. For test results to be useful, the sample must accurately reflect the variability and conditions in the field. A sample from a single spot cannot achieve this. Steps for taking a good soil sample: A: Before sampling, make a detailed map of your land. For small areas, simply draw a diagram. For large tracts, aerial photographs may be helpful. B: Divide the map into individual sample areas of 40 acres or less. Assign a short, permanent sample identification name to each area that will help you remember its location.

C: Each sample area should consist of only one general soil type or condition. If a field varies in slope, color, drainage or texture, and if those areas can be fertilized separately, submit a separate sample for each area. D: If the field being sampled has been divided into sections, submit a sample for each section – even if you now plan to grow the same crop across the entire field. Areas where liming or fertilizing patterns have differed from the rest of the field should also be sampled separately. To learn more about our agriculture testing services and good sampling practices, visit: noble.org/ag/ services/testing

BEYOND THE BOTTLE Winning the praise of cattlemen andveterinarians requires top performance, reliability and a fair price.

® Norfenicol (f lorfenicol 300 mg/mL) Less Viscous and More Syringeable Than Nuflor* Shorter Sub-Q Withdrawal Time Than Nuflor® Plastic Bottles Eliminate Breakage and Product Loss FDA-Approved for Sub-Q Use in Cattle at High-Risk of BRD Broad Spectrum Treatment and Control Against BRD Unique Formulation

orfenicol

®

*Data on file

(florfenicol)

www.norbrook.com The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Nuflor is a registered trademark of Merck Animal Health.

0717-591-I01A

Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. For use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment or within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which may result in trim loss at slaughter. See product labeling for full product information, including adverse reactions.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

21


22

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


It doesn’t do average. Average isn’t how you get ahead. Or get more done. That’s why the 6M is anything but.

And really, isn’t that what a utility tractor is supposed to do? Get the job done – any job – quickly, the right way, and without a fuss. That’s why you should think long and hard about the new, versatile, productive 6M. It’s the mid-spec tractor built for hardworking beef and dairy operations … and made to get after utility chores of all kinds. It features the perfect mix of options, performance features, automation, comfort, and economy. Available in 110 to 195 Final Tier 4 engine horsepower. With many options … cab, open station, three transmissions, 2WD, and MFWD. And the hydraulic capacity of up to 30 gpm (113 lpm) to cycle heavy loads and lift big rear implements, the engine power and torque to master tough conditions, and the comfort and economy to keep you going … day after day, year after year. That’s the 6M. Talk to your dealer about America’s Tractor.

More power. More getting work done. The 6M.

COW COUNTRY NEWS 70580-3_9.5x9.5.indd 1

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

JohnDeere.com/6M

23

7/13/17 4:46 AM


+ 1-2 lb/A ladino clover. Grass can also be added to this mixture as needed. Tall fescue can be broadcast at a rate of 1015 lb/A and orchardgrass at 6-8 lb/A. If summer forage is needed, the damaged area may be prepared as described above and overseed in mid to late April with a mixture of crabgrass (3-6 lb/A) and annual lespedeza (10-15 lb/A).

FORAGES

PUGGED PASTURES:

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES CHRIS D. TEUTSCH UK Research and Education Center at Princeton

chris.teutsch@uky.edu

A wetter than normal winter has resulted in significant pugging damage in pastures across Kentucky. Pugging occurs when the hooves of grazing livestock penetrate the soil surface during wet conditions causing damage to pasture plants as well as soil structure. Pasture plants can be torn and buried. Soils can be compacted resulting in lower water infiltration rates and increased runoff from pastures. The net result is decreased pasture productivity. Depending on the severity of the damage, decreases in pasture productivity can range from 20 to 80% for 6 to 12 months following the initial damage. Damaged sods are much more vulnerable to invasion from less productive weedy species. Even after pastures have appeared to recover, pasture productivity can be decreased by as much as 20%. Due to the lower productivity of severely pugged pastures, timely rehabilitation is necessary. The remainder of this article will discuss some options for rejuvenating damaged pastures.

and very severe damage will in most cases require full renovation.

Assess pugging damage. The first step in developing a recovery strategy is to get an accurate assessment of the severity of pugging damage. In many cases, pugging may not be as bad as it appears at first glance. Frank Mickan from Victoria’s Dairy Extension Centre, said it is important to avoid a quick emotionally based assessment. He developed a chart to help quantify pugging damage in pastures. This chart considers the percent of a given area that is damaged and the depth of the pugging damage. He suggests assessing several relatively small areas (1 x 1 ft) that are representative of the pugging damage that is present. This best done by making a quadrat out of PVC pipe and laying it on the damaged areas that are being assessed. Then estimating how much of the total area of the paddock has been impacted. Pastures that have very light to light damage may recover fully without any inputs other than extra rest in the spring. Pastures with moderate damage may be thickened up by harrowing to level and smooth damaged areas, broadcasting seed, and cultipacking. Areas with severe

Subsoiling and surface tillage. Subsoiling may in some cases have a beneficial impact on soil structure, but it has not been shown to consistently increase dry matter production of pastures. Likewise, surface tillage (harrowing, disking, etc.) alone has been shown to have limited impact on overall dry matter production. Both practices have no impact or in some cases may further damage recovering plants. In either case, pasture sods still have a decreased stand density making them vulnerable to invasion by undesirable weedy species.

24

Soil test and adjusting fertility. Damaged areas should be soil tested and lime and fertilizer applied as needed. Soil fertility is a major factor impacting pasture productivity in the Upper South. Poor fertility limits pasture growth and decreases legume presence. In addition, it results in weak sods that are more vulnerable to weed invasion. The best defense against weeds in pastures is maintaining a healthy and vigorous sod. Rest and recovery. In cases where the pugging damage was very light or light, simply giving pastures a little TLC this spring may be enough. Allow damaged paddocks to get a little more mature before initiating grazing in the spring and give them a little longer rest period after grazing. Make sure to avoid overgrazing these pastures during the summer months when they are stressed by high temperatures and drought.

Overseeding damaged sods. Pugging may provide an excellent opportunity to incorporate legumes and improved grass species into tall fescue sods. Damaged sods may be overseed with legumes or a combination of grasses and legumes. This is best accomplished in late winter or early spring. Areas should be leveled with a pasture drag or other tillage implement, seed can then be broadcast on the soil surface and cultipacked. A legume mixture that works well across the Commonwealth is 6-8 lb/A red clover

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Reseeding damaged sods. In cases of severely and very severely pugged sods, complete renovation may be needed. Although sods can be reseeded in the spring, it may be advisable to wait until the following fall. In this case, severely damaged areas can be leveled and smoothed by harrowing in late spring and seeded with a summer annual crop such as pearl millet or sorghumsudangrass. These crops can be utilized for summer grazing or conserved as hay or silage. This provides the opportunity to adjust soil fertility as needed and control any undesirable plant species with a nonslective herbicide application in late spring and again in late summer before reseeding the desired perennial forage mixture. This is an ideal opportunity to eliminate toxic tall fescue from a paddock

and reseed a novel endophyte tall fescue variety. For more information on converting from toxic to novel endophyte tall fescue, please watch videos from the tall renovation workshop that was held last month in Lexington. They can be found on the KYForages YouTube Channel at https://youtu.be/h_YzA4l60Z0. The best solution to pugging damage is to work hard at avoiding it. This may not always be possible, but there are some strategies that you can implement when the Good Lord blesses us with a little more water than we can use at any given time. The first strategy is to keep the cattle moving. This will help keep them from damaging any one paddock severely. The second is to just select a paddock that needs renovated and let them camp out there with some hay until things dry up. This second option has some issues in that animals may likely be in the middle of a mucky mess and that is not good for animal health and that you must feed hay. For more information on renovating pastures and no-till seeding techniques visit UK Forage Extension website at http://forages.ca.uky. edu/ or contact your local extension office.

Percentage of Quadrant Damaged

Depth of Pugging

0-25%

25-50%

50-75%

75-<100%

100%

0-1 in

Very Light

Very Light

Very Light

Light

Light

1-2 in

Very Light

Light

Moderate

Severe

Very Severe

3-4 in

Light

Moderate

Very Severe

Very Severe

Very Severe

> 4 in

Moderate

Severe

Very Severe

Very Severe

Very Severe

Adapted from Rob La Grange. 2009. Getting pastures back into shape. In the Tassie Dairy News, Issue 10, November 2009, TIAR Dairy Centre, Tasmania.

Table 1. Assessing pasture damage using an area x depth matrix.

FORAGE MANAGEMENT TIPS FOR APRIL Graze winter annuals. Creep graze calves allowing access to high quality pastures. Start rotation on perennial pastures. Move animals through paddocks quickly to create a “grazing wedge”.

Assess pugging damage to pastures and decide on remediation strategies. Smooth and reseed winterfeeding areas as needed. Make plans to plant summer annual forages and order seed.

Allow calves to creep graze the highest quality forage.

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


SAVE

time money water Ritchie water is smart water. Provide fresh water for your animals, and have more left for other things in your life. See what owning a Ritchie automatic waterer can do for you at www.ritchiefount.com Partner to the American Cattleman since 1921 Proud to be a sponsor of:

AmMAD si e E I N nc r e 1 ic 92 A

M

1

Call Central Farm Supply of KY at 1-800-777-5923 for a dealer near you or check our dealer locator at www.centralfarmky.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

i9c2A r e 1 1

E AD

IN

ce Amsin

25


e m i T g Sprin 21ST ANNUAL UCCA

e l a S t c e l e S

CTS Remedy 1T01

SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2018 12:00 PM CST

Hyder-Burks Sale Pavilion TN Tech University | Cookeville, TN

Selling90Lots

CE +9 | BW -1.3 | WW +54 | YW +119 | CW +55 MARB +0.41 | RE +0.80 | $W +56.30 | $B +156.57

Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36

COW/CALF PAIRS BRED COWS & HEIFERS OPEN HEIFERS BULLS

CE +9 | BW +2.5 | WW +82 | YW +141 | CW +63 MARB +0.52 | RE +1.36 | $W +65.74 | $B +178.50

Contacts:

SS Niagara Z29

SALE MANAGER: BROWN MARKETING SERVICES KENT BROWN 931-265-9200 bms@twlakes.net UCAA: RICHARD BROWN President 931-239-9785 DAVID HOLT Sale Chairman 931-397-1715 SALE DAY PHONES: 931-372-6762 OR 931-265-9200

View our sale book at:

CE +7 | BW +0.3 | WW +68 | YW +134 | CW +52 MARB +0.79 | RE +0.97 | $W +66.60 | $B +159.23

FEATURE

NCBA APPLAUDS USDA’S WITHDRAWAL OF ORGANIC MARKETING RULE WASHINGTON (March 12, 2018) National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Kevin Kester today issued the following statement regarding the announcement from the U.S. Department of Agriculture that it is withdrawing its Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices (OLPP) final rule: "Common sense scored an all-toorare victory in Washington, DC, today. Not only did USDA not have the legal authority to implement animal-welfare regulations, but the rule would have also vilified conventionally raised livestock without recognizing our commitment to raise all cattle humanely, regardless of the marketing program they're in. Secretary Sonny Perdue deserves a lot of credit for yet another common-sense decision that will benefit America's cattle producers." NCBA filed comments numerous times in opposition to the organic marketing rule. You can read the group's most recent comments, which were filed in January, at goo.gl/GJD7ps The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) has represented America's cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 1-866-BEEF-USA or membership@ beef.org.

www.angusjournal.com

26

CCOOW W CCOOUUNNTTRRYY NNEEW WSS • •J AANPURAIR L Y2 021081 8 • • A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Quality Cover

859-351-2604

Dan Perkins

Versailles, KY

Est. 2007

Hoop Barns Built to Last! 24’ to 140’ Wide

Offering Covers for all brands Portable Livestock Shades Permanent Shades

See the latest video news segments at kycattle.org

Selling Rollin R a daughter of (172286 ock Blackbird 2 68 3 BJF, Ham )who is a dono 45 Bend. Sh mer Head and r for Davis e aSesllin a gsa l the Roll Rw o d a t u h g ollin Roc tp eircok in f of o hkerBlackebhir (17R 228c6k d 2345 68)whod in 2 015. is a BJF,

ANGUS thAnnualANGUS 9 Annual 29 thAnnualANGUS 29 th

OPPORTUNITY SALE SALE OPPORTUNITY ner & Jeffries Angus Farm • Canmer, Kentucky

ay •

dono Ham Bend. Sh mer Head and r for Davis e was als the Roll in Rock o the pick of herd in Selling a 2015. d a ughter Rollin R o f o ck Black 1722 bird 23 Saturday (• Noon 8668 BJF, Ham )who is a dono 45 r fo er Head Bend. Sh m and Dav r Saturday Noon e• w is a s als the Roll in Rock o the pick of herd in 2015.

OPPORTUNITY SALE At Buckner & Jeffries Angus Farm • Canmer, Kentucky At Buckner & Jeffries Angus • Canmer, Kentucky Noon • April 7, Farm 2018

April 7, 2018 April 7, 2018

Saturday • Noon • Saturday • Noon •

TC Moonshine 0070

April 7, 2018 April 7, 2018

Selling Rollin R a daughter of (172286 ock Blackbird 2 68)w 345 ono $F MILKBJF,CWHam Marb hoREis a d$W $G Reg.$BNo. 16764253 Bend. Sh mer Head andCED rBWforWW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B Da+76.05 +28th +39 e+.35 +55.37 +31.62 +125.47 was +.52 v is a ls ot e Rollin +1ic+3.1 k of+64 +113 +28 +39 +.35 +.52 +55.37 +76.05 +31.62 +125.47 Rock he he p rd in Featuring a January daughter of this powerful TC Total 2015.

Reg. No. 16764253

CED BW WW YW +1 +3.1 +64 +113

TC Moonshine 0070

SELLING:

Featuring a January daughter of this powerful TC Total SELLING: daughter that isBend a powerhouse donor at Davis Bend daughter that is a powerhouse donor at Davis Saturday • Noon Cow/Calf Pairs and • Bred and Open Heifers Farms. EPDs as ofCow/Calf 2/2/2018 Pairs • Bred Open Heifers Farms. EPDs as of 2/2/2018 TC Moonshine 0070 Saturday • Noon PVF Blackbird 0105 Angus • Embryos PVF Blackbird 0105 Reg. No. 16764253 TC Moonshine 0070 Reg. No. 16752028 PVF Blackbird 0105 Reg. No. 16752028 Angus • Embryos A ne 0070 CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marbembryos RE $W $F Surveillance $G Featuring $B 4129 Service-age Angus Bulls Reg. No. 16764253 Reg. No. 16752028 embryos by PVF Surveillance 4129 Featuring by PVF April 7, 2018 4253 +1 +3.1 +64 +113 +28Owned +39 with +.35 Davis +.52 Bend +55.37 Farm +76.05and +31.62 +125.47 Featuring embryos by PVF Surveillance 4129 Owned with Davis Bend Farm and Fairfield Farms Fairfield Farms $W $F $G $B with Davis Bend Farm and Fancy Fairfield FarmsSet of Fall Bred Heifers Featuring a January daughter of this powerfulOwned TC Total +55.37 +76.05 +31.62 +125.47 Service-age Angus Bulls Featuring a January daughter of this powerful TC Total SELLING: daughter that is a powerhouse donor at Davis Bend this powerful TC Total SELLING: daughter that is a powerhouse donor at Davis Bend Cow/C (New this year) Farms. donor at Davis Bend Cow/Calf Pairs • Bred andHeifers Open Heifers Farms.7101 EPDs as of 2/2/2018 Cow/Calf • Bred and 7101 OpenDBF Heifers Ruby BJF Fancy Set of Fall Bred 2/2/2018 S e DBFPairs Ruby BJF ll in DBF This Ruby BJF 7101 g Rollin R a daughter o Years Featured Lot 1. Angus • Embryos CONSIGNORS: Angus • Embryos This Years Featured Lot 1. ThisConnealy Years Featured Lot 1. x Shipwheel Montana x (172286 ock Blackbird 2 She is a February 2017 Black Granite 6 8 )who is Buckner • Davis Bend Farm BJF, H (New this& Jeffries year) She is a February 2017 Connealy Black x Shipwheel Montana x She is a February 2017 Connealy Black Granite x0096. Shipwheel Montana x Granite F Service-age Angus Bulls a dono TC Ruby Her dam is a two-year-old ideal young Angus cow, who ammer Service-age Angus Bulls TC ideal Ruby 0096. Her dam iscow, a two-year-old ideal young Angus cow, who B Haines Angus • Kostbabe Cattle • Caveland Angus TC Ruby 0096. Her dam is a two-year-old young Angus who e n d. She w Head and D was the high-selling female of the 2017 Angus Opportunity to JHL Angus. a Fancy Set of 2017 Fall Bred Heifers was the high-selling female of the 2017 Angus Opportunity to JHL Angus. was the high-selling female of the Angus Opportunity Angus. Angus • Barry Smith the Rollin Rocskalso the pi OwnedtobyJHL Davis Bend Farm and JHL Angus. FancyShaw Set Family of Fall Bred Heifers herd in (New this year) Owned by Davis Bend Farm and JHL Owned Angus.by Davis Bend Farm and JHL Angus.

April 7, 2018

CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B +1 +3.1 +64 +113 +28 +39 +.35 +.52 +55.37 +76.05 +31.62 +125.47

EPDs as of 2/2/2018

CONSIGNORS:

JHL Angus • Fouts & Fouts Angus • D&D Angus (New thisCorbett year) APS&Angus • Byron & Kay & Carol Jaggers Hain Buckner Jeffries • Davis Bend• Larry Farm HammerHead Cattle Co. • Fairfield Farms Buckner & Jeffries • Davis Bend Farm JH CONSIGNORS: Haines BJF Angus • Kostbabe Cattle • Caveland Angus • Noon APS An Haines Angus • Kostbabe Cattle • Caveland Angus BJF Princess 1110 Saturday Forever Lady BJF BVF BVF Forever Lady 81528152 Shaw Family Angus • Barry Smith Buckner & Jeffries • Davis Bend Farm For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers, TOM Reg. BJFShaw and Shaw will be selling a HAAG, Shaw Family Angus • Barry Smith BJF 8152 and FamilyFamily Angus will beSCHAFF/JEREMY selling TCAngus Moonshine 0070 BJFNo. BVF16955638 Forever Lady JHL Angus • Fouts & Fouts Angus • D&D Angus BJFHALL Princess 1110 BURKE/KURT AMERICAN OF Angus FAME at7, the WORLD Haines Angus •aBox Kostbabe Cattle •ANGUS Caveland April 2018 natural and embryos from the660, Smithville, natural daughter and embryos fromNo. the proven producer and has will been Reg. 16764253 ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. Fax (816) and Shaw Family Angus be aselling adaughter APS Angus • Byron & Kay Corbett • Larry & Carol JaggersShe is a BJF Reg. No. 16955638 JHL Angus • Fouts & Fouts Angus • D&D Angus 8152 donor x PVF Insight 0129. 8152 donor x PVF Insight 0129. Shaw Family Angus • Barry Smith 532-0851. E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com She is a proven producer and has been a natural daughter andfor embryos from the HammerHead Cattle Co. • Fairfield Farms many-time champion cow/calf the Jeffries s 1110 many-time champion cow/calf for the Jeffries JHL Angus • Corbett Fouts & Fouts Angus Angus x PVF Insight 0129. • Byron Featuring a& January daughter of this powerful Total SELLING: APS Angus Kay •TCBend Larry &• D&D Carol Jaggers girls. Selling 8152 with donor her September 2017 Sale Saleheld heldat: at: girls. Selling with herJaggers September 2017 5638 daughter that is a• powerhouse at Davis APS Angus Byron &donor Kay Corbett • Cow/Calf Larry & Carol Pairs • Bred and Open Heif Silviera Style bull calf. Silviera Style bull calf. Farms. and hasSale been held a HammerHead Cattle Co. • Fairfield Farms at: 226 KYKY 42722 HammerHead Cattle Co. • Fairfield Farms 226Angus AngusRoad Road• •Canmer, Canmer, 42722

CONSIGNORS:

2

For your fre BURKE/KU ANGUS HEA

CED BW WW YW MILK CW Marb RE $W $F $G $B +1 +3.1 +64 +113 +28 +39 +.35 +.52 +55.37 +76.05 +31.62 +125.47

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers, TOM BURKE/KURT SCHAFF/JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. Fax (816) 532-0851. E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com

BJF Princess 1110

EPDs as of 2/2/2018

Princess 1110 Fax Fax(270) (270)528-3315 528-3315 Todd &BJF Road • Canmer, KY 42722 Denise Jeffries Todd & Denise Jeffries Angus Bulls For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of theService-age Sale Managers, TOM Reg. No. 16955638 For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office theOFSale Keith & Diana Jeffries BURKE/KURT SCHAFF/JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUSof HALL FAMEManagers, at the WORLD TOM 528-7246 Fax (270) 528-3315 No. 16955638 Keith & Jeffries Diana Jeffries (270) (270) 528-7246 Fancy Set ofFax Fall She is a proven producer and has been a ToddReg. &(270) Denise ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. (816) Bred Heifers BURKE/KURT SCHAFF/JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WORLD && Tammy Jeffries (270)528-3318 528-3318 andTroy Troy Tammy E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com (New this year) She is(270) a proven producer has been aJeffriescow/calfANGUS many-time champion for the HEADQUARTERS, Jeffries Box 660,532-0851. Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. Fax (816) Keith & Diana Jeffries 528-7246 Tim 524-3440 Tim&&Leslie LeslieJeffries Jeffries (270) (270) 524-3440 532-0851. E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com CONSIGNORS: girls. Selling with her September 2017 (270) 528-3318 Troychampion & (270) Tammy Jeffries 528-6605 many-time cow/calf for the Jeffries timothyljeffries@gmail.com (270) 528-6605 timothyljeffries@gmail.com Buckner & Jeffries • Davis Bend Farm Silviera Style bull calf. Tim & Leslie Jeffries (270) 524-3440 Haines Angus • Kostbabe Cattle • Caveland Angus girls. Selling with her September 2017 Shaw Family Angus • Barry Smith (270) 528-6605 timothyljeffries@gmail.com JHL Angus • Fouts & Fouts Angus • D&D Angus

alf for the Jeffries ptember 2017 226 Angus l calf.

Silviera • A P R I L Style 2 0 1 8 • bull A P Ucalf. B L I C AT I O N

COW COUNTRY NEWS

O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

BJF Princess 1110 Reg. No. 16955638

She is a proven producer and has been a many-time champion cow/calf for the Jeffries girls. Selling with her September 2017

Angus • Embryos

2 7 & Carol Jag APS Angus • Byron & Kay Corbett • Larry HammerHead Cattle Co. • Fairfield Farms

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers BURKE/KURT SCHAFF/JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WO ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone (816) 532-0811. Fa 532-0851. E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net • www.angushall.com


ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

BEEF HERD CONTINUES TO GROW Kenny Burdine

USDA released their January 1 estimates for cattle inventory late last month and I wanted to walk through some of the high points of this report. Beef cow numbers were estimated to have grown by 1.6% from 2017, which is a little less than half the increase that was seen in the prior year. Although growth in the US herd is clearly slowing, beef cow inventory has increased by 9% since 2014. Anytime the beef cowherd is expanding, heifer retention is of interest. Heifer retention for beef cow replacement was estimated to be down 3.7% from 2017. Often a decrease in heifer retention is seen as evidence of future decreases in cow numbers, but that is likely not the case this time. This point is probably best made by considering beef heifer retention as a percent of the total number of beef cows in the US, as shown in figure 1. Heifer retention, as a percent of beef cow inventory, has averaged 17.3% since 1973 and is depicted by the dotted line. The solid red line shows heifer retention as a percent of beef cattle inventory by year. While this number has decreased from its high of 21% in 2016, it is still well above the long term average. So, while heifer retention is decreasing, it appears that we are still developing a sufficient number of heifers to see herd expansion continue. This really speaks to how high heifer retention was just a couple years ago. The largest change from 2017 was a 7% increase in the number of cattle on feed. Monthly reports (which survey only large feedlots) had been showing cattle on feed numbers above year-ago levels since spring, but had shown especially large increases since fall. Part of this is due to the size of the calf crop, which was 2% larger in 2017, but I think a larger issue involves winter grazing. The annual inventory report also includes an estimate of cattle grazing small grain pasture on January 1st in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. This estimate serves as a gauge of winter grazing, which has a significant impact on late fall and winter calf markets. USDA estimated a 13% decrease in the number of cattle grazing small grains this January as compared to 2017. I had an opportunity 28

to visit with some of my colleagues in Texas and Oklahoma last week and they confirmed that fewer cattle were placed into winter grazing programs this year and some that were placed had to be sold early due to weather challenges. This would suggest that, in addition to the larger calf crop, more light cattle were placed directly on feed this winter. Cattle placed on feed at lighter weights will tend to be on feed longer and finish at slightly lower weights. Still, the combination of growing cattle on feed inventories and relatively inexpensive feed, should translate into a sizeable increase in beef production for 2018. Increases are also expected for both pork and poultry. This growing supply of meat will be the largest challenge for the beef sector in 2018. The USDA report is summarized in table 1 and the full report can be accessed at: http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/ current/Catt/Catt-01-31-2018.pdf

Figure 1: Jan 1 Beef Heifer Retention as a % of Beef Cow Inventory (1973 to 2018)

Table 1: USDA January 1, 2018 Cattle Inventory Report 2017 (1,000 hd.)

2018 (1,000 hd.)

2018 as % of 2017

All Cattle and Calves

93,704.6

94,399.0

101

Cows and Heifers That Have Calved

40,559.2

41,122.6

101

Beef Cows

31,213.2

31,723.0

102

Milk Cows

9,346.0

9,399.6

101

20,132.0

20,244.8

101

For Beef Cow Replacement

6,368.2

6,131.2

96

For Milk Cow Replacement

4,754.0

4,781.3

101

Other Heifers

9,009.8

9,332

104

Steers 500 Pounds and Over

16,383.5

16,352

100

Bulls 500 Pounds and Over

2,243.6

2,252.2

100

Calves Under 500 Pounds

14,386

14,427.2

100

13,067.0

14,006.4

107

2016

2017

2017 as % of 2016

35,092.7

35,808

102

Heifers 500 Pounds and Over

Cattle on Feed

Calf Crop

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

NAFTA UPDATE AND A PRIMER ON TRADE DATA William M. Snell The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), went into effect on January 1, 1994. This trilateral agreement between the United States, Mexico, and Canada, effectively reduced most agricultural tariffs to zero over time. Since the implementation of NAFTA, U.S. agricultural exports have increased from less than $9 billion in 1993 to nearly $40 billion in recent years. Collectively, NAFTA is the largest export market for U.S. corn, wheat, beef, poultry and pork and accounts for approximately 28% of total U.S. agricultural exports. U.S. consumers are also an important market for Canadian and Mexican farmers and food companies. In fact, despite the dramatic growth in U.S. trade to Canada and Mexico, the U.S. has actually run an agricultural trade deficit with NAFTA markets over the past four years. U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly threatened to withdraw from NAFTA, blaming the trade agreement for job losses and contributing to the U.S. trade deficit. Last year, the U.S. trade deficit in all goods and services totaled $566 billion, its highest level since 2008. The trade deficit in goods alone swelled to more than $800 billion with U.S. trade deficits totaling $71.1 billion with Mexico and $17.6 billion with Canada. Currently the three nations are in negotiations to “modernize” NAFTA which includes addressing digital commerce and intellectual property rights, while also focusing on labor/environmental issues and settling trade disputes. U.S. agriculture has been very involved in the NAFTA renegotiations (labeled as NAFTA 2.0) given the importance of Canada and Mexico to the U.S. farm economy – our second and third largest ag trading partners. Most of the trade dispute over agriculture in the NAFTA negotiations has centered on dairy policy, with the U.S. claiming that Canadian dairy pricing policies are undercutting U.S. dairy exports to Canada. In addition, U.S. ag concerns have escalated in response to Canada and Mexico seeking alternative suppliers and signing/ pursuing other trade agreements with other important U.S. ag export markets. Trade negotiators between the three NAFTA nations wrapped up the sixth round in Montreal late last month, with the seventh round currently proceeding in Mexico City. The talks are scheduled to finish by the end of March to avoid clashing with Mexico’s presidential election in July. However, it appears likely that negotiations will continue beyond March, assuming the parties observe progress in a revised agreement. While much uncertainty exists on the fate of NAFTA, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Purdue stated before the House Ag Committee earlier

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

this month that he remains optimistic an agreement can evolve by late in 2018, but others claim that the negotiations may linger into 2019. If the United States withdraws from NAFTA, tariffs on U.S. agricultural products to Canada and Mexico would be allowed to increase according to trade rules established by the World Trade Organization (WTO). Acceptable tariff levels vary depending on the commodity/ product. For example, the tariff for some U.S. meat exported into Canada could be as high as 75%. U.S. corn exports to Mexico could become 20% higher for Mexican buyers. According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS), the average tariff across all U.S. agricultural products imported into Canada would be 23% and 32% for U.S. agricultural products transported to Mexico versus duty free status on most U.S. agricultural products currently entering Canada and Mexico under NAFTA . (See the appendix in the CRS report (https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R45018.pdf) for allowable tariff levels facing U.S. agriculture if the U.S. withdraws from NAFTA). Higher tariffs facing U.S. exporters would give competitive advantages to U.S. competitors, leading to loss of U.S. ag exports and likely reducing already depressed U.S. commodity prices. In addition, tariffs would have a modest positive impact on U.S food prices due to increased costs of food products imported into the U.S. from Canada and Mexico along with disrupting supply chains and adversely impacting trade-related jobs. The Foreign Ag Service (FAS) at USDA indicates that Kentucky ag and ag-related exports to NAFTA markets have averaged around $300 million annually over the past 5 years, accounting for over 22.5% of Kentucky’s global ag exports. Canada is the largest foreign purchaser of Kentucky ag and ag-related products (primarily processed foods, forest products, and distilled beverages), representing around one-fifth of the Commonwealth’s global ag sales and comprising 80% of Kentucky’s NAFTA ag trade. FAS trade data indicate very limited Kentucky bulk (ag commodity) exports to Canada except for a relatively large shipment of canola in 2017 ($5 million). Mexican ag imports from Kentucky are comprised primarily of meat and dairy products, along with corn and periodically wheat. Understanding NAFTA/Global Trade Data Trade data can be measured in different ways, leading to different totals and different conclusions. USDA’s Foreign Ag Service (FAS) measures trade data by state based upon the final origin of movement of the product to the export market. Thus, a calf born and

“Canada is the largest foreign purchaser of Kentucky ag and ag-related products, representing around onefifth of the Commonwealth’s global ag sales and comprising 80% of Kentucky’s NAFTA ag trade.”

The Agricultural Economics Department publishes the Economic and Policy Update towards the end of each month.  Each issue features articles written by extension personnel within the department and other experts across the country. 

backgrounded in Kentucky, but finished out in the Midwest and shipped as beef to Mexico would not be reflected as a Kentucky ag export according to the FAS database. Likewise, Kentucky would not receive export credit for tobacco produced in Kentucky, comingled, processed, and exported out of Virginia, or Kentucky-produced soybeans shipped out of the port in New Orleans. Consequently, FAS export data will generally understate the importance of ag exports of inland states, like Kentucky that do not possess ports and that do not process a lot of agricultural products. Alternatively, USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) of USDA measures trade data by state based on the location of original production. Thus, if Kentucky produces 25% of the nation’s tobacco cash receipts, Kentucky would receive 25% of the nation’s tobacco exports. ERS’s methodology does not allow one to track state ag exports to specific countries (as is the case with FAS data). According to the ERS database, Kentucky ag exports have averaged $2.2 billion over the past five years (2012-2016) versus only $724 million under FAS methodology measuring ag product exports only and $1.4 billion if you add in ag-related trade (such as ethanol, distilled spirits, and forest products.). Looking at specific ag commodities, the ERS reports $161.8 million of Kentucky corn exports in 2016 vs only $2.9 million from the FAS database. Similarly, 2016 ERS data reveal $73 million of Kentucky beef exports versus $1.6 million recorded by FAS. The chart below shows total KY ag exports to all markets using the different methodologies.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Topics will vary greatly but regularly include marketing, management, policy, natural resources, and rural development issues. If you would like to recieve this newsletter by email, please contact Kenny Burdine at kburdine@uky.edu. You can also view current and past issues online at http://www.ca.uky.edu/ agecon/index.php?p=209 Co-editors: Kenny Burdine, Alison Davis, and Greg Halich

29


ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

2018 REVENUE PROTECTION INSURANCE SAFETY-NET FOR CORN AND SOYBEANS SIMILAR TO LAST YEAR Todd Davis

Yogi Berra famously said, “It’s déjà vu all over again.” He probably was not referring to the 2018 revenue protection (RP) crop insurance projected prices; however, the sentiment is appropriate. The closing prices of the December 2018 corn and November 2018 soybeans futures contract during February provide the initial price guarantee used in crop insurance. As of February 20, 2018, the projected prices for corn and soybeans are $3.95 and $10.11 per bushel, respectively. If realized, the 2018 price guarantees are $0.01 and $0.08 lower from the 2017 price guarantees for corn and soybeans, respectively. Figure 1 compares the expected crop insurance guarantees for corn and soybeans compared to the budgeted total variable costs and cash rent for corn and soybeans. As in 2017, soybeans will likely have a better safety net than corn. Given the budget assumptions, soybean RP

insurance guarantee at the 75% coverage would have a deficit of $106/acre. The RP guarantee for corn at the 80% coverage level would be $150/acre below budgeted variable costs and cash rent. As managers consider the coverage levels purchased for 2018, managers should take stock of the farm business’s financial strength and the availability of working capital to absorb a loss. If the farm’s working capital is limited, managers may want to consider increasing coverage to protect the farm’s ability to cash flow this fall if there is a yield loss or lower prices. Managers planning to sell grain at harvest should consider risk management tools to lock in prices before harvest. Another large corn and soybean crop in 2018 will contribute to lower fall prices and create profitability and cash flow challenges. The 2014 Farm Bill made crop insurance the foundation of the corn and soybean safety net. As Congress begins discussing

Figure 1: 2018 RP Protection vs. TVC+ Rent for Corn ansd Soybeans

the next farm bill, changes to the crop insurance program may be proposed to find cost savings. Reducing the crop insurance premium subsidy or eliminating

Hotel Information Ramada Inn $82.00 per night

y Speakers include: Dr. Bob Weaber,

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018

Professor, Extension Specialist

Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler, Dr. Darrh Bullock,

Extension Professor University of Kentucky

251 Breighton Circle, Shelbyville KY (502) 257-8402 Reserve by April 10, to get block pricing!

Seedstock Sponsors

1117 Frankfort Road Shelbyville, KY40065

Kansas State University;

Assoc. Extension Professor University of Kentucky;

the harvest price option for RP insurance will increase the farm’s risk and lower the safety net for farms already facing tight, or negative, profit margins.

$25 registration fee includes lunch. You may register onlineat: seedstock-cattle-symposiumtickets-43481838349

KENTUCKY SHORTHORN ASSOCIATION

Please register by April 18, 2018

Topics include:

For more information, or to register by mail, send your check made payable to University of Kentucky to Trimble County Extension Service PO Box 244 Bedford, KY 40006 (502) 255-7188 or

Bull Development Bull Selection Utilizing EPD’s EPD Development

Kentucky Hereford Association This program brought to you by:

Genomics Technology Selection Indices

30

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Blue Grass Lexington

UPCOMING SALES Blue Grass Albany Bret Carver 606-387-4681 Blue Grass Campbellsville Ronnie Choate 270-465-4051 Blue Grass East Tim Gayheart 859-498-9625 Blue Grass Internet Adam Menker 859-255-7701 Blue Grass Lexington Jeremy Shryock 859-255-7701 Blue Grass Maysville Corey Story 606-759-7280 Blue Grass Richmond Jim Dause 859-623-1280 Blue Grass South David Holt 606-365-0665

Blue Grass Albany Consignment Equipment Sale Saturday, April 21 @ 10:00 AM(CT) Spring Holstein Sale Wednesday, April 25 @ 11:00 AM(CT) Blue Grass East Amburgey Registered Charolais Sale Saturday, April 14 @ 1:00 PM Blue Grass Lexington Spring Holstein Sale Wednesday, April 11 @ 5:30 PM Blue Grass Maysville Hord Charolais Sale Friday, April 20 @ 6:30 PM Blue Grass South Spring Holstein Sale Tuesday, April 10 @ 5:30 PM KY Certified Hereford Influence Sale Thursday, May 10 @ 10:30 AM

www.bgstockyards.com COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

31


THE NEW MODEL FOR PROFITABLE BEEF PRODUCTION SEMEN AVAILABLE $20/STRAW ALL SIRES

Dutch Creek Molly 640 945 Pathfinder dam of Forager 619 pictured at 9 years of age Frame 3 cow weighing 1,145 lbs Weaning ratio of 106 on 7 calves with 359 day calving interval

Dutch Creek Forager 945 619 Reg # 18763756  Traces 53 times to Luria of Wye and 18 times to Leonid of Wye 300+ Pathfinder cows in extended pedigree Top 5% of Angus breed for reducing mature weight and frame size Explosive early growth potential in a 4 frame score package

Dutch Creek Forager 816 308 Reg #17751513 Traces 28 times to Luria of Wye and 8 times to Leonid of Wye 250+ Pathfinder cows in extended pedigree Top 5% of Angus breed for reducing mature weight and frame size. Top 10% for low birth weights and top 1% for docility Extremely slick hair coat and super easy fleshing Massive 97' heart girth with a 4 frame

Dutch Creek Beulah 219 816 Pathfinder dam of Forager 308 pictured at 10 years of age Frame 4 weighing 1,325 lbs Weaning ratio of 107 on 8 calves with 368 day calving interval

Luria of Wye Reg #4020176  Born May 15, 1963 Sired by Prince of Malpas Reg #2776941 born April 12, 1956 Luria's weaning production:  Nearly 9 times her own body weight or 9,831 lbs on 17 calves  Luria's  own mature weight 1,100 lbs  Was known as the Angus breed's oldest living Pathfinder cow at the time of her death Dutch Creek Lucy 302 510 Dam of Forager 435 pictured at 13 years of age A steady producer having weaned 11 calves with a 368 day calving interval  Frame 3 cow weighing 1,075 lbs

Dutch Creek Forager 510 435 Reg #18068656 Traces 24 times to Luria of Wye Double bred OCC Homer 650H while also tracing 5 times to Leonid of Wye A breed leader for calving ease along with a 3 frame score One of the best for reducing frame size while transmitting explosive early growth and muscle

Dutch Creek Angus Forage Genetics Doug & Susan Schlosnagle Pleasureville, Ky Doug: 502-706-0008 Susan: 502-321-2727 www.dutchcreekangus.com

Covalent of Wye UMF 10832 Reg #18627224 This Leonid son traces 49 times to Luria of Wye and was our top pick of the 2017 Wye Angus sale. Covalent's amazing ribeye area of 15.24" along with a REA/CWT of 1.54 puts him at the top of the class for adding carcass value. Steve Downs Frame score 4

Copeland of Wye UMF 10143 Dam of Covalent of Wye UMF 10832 Mature weight 1,225 lbs Weaning ratio of 97 on 3 calves 

Lebanon 270-402-3672

info@dutchcreekfarms.com

Todd Harned Boston 502-249-2354

David Sandusky Lebanon 270-692-7793

Central Kentucky Premier Heifer Sale

June 2nd, 2018 • 1:00 PM EST Marion County Fairgrounds • Lebanon, KY

• Approximately 150 heifers will sell from producers in Marion, Nelson and Washington Counties. • Bred to calve in fall starting September 1st . • Guaranteed bred to bulls with known EPDs and have met stringent requirements for health, quality and pelvic measurements. • Guaranteed pregnant 30 days past sale. • Some heifers are synchronized and artificially bred. • All consignors are certified Master Cattlemen. • Free delivery of 10 head or more up to 100 miles.

For More Information Visit www.heifersales.com or Contact: Todd Harned Boston 502-249-2354

32

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Terry Geoghegan Bardstown 502-827-0771

David Sandusky Lebanon 270-692-7793

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

NATIONAL FARM MACHINERY SHOW SETS RECORD INCREASE IN ATTENDANCE, TICKET SALES, AND EXHIBITORS

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (February 20, 2018) — The 2018 edition of the National Farm Machinery Show (NFMS) closed Saturday with an increase in attendance and ticket sales, and a record number of new exhibitors and exhibit sales. Over 314,000 attendees packed the Kentucky Exposition Center for the four-day event that celebrated 53 years of providing the agricultural industry’s latest and most comprehensive display of equipment, services and technology. With the largest number of exhibitors in its history, NFMS spanned more than 1.3 million square feet filling 920 booths, for an increase of 40 exhibitors. Celebrating its 50th anniversary, the Championship Tractor Pull attendance was the largest number in recent history. Over 67,000 tickets were sold to the five performances in Freedom Hall. During the Saturday night finals, a ceremony honored past participants and the organizers of the first tractor pull. In a half-century of growth, the invitation-only tractor pull now draws the nation’s top drivers competing for the COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

title of Grand Champion and more than $200,000 in prize money. “For over half a century, the National Farm Machinery Show has delivered on its purpose to provide solid information and cutting edge technology to the farming community,” said Don Parkinson, interim CEO of the Kentucky State Fair Board. “The largest indoor farm show along with the longest running championship tractor pull in one venue is unique to Kentucky and we look forward to another 50 years of championing agribusiness here in the Commonwealth.” Parkinson also serves as Secretary of the Tourism, Arts & Heritage Cabinet.

The seasons change. The tasks change. Fortunately, your machine doesn't have to change. Bobcat® equipment is famous for its adaptability. With dozens of attachments to handle any job, comfortable cabs that battle the elements, and innovative designs you can't find anywhere else, Bobcat lets you do more with less. Bobcat® and the Bobcat logo are trademarks of Bobcat Company.

As the nation’s largest indoor farm show, NFMS brings an economic impact of $17 million to Louisville annually, filling local hotels and restaurants with attendees from across the country and around the world. NFMS is owned and produced by the Kentucky State Fair Board. The 2019 NFMS dates are February 1316. For more information, visit www. farmmachineryshow.org. • A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Authorized Bobcat Dealer

Lexington, KY | Louisville, KY

859.254.3936 | 502.245.1911 bobcat-ent.com Parts. Service. Sales. Rental.

33


FEATURE

DON’T FORGET TETANUS PREVENTION WHEN BANDING BULLS! MICHELLE ARNOLD DVM-Ruminant Extension Veterinarian, University of Kentucky

In the United States, more than 17 million bulls are castrated yearly that range in age from 1 day to 1 year old. Tetanus (Clostridium tetani infection) is a potentially life-threatening neurologic disease affecting all species of domestic livestock, including cattle. The clinical signs of tetanus are subtle and often missed until the disease is advanced. At that point, treatment and management of the affected animal is very difficult and the chance for recovery is poor. Recognition of the initial signs of stiff legs, an anxious expression with ears held back toward the poll, moderate bloat, erect tail, and the unusual “flick” of the third eyelid across the eye leads to an accurate early diagnosis and allows treatment to begin when it is most effective. Any calf castrated with an elastrator band should be given tetanus prevention in the form of either tetanus toxoid (two doses required with the 2nd given two weeks prior to castration), tetanus antitoxin (given the day of banding) or, in some cases, both are used concurrently. Calves banded early in life are less likely to develop tetanus because the testicles are much smaller and the scrotal sac generally falls off much more quickly than heavier calves so the tetanus organism does not have time to grow. Additionally, with early castration by any method, the risk of infection is much lower, the risk of injury to the person performing the castration is lower, and the procedure is relatively quick and easy. Tetanus is caused by toxins produced by the gram-positive bacteria Clostridium tetani. It is found in soil but may also be present in the feces of domestic animals, especially horses. In the presence of oxygen, C. tetani produces “spores” that basically protect the bacteria with a hard outer layer and allow its survival in soil for years. These spores are resistant to many disinfectants and can even survive steam heat at 212°F for 20 minutes. The spores of C. tetani will germinate in environments without oxygen (such as the scrotum after banding), resulting in rapid growth and production of tetanus 34

neurotoxin (TeNT) responsible for causing the clinical disease of tetanus or “lockjaw”. The most common infection sites in cattle for C. tetani include deep wounds with dead tissue, infected areas of the vulva or vagina following difficult birth, and severe infections in the uterus. Management practices that may create environments perfect for germination of C. tetani spores include dehorning, elastrator band castration, nose ring placement, tail docking, and ear tag placement. The incubation period, or time from injury to development of first signs, averages seven to ten days but can be much longer. The first detectable clinical signs of tetanus in cattle are usually generalized leg stiffness and reluctance to move. Signs of tetanus vary and may be mild to severe when the animal is found. As the disease progresses, a stiff, stilted walk develops and the calf resembles a sawhorse when standing still due to muscle rigidity. A “pump-handle tail” is often noticed where the animal’s tail is stiff and raised away from the body because of the rigid muscles along the lower spine. An affected calf may have the head extended, nostrils flared, the ears standing up and pulled back towards the poll, and eyelids held widely open so much of the white (sclera) is showing. Most producers will describe a “strange-looking eye blink” which is actually prolapse of the nictitans (“flick” of the third eyelid). This is caused by spasm of the muscles pulling the COW COUNTRY NEWS

eyeball inward and allowing the third eyelid to passively move across the eye. The chewing muscles of the jaw may be involved to the point that opening the mouth is very difficult (“lockjaw”). Affected cattle usually lose the ability to eat and drink, resulting in progressive weakness and dehydration. Rumen contractions become weak or disappear and cattle frequently bloat because they lose the ability to eructate (burp off) gas. Subtle muscle tremors may be seen early, but are much more obvious in later stages of disease. Convulsions may be triggered by loud noises or handling of the animal or may occur spontaneously. Affected animals finally become recumbent (down on their side) and unable to rise due to stiffness of the hind legs and the inability to pull their legs underneath them. If left untreated, severe dehydration develops and death may result from exhaustion and respiratory failure or from bloat. The distinctive clinical signs of tetanus found on a routine physical examination are usually enough to make a diagnosis as there are no reliable tests to confirm the disease.

Tranquilization by a veterinarian with sedatives such as acepromazine in the muscle will allow some muscle relaxation and help to control excessive sensitivity to stimuli, allowing easier treatment. Tetanus antitoxin, available over-thecounter and on the Internet, may catch and inactivate any circulating toxin but cannot undo the effects of toxin already bound to nerve receptors. The dose for tetanus antitoxin has a wide range from 1,500-100,000 units per animal but generally 15,000 units administered under the skin is recommended for initial therapy. To initiate active antitoxic immunity, a dose of tetanus toxoid should also be delivered in the muscle. Once the wound or infection site is identified, then it must be thoroughly cleaned to remove the dead tissue and should be flushed with hydrogen peroxide to reduce toxin production by any remaining actively growing bacteria. In a recently banded calf showing signs of tetanus, the scrotal sac should be removed and the area cleaned and flushed with peroxide. Antibiotics, primarily penicillin, is

Basic principles for medical management of tetanus cases in cattle are to provide muscle relaxation, neutralize the circulating unbound TeNT toxin, begin establishment of active immunity, eliminate the C. tetani infection with antibiotics, maintain hydration and nutritional status, and provide good footing with deep bedding.

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


that result in death or the need for euthanasia. Regaining the ability to drink is one of the most encouraging signs of recovery. Cattle that end up down on their side usually require euthanasia.

recommended at high doses in the muscle for at least 7 days. Good nursing care is very important to survival of tetanus patients. The animal should be placed in a stall with deep bedding to prevent “bedsores” and good footing to help them stand. The animal’s hydration status should be monitored closely and intravenous fluids may be needed if unable to drink. Downer cattle should be set up in a sternal position if possible to prevent bloat. If the patient develops free gas bloat requiring stomach tubing, then a rumen trocar should be placed to relieve gas buildup until the patient regains the ability to eructate. The opening provided by the trocar can also provide a portal for the delivery of water and feed to the rumen. The mortality or death rate may reach 50% in cattle, but animals that survive longer than seven days have a fair-togood chance of complete recovery. Mild cases usually respond to treatment within one week, but it is important to realize that many patients may improve then develop unforeseen complications

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Prevention involves reducing the risk of cattle developing deep wounds or areas of dead, rotten tissue where C. tetani spores may germinate along with the use of vaccines in animals at risk for infection. Elective procedures that could lead to open wounds include dehorning, elastrator band castration, nose ring placement, tail docking, and ear tag placement. It is important for veterinarians and producers to maintain clean conditions and disinfected instruments for each of these procedures. Cattle are not routinely vaccinated against tetanus, and most 7- or 8-way Clostridial (blackleg) vaccines do not contain specific protection against C. tetani although some do (for example, Covexin 8® and Calvary 9®-Merck) contain a tetanus toxoid. Cattle can be vaccinated easily and inexpensively with tetanus toxoid and protective antibody levels should develop in two weeks following the booster injection (2nd shot) of the series. Tetanus antitoxin is recommended for immediate, emergency treatment of exposed or at risk animals when clinical tetanus is suspected or could develop. Elastrator band castration of heavier, older calves often results in the scrotal sac remaining attached for extended periods of time (> 10 days), creating the right environment for C. tetani spores to germinate. In those cases, both a toxoid and antitoxin should be given at the time of castration if no previous tetanus toxoid series was given prior to banding. Castration is considered to be a necessary management practice for cattle. Work with a local veterinarian to establish the optimal herd health program for your farm and institute an early castration program to minimize the pain, stress and complications that go along with this procedure. If castration is delayed until the calves get older and heavier, these calves are at much higher risk for development of tetanus and are twice as likely to get respiratory disease as steers on arrival in a feedlot or backgrounding operation.

KingFisher

TM

$ Livestock performance = $$ ormance KingFisher = livestock perf in the bank KF sorghums are MONEY

FORAGE SORGHUM: KingFisher Fiber Pro 70-FS If you’re looking for lush tons of sweet forage, and with yields that rivals corn silage in a one-cut system, KingFisher Fiber Pro 70-FS is your forage. BMR gene 6 gives incredible energy from the high NDF digestibility. The brachytic dwarf trait gives superior standability and an excellent leaf-to-stem ratio.

SORGHUM SUDAN: KingFisher Sugar Pro 55-SS The name says it all. Energy that rivals corn silage without all the baggage that comes from starch. Quick growing, with a high leaf-to-stem ratio gives quality feed for grazing or harvest. It’s another BMR gene 6 so you know you’ve got everything you need for success.

3 3

The same KingFisher quality you’ve known. The same KingFisher value you’ve experienced. Farmers Helping Farmers

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

800-801-3596

35


36

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

BIPARTISAN BILL BACKED BY 85 ORIGINAL CO-SPONSORS WASHINGTON (March 14, 2018) - The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) today applauded the introduction of bipartisan legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives that would prevent 200,000 farms and ranches from being regulated as if they were toxic Superfund sites. The bill, introduced by U.S. Reps. Billy Long (R-Mo.) and Jim Costa (D-Calif.), is known as the Agricultural Certainty for Reporting Emissions (ACRE) Act and is supported by 85 original co-sponsors. "There's not a lot of bipartisan consensus on Washington, DC, these days, but one thing that a lot of folks on both sides of the aisle can agree on is that the CERCLA law that regulates toxic Superfund sites shouldn't apply to animal agricultural operations," said fifth-generation California rancher and NCBA President Kevin Kester. "CERCLA was never intended to regulate cow manure, and

Congress should fix this situation as soon as possible." Similar bipartisan legislation - the Fair Agricultural Reporting Method (FARM) Act - was introduced in the U.S. Senate by U.S. Sen. Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) and Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) on Feb. 13. That bill currently has 37 co-sponsors and could be marked up by the Senate's Environment and Public Works Committee as soon as next week. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) was enacted to provide for cleanup of the worst industrial chemical toxic waste dumps and spills, such as oil spills and chemical tank explosions. CERCLA was never intended to govern agricultural operations, for whom emissions from livestock are a part of everyday life. To make this clear, in 2008, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

viewed to be necessary.

“CERCLA was never intended to govern agricultural operations, for whom emissions from livestock are a part of everyday life.” finalized a rule to clarify that farms were exempt from CERCLA reporting and small farms, in particular, were exempt from EPCRA reporting, given that lowlevel livestock emissions are not the kind of "releases" that Congress intended to manage with these laws. Upon being sued in 2009 by environmental advocacy groups, the Obama Administration's EPA defended the exemption in court on the grounds that CERCLA and EPCRA do not explicitly exempt farms because Congress never believed that agriculture would be covered under these statutes, so a specific statutory exemption was not

Unfortunately, in April 2017, the D.C. Circuit Court vacated the EPA's 2008 exemption, putting nearly 200,000 farms and ranches under the regulatory reporting authorities enshrined in CERCLA and EPCRA. The new reporting requirements could have gone into effect on Jan. 22, but the Court delayed implementation of the requirements until May 1, 2018, which gives Congress time to act. The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) has represented America's cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 1-866-BEEF-USA or membership@ beef.org.

Office: (765) 494-6439 Fax: (765) 494-9346 Bull Test Station: (812) 279-8554 Sale Day Phone: (812) 279-1282 http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/ibep

Indiana Beef Evaluation Program Creighton Hall of Animal Sciences 270 S. Russell St. West Lafayette, IN 47907-2041

81st IBEP Bull Sale Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 6:00 p.m. at the Springville Feeder Auction 10 miles northwest of Bedford, Indiana on SR 54-58

110 Bu

lls Se ll

Angus, Charolais, Hereford, Red Angus, Simmental, and SimAngus CALL OR WRITE FOR SALE CATALOG Only top-indexing bulls of their breed that pass the structural and breeding soundness exams sell.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

SALE WILL BE BROADCAST ON DVAUCTION.COM

REMOTE SITES: Lafayette - Tippecanoe County Extension Office, 3150 Sagamore Parkway South Contact: Karen Mitchell (765-474-0793, mitcheka@purdue.edu) Rochester - Rochester Meats and Deli, 901 East 9th St. - new location Contact: Mark Kepler (574-223-3397, mkepler@purdue.edu)

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Visitors Welcome Any Time at Test Station at Feldun-Purdue Ag Center, 3 miles northwest of Bedford on SR 158 & 458

37


FEATURE

KENTUCKY SOYBEAN PRODUCTION YIELD AT RECORD HIGHS LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the county estimates for corn and soybeans Feb. 22, from the 2017 production year. The two crops are significant to Kentucky agriculture, together bringing in $1.65 billion in cash receipts in 2016. “Corn yields rebounded from an off year in 2016, while soybean yields continue a string of annual increases,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “Statewide, the soybean and corn yields were record highs and soybean production was at a record high for the fifth year in a row.” Christian County is the leading corn producing county in Kentucky for 2017, with production totaling 13,957,000 bushels, harvested from 73,100 acres. The top five counties, which account for 29 percent of Kentucky’s corn production,

include: Christian County – 13,957,000 bushels Henderson County – 12,970,000 bushels Union County – 12,390,000 bushels Graves County – 12,121,000 bushels Daviess County – 11,335,000 bushels Wayne County took the top corn yield spot in 2017, producing 205 bushels per acre and the first time a county average corn yield has exceeded 200 bushels. The previous record was held by Ohio County when the average yield was 199.1 bushels in 2014. The top five counties for yield include: Wayne County – 205 bushels per acre Ohio County – 199.3 bushels per acre Hancock County – 198.6 bushels per acre Daviess County – 197.8 bushels per acre McLean County – 191.6 bushels per acre Henderson County is the leading soybean producing county in Kentucky for 2017, with production totaling 5,402,000 bushels, harvested from

91,800 acres. The top five counties, which account for 24 percent of Kentucky’s soybean production, include: Henderson County – 5,402,000 bushels Daviess County – 5,359,000 bushels Graves County – 4,975,000 bushels Christian County – 4,765,000 bushels Union County – 3,908,000 bushels Pendleton County had the highest soybean yield at 60.9 bushels per acre. The top five counties for yield include: Pendleton County – 60.9 bushels per acre Wayne County – 60.4 bushels per acre Union County – 60.4 bushels per acre Daviess County – 60.3 bushels per acre Boone County – 60.3 bushels per acre County-level estimates are used by other USDA agencies to set standards for insurance and risk protection programs many farmers rely on to protect their operations. “Farm

Service

Agency

(FSA)

relies

on the county-level estimates for Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) program calculations,” Knopf said. “The Risk Management Agency (RMA) uses the data for administering the Area Risk Protection Insurance Plan, establishment of transitional yields, and determining when to make crop loss insurance payments. When drought and flooding impact crop production, or even in a year with good yields, these data are crucial to the agriculture industry.” In April NASS will release county estimates for hay and tobacco. Hay – April 19, 2018 Tobacco – April 26, 2018 The complete listing of corn and soybean county estimates for each county is available online in the NASS QuickStats database: https://www.nass.usda.gov/ Quick_Stats/Lite/. For more information, call the NASS Kentucky Field Office at (800) 928-5277.

Fo r more i n f ormati on v i s i t ou r w eb s i t e ht t ps ://w w w .n a s s.us d a .g o v / S t a t i s t i c s _ by _ S t a t e / Ke n t uc k y / P ubl i c a t i o n s/ C oun ty_Estimates/ c oest/ 2 017 / in d ex .p h p

Harvey Mitchell Principal Broker · Office: 859-265-5100 232 S. College Street · Harrodsburg, KY 40330 ·

Harvey Mitchell, Principal Broker 859-612-7326 harvey@kyprimerealty.com

Matt Mitchell, Associate Broker 502-758-4226 matt@kyprimerealty.com

Dan Campbell, Associate Broker 859-319-0866 dan@kyprimerealty.com

Steve West, Realtor 859-707-9745 steve@kyprimerealty.com

Greg Robey, Realtor 859-265-0373 greg@kyprimerealty.com

www.kentuckyprimerealty.com

Stephen Carney, Auctioneer, Realtor 859-481-1304 stephen@kyprimerealty.com

Jordan Aumiller, Realtor 859-583-6555 jordan@kyprimerealty.com

266 ACRE FARM. LINCOLN CO. $1,175,000 MLS# 1613280 Excellent farm, high quality land and great improvements. Numerous metal barns and sheds. Ready to go to work. Owner motivated.

130 ACRE FARM MERCER CO. MLS# 1722763 $839,000 Outstanding farmland with easy access and located on a 4 lane road, US 127, 30 mi. SW of Lexington. Farm has the best soils in Central Ky with one tobacco barn and one hay storage/feeding barn. Excellent fence and water; a well rested farm suitable for grain, livestock or many other productive uses. Can be divided.

160 ACRE FARM MERCER CO. MLS# 1717690 $656,000 Price recently reduced! Set up for livestock, hay and crops, this is a great all around multipurpose farm. This was a Dairy farm in the past and the milk parlor still exists but is set up now for beef cattle. Good soils, excellent fence and water. Also includes numerous barns and a three bedroom 1 bath home.

410 ACRE FARM. OLDHAM CO. $3,895,000 MLS# 1605398 Wonderful opportunity to own a large tract of land in desirable Oldham County. Located close to town, schools and Interstate 71. Approximately 1.7 miles of road frontage on Highway 1315 and Highway 53. 150 +/- acres currently used for crops. Four ponds and a stream. Also borders Floyds Fork Creek on the east boundary. Lots of wild turkey and deer. Seller may divide.

175 ACRE FARM CASEY CO. MLS 1803141 $309,000 Wonderful property with woods, fields and streams. Good creek bottom land. Carpenter’s Creek crosses the property

240 ACRE FARM BOURBON CO. MLS# 1721414 $1,752,000 Outstanding 240 acre grain or livestock farm with tenant home rented. Maury and McAfee soils. Located just inside Bourbon Co line about 12 miles from Lexington, 5 miles from Paris.

38

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

39


FEATURE

CATTLE FLY CONTROL OPTIONS Rory Lewandowski, OSU Extension

Fly control in cattle is about reducing fly populations, not elimination. The goal is to limit the negative economic impact that flies can cause. There are three main fly species that can economically impact pastured cattle and those are the horn fly, the face fly and the stable fly. Horn flies are responsible for significant economic losses. According to Dave Boxler of the University of Nebraska, economic losses associated with the horn fly are estimated at more than 800 million per year in the U.S. Those losses are due to decreased grazing efficiency, blood loss, reduced weight gains, and declines in milk production. University of Nebraska studies have shown calf weaning weights to be 10 to 20 pounds heavier when horn flies were controlled on the mother cows. Horn flies are small, about half the size of a housefly and they are blood feeders. Each fly will bite the animal and feed on blood 20 to 30 times per day. The economic injury or threshold level of horn flies is 200 flies per animal. Horn flies spend most of their time on the animal. The female fly will leave the animal for a short period of time to deposit eggs in fresh manure and then will return to resume feeding. The most common and often the most convenient method of horn fly control is insecticide impregnated ear tags. The disadvantage of ear tag control is that there are horn fly populations resistant to the pyrethroid insecticides commonly used in the tags. In order to minimize and slow down resistance problems ear tags should not be put in until horn flies reach that economic threshold level of 200 flies/ animal. Those horn fly ear tags should be cut out of the animal’s ear in the fall of the year when fly levels decrease. Other control measures include backrubbers and dust bags, especially if they can be located in areas where cattle can have daily and consistent access to them. There are insecticide sprays and pourons that can provide between 7 to 21 days of control, but to be effective they must be applied on a regular basis throughout the fly season. There are also oral larvacides

40

that prevent fly larvae from developing into adults. Although effective, the challenge is getting consistent, daily consumption. These products can work well for cattle in confinement situations or that are supplemented regularly on pasture, but are more difficult to use in rotational grazing systems. In contrast to the horn fly, the face fly is a non-biting fly that spends significant time off the animal. This fly feeds on secretions, nectar and manure liquids. Face flies cluster around the animal’s eyes, mouth and muzzle. Feeding around the eyes can cause tissue damage which opens a pathway for pathogens. The female face fly can vector the Moraxella bovis bacteria which is a primary pathogen for contagious pinkeye. Control of face flies can be difficult because of all the time that the fly actually spends away from the animal. As with horn flies, insecticide impregnated ear tags are a common form of control. Dust bags and oilers can provide effective control if, once again, animals can have consistent daily access to use of these options. The stable fly is a biting fly that will spend considerable time apart from the animal. This is a pest that will travel up to several miles to bite. These flies and their painful, biting attacks are associated with lowered milk production, reduced feed efficiency and lowered weight gains. Agricultural Research Service entomologist David Taylor says that a model developed to look at the economic impact of stable flies on dairy cattle, cow/ calf, pastured and range stocker animals and feedlot cattle showed that stable flies cost the U.S. cattle industry more than 2.4 billion dollars each year. Stable flies are generally associated with sites where waste hay/feed, manure, and urine accumulate because this is the ideal site for larval development. Control is dependent upon sanitation, cleaning up those breeding and larval development sites. Entomologists with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have found that insect growth regulators can be effective

COW COUNTRY NEWS

at reducing stable fly populations. Those entomologists used a commercial product called cyromazine to control immature stable flies by preventing those immature flies from developing into adults. According to information released by the ARS, in one study, the application of granular cyromazine sprinkled on a hay feeding site reduced the number of emerging adult stable flies by 97 percent. Other ARS researchers are looking at the use of repellents to keep stable flies away from animals. Catnip oil has been

• APRIL 2018

found to be effective. On the horizon, other ARS scientists are experimenting with a biological control agent, a salivary gland virus that has shown some promise in providing stable fly control in initial trials. Summer weather is associated with increasing fly populations that can negatively impact cattle performance. Take some time to develop a fly management plan.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

QUARLES APPLAUDS PASSAGE OF ELD MODERNIZATION Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Bill Protects Kentucky Livestock, Agricultural Haulers Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles praised the enactment of a bill that provides greater flexibility for Kentucky farmers and other haulers transporting livestock and other agricultural commodities across the state. “It is important that our agricultural and livestock haulers have flexibility when transporting agricultural commodities,” said Commissioner Quarles. “I thank the General Assembly and Representative James Tipton for working to achieve a solution that allows Kentuckians to take full advantage of the federal exemption for our agricultural industries.” Federal law exempts vehicles carrying agricultural commodities for a distance less than 150 air-miles from any obligation to comply with hours-of-service limits or ELD (electronic logging device) installation requirements during a state’s planting and harvest season. The maximum exemption allowed by federal law is greater than Kentucky law’s 100 air-mile radius, leaving Kentucky’s haulers at a disadvantage. House Bill 133 aligns Kentucky’s maximum exemption with the federal standard and automatically adopts any future increases in the federal agricultural exemption into Kentucky law. “When I learned that our state’s public policy was not allowing our people and our businesses to take full advantage of an already existing federal exemption, I thought it was important to make our state law consistent with federal statutes,” said Representative James Tipton. “I was honored to work alongside Commissioner Quarles to lead the effort and deliver meaningful relief for our farmers and livestock haulers across Kentucky.” On December 15, the U.S. Department of Transportation delayed implementation of regulations requiring agricultural haulers to purchase and install ELDs on trucks. The DOT extended the implementation delay again on March 14, 2018. COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

41


FEATURE

SPRING WEED CONTROL IN GRASS HAY AND PASTURE If you were unable to control winter annuals and biennials last fall, there is still time now. However, herbicide application (or mowing) timing is critical and can make the difference between an effective tactic and a waste of time and money. Once the weeds are in the “setting seed” stage a herbicide application will not be effective and the seeds will most likely continue to develop and be viable. Winter annuals including yellow rocket and many of the other mustard species, common chickweed, marestail, fleabane, annual bluegrass, downy brome, etc. are growing rapidly and have already or will begin to flower and set seed very soon. Winter annuals (Mustard species, common chickweed, etc.) • Mow after bolting to prevent seed production. • Apply an effective herbicide in fall or spring prior to bolting. • Most winter annuals emerge by late fall - a smaller percentage will emerge in early spring • Prevent seed production to prevent spread.

Biennials including musk and plumless thistle, burdock, wild carrot, etc. should be treated before they begin to bolt (they are bolting now or very soon) and the smaller the better. (Late fall or early spring is really the best time to treat them.) And finally, control summer annual weeds as soon after they emerge as possible when they are most sensitive to chemical control. The most common herbicides used for control of many broadleaf weeds in grass hay/pasture this time of year are the plant growth regulator herbicides such as 2,4-D, dicamba (Banvel, Clarity, etc.), triclopyr products (Crossbow, Garlon, etc.),

and clopyralid (Stinger, PastureGard, etc.). In addition products containing metsulfuron (Cimarron, other generic formulations, etc.) can provide good control of many broadleaf weeds in the spring. (Be cautious, if forage grasses were recently seeded and are not yet established many of these herbicides can cause severe crop injury.) Refer to the Penn State Agronomy Guideor the 2016 Mid-Atlantic Field Crop Weed Management Guide for additional details. Below are some guidelines to provide a quick management summary for some common weeds of pasture.

Summer annuals (Pigweed species, common lambsquarters, common ragweed, etc.) • Keep pasture full and competitive. • Mow after bolting to prevent seed production. • Apply an effective herbicide in early summer. • Prevent seed production to prevent spread.

Allison Charolais Charolais Breeder Since 1962

Biennials (common burdock, bull and musk thistle, poison hemlock, etc.) • Mow after plants have bolted but before seed set to prevent seed production. • Remove or dig individual plants by hand. • Apply an effective herbicide to rosettes in the spring or fall. • Prevent seed production to prevent spread.

Ranch Ready Bull & Female Sale Selling 80 Fescue-Aged, Ranch Ready Bulls and 80 Black & Baldy SimangusTM Bred Heifers

Saturday, April 14, 2018 • 1:00PM Osceola, Missouri • Wheeler & Sons Livestock Auction

Bulls Available

S I M M E N TA L

X - FA C T O R H Y B R I D

3259843 IRON HIDE x BUILT RIGHT

3251222 CIRCLE OLD SCHOOL x OZZ IDEAL LEGACY

SIMANGUS

SIMANGUS

3243322 TJ MAKERS MARK x BDV CLICKER

3236830 HOOK’S XAVIER x PVF DOUBLE GRADE

Ø Bull calves out of HCR ANSWER 2042

and HCR SPIRIT 4007.

Ø Bred for calving ease and growth Ø Bulls for both purebred and commercial

breeders

John Allison, Owner 545 Eminence Road New Castle, KY 40050 502-220-3170 42

David Carter, Farm Manager 502-706-0075

Jared Wareham • (660) 492-2777 • beefsolutions@gmail.com

N E W D AY G E N E T I C S . C O M COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS SPRING SHOWCASE SALE

SELLING SONS, DAUGHTERS AND EMBRYOS OF THESE CHAROLAIS ELITES

SATURDAY MAY 12, 1:00PM BLUEGRASS STOCKYARDS SOUTH STANFORD, KENTUCKY

BRED COWS COW/CALF PAIRS BRED HEIFERS OPEN HEIFERS BULLS

EARLY CONSIGNORS: Paul Jeffries, James Hayden, Druin Charolais, Barron Charolais, Doub Charolais, Premier Cattle, Long Hall Cattle, West Charolais CONTACT: Jeff Harrod........................(502) Chuck Druin.....................(502) Jacob Miller......................(502) Mike Barron......................(606) COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

330-6745 321-1160 507-4987 386-1511

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

43


FEATURE

PREVENTING GRASS TETANY As spring approaches and grass begins to grow, grazing livestock may experience a forage-related problem known as grass tetany, grass staggers, lactation tetany, or hypomagnesemia. Grass tetany is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced magnesium (Mg) levels in the animal’s blood. In cattle, it generally affects older, lactating cows but can also be seen in dry cows, young cows, and in rare cases, growing calves. Symptoms often observed include nervousness, lack of coordination, muscular spasms, staggering, convulsions, coma, milk yield decrease, and death. If you suspect cattle are stricken with grass tetany, a veterinarian should be contacted immediately as early treatment can save animals. Young cool-season grasses and small grains are commonly associated with this disorder. Grass tetany occurs most frequently in the spring, but may occur in the fall and winter when these forages start growing rapidly again or when cereal grain forages are grazed High levels of nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) in the soil can increase the risk of grass tetany because they reduce the availability of magnesium to the animal. Farmers should refrain from placing cattle in a field that has been recently fertilized or has resulted in the disease before. Pastures where a significant amount of manure has been applied often have excessive potassium fertility increasing the risk to grass tetany. A farmer can also increase the legume content in his/ her pastures with clover or alfalfa since they have higher magnesium levels to compensate for the lack of it in the new lush grass. Feeding high magnesium or high “mag” mineral supplements is the preferred method to reduce the occurrence of grass tetany. High “mag” mineral mixes are available at most feed stores and contain higher inclusions of magnesium oxide than other complete mineral mixes. Cattle should begin consuming this high “mag” mineral during the late winter months and into early spring when new plant growth is starting. In late spring once temperatures are consistently above 60ºF, a producer can quit feeding the high “mag” mixtures. High mag mineral

44

does not need to be fed year round, but is not problematic if it is. Free-choice high mag mineral should contain 12 to 15% magnesium from magnesium oxide. Cattle need to consume four ounces of the mineral supplement daily. Magnesium oxide is unpalatable, which can result in low mineral intake. Co-product feedstuffs such as dried distillers grains, molasses or a flavoring agent is added to the mineral mix to increase palatability. If free-choice mineral is not a viable option, producers can also mix their own supplement by adding the appropriate amount of magnesium oxide to another palatable feedstuff, i.e. feeding in or with 1 to 2 lbs. of corn or other by-product that provides 20-25 grams of magnesium. For dairy cows, magnesium oxide can be added to the grain mix to provide an intake of 20 g of magnesium per cow per day. Magnesium oxide may be routinely used as a buffer in these grain mixes for dairy cows, so producers should check with their nutritionist to make sure adequate amounts and proper sources are being used to prevent grass tetany. Besides magnesium oxide, another source of Mg is magnesium sulfate, which is more palatable than magnesium oxide. The downside to feeding magnesium sulfate is it can be an issue where cattle are consuming high sulfate water or other feedstuffs high in sulfur. Producers that are feeding corn co-products (distiller’s grains or corn gluten feed), adding additional sulfur to the diet in the form of magnesium sulfate, or have high sulfur water could create a sulfur toxicity. Grass tetany blocks provide magnesium similar to that of a mineral supplement. The major disadvantage of this method is that all the animals may not consume an adequate amount of the block. Multiple blocks should be available with one block per ten cows. The season for grass tetany will be developing as temperatures rise and grasses begin to grow. To reduce health problems and livestock death to this disorder, it is important to provide a quality high “mag” mineral or supplement containing Magnesium oxide.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


The JMS Program:

Victor Domino Polled Herefords line bred for consistency and predictability Calving ease, highly maternal, and excellent carcass traits

Polled Hereford Bulls Available Contact us for more information

JMS Victor 967 340

JMS Victor 475 035

JMS Victor 967 202

DON’T FALL BEHIND

THE HERD!

Danny Miller and Trent Miller 4850 Caldwell Ridge Rd., Knifley, KY 42753 270-465-6984 270-566-2694 Danny cell 270-566-2000 Trent cell jmsfarm@msn.com www.jmsvictordomino.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

45


FEATURE

7 GUIDELINES TO HELP CATTLE PRODUCERS MANAGE THROUGH DROUGHT CONDITIONS Hugh Aljoe, Director of Producer Relations, Noble Foundation

5. Maintain a culling criteria list for marketing livestock if drought requires such action.

Farmers and ranchers have become accustomed to managing through adverse conditions, and drought certainly falls into that category.

The first category of animals to market in a drought is non-producing stock, such as yearling steers and replacement heifers (usually heaviest weights first - especially in a stocker operation), and open cows. The second category would be producing cows that have poor udders, eyes, feet, teeth, disposition, etc. The third category for culling would be less productive cows, non-uniform cows and the oldest cows.

There is a common denominator for those producers who cope with drought better than others: they all have active drought management plans. Following is a set of guidelines for developing a drought management plan. 1. Know your expected forage production and annual rainfall patterns by season. As a rule of thumb for warm-season perennial pastures (native or introduced), about 70 percent of our annual forage production will occur by July 1 regardless of the total rainfall for the year. The most effective rainfall for our warm-season grasses occurs during the second quarter of the year (April through June), which is typically the most abundant rainfall quarter across the Southern Great Plains. Table 1 shows annual precipitation (including totals by quarter) for three selected southern Oklahoma counties extending on a line from east (Choctaw County), through Ardmore (Carter County), to west (Tillman County). About 30 to 37 percent of annual rainfall occurs during the spring quarter (Apr-Jun), in which 70 percent of our annual forage is produced. If precipitation is significantly below average during that quarter, drought management plans should be implemented. Drought management plans should always be in consideration

6. Wean calves early.

if drought conditions continue for more than one quarter. 2. Establish conservative stocking rates based on average (or below) moisture conditions, providing an element of flexibility into the stocking rate. For example, with a spring calving cowcalf operation, maintain cattle inventory at about 70 percent of potential stocking rate with the plan to retain ownership of all or some calves through the following spring if moisture conditions are average or better. 3. Identify target dates to assess pasture conditions and make strategic decisions to keep the operation aligned with the longterm management plan.

The most critical date during the growing season is the end of the second quarter, when 70 percent of our forage production should have occurred. At this time, determine production to date and the variance from what was planned or expected. Another critical date is the end of the third quarter when forage reserves for the winter should be determined. 4. Apply spring fertilizer and herbicides to the most productive introduced grass pastures at the appropriate times. Even if early spring rains are absent, prepare to have fertilizer applied in early May since peak spring rainfall in the Southern Great Plains occurs in May and June.

It is typically more cost effective to feed early weaned calves through a drought than lactating cows. In addition, the maintenance requirements of a dry cow are about one-third that of a lactating cow. 7. If purchasing hay, purchase early in the growing season and only enough for winter use. Do not attempt to feed through a drought. If pasture can be located in another region within a reasonable trucking distance, it is often better to pay for a grazing lease for a short period of time (including hauling cattle to and from the alternate location) than to feed through a long drought spell. There are no easy answers when it comes to dealing with drought. However, with a good drought management plan in place, a producer is better prepared to take action if drought conditions persist.

Middle Tennessee Hereford Association

Annual Sale

Saturday • April 28, 2018 • 11:30 am CT KY/TN Livestock Market • Cross Plains, TN Exit 112, I-65 North of Nashville

Selling Registered Horned and Polled Breeding Stock

• Registered Females: Spring and Fall calving pairs, bred and open heifers • Registered Service Age Bulls • Hereford Influenced Commercial Cattle For more information or catalogs contact: Dale Stith 918-760-1550 • Billy Jackson 615-478-4483 46

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Serious seed with serious yield, Because farming isn’t just a hobby.

Quality Seed, Family-Owned, One Farm, One Bag at a Time Our seed isn’t just a product, its a passion we have to provide the best genetics for your farm. Our seed is thoroughly tested and proven on our farm before it makes it to yours. www.CaverndaleFarms.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

47


FEATURE

MULTIGENERATIONAL SUCCESS SHINES IN MAY’S LICK Five minutes with Charlie Boyd II, his son Blake, and Charlie’s mother Martha, is more than enough time to get a clear picture of the family’s love for one another, the cattle business, their community, and their pride in stewarding the legacy founded by Charlie Boyd Sr., his father, and his father’s father. Boyd Beef Cattle is a fifth-generation family business based in May’s Lick. They raise registered Hereford and Angus cattle, and the work they do has influenced both breeds on the national level. “My grandfather and great-grandfather had horned Herefords over in Minerva,” said Charlie. “When my mom and dad married, they branched out on their own and bought the place in May’s Lick in 1973.” “I remember as a kid we’d always go to May’s Lick Mill. At that time, we raised most of our feed. We’d always take it to May’s Lick Mill to grind and bag it. At least twice a week, and almost always on Saturday. If you wanted to see anybody in May’s Lick, more than likely they were at the mill on Saturday. You got your feed and you got to see all your neighbors.” In the 45 years since they came to May’s Lick, Boyd Beef Cattle has grown from a dozen registered cows and a bull into an operation with more than 300 head. “The Boyds are great people to work with,” said Ronald Lawrence, the manager at May’s Lick Mill. “They are so precise on what they do – they know their plan, and they get it right from the beginning. Mr. Boyd (Charlie Boyd Sr.) gave me a lot of encouragement over the years. A lot of knowledge on doing things right.” Charlie II credits both the customer service at May’s Lick Mill and quality of Hinton Mills’ feed for keeping their business as they’ve grown. “There are three arms in our business that are critical: genetics, feed and nutrition,” said Charlie. “If one of those three critical areas doesn’t work to bring the other two in, then the chain is broken. It doesn’t matter how good our genetics are, if the nutrition doesn’t maximize that genetic potential, then it won’t work. That’s where dealing with May’s Lick Mill has been critical to our success. That consistency 48

Charlie Boyd Senior at the International Livestock Expo in Chicago, ML from week to week is vital. We know that every delivery, it’s going to be the same as it was the past trip.” Not every business can say that generation after generation feels the pull to return, but Blake and Logan, Charlie II’s sons are both actively involved. This is where the influence of their close-knit family, especially Charlie Boyd Sr., becomes very clear. “The glass was always half-full,” said Charlie II about his dad. “We never dwelled on anything negative. The sun will always come up tomorrow. That’s important, because if you always look at things in a positive light, then it will be positive. That’s a unique attribute.”

(L-R) Martha Boyd, Blake Boyd and Charlie Boyd II

“From some of my earliest memories, we’d be out riding around in a farm truck,” said Blake. “Those were some of my greatest teaching moments – more than anything I ever learned in a classroom. He was my greatest teacher.” “I think something that probably described him (Charlie Sr.) was a continuous pursuit for excellence,” he also said. “Make every generation better than the last – whether it’s family or cattle – make sure it keeps getting better. That was his passion, so every minute of it was enjoyable. “I think Charlie (Sr.) would best be remembered as a mentor for so many, not only for his children,” said Martha, “but for other young people and those in the cattle business. It’s not something you can just say – OK, you’re going to be involved with the cattle and the farm. You can’t make children, grandchildren want to do this. That’s something they just learn, and it’s something I’m very thankful for.” Another key to the multi-generational

COW COUNTRY NEWS

(L-R) Charlie Boyd Sr., Bud Hinton and Ronald Lawrence (manager of May’s Lick Mill) success of the Boyds may lie in their care for the community, another value they share with Hinton Mills.

really not a customer, everybody works together. They don’t treat you any differently than they would one another.”

“Any family-run business that’s dedicated to success understands that their neighbors are their most important customers,” said Charlie. “And if you take care of your neighbors like they’re your family, you’ll have a successful business because of those relationships.”

As for the future?

“That’s the unique part about Hinton Mills,” he said. “The people that work there – it’s a family atmosphere. You’re

• APRIL 2018

“We’ll continue to grow,” said Charlie, “but not at the expense of quality.” “In our operation as well as in Hinton’s, my grandfather and father – they did it for the next generation,” he said. “Every day, when I get up, any successes we have, I feel like those are successes for Blake and Logan. They’re not my successes, it’s for them.”

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Silver Stream Shelters 30’ x 70’ Double Truss Pipe & Rachet Regularly Priced: $8,200 On sale for: $4,995 (Limit 10 Sheds) 30 X 72 Single Steele Rope Tie $3995.00 *Twice as strong as single steel

Contact Us Today! Derek Woods - 859-588-5416 or Toll Free - 877- 547-4738 www.silverstreamshelters.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

49


FEATURE

JANUARY EXPORTS SHOW SOLID START TO 2018 FOR U.S. BEEF, PORK January exports of U.S. beef were significantly higher than the large totals of a year ago while pork exports were steady in volume and increased in value, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).

32 percent in value ($5.9 million), led by a strong performance in Guatemala and larger variety meat shipments to El Salvador.

Beef exports totaled 105,486 metric tons (mt) in January, up 9 percent year-overyear, while export value surged 21 percent to $624.4 million. Exports accounted for 12.4 percent of total beef production in January, up slightly from a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported increased from 9.5 percent to 10.1 percent. Beef export value averaged $293.06 per head of fed slaughter, up 14 percent year-over-year. January pork exports totaled 203,488 mt, steady with last year’s strong volume, while export value increased 7 percent to $545.6 million. Pork exports accounted for 24.7 percent of total pork production, down from 26.2 percent a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported declined slightly to 21.5 percent. Pork export value averaged $50.93 per head slaughtered, up 1 percent year-over-year. For muscle cuts only, beef exports reached 80,495 mt (up 15 percent) valued at $555.7 million (up 23 percent). Pork export volume increased 5 percent to 164,189 mt, while value climbed 9 percent to $454.2 million. Beef variety meat volume fell 5 percent to just under 25,000 mt, but value increased 7 percent to $68.8 million. Pork variety meat exports dropped 16 percent in volume (39,299 mt) but still managed a 2 percent increase in value to $91.5 million. “January export results were solid overall and were especially strong for muscle cuts,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “Despite the decline in variety meat volume, export value continued to increase. This underscores the important contribution variety meats deliver for producers and for everyone in the U.S. supply chain.” Asian markets continue to shine for U.S. beef U.S. beef continued to gain momentum in the Japanese market, with January exports increasing 7 percent from a year ago in volume (23,968 mt) and 19 50

percent in value ($148.6 million). This included a 30 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 12,411 mt, valued at $92.4 million (up 38 percent). Frozen exports declined 13 percent in volume (8,141 mt) but increased slightly in value ($33.1 million). Frozen U.S. beef entering Japan is subject to a 50 percent safeguard tariff, which is scheduled to revert back to 38.5 percent on April 1, the beginning of the new Japanese fiscal year. Benefiting from a bilateral trade agreement with Japan, frozen beef from Australia is subject to a duty of 27.2 percent. This rate will decline to 26.9 percent on April 1.

and down significantly from the preKORUS rate of 40 percent. •

Exports to Taiwan posted impressive gains in January, increasing 17 percent in volume to 4,207 mt. Export value increased 41 percent to $42 million.

Led by solid gains in Indonesia and Vietnam, exports to the ASEAN region climbed 22 percent in volume (3,108 mt) and 13 percent in value ($15.9 million).

Strong results in Chile and Colombia fueled beef exports to South America, which increased 90 percent in volume (3,307 mt) and 65 percent in value ($13.9 million).

Exports to Central America jumped 40 percent in volume (1,082 mt) and

Other January highlights for U.S. beef included: •

Exports to South Korea, which reached a record $1.2 billion in 2017, increased 13 percent from a year ago to 17,133 mt, while export value soared 34 percent to $122.3 million. This included a 54 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 3,954 mt, valued at $36.9 million, up 63 percent. Through the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS), the duty on U.S. beef was reduced to 21.3 percent on Jan. 1, about 5 percentage points lower than Australia’s rate for this year

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Following large shipments in the fourth quarter of 2017, exports to Hong Kong slowed in January, but still easily exceeded last year’s totals, increasing 41 percent from a year ago in volume (10,493 mt) and 53 percent in value ($79.8 million). Exports to China, which resumed in June after a 13-year absence, hit a new monthly high of 819 mt in January valued at $7.5 million.

• APRIL 2018

Beef exports to Africa were mostly variety meat in 2017, but January produced a large increase in muscle cut exports to Angola and South Africa. As a result, total exports to Africa were up 19 percent in volume (954 mt) and surged 88 percent in value to $1.4 million.

Pork steady to Mexico; strong increases for Japan, Korea, Central America

Building on a record 2017 performance, January pork exports to Mexico increased 1 percent from a year ago in volume (72,997 mt) and 4 percent in value ($133.5 million). Mexico continues to be a mainstay market for U.S. hams and is the second-largest destination (behind China/Hong Kong) for pork variety meat.

Other January highlights for U.S. pork included: •

Exports to leading value market Japan totaled 35,048 mt (up 11 percent) valued at $146.4 million (up 17 percent). Chilled exports were up 15 percent in volume (20,212 mt) and 21 percent in value ($96.8 million).

Exports to Korea, which posted impressive gains in 2017, continued to gain momentum in January as volume increased 17 percent to 18,879 mt and value climbed 20 percent to $54.2 million.

Led by solid gains in mainstay markets Honduras and Guatemala and exceptional growth in El Salvador, pork exports to Central America increased 18 percent in volume (6,179 mt) and 20 percent in value ($14.5 million).

Year-over-year increases in both Australia and New Zealand pushed export volume to the Oceania region up 10 percent to 7,613 mt, while export value increased 15 percent to $22.2 million. Pork exports to Oceania are primarily composed of

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


raw material for further processing, with Australia being one of the leading destinations for U.S. hams. •

Led by strong growth to Vietnam, January export volume to the ASEAN region climbed 16 percent to 3,053 mt and value was up 17 percent to $7.9 million. The strong performance in Vietnam helped offset lower exports to the Philippines, the region’s largest destination for U.S. pork. Reflecting larger domestic production in China and correspondingly lower hog and pork prices, exports to China/ Hong Kong fell 16 percent to 31,997 mt, but still achieved a 2 percent increase in value to $77.9 million. For muscle cuts only, exports to China/Hong Kong increased 10 percent in volume (12,827 mt) and 14 percent in value ($25.6 million) from a year ago, but slowed from the fourth quarter pace when shipments gained momentum ahead of Chinese New Year. Following two big years, January pork variety meat exports to the region were the lowest since 2015.

FARM AUCTION

143+/- ACRE FLEMING COUNTY FARM • 20 TRACTORS• FARM MACHINERY• HAY

SATURDAY • APRIL 14TH • 10:00 AM T E A RU N R OA D ( H I L LTO P C O M M U N I T Y ) F L E M I N G C O U N T Y K E N T U C K Y

20 TRACTORS

FARM MACHINERY

3 TRUCKS

Lamb exports get long-awaited boost from variety meats Exports of U.S. lamb muscle cuts posted a solid performance in 2017, but overall results were held back by a decline in variety meat demand. That trend reversed in January, as variety meat exports were up 62 percent in volume to 614 mt and jumped 73 percent in value to $687,000. This helped push overall results for U.S. lamb to 740 mt (up 29 percent) valued at $1.5 million (up 6 percent). Variety meat export growth was led by Mexico, Angola and Gabon, while lamb muscle cut exports increased to the Caribbean and Canada. Complete January export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online. If you have questions, please contact Joe Schuele at jschuele@usmef.org or call 303226-7309. NOTES: • Export statistics refer to both muscle cuts and variety meat, unless otherwise noted. • One metric ton = 2,204.622 pounds.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Directions: From Flemingsburg By-Pass take Hwy 57 S 4 miles to Elizaville, turn left onto Ky#170 go 4.5 miles to Hill Top turn right onto Tea Run Rd, sale is ½ mile on left. from Mt.Sterling (I-64) take Hwy 11N 19 miles, Turn left onto Hwy 1325 (at Sherburne), 5 miles turn right on #1325, 1 mile turn left onto KY #170, 2 miles to KY #1347-Hwy #57 (Hill Top) turn left, 200 feet to Tea Run Rd, turn right , sale is ½ mile on left. Approximately 48 acres of fine sandy loam ridge land soils, utilized for hay production; approx. 35 acres of pastureland and 60 acres of woodland. Hayland has a good vegetative cover of mixed grasses. One well located small lake and branches provide livestock water. Abundant wildlife as it is located near the Clay Wildlife Preserve. Farm has access off Tea Run Road and fronts on Battle Run Road (Hwy 57). Improvements: 40’x100’ Quonset Building with concrete floor; 56’x72’ tobacco barn w/12’ att shed; 36’x36’ stock barn; 2 wire corn cribs; 2 metal corn cribs. City Water available. Tractors: John Deere #4020, 1967 (D); JD #730, 1960 (D): JD #530, 1959, p.s.; JD #50, 1956, p.s.; JD#620, 1958, p.s.; 2 JD “A’s” 1949 & 1950; JD “B” 1947-52; IH#660, Wheatland 6cyl., 1962: Farmall

#350, 1956,(D); Farmall “M” 1949, (G);Farmall “M” w/loader, 1940; Farmall “H”; IH #140 w/cultivators, fast hitch; Farmall F-30, rough; Case “C” 1937?, rear on steel, rough: Allies Chalmers, WD 45; 3-Allis Chalmers-CA, average condition. These tractors have all been stored inside, most have good rubber and paint. Mr. Emmons passed away 9.5 years ago and was an avid collector of classic tractors. Machinery: Kuhn #FC 300 R9’ Haybine, good; New Holland #488 haybine, good; Vermeer #505L hay roller, 5x5, 1998; Caterpillar (motor) scraper, rough; Bog Harrow, 8’ w/cylinder; NH #258 hay rake w/ dolly wheels: Hay Tedder, 2 basket; Grade blade 8’ w/cylinder; 4-wagon running gears; 3-PT 20’ boom spray; IH 4 row corn planter w/ fert./Gandy boxes; Corn Pro 14’ cattle trailer, rough; Miller legend 200 LEWelder. Plows: 2-JD #145, 3-16”s; JD trailer #145, 4-16”; AC 3-16”; 2-14” plows; IH#194 plow / 140; Bush Hog 7’ rotary mower w/cylinder; Birch 8’ Tandem

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

disc w/cyl; Harrigator, 16’; Cultipacker, 9’: 2-2 row rear mount cultivators; 80” roto-tiller; New Idea UniSystem cab; 3 pt hich hay mover ; 4-12.4x36 JD rims/tires; IH#660 weights and various other tractor weights; Lots of tractor tires, some on rims; Approx. 10,000 tob. Sticks; approx. 50 rolls of hay (inside); Approx. 50 sheets of new metal - 3’x18’, 20’ & 22’; Tracker 12’ John Boat: metal band saw; large pile scrap iron; many more items too numerous to mention. Trucks: 3 trucks available, see website for details! Terms: REAL ESTATE : 10% down the day of auction, balance with delivery of the deed within 45 days. Chattel Property: Cash or Approved Check Day of the sale. NO BUYERS PREMIUM. FARM TO SELL AT NOON. Announcements Day Of Sale Take Precedence Over printed, Verbal or Electronic Advertising. Note: OPEN HOUSE: Saturday, April 7, 1-4 pm. Other inspections times by contract selling agency. This farm has been in the Emmons family several generations. Tractors and Equipment Selling Absolute. Refreshments Available. Call selling agency for more info and visit www.mclaa.com or www.auctionzip. com to see more pictures!

51


FEATURE

UK, STAKEHOLDERS BREAK GROUND ON GRAIN AND FORAGE CENTER OF EXCELLENCE Katie Pratt

University of Kentucky researchers have a long, storied history of working with farmers and stakeholders to make the state’s agricultural community world leaders in innovation and adaption. Today, they joined together to break ground on the Grain and Forage Center of Excellence, a facility that will allow them to continue this rich tradition. “UK is inextricably linked to the wellbeing and the economic development of all 120 Kentucky counties,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “Agriculture is a fundamental component of the Kentucky economy, and the innovation underway at the UK’s Research and Education Center in Princeton advances that work. This new center of excellence expands and enhances our capacity to serve as the University for Kentucky.” To accommodate the center, UK’s Research and Education Center in Princeton is undergoing a renovation and expansion. The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment facility will serve

Numerous stakeholders joined UK personnel to break ground on the Grain and Forage Center of Excellence. as the center’s nucleus with faculty and staff based at Princeton and Lexington. Among the improvements are updated and state-of-the-art meeting facilities, laboratories and offices, and a boost to the center’s high-speed internet capabilities to allow graduate students

You have one day to get her pregnant.

Trust the professionals.

stationed at the center to remotely participate in classes in Lexington. These improvements will enhance the college’s extension, research and teaching missions. The network of ag-related partners we have in this great state is second to

none, and it has helped UK become a world leader in agriculture research,” said Nancy Cox, dean of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We are excited about the opportunities this center will provide for the farm families of Kentucky. Our goal is to help

REGISTERED RED ANGUS AND

POLLED HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE Home Raised and Full Two Years Old – Moderate Framed Vaccinated Four Times with Bovishield Gold and Blackleg BVD PI Tested Negative Breeding Soundness Exam and Guaranteed Developed Slowly – Sound Feet – Not Fat Hot Wire Broke to Rotational Grazing Gentle Dispositions – Handled on Foot Priced at $2,500 to $3,000 each

For more information, contact John Ethington // Danville, KY // 859.533.1301 Derek Brown // Walton, KY // 859.322.2757 Samantha Tate // Hardinsburg, KY // 270.883.2855

REYNOLDS FARM BEEF CATTLE – MURRAY, KENTUCKY Greg Reynolds (270) 293-1598 - reynolds@wk.net

www.crinet.com © 2018 Genex Cooperative, Inc. All rights reserved.

52

A-17967-18

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


improve Kentucky’s farm economy by promoting advanced technologies and useful practices through research and extension.” The center is a testament to the strong working relationship between UK specialists and Western Kentucky farmers with the idea coming from Logan County farmer Don Halcomb and Lloyd Murdock, UK extension soils professor emeritus. “We needed the ability to attract outstanding extension researchers to work in our unique soils and climate, and the center of excellence will help us do that,” Halcomb said. The idea gained support and momentum from the state’s farmers and commodity groups. It became a reality when the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board awarded the university $15 million in July 2016.

Black Gold Genetics n o i s i v i D y k c u t n Ke Female Production Sale

April 29, 2018 • 12:30 p.m.

7980 Hanna Road • Crestwood, KY

Sire: VAR Discovery 2240 • Dam: GAR/DRMCTR Objective 9J86 Featuring Rita 665 as the Lot 1 lead-off female who blends the growth and Marb. sire, Discovery with the now-deceased Black Gold foundation Rita, Objective 9J86. Rita 665 sells due 10/11/18 to 3F Epic 4631.

Black Gold Rita 665

“The UK Grain and Forage Center of Excellence is the largest project ever approved by the KADB,” said Warren Beeler, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy. “This project has the power to positively affect Kentucky agriculture for the next 50 years.” As part of the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board grant, the university is required to raise an additional $15 million match within five years. To date, the college has received more than $7 million in gifts, grants and other donations toward that match. As a result of the center, a team of UK researchers have started new projects to better understand the connections between intensive agriculture production and water quality. Some of the projects underway include mixed forages for grazing cattle and their impact on other species and better use of chicken litter as a soil amendment on Kentucky fields. They will partner with local producers as these projects progress. “We are focusing on issues that are important to Kentucky farmers and citizens,” said Chad Lee, the center’s director. “We are approaching this with the same multidisciplinary effort that we did with no-till adaptation and intensive management of wheat, which were statelevel problems UK researchers tackled that had worldwide implications.” The center is expected to be complete in summer 2019.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

9J86 The dam of Rita 665

18663197

Black Gold Rita 674

Black Gold Blackcap 675

18765874

18768465

Sire: VAR Generation 2100 • Dam: Rita 3P6 of 9MH5 Prophet Due 9-23-2018 to MGR Treasure.

Sire: EXAR Resistol 3710B • Dam: GAR Predestined N1039 Due 10-24-18 to SydGen Enhance.

BLACK GOLD GENETICS

SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Donald E Jones Jr., Owner 12251 E 625th Avenue PO Box 8638 • Robinson, IL 62454 Farm 618-544-7777 Danny Lynn, General Manager • 573-721-6660 Kris Lynn Kentucky Division • 573-721-6663 Office 502-222-7403

www.blackgoldgenetics.net

53


54

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


CENTRAL KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION 53rd Annual Spring Sale 18th Annual Premier Bull Division Saturday • April

21, 2018 • 1 PM (EDT)

Central Kentucky Angus Sales Pavilion Ÿ Danville, KY

4 miles NE of Danville just off of Hwy 34 on Chenault Bridge Road and then Fork Church Road GPS Address: 2286 Fork Church Road, Lancaster, KY 40444

20 Premier Bulls:

15 2017 Yearlings • 3 Fall Yearlings • 2 2016 Two-Year-Olds

Bulls must meet specified EPD, weight and health requirements to qualify as Premier Bulls.

50 Registered Females:

25 Cows, 20 to have calves by sale date 8 Bred Heifers, most to calve by sale day 18 Open Heifers, Ready to breed for spring 2019 calves

12 Commercial Angus Females: 10 Spring Bred Heifers and 2 Cows

150 Straws Of Semen:

Sires include: Bando 0699, Predestined, Bushwacker, Iron Mountain, Ideal 3452, Connealy Mentor, Marriott

COVELL’S TITUS 19055252

COVELL’S MATTIS 18965078

BOTH OF THESE COVELL BULLS ARE FROM THE SAME COW FAMILY THAT PRODUCED THE TOP SELLING BULL OF THE RECENT CKAA WINTER SALE. SALE DAY SPONSOR: Central Kentucky Angus Central Kentucky Angus Association Association 2018 Calendar: President: Bob Clark, Harrodsburg, KY September 8, 2018: April 21, 2018: Vice President: Pete Dennen, Harrodsburg, KY Ladies Day 2018 53rd Annual Spring Sale Treasurer: John Goggin, Danville, KY November 10, 2018: June 24, 2018: Secretary: Joe Goggin, Danville, KY 28th Annual Junior Show & Picnic 56th Annual Fall Sale Jr Advisor: Ann Covell, Harrodsburg KY January 26, 2019 Past President: Tom McGinnis, Shelbyville, KY 55th Annual Winter Sale

SALE DAY PHONES:

859/238-3195 or 859/583-0364

Auctioneer: Eddie Burks

HERITAGE 292 TRACTION 720 18893608 EPDS: WW 72 YW 126 $B 140.87

SALE MANAGER: Tim Dievert

478 Dry Fork Road • Danville, KY 40422 Office: 859-236-4591 • Mobile: 859-238-3195 E-mail: tdievert@dievertsales.com Logan Goggin: 859-516-3199 Details and online catalogs available at www.dievertsales.com

216th Sale Sponsored by the Central Kentucky Angus Association COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

55


FORAGES

SPRING FORAGE MANAGEMENT REMINDERS Eileen Coite / Patricia Burch, NC State University Extension

The longer, warmer spring days are upon us and it certainly feels nice! I’m sure many of you share my excitement and eagerness for warm weather and more sunlight. If you manage a hay field or pasture for your livestock, or are planning to plant one, now is the time to make some final management decisions and plans. What you do now will ensure spring pasture growth starts off right and leads into a productive summer. For those wanting to plant a new pasture or hay field, your first decision will be what to grow. Is bermudagrass the ideal forage for your land? Are you interested in growing hybrid bermudagrass, or maybe a seeded variety? There is a difference, starting with when and how to get this done. Hybrids spread and reproduce by stolons (above ground growth) and rhizomes (below ground growth). Any seeds seen on a hybrid plant are sterile, so we must start a field by planting “sprigs” which are small plants that have been dug from an established field and then re-planted to a new field. While hybrid bermudagrass, such as Coastal, Tifton 44, or Midland 99 should ideally be planted anywhere from mid February

to mid March, they can still be planted into April. There are sprig suppliers in the area that sell and will deliver sprigs to your field. Our office can assist with contacts to sprig suppliers if this is your choice. Seeded varieties of bermudgrass are also available and may be a better choice for small acreage locations or the flexibility of later planting dates. Of course, there are other forage choices you might decide to plant. Bermudagrass is a perennial plant, which will grow throughout the spring and summer and become dormant during the winter months but come back again the next year, and that is one reason it is often preferred. However, there are annual grasses that could be planted, such as pearl millet or crabgrass, and these will grow well and provide plenty of grazing throughout the warmer months too. If you want the flexibility of planting something new each season, an annual such as these may be a better choice for you. Either way, if a soil sample has not been taken in the past 2-3 years, it’s time to take one. Ideally, a soil sample

is taken prior to the growing season, but anytime is better than none. Soil fertility changes over time and may not always be optimum for forage growth. Both establishing and planting forages for new pastures and maintaining fertility on existing pastures require soil sampling. Pastures in southeastern NC will need to maintain around a 6-6.5 pH for maximum productivity. Soil pH tends to drop off over time and additional lime may need to be applied in order to bring these levels back to normal. The soil sample will provide useful information with both lime recommendations and fertilization needs. Stop by the Extension office to pick up a soil test box and instructions on sampling. Another important step to starting off spring growth is fertilization. Meeting the needs of the plant will allow for the optimum production of the crop, whether for grazing or hay. Fertilization for warm season grasses should be applied in split applications throughout the growing season, generally with the first application in April or early May. Again, the soil test is a handy tool in knowing what the nutrient needs of your pasture

are, being based on what is currently available in the soil and depending on the type of pasture you are growing. Along with the spring growth of our pastures, comes the growth of various weeds. There are several products on the market to help with this. Emerging warm season weeds, such as pigweed, dogfennel, bitter sneezeweed, sicklepod, and horsenette can be effectively controlled as long as they are treated while still immature. At the same time, chemical herbicides generally work best when applied in moderate temperatures (60 degrees or better). A precaution to note: some herbicides are damaging to neighboring crops, such as tobacco and cotton, so be careful to select a safe product if these crops have been planted close by. Choosing to apply herbicides during calmer days or times of the day is also a good idea as wind will carry these chemicals farther than you might think. In addition to controlling broadleaf weeds that invade our pastures and hay fields, there now are more options for grass-type weeds. Many fields battle competition from crabgrass, bahiagrass, goosegrass, and vaseygrass just to name a few. Once you’ve identified the weed or weeds you are dealing with, a selection can be made of the most ideal, appropriate, yet economical method or chemical to achieve this goal. For your copy of an updated list of herbicides labeled for forages or for assistance selecting a product, contact the Extension Center at 910-592-7161. We will be glad to assist you in decisions to get your spring pastures started off right. The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this article does not imply endorsement by North Carolina State University nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned.

Fertilizer andLime LimePower Power Fertilizer Precision Precision and

Introducingthe thefirst firstStoltzfus Stoltzfus spreader for fertilizer application Introducing spreaderdesigned designedprimarily primarily for fertilizer application

Redhawk Redhawk CU50F CU50F

Find this STOLTZFUS spreader & more at Red Barn & Associates!

Bulls for sale Bred & Open Heifers for sale

Jennye Logsdon • 270-537-3259 • 2318 South Jackson Hwy • Horse Cave, KY 42749

www.redbarnandassociates.com • Call Charlie @ 859-608-9745 56

PUREBRED SIMMENTAL • PUREBRED ANGUS • SIM/ANGUS

COW COUNTRY NEWS

We strive to provide our customers with a superior product with personal attention to innovation, professionalism, and integrity. www.BandLfarmcattle.com • APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


GLENVIEW FARMS BULL WEEK: APRIL 9-14

Quality Charolais Cattle in the Heart of the Bluegrass

Select group of yearling bulls for sale

AI Sired, Good EPD’s, Polled & Docile

Registered Angus Bulls for Sale by Private Treaty

þ 12 to 18 Months Old þ Breeding Soundness Examined þ Complete Herd Health Program þ Tested Free of Known Genetic Defects þ FREE delivery in Kentucky A.I. Sires Include:

Sandpoint Butkus X797 PA Power Tool 9108 · WR Journey 1x74 VAR Generation 2100 · Yon Future Force Z77

Save the Date for the 2nd Annual

Spirit of the Bluegrass Sale on October 6th, 2018

at Bluegrass Stockyards, Lexington

Danny Rankin · Cell: 502 693-4803

Farm: 502 845-0399

2923 Port Royal Road | Campbellsburg, KY 40011

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Contact: Candy Sullivan (859) 338-0170

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

57


FEATURE

NASS STILL ACCEPTING COMPLETED CENSUS FORMS ALTHOUGH THE FIRST DEADLINE HAS PASSED, NASS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCEPT CENSUS INFORMATION As we celebrate National Ag Day March 20, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service wants farmers to know they still have time to be counted in the 2017 Census of Agriculture. (AJ Cann via Flickr) LOUISVILLE, Ky. — As we celebrate National Ag Day March 20, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service wants farmers to know they still have time to be counted in the 2017 Census of Agriculture. Although the first deadline has passed, NASS will continue to accept Census information to get a complete and accurate picture of American agriculture that represents all farmers. “NASS needs a Census of Agriculture response from all Kentucky producers,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “In order to get an accurate representation of the Commonwealth’s agriculture, NASS will continue to accept completed Census questionnaires through spring. We’ve heard that some producers need extra time to gather documents for taxes and the Census. All operations are important and every response matters. NASS is committed to giving producers every opportunity to be represented in these widely-used data. Federal law mandates that everyone who received the 2017 Census of Agriculture questionnaire complete it and return it, even if not currently farming. NASS will continue to follow-up with producers through the spring with mailings, phone calls,

58

VISIT US TODAY! ALL AGES WELCOME • SCHEDULE A GROUP VISIT AND CHOOSE YOUR LESSON PLAN • CATERING IS AVAILABLE

and personal visits. To avoid these additional contacts, farmers are encouraged to complete their Census either online or by mail as soon as possible. Responding online saves time by skipping sections that do not apply and automatically calculating totals. The online questionnaire is accessible on desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. “Our goal is at least 80 percent response, and Kentucky’s response rate is currently at 45 percent,” Knopf said. “We have several counties under 40 percent, and we’re asking every farmer to take the time to respond to the Census.” For more information about the 2017 Census of Agriculture, visit www. agcensus.usda.gov. For questions or assistance filling out the Census, call toll-free (888) 424-7828. For more information about Kentucky surveys and reports, call the NASS Kentucky Field Office at (800) 928-5277, or visit https:// www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_ State/Kentucky/

COW COUNTRY NEWS

NELLIS@KYCATTLE.ORG • (859) 382-4303 THE YARDS is an education center focusing on the

science and practices of the beef industry. Educational opportunities provide a unique learning experience based on its location in the Blue Grass Regional Stockyards Marketplace. This environment fosters complex thinking, experiential learning, and life skill application.

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


l

keep immune and reproduction functions performing properly. The addition of chelated

dealer for more information on how Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ minerals can help your herd. 7500 Grade Ln, Louisville, KY 40219 7500 Grade Ln,

trace minerals helps negate any antagonists present on pasture or in water. Contact your local dealer for more information on how Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ minerals can help your herd.

1-800-777-5923

Louisville, KY 40219

www.centralfarmky.com

1-800-777-5923

www.centralfarmky.com

Finally a Mineral That Really works on “Endo-Fight” Fescue.

New from Triple Trust: HERBUILDER FESCUE FIGHTER.

TRIPLE TRUST TRIPLE TRUST

HERDBUILDER HERDBUILDER livestock mineral livestock mineral

R

With Endo-Fighter it’s easy to conquer the debilitating effects of fescue toxicosis. When used in free-choice formulations, it’s even easier to protect cattle from fescue toxicosis. Cattle consuming EndoFighter are more comfortable and less stressed and more productive. Better gains, better reproduction efficiency, better cow

Endo-Fighter’s effect on production has been validated by numerous research studies as evidenced by the following:

Cow/Calf Missouri Study Control

Endo-Fighter

Cow/Calf Herd A Cow ADG, lb Calf ADG, lb

-0.24 1.44

0.25 2.02

Cow/Calf Herd B Cow ADG, lb Calf ADG, lb

0.38 2.53

0.81 2.74

TOTAL GAIN ADVANTAGE

49 lb 58 lb 59 lb 23 lb

ENDO-FIGHTER FIGHTS FESCUE TOXICOSIS BY PROVIDING… 1. A potent, natural, plant-derived ingredient shown to dissipate body heat by facilitating blood flow to the body surface and enhancing thermoregulation. 2. CitriStim™, a unique, whole-cell yeast, proven to support gut health and gut immune function.

also contains

3. A natural component that exerts a positive effect on reducing absorption of fescue toxins. 4. Natural-source vitamin E to protect body cells against oxidation and support immune function during times of stress.

Available through Central Farm Supply 800-777-5923 of Kentucky and their dealer network COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

BioPlex™ and Sel-Plex™ are registered trademarks of Alltech.

centralfarmky.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

59


Amburgey Charolais Farm

FEATURE

UNDERSTANDING INCOME, EXPENSE AND CASH FLOW STATEMENTS Myriah Johnson, PhD

In the February issue, Dan Childs described the usefulness of a balance sheet. This month, we’ll take a look at two other financial statements that can help you understand the financial health of your business. Together, these three statements provide powerful insight. Income and Expense Statement Most simply, the income statement is a summary of revenue and expenses over a period of time. The time interval will depend on the entity but can be as short as one month and as long as one year. Due to the annual nature of activities, most agricultural operations put together their income and expense statement on a yearly basis. In thinking about how an income and expense statement fits together with a balance sheet, you might think of the income and expense statement as telling the story of what occurred throughout the year while the balance sheet is a snapshot at the beginning and the end. The income and expense statement can be compiled using the cash or accrual method. Most frequently, the cash method is used because of its simplicity. However, the cash method can tell you the wrong story unless you manage inventory and accounts payable and receivables very consistently over time. The main difference between the two methods is the time period in which the income and expenses are recognized and recorded. The cash method is simple while the accrual method allows you to match income to the expense incurred to produce it. In other words, the cash method only considers cash transactions such as selling grain or cattle or paying for the inputs the operation consumed. Sometimes a crop of grain or calves can be produced and the inputs paid for and the grain or calves still be in inventory at the end of the accounting period. The statement of cash flows contains all cash flows, not just revenue and expenses. In this scenario, a cash method income statement would report much higher expenses than revenue. Oftentimes in an

effort to manage taxable income, a farmer or rancher may pay expenses ahead, defer accounts receivable, or only sell a portion or no grain or calves at all. If these practices are not accounted for through accrual adjustments, the true story is not being told. Therefore, if accounts payable and receivables and inventories change considerably from the end of one accounting period to another, it would be best to complete the income statement using the accrual method. This will allow one to accurately evaluate the profitability of their operation, as well as other things like operating profit margin ratios, rate of return on assets and rate of return on equity. Statement of Cash Flows Unlike the income and expense statement, the statement of cash flows contains all cash flows, not just revenue and expenses. Cash inflows may include things such as cash from the sale of capital items and proceeds from new loans, while cash outflows can encompass things like principal payments on debt and full cost of new capital assets. This statement reconciles changes in cash from one balance sheet to another. From the statement of cash flows, you can better understand the repayment capacity, or ability to repay term debts on time, of your business. Some of the ratios that help inform in this area are the replacement margin and the capital debt repayment capacity. Use Statements Together While each of the financial statements are useful tools on their own, together they provide powerful knowledge. Additional ratios regarding financial efficiency can be calculated using information from all of the financial statements. These include the asset-turnover rate, operating expense, depreciation expense, interest expense and net farm income ratios. Collectively, all of the ratios and indicators help highlight areas of strength and vulnerability. In fact, they may just help us keep our operations out of the ditch.

Annual Bull & Female Sale **NEW DATE** Saturday, April 14, 2018 12 PM

Followed with the Commercial Cow Sale Blue Grass Stockyards East, Mt. Sterling, KY

Selling:

(1/2 mile off I-64 at exit 113)

Charolais Bulls

Performance tested, good disposition, semen checked

Bred & Open Heifers For More Information Contact: Robert Amburgey Blue Grass Stockyards East 3171 Camargo Road Tim Gayheart Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-9625 (859) 498-2764 Home (859) 404-3751 Mobile

Registered Angus Herd Dispersal Registered Angus Herd Dispersal Selling OverHerd 300 Head Registered Angus Herd Dispersal Registered Angus Dispersal Registered Angus Herd Dispersal Selling Over 300 Head Three-in-Ones • Pairs • Bred Heifers Selling Over 300 Head Selling Over 300 Head Selling Over 300 Head Bred Cows • Commercial Bred Heifers Three-in-Ones • Pairs • Bred Heifers Three-in-Ones Pairs BredHeifers Heifers Three-in-Ones •••Pairs Three-in-Ones Pairs• ••Bred Bred Bred Cows • Commercial BredHeifers Heifers Bred Cows • Commercial Bred Heifers Bred Cows Commercial Bred Heifers AI Sires: Bred Heifers Bred Cows • Commercial

AI Sires: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • EXAR Stud 4658B • EXAR Resistol 3710B AI AI Sires: Sires: AI Sires: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • EXAR Stud 4658B • EXAR Resistol 3710B

Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 •• EXAR Stud 4658B • EXAR Resistol Quaker 4658B EXAR Resistol 3710B Up 5405 Werner Flat TopHill 4136 • CTS0A36 Remedy1T01. Epic 4631 • HA 3710B Cowboy Quaker HillRampage Rampage 0A36 •EXAR EXAR Stud Stud3F 4658B •• EXAR Resistol 3710B

Werner Flat Top 3FEpic Epic4631 4631 • HA Cowboy Up 5405 Werner Flat Top4136 4136•••CTS CTS Remedy1T01. Remedy1T01. 3F • HA Cowboy Up 5405 Werner Flat Top Epic 4631 4631 HA Cowboy Up5405 5405 Werner Flat Top4136 4136 •CTS CTSRemedy1T01. Remedy1T01. 3F 3F Epic ••HA Cowboy Up

Saturday 14 •11 11A.M. A.M. (CDST) Saturday• •••April April Saturday 14 A.M. (CDST) Saturday April 14 •••11 A.M.(CDST) (CDST) Saturday •April April 14 11A.M. (CDST) Cullman Stockyard Alabama Cullman Stockyard Cullman, Alabama Cullman Stockyard Cullman, Alabama Cullman Stockyard ||||Cullman, Cullman, Alabama Cullman Stockyard Cullman, Alabama Bill & Carol Freeman

Bill & Carol Bill& &Carol Carol Freeman Freeman Bill Freeman

Bill & Carol 15185 County Road 49 • Freeman AL 35592 15185 County Road 49 ••Vernon, Vernon, AL35592 35592 15185 County Road 49 Vernon, AL 15185 County Road 49 • Vernon, ALAL 35592 15185 County Road 49 • Vernon, 35592 Office: 205-695-6314 | Bill: 205-712-0671 | Carol: 205-712-8966 Office: 205-695-6314 | |Bill: 205-712-0671 | Carol: Carol: 205-712-8966 Office: 205-695-6314 Bill: 205-712-0671 | 205-712-8966 Carroll T. Cannon, Auctioneer • 229-881-0721 • Lic. #5233 Office: 205-695-6314 | Bill: 205-712-0671 | Carol: 205-712-8966

Office: 205-695-6314 | Bill: 205-712-0671 | Carol: 205-712-8966 Carroll Lic.#5233 #5233 CarrollT.T.Cannon, Cannon,Auctioneer Auctioneer •• 229-881-0721 229-881-0721 ••Lic. Carroll T. Cannon, Auctioneer • 229-881-0721 • Lic. #5233

Carroll T. Cannon, Auctioneer • 229-881-0721 • Lic. #5233

60

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Rd. • Danville, KY 40422 Office:859/236-4591 (C)859/238-3195 • tdievert@dievertsales.com Logan Goggin • 859/516-3199 www.dievertsales.com

HERITAGE FARM INAUGURAL SALE

March 31, 2018 • Shelbyville, KY

BRANCH VIEW ANGUS SALE Saturday, April 14, 2018 Hustonville, KY See ad on back cover

53rd CKAA SPRING SALE 18th Annual Premier Bull Division Saturday, April 21, 2018 CKAA Sale Pavilion, Danville, KY See ad on page 55

l a u n n A h t 27

SERAA

Southeast Red Angus Association

Grasstime Auction Saturday • April 7, 2018

1 p.m. • Central Time | Cullman Stockyards, Cullman, Alabama

Selling 85+ Registered Lots Cow/Calf Pairs | Bred Females | Heifer Calves | Excellent Bull Selection | Embryos and Semen

BRIDGEVIEW ANGUS SALE

Featuring an elite set of Red Angus genetics like these past sale features…

Sunday, May 6, 2018 Stamping Ground, KY See ad on page 11

Registered Angus and Polled Herefords Largest Selection of Polled Hereford Bulls in Central Kentucky, also a few select Angus Bulls! BULLS ALWAYS FOR SALE! John Tucker II 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Hudson, KY 40145 270-617-0301

For more information, contact: SERAA Grasstime Sale Chairman Danny Osborn: 256-679-6307 View catalog online at:

www.seraa.org or www.redcows.net COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Auction management by: Kyle and Lisa Gilchrist

Kyle: 641/919-1077 • Lisa: 515/669-9945 14075 120th St. • Douds, IA 52551 redcowseller@yahoo.com

61


Saturday, April 21st at 12:00pm CST Online Bidding at

Kentucky, cont.

Ohio

David Downey

Blake Stephens

Rusty Sams

Bobby Keahey

Chip Stewart

Luke Vollborn

Morris Orr

Ronnie Gearlds

Tennessee

Nickolas Williams

David Gregory

Ricky Smith

Noel Holland

David King

Bobby Bain

United Producers Inc.

Georgia

John Bruner

Kyle Reaves

4350 Old Louisville Rd.

Edward Salter

Mike Malone

Jim Owens

Bowling Green, KY 42101

Chad Gibson

Adam McCord

Mike Davis

Scott Carey

Paul Jeffries

Mike Foster

QUALITY

Illinois

Ross Embry

Bob Morton

Doug Thurnau

Frankie Anthony

Lynn Hankins

QUANTITY

17 PAIRS

Indiana

Missouri

Sonny Bratton

Junior Sullivan

Mike Haley

Terry Caudill

CHAROLAIS

24 BRED COWS

Tracy Sullivan

Mike Kisner

Bill Baird

Kentucky

Mississippi

Tommy Turner

TJ Adkins

Rocky Hughes

Virginia

Cowbuyer.com Catalog available: Kentuckycharolais.com

Lot 24

137 LIVE LOTS! 15 SPLITS

26 BRED HEIFERS 20 OPEN HEIFERS

John Allison

Embryos

Manager: Morton Management Bob Morton: (931) 842-1234 Chairman/Host: Frankie Anthony (270) 617-0888 Charolais Journal Rep. : Floyd Wampler (423) 612-2144 62

Pre-Sale Social

Alabama

and Dinner Friday April 20 6:00 pm CST

&

Brent Crews

137 LIVE LOTS!

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Semen

Lot 134

Sale Headquarters: Hotel Sync (270) 745-0123 Mention Charolais Classic for $99/night NEW HOTEL, every room is a suite! If the hotel is full contact Frankie at (270) 617-0888 • APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Lot 86

Lot 80

Lot 77

Catalog available online March 20th at:

Online bidding available on sale day at:

Kentuckycharolais.com

cowbuyer.com

If you have any questions about the sale or lodging call Frankie Anthony (270) 617-0888

If you only attend one Charolais event a year, this is the event for you!

!!AUCTION!!

SOCIAL & VIEWING

Saturday April 21st 12:00pm CST

Friday April 20th 6:00pm CST

Lot 87

Lot 115 Lot 42

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

63


ROCK RIDGE FARMS Angus & Hereford

50 –Bulls Sell! Fall Yearlings

Bull Sale

6PM Ÿ Friday evening, April 27, 2018

– Spring Yearlings

ROCK RIDGE PEDIGREE D154

Lawrenceburg, KY Ÿ At the Farm

ROCK RIDGE GAME CHANGER D132 D13

DOB: 12/07/16

DOB: 10/21/16

SAV Pedigree 4834 x SAV Hesston 2217

Gaffney Game Changer 371 x SAV Iron Mountain 8066

ROCK RIDGE WILDCAT 7002 DOB: 01/15/17

C ETF Wildcat 4248 ET x Boyd Worldwide 9050 ET

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$W

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$W

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$CHB

+8

+1.4

+65

+109

+26

+61.38

+5

+2.1

+65

+110

+27

+66.91

-2.2

+2.3

+53

+81

+56

+33

ROCK RIGDE DOUBLE BLACK D128

ROCK RIDGE TWENTY X 6128

Penners–CC Double Black 2257 x SAV Brilliance 8077

A&B Twenty X 3149 x Connealy Confidence 0100

DOB: 10/19/16

DOB: 10/03/16

ROCK RIGDE TIME TRAVELER 6022 DOB: 12/29/16

LCC FBC Time Traveler 480 x Boyd Worldwide 9050 ET

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$W

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$W

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

$CHB

+4

+3.4

+57

+95

+95

+57.27

+10

+.9

+55

+103

+25

+49.93

+.8

+2.9

+57

+87

50

+28

ROCK RIDGE COURAGEOUS 385

TOUR OF DUTY

WERNER FLAT TOP

SONS OF THESE PROVEN SIRES WILL BE REPRESENTED!

Call or email to request a sale catalog! 64

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

ROCK RIDGE FARMS

PO Box 480 • Lawrenceburg, KY 40342 Phone: (502) 839-4196 • Email: rockridge@sci82.com www.rockridgefarmsky.com Brandon Mitchell (502) 680-0532 • A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

BUTTERCUPS IN GRAZED PASTURES Dr. J.D. Green, Extension Weed Scientist, University of Kentucky - One of the signs that spring has arrived is when the yellow flowers of buttercup begin to appear, but it’s during the winter months that the vegetative growth of buttercup takes place. As a cool season weed, this plant often flourishes in over grazed pasture fields with poor stands of desirable forages. In fact, many fields that have dense buttercup populations are fields heavily grazed by animals during the fall through the early spring months.  Buttercups are sometimes classified as short-lived perennials, but often grow as winter annuals. Plants typically produce five, shiny yellow petals in the early spring. There are four different species of buttercups that may be found in Kentucky: bulbous buttercup (Ranunculus bulbosus), creeping buttercup (Ranunculus repens), tall buttercup (Ranunculus acris), and small flower buttercup (Ranunculus arbortivus). Although each of these plants may have somewhat similar flower heads, each of these buttercup species differs somewhat in their vegetative leaf characteristics. New seed are produced during the time petals are showy. Waiting until after flowers appear can be too late to implement control tactics. This is one reason buttercups can survive year to year and new plants emerge each year.  Most buttercup plants emerge from seed during the fall or late winter months. Therefore, pasture management practices that improve and promote growth of desirable plants during these months is one of the best methods to help compete against the emergence and growth of this plant. Whereas, livestock animals allowed to overgraze fields

during the fall and winter months is one of the main factors that contribute to buttercup problems. Mowing fields or clipping plants close to the ground in the early spring before buttercup plants can produce flowers may help reduce the amount of new seed produced, but mowing alone will not totally eliminate seed production. For chemical control, herbicides registered for use on grass pastures that contain 2,4-D will effectively control buttercup. Depending on other weeds present products that contain dicamba+2,4-D (eg. Weedmaster), aminopyralid (eg. ForeFront, Milestone), triclopyr (eg. PastureGard, Crossbow), or metsulfuron (eg. Cimarron) can also be used. However, legumes such as clovers interseeded with grass pastures can be severely injured or killed by these herbicide products. For optimum results apply a herbicide in the early spring (February - March) before flowers are observed, when buttercup plants are still small and actively growing. For best herbicide activity wait until daytime air temperatures is greater than 50 F for two to three consecutive days. Consult the herbicide label for further information on grazing restrictions, precautions, or other possible limitations.

CLIFFORD FARMS & GUESTS HEREFORD PRODUCTION SALE NOON - SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2018 CHENAULT AGRICULTURE CENTER 2130 CAMARGO ROAD • MT. STERLING, KY

SELLING 50 LOTS SERVICE AGE BULLS, SPRING & FALL CALVING PAIRS, BRED AND OPEN HEIFERS, BLACK BALDY PAIRS

Wells Farm, Corbin, KY Botkin Polled Herefords, Lexington, KY Underwood Farms, Campbellsville, KY K3 Cattle, Cynthiana, KY

LOT 1

LOT 9

CHF Ekton 4302 01E calved Jan. 2, 2017

CHF Emmett 3001 11Z 18E calved Feb. 14, 2017 LOT 8

CHF Eula Has Legs 3001 31E calved Mar. 13, 2017

Ben Clifford, 859-421-7902 Lincoln Clifford, 859-954-0102

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

CHF Master Vickie 63D calved Sept. 28, 2016 LOT 16

LOT 3

For fields heavily infested with buttercup a variety of control tactics may be needed. Apply a herbicide to help reduce the population of buttercup plants in the spring plus use good pasture management techniques throughout the year to help improve and thicken the stand of desirable forages. This plant often flourishes in over grazed pasture fields with poor stands of desirable forages.

GUEST CONSIGNMENTS FROM:

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

CHF Revolution 11Z calved Feb. 25, 2012 LOT 37

K3 101Y 1043 Backlash 711 calved Mar. 18, 2017

For sale catalog contact: Dale Stith, Sale Manager, 918-760-1550

65


Wayward Hill Farms consignments to the

Bulls of the Bluegrass Sale • April 7, 2018 NEW LOCATION: Bluegrass Stockyards • Lexington, KY

WHF Emperor E243

WHF Evolution E246

SELLING

WHF Blackhawk D353 Tattoo D247 D248 D245 D012 D075 D598 D246 D112 D014 D353 D751 D597 D38 D372 D242 D214 E243 E246 E35 E241 E315 E249

Birth Date 9/3/16 9/15/16 9/15/16 9/17/16 9/17/16 9/18/16 9/22/16 9/22/16 9/25/16 10/3/16 10/5/16 10/11/16 10/11/16 10/11/16 10/11/16 10/12/16 2/5/17 2/11/17 3/3/17 3/2/17 4/5/17 2/21/17

SIRE HOOK`S BLACK HAWK 50B HOOK`S BOUNTY 6B CCR COWBOY CUT 5048Z HOOK`S BOUNTY 6B CCR COWBOY CUT 5048Z DJF FORTIFIED A357 HOOK`S BOUNTY 6B HOOK`S BLACK HAWK 50B TNT DYNASTY Z226 HOOK`S BLACK HAWK 50B WHF STEEL A24 TNT DYNASTY Z226 TNT DYNASTY Z226 TNT DYNASTY Z226 WHF TRACKER A007 TNT DYNASTY Z226 ES BLACKSTONE CA117 TNT DYNASTY Z226 TJ MAIN EVENT 503B TJ NORTHWARD 573C TJ MAIN EVENT 503B TJ NORTHWARD 573C

WHF Blackhawk D247

SELLING These bulls also sell:

DAM 247B 248Y 245X 248Y 075W 596Y 246A 112B 245S 351B T752 597Y 38A 372Z 242Y 214X 243B 245A 35C 240A 315C 249B

BW 74 83 85 84 86 92 78 80 87 85 82 88 74 74 75 86 80 85 80 87 77 90

WW 634 ---514 ---575 612 691 660 719 584 732 631 611 795 680 610 756 756 837 ---827 764

YW 1093 ----1042 ----1063 1111 1197 1041 1126 1049 1170 1114 1152 1280 1115 1004 1307 1261 1388 -----1300 1225

CE 15.4 8.6 13.4 8.6 12.7 12.8 9.5 14.2 13.9 12.9 12.1 10.5 12.8 12.9 10.7 13.1 9.6 11.9 12.9 9.9 12.8 5.6

SELLING

WHF Eclipse E35

WHF Dynasty D014 BW -1.1 1.4 0.9 1.4 1.6 1.4 1.3 0.2 -0.7 0.2 0.9 1.3 0.3 0.1 0.4 0.4 2.2 0.8 -1.4 2.8 -1.5 3.7

WW 70.9 72.7 63.9 72.7 69.9 64.8 82.3 67.6 68.3 62.6 76.8 69.9 69.2 85.2 67.3 66.4 74.5 75.2 94.6 75.2 84.6 64.8

YW 103.1 112 95.8 112 100 102.4 130 97 94.6 91.5 112.5 101.5 109.8 133.6 99.6 96.2 117.2 108.7 132.1 112.3 117.1 89.9

WAYWARD HILL FARM

MM 19 20.1 27.8 20.1 24.9 22.2 20.6 23.1 15.6 19.2 23.4 14.6 20.1 28.1 22.8 18 15.7 16 21.1 29.9 22.8 28.4

API 150.7 135.5 137.6 135.5 130.8 133.7 141.6 159.1 144.2 145.2 130.9 142.4 149.9 156.8 116.8 142.7 131.3 131.8 146.5 141.6 142.8 114.8

WHF Efficient E315 TI 80.5 77.8 78 77.8 77.6 70.8 85.3 81.5 79.9 74.5 80 75.9 79.3 89.7 71.5 75.3 77.5 80.2 92.6 83.3 86.2 68.5

PERCENT Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred Purebred 5/8 Simmental Purebred Purebred 3/4 Simmental Purebred 3/4 Simmental Purebred

HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HETRO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HETRO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK HOMO POLLED/HETRO BLACK

Chris Allen WAYWARD HILL FARMS BULLS FOR SALE AT BULLS OF THE BLUEGRASS SALE 4/7/18 859-351-4486 ALL BULLS TESTED FOR HOMO BLACK AND HOMO POLLED CONTACT CHRIS ALLEN WITH ANY QUESTIONS, VISITORS WELCOME ANY TIME callenuky@hotmail.com 66

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755 Nathan Hicks 859-576-6738

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


HELP DEFEND YOUR CATTLE AGAINST THE CHALLENGES OF ENDOPHYTE-INFECTED FESCUE. Tall fescue. A dream to grow, but for cattle, it can be a nightmare. Until now. Fescue EMTTM is a new mineral defense with Endophyte Management Technology. Research-proven and backed by the expertise of Cargill Animal Nutrition. It’s uniquely designed to help defend cattle against the challenges of grazing endophyte-infected fescue while improving growth and overall performance.

ENDOPHYTE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY

Make sure your cattle are prepared to meet the threat. FescueEMT.com.

1-844-889-7712 ©2018 Cargill, Inc. All rights reserved.

FESCUE-EMT-PrintAd_KY COW COUNTRY_2018_9.5x9.5_no promo.indd 1

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

3/1/2018 10:56:53 AM

67


PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM State and National Beef Promotion and Research Programs Information is required by 7 CRF 1260.201. Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential per 7 CRF 1260.203.

TODAY’S DATE

ID NUMBER (IF KNOWN)

SELLER’S NAME

BUYER’S NAME

ADDRESS

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

CITY

SELLER’S SIGNATURE

STATE

ZIP

BUYER’S SIGNATURE

Both the seller and the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Kentucky Beef Council. DATE OF SALE

STATE OF ORIGIN*

TOTAL NUMBER OF CATTLE SOLD

X

$1.OO per Head Federal Checkoff

$

X

$1.OO per Head State Checkoff

$

Total Checkoff Payment for Federal and State

PERSON REMITTING FORM

+ =

BUYER

SELLER

PHONE

*If the cattle purchased came from another state within the last 30 days, indicate from which state the cattle were purchased.

$

Send Report and Remittance to: Kentucky Beef Council 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 For additional information: call 859-278-0899 or email beef@kycattle.org According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0581-0093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

68

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


IN MEMORIAM

DR. PEARSE LYONS, ALLTECH PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER, DIES AT 73 It is with great sadness that Alltech announces the passing of its founder and president, Dr. Pearse Lyons. Lyons died on Thursday, March 8, due to an acute lung condition that developed during his recovery from heart surgery. He was 73. “The thoughts of our entire Alltech family around the world are with Dr. Lyons’ family, specifically his wife Deirdre, daughter Aoife, son Mark and Mark’s wife Holly,” said Alric Blake, CEO and treasurer of Alltech. “Dr. Lyons was a visionary entrepreneur who transformed the agriculture industry beginning with his innovative application of yeast technology in animal nutrition. From farm to field, from market to family dinner table, our

world is immeasurably better because he was a man who never saw problems, only a challenge that had not yet been solved. “He inspired everyone he met with his energy, enthusiasm and passionate belief in possibilities. He instilled that positivity in his people, more than 5,000 Alltech team members around the world. I am confident I speak on behalf of all of them when I say that we are deeply honored to have known and worked for such a great man. We will resolve to honor his legacy by deepening our commitment to his customers and all the innovative ideas he believed in so strongly.” To continue driving forward his vision for serving the agriculture industry through field-proven innovations, Dr. Lyons established a clear leadership structure, including: •

Dr. Mark Pearse Lyons, Chairman and President

Alric A. Blake, Chief Executive Officer and Treasurer

E. Michael Castle II, Vice President and Secretary

As the company’ director of corporate image and design, Mrs. Deirdre Lyons will continue to further Dr. Lyons’ vision for Alltech’s global presence and their shared commitment to philanthropy and community

PERFORMANCE ANIMAL HEALTH, LLC has ANY PRODUCT that you need for your animals (including pets). We work with different animal health companies and DVMs to get you THE HEALTH PRODUCTS THAT YOU NEED at the LOWEST POSSIBLE COST TO YOU. We work with our customers to develop health protocols for efficient production. From vaccine requirements to treatment options, we offer the support you need to make informed decisions based on what is working for others. Products Include: • All prescription medication • All lines of dewormers • All lines of vaccines • All lines of ear tags • Growth Implants • Castration Tools

• APRIL 2018

“We are all deeply saddened by my father’s passing,” said Dr. Mark Lyons, Pearse’s son and chairman and president of Alltech. “He always focused on developing people, and he built an extraordinary team over the years. I know he had full confidence in his team to continue growing the company he built. “He saw farther into the horizon than anyone in the industry, and we, as his team, are committed to delivering on the future he envisioned. He planted seeds that will produce a bountiful harvest for the world in the years to come.” Dr. Lyons’ family are deeply appreciative of the many prayers and well wishes they have received from friends around the world. At this time, they kindly ask that any expressions of sympathy, including memories and tributes, be shared at alltech.com/pearselyons. In lieu of flowers, the family is encouraging donations to the Alltech ACE Foundation, a 501c3 nonprofit organization that funds a variety of philanthropic endeavours around the world from disaster relief to primary schools in Haiti. Donations may be made at alltech.com/pearselyons.

SERVING THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Specializing In: Full Line Of Animal Health Supplies Complete Feeds Premixes Supplements Minerals Low Moisture Tubs

FOLLOW US

Just like our feed company, we buy products in volume, so we save money and then pass those savings on to you the customer.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

involvement.

Commodities We Deliver High Quality Livestock Feeds at the Lowest Possible Cost to the Producer. Contact us today at (866) 699-5080 or visit us at www.performance-feeds.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

69


e YARDS Inside th cated at m lo s Classroo Stockyard s s a r G lace the Blue l Marketp e, a n io g e R Pik n Works 4561 Iro 511 n, KY 40 Lexingto

ss d discu t n a r e Discov ake the mos nd m how to high school a re r p re a you ce to p your out of n ie r e exp r of college for the caree lture lf icu yourse Explore agr gh Bill . s k throu ers r dream o w d ies an mploy e industr 10 Things E olleg ’s n in C r a Coplin e L u need ou to Want Y the skills yo n eed. to lear to succ

70

e c i o h c “Ever y n a s i e yo u mak e h t n i t n e m t s e v in ” e f i l r u o y f o t res

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

71


FEATURE

QUARLES, OTHER FARM LEADERS, KROGER INTRODUCE

KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S GROUND BEEF ALL-KENTUCKY PRODUCT IS

AVAILABLE IN SUPERMARKETS ACROSS THE COMMONWEALTH LOUISVILLE (March 20, 2018) — Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles today joined Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association leaders, Kroger officials, and farmers to unveil a new all-Kentucky beef product on National Agriculture Day. Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef is sold in 85 Kroger supermarkets across the Commonwealth in one-pound packages and in two-pound packages of four patties each. “On a day when we celebrate the contributions that farmers make to our everyday lives, we are thrilled to introduce Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef will create new income and jobs all across the food chain – from the farmer to the grocery. It also gives consumers a wholesome local product that they can serve to their families with confidence.” “We are proud and excited to provide fresh, natural beef sourced from Kentucky farm families,” stated Beef Solutions Chairman and cattleman Jeff Pettit. “As the largest cattle producing state east of the Mississippi, we are prepared and dedicated to offering local ground beef to consumers across the state.”

Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles announces the launch of Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef, a 100 percent Kentucky beef product sold in 85 Kroger supermarkets across the Commonwealth, Tuesday in Louisville.

“Kroger takes immense pride in supporting our hard-working Kentucky farm families. We are thrilled to see this project come to fruition and to offer our customers this completely local product,” said Erin Grant, Kroger spokesperson. Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef is fresh, natural beef produced by Kentucky farm families and processed by The Chop Shop, a Kentucky Proud member in Wolfe County that is the only Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI)-certified processor in the state. The beef is ground and packaged by Creation Gardens of Louisville and distributed from Kroger’s Louisville distribution center. The beef is a product of Beef Solutions, a limited liability company owned by the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association (KCA). The ground beef product is the result of years of ongoing discussions among the KCA, the Kentucky Beef Council, the Kentucky Beef Network, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA), the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy, Kroger, producers, and processors. Kentucky is the leading beef cattle state east of the Mississippi River with more than 38,000 producers and more than 1 million beef cows. To find out more about Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef, go to kentuckycattlemensbeef.com. To learn how to become a participating producer for Beef Solutions, host a sampling event, or for other questions, contact the KCA at (859) 278-0899.

72

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FROM OUR HANDS TO YOURS LOCAL BEEF JUST GOT EASIER.

@kycattlemensbeef for more information, visit kentuckycattlemensbeef.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

73


74

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


FEATURE

BEEF EXPO SALES TOP $1M AGAIN AVG UP SLIGHTLY IN 32ND RUN OF WINTER BEEF BENEFIT The Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo recorded sales of just over $1 million, crossing seven figures for the seventh consecutive year in its 32nd edition March 2-4 at the Kentucky Exposition Center. “The Beef Expo has become a staple of the beef cattle calendar in the United States, and the results of the last several years bear that out,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “We are Kentucky Proud to be the leading beef cattle state east of the Mississippi River. Congratulations to all the consignors, exhibitors, and juniors on a great event.” Gross sales for 447.25 lots from 207 consignors totaled $1,061,125, down 7.6 percent from the 2017 total of $1,147,805 for 493.5 lots. The average of $2,373 per lot was slightly higher than last year’s figure. Cattle from 13 states converged on Louisville for the Beef Expo.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

The sale topper was the grand champion bull in the Limousin sale, sold by Fawley Farms of Ohio for $8,750. The top Kentucky animal was a Simmental heifer consigned by Metzger Cattle Co. of Rockfield, which brought a high bid of $7,700. An Angus heifer consigned by Kalli Flanders of Buffalo, Kentucky, was gaveled at $7,500. The 53 Angus lots fetched a total of $181,350, an average of $3,422 per lot, to lead all breeds in both categories. The junior show saw 381 cattle enter the show ring, of which 202 were from Kentucky. The judging contest attracted 161 participants. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA), Kentucky Farm Bureau, and Farm Credit Mid-America were the major sponsors of the Beef Expo.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

75


FEATURE

they have on those items. What’s left to actually feed the farmer’s family?

THE END OF THE ROAD

Stop by the average small farm in America during business hours and no one’s home. More often than not, the post-retirement-age-farmer, whose kids have all grown and left the farm for greener pastures in the city, is gone at work. Working to pay for his habit.

Dan Belprez

Last week while on our monthly grocery trip, we were shocked to see that milk was selling for $1.50 a gallon at ALDI in Big Rapids. $1.50. “Limit five,” the sign said. Clearly, most shoppers’ reaction to these prices was to say “wow, $1.50!” and to then stock up. For us, our hearts sank. Those farmers, their families, their cows. How in God’s name can they survive $1.50 a gallon? This week, Dean Foods gave notice to 140 small family dairy farms in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio that after May 31 of this year, there will be no truck to pick up their milk. Walmart, the largest buyer of Dean’s milk in the region, has vertically integrated and will now be processing their own milk. But not from those farms. Those farms are too small for Walmart to waste their time with. And now, Dean

has no avenue to sell those farms’ milk. After years of low prices, it is, likely, the final nail in the coffin for those farms. These are the guys who are up at work at 5 AM feeding calves, milking cows, and cleaning barns. Then after breakfast, they don their ties and head into town for their 9-5 “day job” before coming home for evening chores and starting the routine all over again. Truly, over 85% of farms can’t support a family, financially, without added outside income, according to recent USDA surveys. What was once the most common job in America, now can’t even support a single family. In a typical year, dairy farmers get only 11 cents from every dollar spent on milk. From that 11 cents they have to pay for their mortgage, feed, fuel, labor, insurance, equipment, and any debts

Tired Of Checking Cows?

Tighten Your Spring 2019 Calving Season With Matchmaker MGA Cubes

His habit? Farming. A few days ago, we were running low on round bales for our cows – our next semi load wasn’t supposed to be in for a few more days. So, I thought I’d run down the road through Lakeview farm country and knock on doors at any of the small farms I saw with hay bales stacked up. Having recently moved to the area, buying hay is always a good way to connect with neighbors, local farmers and create community. Not one person was home. The barn roofs sagged in the middle as the ridge beams rotted away. The tractors, mostly over 40 years old, sat rusting in barely standing equipment sheds. The old fence posts looked more like Woodpecker feeders, and the barbed wire fences that once controlled livestock now swung limply in

wind. Paint peeled from the siding, and shingles were missing from the roofs, and no one was home. Despite all their hard work, those farmers still couldn’t afford to make ends meet without a towny job. In a few more years, after that farmer has worked until his last day, those tractors will be wrapped in weeds, the barns will be piles of rotted wood and twisted nails, and the houses will sit vacant – too poorly maintained and outdated to even sell. Eventually, some mega farm will come burn the collapsed barn, bulldoze the house, and try to squeeze out a few more bushels of corn over-top the tomb of some other farmer’s dreams, until they eventually succumb to the same fate. I don’t say this to be pessimistic. It’s the truth. The rot and decay in our food system has taken such a hold that, without drastic intervention, the industry will die. What then? According to the USDA the average age of the American farmer is 58, with over CONTINUED ON PAGE 80

J & D KERSTIENS GELBVIEH AUCTION Will Lunch vided o r P e B .m. on p 12 t a 7 April

VIEWING: APRIL 6, 2018 12 P.M. -4 P.M. AUCTION DAY: APRIL 7, 2018 VIEWING AT 9 A.M. AUCTION STARTS AT 1 P.M.

LOCATION: J&D Kerstiens Gelbvieh - Jerome Kerstiens Farm Manager: Duane Cassidy 812-661-8005 3928 Old Huntingburg Rd. Huntingburg, IN 47546 8 miles north of I-64 on St Rd 231

30+ Gelbvieh/Angus Balancer Bulls Breeding Soundness Evaluation, BVD, Semen & Trich Tested

Born in: Fall of 2016

In Glasgow: 1-800-859-2174 76

On the Web: www.burkmann.com

**All Bulls Base Bid: $1800

In Danville: 1-800-786-2875 COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


GVF BANKROLL 7009

GVF AFTON 7077

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

+13

+.4

+86

+156

+81

+181

+8

+2.5

+85

+157

+87

+181

GVF AVIATOR 7012

GVF CASH 7067

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

+7

+1.5

+71

+126

+68

+120

+11

-.2

+66

+120

+80

+147

GVF RAMPAGE 7018

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

GVF WEIGH UP 7008

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

$W

$B

+5

+3.4

+96

+153

91.06

+160.63

+11

+.8

+72

+128

+70

+164

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

77


FEATURE

UK EXTENSION HELPS LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS DETER BLACK VULTURES Katie Pratt

Black vultures are a concern for livestock producers throughout Kentucky, particularly this time of the year, as they can kill newborn calves and other juvenile livestock. University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment faculty and staff are working with Kentucky producers to find low-cost, legal options to control these birds and prevent livestock losses. Controlling black vultures is challenging, because they are protected by the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This act makes it illegal to kill them without a valid federal permit. A highly intelligent bird, the vulture is difficult to kill even with a valid permit. It’s their intelligence that Matt Springer, UK assistant extension professor for wildlife management, is hoping to use to control them. Springer and his graduate student Jonathan Matthews designed an effigy of a black vulture using a rubber stall mat and specifications from similar designs developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services. An effigy is an image or representation of a particular species. The idea is if black vultures see the effigy of the bird hanging upside down from a high post or tree, they will assume it’s an actual dead bird and stay away from the area. The effigy is inexpensive and easy to make with materials costing under $30 and taking about two hours to complete. “There is not a lot of research in this area, but we do know that when they were dealing with roost issues in Florida and Georgia, they would hang two or three effigies up, and that seemed to be very effective, especially over 48 hours. Basically, the roost would leave the area and go somewhere else,” said Springer, faculty in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. “For a calving

78

pasture, we are telling producers if you can’t see the effigy from somewhere in the pasture, you should hang another one to ensure vultures can see them from everywhere.” Tyler Ferguson, of Flat Gap in Johnson County, is like many Kentucky cattle producers in that he farms part-time and has a small herd. After spotting a roost of black vultures within a mile of his farm, he was concerned enough to attend a meeting where Springer presented the effigy designs at the Johnson County office of the UK Cooperative Extension Service in December. Within a few days, he and his father built an effigy to hang on his farm and one for his neighbor. “We thought we would try to get in front of the problem,” he said. “Nobody wants to lose a calf or a cow, but it hurts small producers more, because losing just one calf is a larger portion of our entire crop.”

EARLY CONSIGNMENTS INCLUDE 63 LOTS 19-BREEDING AGE BULLS 8-COW/CALF PAIRS 15-BRED & 21-OPEN HEIFERS CONSIGNMENTS FROM: OH, WV, KY &PA

SALE BROADCAST & ONLINE BIDDING

Brian Jeffiers, Johnson County extension agent for agriculture and natural resources, said the December meeting with Springer was well attended by livestock producers in his county. Jeffiers provided effigy plans and materials for meeting participants. “I think this really highlights that people are interested in dealing with this problem in a way that complies with the law, because there are so many complexities on that side,” he said. “We also want to make sure that people don’t take a big financial loss on something that they may be able to prevent fairly easily.” Springer is in the process of developing an extension publication with the black vulture effigy design specifications. In the meantime, producers should contact their county extension agent for agriculture and natural resources for directions on effigy construction.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

View Catalog online at : theovla.com Auctioneer COL JOHN SPIKER

Ohio Valley

Limousin Association

Sale Consultant BILL HELTON 256-962-0256

For Catalog or Information Sale Chairman

Limousin Today Rep NATHAN SMITH 256-590-2487

740-516-1675

• APRIL 2018

JOE PRYOR

pryorlimousin@yahoo.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Lot 58

AAA 17708883

Outlaw Daughter bred to HA Cowboy Up. Nice!

Lot 41

AAA 17858870

Capitalist 3 & 1. Heifer calf by Epic, Bred to Fortress. Direct Daughter of SAV Bessie Heiress

Lot 89

AAA 18991512

Lot 12

AAA 18928571

Bismark x Capitalist. Good looking with 18 CED.

Lot 23

AAA 18880848

Old Hickory with Class and Style. Open heifer division is loaded!

Lot 97

AAA 18852796

Lot 65

AAA 18576955

First Calf Heifer with a gorgeous Bronc Heifer at side

Lot 43

AAA 18023752

All Purpose 3 & 1. Heifer calf by Seedstock, Bred to sexed VAR Legend. Oh My! Request catalog at: matt@jacksonmarketingsolutions.com More info at: www. greatmeadowsangus.com Follow us on Facebook: Jackson Marketing Solutions Great Meadows Angus Association

Tex X x Bismark. Lots of growth and performance.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Courage Son with a look-alike half brother. CED 13 to YW of 116.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

79


SELLING THE ENTIRE KALARAMA HERD OF 117 PUREBRED BLACK ANGUS, CHAROLAIS AND MIXED CHAROLAIS/ANGUS COWS PLUS 7 PURE-BRED BLACK ANGUS HERD BULLS, 1 ANGUS/WAGYU CROSSED BULL, 1 PUREBRED WAYGU BULL, FALL CALVERS

Friday, April 6, 2018 • 1 PM

Washington County Livestock Center • Springfield, Kentucky 40069

For info contact: Joan Hamilton 859-481-1892 cell kalaramafarm@gmail.com

This is an excellent opportunity to buy cows bred to thrive well on Kentucky grass. They are forage grazers and have never had grain. They consistently produce high selling, heavy weight feeders. The females from these cows make excellent producers because that’s what they were bred to do by two great cattle breeders in Wyoming, Larry Leonhart of Shoshone Angus and George Brown of Hoodoo Ranch. Both these men spent a lifetime breeding cattle to be as functional and as problem free as possible. We purchased heifers from these two great cattle breeders and brought them to Kentucky 16 years ago and they have been thriving ever since. We have continued breeding only the best of every crop. These cattle selling are bred and are in production. Most of them are 5-6 year olds. The 9 herd bulls are young as well. We just sold feeders off these cows. They topped the market. Grass fed only.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 76

31% still running their farm at over 65 years old. Anyone can see that the population demographics in agriculture are dreadful. It didn’t used to be this way. The idyllic farms pictured on the front of every Country Crock margarine container in the supermarket used to be real. Small, diversified, family farms were the backbone of America. What happened? Who is to blame for the demise of an entire way of life? For the collapse of rural America? The answer – the 1970’s. No, really. The 1970’s ushered in a radical change in the government policy surrounding agriculture and subsidies. Policy that interferes with the natural rules of supply and demand and encourages farmers to “get big or get out.” Moreover, our government farm subsidies prioritize the growing of commodities – non-perishable food products that can be stored indefinitely

80

in grain-bins and traded on the world market to increase our nation’s GDP, thus giving the government more borrowing power to stem off its eventual debt-defaults from bloated budgets and out of control spending. The deeper you look, the farther the rot penetrates. The farm of days gone by – of Old MacDonald with his diversified farm of edible crops, cows, pigs, and chickens – has been replaced with endless rows of corn and shiny-new grain bins that stick out of the countryside like cathedrals paying homage to holy corn. But the rot has spread to these now, too. The price of a bushel of corn was $3.58 on Dec 2, 1974. In January of 2018, a bushel of corn sold for $3.56, down two cents from 44 years ago. The farmer who planted his first field of corn in 1974 can expect the same prices for his corn as he retires. All the while the price of seed, land, equipment, fertilizer, and fuel have grown exponentially. It’s unbelievable. It’s an insult.  It’s downright sinful. COW COUNTRY NEWS

Even now as I write, farmers are taking their planters out of winter storage, they are inoculating their seeds, calibrating the sprayers, and eagerly awaiting to get back out in the fields. Yet, the forecast for commodity futures on corn and soy don’t look any better than they did last year, and sadly, they will probably lose money after a year of work. So, as the days get longer, and the sun comes out of it’s winter hibernation, take a ride down a country road and see the vacant houses, the barns falling down, the rows upon rows of corn and soy. But, when you see that veggie stand on the side of the road, stop and buy something. Buy everything you can afford to locally. Your dollar will have a greater impact when you buy anything directly from a local producer than switching to an organic item at a chain supermarket. Truly. More and more farmers are finally starting to see the writing on the wall, and they’re trying to save themselves. They are returning to growing food instead

• APRIL 2018

of commodities, and more importantly they are marketing that food directly to customers, instead of selling it for pennies on the dollar to multinational packing and processing corporations. Farmers are fiercely independent, and they are indoctrinated with the “pull-yourselfup by your bootstraps” mentality, but they can only partially save themselves. The consumer has to help save them. Instead of Costco, spend your money at the farmer’s market. Or a buying club, or a co-op, or any farm. Buy your food direct from the farm as often as possible. Not only is it better for your health, (and your taste buds!), it helps restore rural and local economies. The radical intervention that agriculture needs is here, and it’s to do away with the cheap global commodity food system that helps no one and fails everyone. Instead, opt for a vibrant, local, and sustainable food system built on the relationship between farmers and consumers, without the government and middlemen in the way.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Selling Open & Bred Spring & Fall Heifers, 3-N-1 Spring & Fall Pairs, & Bred Fall Cows at the 2018 Mountaineer Red Angus Classic

Mountaineer Red Angus Classic Saturday, April 14, 2018 • Sale Start Time Approximately 1:00 PM 2018 WV Beef Expo • Jackson’s Mill 4-H Conference Center @ Expo Weston, WV 2018 WV Beef Saturday, April 14, 2018 Sale Start Time Approximately 1:00 PM Jackson’s Mill 4-H Conference Center @ Weston, WV Auctioneers: John Spiker (Lic. No. 184-18) Phone / Cell: 304-884-7915 / 304-677-0255 David Spiker (Lic. No. 1937-18) Cell: 304-813-6550 Red Angus Sale Chairman: Dan Stickel – Cell: 304-545-7677 / Email: cedarhillredangus@frontier.com Open & Bred Spring & Fall Heifer, 3-N-1 Spring & Fall Pairs, Bred Fall Cows

Auctioneers:

John Spiker (Lic. No. 184-18) Phone / Cell: 304-884-7915 / 304-677-0255 David Spiker (Lic. No. 1937-18) Cell: 304-813-6550

West Virginia Red Angus Sale Chairman: Request a catalog at 304-545-7677 or cedarhillredangus@frontier.com. WV Beef Expo multi-

Red Angus Dan Stickel – Cell: 304-545-7677 breed catalog is also available at www.cowbuyer.com. If youAssn.: are unable to attend the sale you 1404 Kincheloe Road • bidding Jane Lew, WV 26378 may view and participate in the auction via live internet through: www.cowbuyer.com. Email: cedarhillredangus@frontier.com (304)545-7677

Confidential or phone bids may also be arranged with the sale manager or auctioneers.

Request a catalog at 304-545-7677 or cedarhillredangus@frontier.com. WV Beef Expo multi-breed catalog is also available at www.cowbuyer.com. If you are unable to attend the sale you may view and participate in the auction via live internet bidding through: www.cowbuyer.com. Confidential or phone bids may also be arranged with the sale manager or auctioneers. COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

81


82

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


L E GI S LAT I ON

Working proactively with our members on all policy issues affecting cattle producers and the beef industry including international trade, animal health, environment, and much more.

LE ADE RS H I P

Offering leadership development through youth and adult programs, strengthening leadership skills and developing a better network of the cattle industry.

T RADE AS S OCI AT I ON

Knowing that as a trade association, we are founded and funded by our members, and it is our mission to provide a voice for all Kentucky’s beef farm families.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

YOUT H

O U TR EA C H

Helping Kentucky Junior Cattlemen learn the beef industry in Kentucky while shaping leaders and ambassadors for the future.

Providing educational and philanthropic endeavors such as scholarships and animal shelter grants through the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Foundation.

I NF ORM AT I ON

P R O D U C E R E D U C AT I O N

Delivering cattle and beef industry news and current events through print, email, video, and social media.

CONS UM E R E DUCAT I ON

Supporting the Kentucky Beef Council and its programs which focus on consumers, industry partners, and health professionals and providing a stronger market for your end product.

Giving cattle producers resources through the Master Cattlemen’s series, Beef Quality Assurance, and on farm demonstrations at Eden Shale Farm.

PA RTN ER SH IPS

Working with agriculture industries and business partners to identify and implement new opportunities within the association.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

83


MEMBERSHIP DIVISION 3 (UP TO 75 MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

“We are members of KCA because it’s a great organization that represents and supports Kentucky beef producers.”

Grant

73

59

14

Louisville Area

70

72

-2

Trigg

64

63

1

Out of State

62

72

-10

Twin Lakes

62

34

28

Mason

60

63

-3

Bobby and Kathina Bell - Breckinridge County

Todd

58

65

-7

Nelson

57

69

-12

Ohio

56

63

-7 -15

DIVISION 1 (151+ MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Barren

455

465

-10

DIVISION 2 (76-150 MEMBERS)

2018

2017

Difference

Woodford

56

71

Allen

161

126

35

Pendleton

54

53

1

53

56

-3

Breckinridge

342

523

-181

Laurel

149

128

21

Oldham

Shelby

335

361

-26

Monroe

140

132

8

Montgomery

53

35

18

Marion

303

332

-29

Henry

138

141

-3

Whitley

48

51

-3

-1

-9

21

138

56

257

137

47

278

Northern Kentucky

Hancock

Bath

Metcalfe

121

117

4

Estill

44

42

2

Franklin

116

112

4

Rockcastle

40

57

-17

Highlands

37

47

-10

Daviess

116

131

-15

Nicholas

36

36

0

Fleming

101

133

-32

Simpson

36

33

3

Scott

100

111

-11

Carroll

36

44

-8

35

44

-9 -8

Adair

276

278

-2

Grayson

254

283

-29

Logan

240

273

-33

Madison

232

264

-32

Clark

213

193

20

Northeast Area

100

115

-15

Wayne

Lincoln

213

240

-27

Anderson

99

104

-5

Butler

34

42

Hart

203

194

9

Pulaski

97

114

-17

Lewis

34

39

-5

McCreary

33

44

-11

Bullitt

29

26

3

Union

28

39

-11

Washington

199

205

-6

Trimble

96

116

-20

Hardin

195

183

12

Jackson

95

100

-5

Larue

189

210

-21

Garrard

89

103

-14

Menifee

26

23

3

23

Boyle

89

95

-6

Clay

25

32

-7

Russell

85

83

2

Livingston

23

25

-2

Edmonson

85

97

-12

McLean

22

26

-4

Bourbon

83

80

3

Calloway

21

30

-9

20

19

1

Bracken

179

156

Mercer

173

196

-23

Christian

169

192

-23

Warren

156

184

-28

Harrison

153

159

-6

Green

146

166

-20

Purchase Area

79

89

-10

Crittenden

Mountain

76

98

-22

Robertson

19

39

-20

Caldwell-Lyon

75

82

-7

Hopkins

18

22

-4

Henderson

10

16

-6

River Hills

8

8

0

Magoffin

8

12

-4

Casey

143

169

-26

Campbell

74

84

-10

Meade

139

167

-28

Owen

74

87

-13

Jessamine

130

240

-110

Muhlenberg

71

79

-8

Eastern Foothills

8

7

1

Clinton-Cumberland

66

77

-11

Pike

7

4

3

Fayette

65

79

-14

Powell

7

7

0

Taylor

62

83

-21

Knox

6

6

0

-39

Harlan

2

1

1

Bell

1

1

0

Gallatin

0

2

-2

March Totals

2018

2017

Difference

9,733

10,669

-935

Webster

53

92

If you need anything for membership, please contact Nikki Whitaker at (859) 278-0899 or nwhitaker@kycattle.org 84

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


2017-18 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION * MEMBERSHIP YEAR 10/1/17– 9/30/18

NAME

SPOUSE NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

COUNTY

RECRUITED BY

PHONE

FAX

EMAIL

ZIP

*Payments of KCA membership dues are tax deductible for most members as an ordinary and necessary business expense. However, charitable contributions of gifts to KCA are not tax deductible for Federal Income Tax purposes. Due to new IRS regulations, $2.24 of your dues would not be deductible. Approximately $12 of your dues will go towards the monthly publication Cow Country News. PLEASE CHECK THE MEMBERSHIP(S) YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN: KCA MEMBERSHIP ($30/YR) Membership dues are $30 unless otherwise listed below

NEW

RENEWAL

NEW

RENEWAL

KCA COUPLE MEMBERSHIP To add your spouse, please add $15 to your KCA Membership KENTUCKY JUNIOR CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION ($10/YR)

I WOULD LIKE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE YOUNG PRODUCER’S COUNCIL TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: KCA

KJCA

$

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS: CATTLEMEN’S FOUNDATION DONATION (voluntary)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: ALL DONATIONS TO KCF ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE

COW COUNTRY NEWS

$

• APRIL 2018

Allen ................................$40 Anderson ........................$25 Bourbon ..........................$20 Boyle ...............................$35 Bullitt ...............................$20 Butler ..............................$25 Franklin ...........................$25 Highlands .......................$20 (Boyd, Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, & Martin)

Hopkins ...........................$35 Laurel ..............................$35 Lewis ..............................$35 Lincoln ............................$25 Louisville Area ................$20 (Jefferson, & Spencer) McCreary ........................$25 Magoffin ..........................$20 Menifee ...........................$25

Mountain...................$25 (Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Morgan, Owsley, Perry & Wolfe) Oldham ...........................$35 Taylor ..............................$20 Twin Lakes ......................$20 Warren ............................$40 Wayne .............................$25 Whitley ............................$25 Woodford ........................$25

IF YOU WOULD ALSO LIKE TO JOIN THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION The NCBA is now a State Marketing Partner with the KCA. You can pay your dues to both organizations with one check, at the same time. # HEAD 1-100

$

COUNTY DUES Dues are $30 except for the counties listed below.

DUES $150

# HEAD 1,001-1,250

DUES $1,150

101-250

$300

1,251-1,500

$1,400

251-500

$450

1,501-1,750

$1,650

501-750

$650

1,751-2,000

$1,900

751-1000

$650

> 2,000

$1,900 + .38/HD

Complete and return to: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 176 Pasadena Drive • Suite 4 • Lexington, KY 40503 For faster service, join online at www.kycattle.org

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

85


KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL KATELYN HAWKINS Director of Product Marketing Growing up with a strong, Italian mother we spent a lot of time in the kitchen as she was always creating new dishes using simple ingredients and assembling batches of meatballs and sauce. Like many families, our kitchen table was at the center of attention as we gathered around it to share how our day went, worked on school projects, or rolled out cookies covering the whole kitchen in flour because of course I was a big kid and could do it by myself (as I spilled flour all over the floor and tracked it all through the house). Her patience as I learned her secrets to certain dishes was key, but the love that flowed out of her as she prepared a meal for anyone who entered our home was inspiring. I didn’t know it then, but spending so much time in the kitchen with my mother was a luxury many do not have the privilege to experience. As a result of all those years learning from my mother, it’s no secret that I love to cook, especially cooking for others. I am even that person in the meat department while I am doing my Sunday shopping to interject into a conversation I hear about questions people are having when purchasing beef or what they should cook with the cut they placed in their cart. All too often I am reminded of the disconnect there seems to be these days between people and what I consider the heart of the home, their kitchen. In an era where online ordering is king even when it comes to what a family will eat for dinner, and meal kit subscriptions are growing, KBC is constantly looking for opportunities to educate consumers on the basics of beef and the basics of cooking beef. One opportunity we have to educate consumers is through training culinary students and instructors. KBC has a long standing history of working with culinary schools to help young and emerging chefs understand beef’s flavor profile, various cuts of beef, and how beef is raised. As family consumer science classes have evolved over the years, we are seeing an increase in culinary lessons and classes at the high school level providing another chance for KBC to place beef at the center of the plate in the culinary world. The ProStart program, developed by the National Restaurant Association, establishes a foundation for high school students interested in the culinary world to begin understanding food safety, flavor profiles, and cooking skills. Students are able to learn knife skills, proper storage of food items, plating techniques, and how to market their dishes on menus. Recently KBC hosted a group of Kentucky ProStart instructors for a Beefing Up ProStart professional development event to showcase beef as an optimal protein to be used in their classes and contest dishes. During the Beefing Up ProStart event the group learned about new and emerging cuts of beef as well as what cuts are currently trending with consumers. Beef flavor was explored using the power of umami exercise in which various ingredients are sampled with and without beef as the group discuss what specific ingredients pair well with beef such as aged cheeses, garlic, and tomato. Instructors were provided with tips on how to build a lesson using beef and resources available for them to utilize in their classrooms. All in all each ProStart instructor walked away with tools to place beef at the center of the plate in their classrooms to help the next generation of consumers begin to make the kitchen the heart of their home.

86

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL

SUNRISE BEEF SLIDERS Rise and shine! These Sunrise Beef Sliders, featuring ground beef, eggs, American cheese, and onions are a fantastic way to start your day and utilize leftover ground beef. INGREDIENTS: •

1 pound Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

4 slices American cheese, cut in half

1/2 cup chopped onions

1/2 cup chopped mushrooms

2 large eggs, slightly beaten

8 whole wheat slider buns, split

COOKING: 1. Combine Ground beef, salt and pepper in large bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into eight thin mini-patties. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add patties; cook 5 to 6 minutes or until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 160°F, turning once. Top each burger with half cheese slice. Remove burgers; keep warm. Cook’s Tip: Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed ground beef. Ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F. Color is not a reliable indicator of ground beef doneness. 2. Add onions and mushrooms to same skillet and cook for 2 to 4 minutes until tender. Add eggs and cook and stir 2 minutes until desired doneness. Season as desired. 3. Place burgers on bottoms of buns. Top burgers evenly with egg mixture. Close sandwiches. Test Kitchen Tips: Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed ground beef. Ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F. Color is not a reliable indicator of ground beef doneness.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

87


KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK drugs, and other chemical compounds and uses testing at the port of entry for residues of banned substances in imported beef to enforce its ban.

CHINA: A NEW MARKET OPPORTUNITY BECKY THOMPSON Director of KBN

4. Response to a Future BSE Case: In the event of a BSE case, China will continue to permit imports of U.S. beef provided that the U.S. maintains its OIE negligible risk status.

Let’s lay some ground rules before I start 1.

Kentucky Beef Network’s Mission is to help Kentucky beef cattle farmers improve animal health, genetics, forages, and marketing opportunities by enhancing producer profitability.

5. Slaughter Plant Registration: China recognizes the U.S. food safety system as equivalent and permits imports of beef from all FSIS-approved establishments (Note: To be eligible to export to China the establishment must be enrolled in the USDA-AMS China Export Verification Program).

2. How do we position Kentucky feeder calves to capture all value added marketing opportunities? The China export market opening in June of 2017 is a very important export market opportunity for the United States. Prior to being shut out of China for 14 years with the infamous “Christmas Cow” in December of 2003 with we had 70% of the market share. Things have changed domestically in those 14 years that make this opportunity that much more important. CattleFax’s annual report states the U.S. beef cow inventory has grown 2.8 million head in four years and could potentially add another 200,000-400,000 head in upcoming years. While the USDA Economic Research report shows that Millennials, the largest generation which makes up 83 million people are spending only 2.4% of their food budget on red and white meat the lowest of all generations. These two factors offer a great opportunity for cattle producers as it appears that we could have an influx of meat domestically that we may not be able to consume which makes export markets more appealing. While the U.S. was shut out of the China market their consumption of red meat increased over 2500%. China’s current population is 1.4 billion people with a growing middle class that has a preference for western cooking methods. This market is a potential $2.5 billion

Today the China export market tends to be the topic that everyone is discussing however, what can our Kentucky producers to do be prepared? 1.

As your spring calves are born start keeping records if you don’t already. As the beginning of the production chain you will need to be the one to start the traceability process at the farm of origin.

2. Talk to your market operators or buyers about opportunities they see with this market over the next 6-12 months to ensure you have your calves prepared and enrolled prior to leaving your farm. market opportunity for U.S. beef however; it will be slow growing because of the trade requirements. From the USMEF FACT SHEET on the U.S.-China Beef Agreement Key Provisions of the Agreement 1. Product Scope: Chilled or frozen bone-in and deboned beef products are eligible for shipment. For a complete listing, refer to the FSIS Export Library 2. Traceability: To be eligible for

export to China, beef must be harvested from cattle that are traceable to the birth farm for cattle born in the United States by a USDA independent 3rd party. For cattle from Mexico and Canada the cattle must be traceable to their first residence in the U.S. or, if imported for direct slaughter, their port of entry 3. Production Technologies: China bans the use of hormones, beta agonists, a variety of veterinary

3. Watch the trade publications to see what other states are doing to comply with this market and what is going on in the Midwest with the feedyards and packers. This will be a slow moving opportunity as it will take time to get calves positioned to meet the no hormone and traceability components however Kentucky is the largest cow/calf state east of the Mississippi river and we need to be aware of market signals coming our way so we are ready to be the beginning of the supply chain.

Ke n t uc k y Be e f Ne t w o r k F a c i l i t a t o r s

Ben Lloyd

Whitesville, KY (270) 993-1074 strridge@aol.com 88

Charles Embry

Cave City, KY (270) 646-5939 dale.embry@yahoo.com

Jacob Settles

Springfield, KY (859) 805-0724 jacob.settles4@yahoo.com COW COUNTRY NEWS

Ron Shrout

Winchester, KY (606) 205-6143 ronshrout@bellsouth.net • APRIL 2018

Tim Graves

Springfield, KY (859) 481-3954 gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Jeff Stephens

Ewing, KY (606) 782-7640 stephensbeef@gmail.com

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

EDEN SHALE FARM UPDATE DAN MILLER

CPH SALE DATES

KBN Industry Coordinator

Despite February being much warmer than usual, it seems like it has been a rough winter. January was brutally cold, and then Feb and March were brutally wet. Hopefully now that it is April, we are on the downhill slide with the bad weather and the mud. The past month at the farm has been defined by one thing, calving season. This year we have right at 80 females to calve and as of March 12th, we have 48 calves on the ground. The first calf heifers started calving on Feb 14th and 20 of the 27 heifers have calved AI. We bred 30 heifers AI so that means we had an AI conception rate of 66%.

April April 4, Steers & Heifers, Springfield April 26, Steers & Heifers, Owensboro June June, 27, Steers & Heifers, Springfield

The cows didn’t start calving until the 1st of March. They are still calving AI bred calves so I don’t know the AI conception rate for the cows yet. As of right now 60% of the herd has calved in the first 27 days of the calving season. The biggest challenge this year has been dealing with the mud. Eden Shale received 8.5 inches of rain in the month of February. Our saving grace was the infrastructure that we have installed, particularly the calving barn and the hay feeding structures. These structures have allowed the new calves to get out of the mud and have a dry spot to lay down. Another project that we completed this month was to hang up our buzzard decoy at the calving barn. The buzzard is made of a black rubber mat and is made to look like a dead buzzard hanging upside down. Buzzards have a strong sense of mortality and when they see one of their own kind dead, they tend to leave the area as to avoid the same fate. Since we hung the decoy we have not noticed any of the black headed buzzards around. We still do have the red headed buzzards occasionally landing to eat after birth and baby calf manure, but we have not had any black headed buzzards terrorizing the new calves. I am curious to see how long the decoy is effective in the same location. For more information about these topics, and to keep up with the farm check out our blog at www.edenshalefarm.com.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

89


FEATURE

SUMMER STOCKER OUTLOOK FOR 2018 Greg Halich and Kenny Burdine

As we progress through the end of winter and pastures start to grow, stocker operators are contemplating placement of calves into summer grazing programs. Calf prices typically rise in the spring and our calf market has risen by roughly $10 per cwt from fall 2017. However, at the time of this writing (March 21, 2018), CME© feeder cattle futures, which are more representative of heavy feeder cattle, had dropped sharply from mid-February. Needless to say, this is prompting many stocker operations to question the profitability outlook for summer grazing programs this year. Some operations likely placed calves during the winter, with the intention of purchasing stockers before the typical spring price peak. However, many more will place calves as pastures green up in the coming weeks. It is imperative that stocker operators pay careful attention to the market, their costs, and what can be paid for stocker calves this spring. The purpose of this article is to assess the likely profitability of summer stocker programs for 2018 and establish target purchase prices for calves based on a range of return levels. While it is impossible to predict where feeder cattle markets will end up this fall, producers need to estimate this and not rely on the current price (March or April) for 750850 lb feeder calves. The fall CME© feeder cattle futures (adjusted for basis) is the best way to estimate likely feeder cattle prices for fall. Grazing costs including pasture costs, veterinary and health expenses, hauling, commission, etc. are estimated and subtracted from the expected value of the fall feeders.

Once this has been done, a better assessment can be made of what can be paid for stocker cattle this spring in order to build in an acceptable return to management, capital, and risk. Key assumptions for the stocker analysis are as follows: 1) Graze steers April 1 to October 1 (183 days), 1.5 lb/day gain (no grain feeding), 2% death loss, and 4% interest on calf. Given these assumptions, sale weights would be 775 lbs and 875 lbs for 500 lb and 600 lb purchased calves, respectively. Using a $146 CME© futures contract for October 2018 to estimate sales price, a 775 steer is estimated to sell for $141.50 and an 875 steer is estimated to sell for $135.50. This estimate uses a $6 per cwt basis for an 800 lb steer and a $6 per cwt price slide. These sale prices are also based on the assumption that cattle are sold in lots of 40 or more head. Stocker operators who typically sell in smaller lots should adjust their expected sale prices downward accordingly. Estimated costs for carrying the 500 and 600 lb steers are shown in Table 1. Stocking rates of 1.0 acre per 500 lb steer and 1.2 acres per 600 lb steer were assumed in arriving at these charges. Most of these are self-explanatory except the pasture charge, which accounts for variable costs such as bush-hogging, fertilizer, and re-seeding. The last of these pasture costs are on a pro-rated basis and are considered a bare-bones scenario. Sale expenses (commission) are based on the assumption that cattle will be sold in larger groups and producers will pay the lower corresponding commission rate. However, producers who sell feeders in smaller groups will pay the

higher commission rate which will likely be around $40 per head based on the revenue assumptions of this analysis. Any of these costs could be much higher in certain situations, so producers should adjust accordingly.

for 500 lb steers and $1.60/lb for 600 lb steers. As an example of exactly how this works for a 500 lb steer targeting a $75 gross profit: 775 lbs steer x $1.425 (expected sale price)

$1,097

Total Variable Costs

-$133

Profit Target

- $75

Target Purchase Cost

$889

Table 1: Expected Variable Costs 2018 500 lb Steer

600 lb Steer

Pasture Charge

$25

$30

Vet

$20

$20

Interest

$18

$20 Target Purchase Price = $989/5oo lbs = $1.78/lb

Death Loss

$19

$20

Sale

$16

$16

Haul

$15

$18

Mineral

$10

$12

Other (water, etc)

$10

$12

Total Variable Costs

$133

$147

Table 2: Target Purchase Prices For Various Gross Profits 2018 Gross Profit

Note: Interest and death loss varies slightly by purchase price.

Target purchase prices were estimated for both sizes of steers and adjusted so that gross returns over variable costs ranged from $25-125 per head. This gives a reasonable range of possible purchase prices for each sized calf this spring. Results are shown in Table 2. For 500 lb steers, target purchase prices ranged from $1.68 to $1.87 per lb. For 600 lb steers, target purchase prices ranged from $1.52 to $1.68 per lb. When targeting a $75 per head gross profit, breakeven purchase prices were $1.78/lb

500 lb Steer

600 lb Steer

$25

$1.87

$1.68

$50

$1.82

$1.64

$75

$1.78

$1.60

$100

$1.73

$1.56

$125

$1.68

$1.52

Notes: Based on costs in Table 1 and sales price of $141.50 and $135.50 for 775 lb and 875 lb sales weight respectively for 500 lb and 600 lb purchased steers.

SALERS

The Balanced Breed STRINGER FARMS Bruce Stringer 128 Teresa Avenue Ÿ Somerset, KY 42501 606-875-3553 90

DIAMOND J SALERS Donald Johnson 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564 606-379-1558 COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

WILLIS FARMS • Danny Willis 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 502-803-5011 • drwc21@aol.com Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


For heifers, sale price for heavy feeders will be lower than comparably sized steers and they will not generally gain as well. In this analysis, we assumed the price discount for 800 lb heifers is $8 per hundredweight lower than 800 lb steers and we assumed heifers would gain 10% slower than steers. With these assumptions, purchase prices would have to be $.17/lb lower for 500 lb heifers and $.14 lower for 600 lb heifers compared to the steer prices found in Table 2. Thus when targeting a $75 per head gross profit, breakeven purchase prices were $1.61/lb for 500 lb heifers and $1.46/lb for 600 lb heifers. Of course, it is highly likely that your cost structure will be different from that presented in Table 1. If this is the case, simply shift the targeted gross profit up or down to account for this. If your costs are $25 higher per calf, then you would shift each targeted profit down by one row: For example, you would use the $125 gross profit to estimate a $100 gross profit. Another way to evaluate this is that a $1 increase in costs would decrease the targeted purchase price by $.20 per cwt for 500 lb steers and $.17 per cwt for 600 lb steers. It is important to note that the gross profits in Table 2 do not account for labor or investments in land, equipment, fencing, and other facilities (fixed costs). Thus, in the long-run, these target profits need to be high enough to justify labor and investment. In many locations, calf markets are already at levels that would place expected returns on the lower end of the range analyzed. This is all the more reason that stocker operators should carefully think through their budgets and make rational purchasing decisions. There is a tendency for calf prices to reach their season price peak when grass really starts growing in early spring. If calf prices do increase further, this would result in even tighter expected margins

COW COUNTRY NEWS

â&#x20AC;˘ APRIL 2018

for stocker cattle placed in the upcoming weeks. Further, the last couple of years have taught us how volatile feeder cattle markets can be and how much impact that can have on profitability. Thus, price risk management will be critical for calves placed this spring. Hedging, through the sale of futures contracts, provides solid downside risk protection, but will subject the producer to margin calls if cattle prices increase. Entering a cash forward contract with a feedlot or order buyer, or offering cattle through internet sales with delayed delivery, will reduce or eliminate price uncertainty, but will also limit marketing flexibility should weather conditions necessitate sale at a different time. Finally, strategies such as put options and Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Insurance offer a less aggressive strategy that provides downside price protection (at a price), but more ability to capitalize on rising prices. Regardless of what makes the most sense for the individual producer, time spent considering price risk management is likely time well spent in these volatile markets. Links to two publications on using futures markets to manage price risk in feeder cattle and a publication on the use of Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Insurance, can be found on the livestock page of the UK Agricultural Economics website: http://www.uky. edu/Ag/AgEcon/extcrops-livestock.php. The best way to ensure profitability is to budget carefully and to manage downside price risk. Greg Halich is an Associate Extension Professor in Farm Management Economics for both grain and cattle production and can be reached at Greg. Halich@uky.edu or 859-257-8841. Kenny Burdine is an Associate Extension Professor in Livestock Marketing and Management and can be reached at kburdine@uky.edu or 859-257-7273.

â&#x20AC;˘ A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S A S S O C I AT I O N

91


Kentucky Hereford Association KHA Invites any Hereford Breeder to Become a Member! Dues are $25. Send to 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 Upcoming Events: KHA Officers

President: L.W. Beckley President-elect: Tim Wolf Secretary/ Treasurer: Earlene Thomas 859-623-5734 thomasep@roadrunner.com

-HEREFORDS -

Codee Guffey • 1815 Grassy Springs Road Versailles, Kentucky 40383 Phone: 502-598-6355 Email: rockridgeherefords@gmail.com www.rockridgeherefords.com

KY CERTIFIED HEREFORD INFLUENCE SALE MAY 10, 2018 • 10:30 AM BLUE GRASS STOCKYARDS SOUTH STANFORD, KY CONTACT PERSON: LOWELL ATWOOD, 606-669-1455

Wells Farm

Joe B. Gray 10787 New Bowling Green Road Smiths Grove, KY 52171

270-590-4579

WOLF FARM

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Females for sale Tim & Peggy Wolf 12939 Peach Grove Rd. Alexandria, KY 41001 Home: 859-635-0899 Ÿ Cell: 859-991-3484

Peyton’s Well Polled Herefords The Lowell Atwood Family 133 Edgewood Drive Stanford, KY (606) 365-2520 home/fax (606) 669-1455 cell

Victor- influenced cattle bred for performance on grass.

“Black cows need a good Hereford Bull”

BECKLEY HEREFORDS L.W. Beckley D.V.M L. Wayne Beckley 284 Pyrse Lane 1420 Fitchburg Rd. Irvine, KY 40336 Ravenna, KY 40472 Cell: 859-779-1419 Home: 606-723-3021 Clinic: 606-726-0000 Cell: 859-779-0962 www.beckleyherefords.com

92

K3CATTLE@YAHOO.COM

198 HICKS PIKE CYNTHIANA, KY 41031

MPH Farms

Jackson Farms

Paul L. Hancock 8559 KY 56 Owensboro, KY 42301 270-771-4194

Chambliss Hereford Farms Brad, Carla, Clay and Clint Chambliss 916 Winchester Blvd. Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Home (270) 982-3905 • Cell (270) 668-7126 fax 270-735-9922 www.chamblissherefordfarms.com

Boyd Beef Cattle

6077 Helena Road • Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II · 606-584-5194 Annual Bull Sale second Saturday in March Hereford and Angus Bulls

WCN Polled Herefords Since 1961

Bill & Libby Norris 2220 Celina Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Phone (270) 433-7256 Cell (270) 433-1525 “Every calf needs a white face”

Sweet T Farm

Pile Stock Farm

TK4 Herefords

Registered Polled Herefords

Pete & Gayla Szak 1040 Hick Hardy Rd. Cynthiana, KY (859) 484-2265

Hansell Pile, Jr. 12045 St. John Rd. Cecilia, KY 42724 270-735-5192•270-862-4462 12 miles West of Elizabethtown

Tony & Kathy Staples 992 Knotts Road Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-4220 tstaples@bbtel.com

Windy Hills Farm

859-588-4531

Registered Polled Herefords 8103 Bill Moss Road • White House, TN 37188 Home/Fax: 615-672-4483 Cell: 615-478-4483 billy@jacksonfarms.com ® “Farming the Same Land Since 1834”

Registered Polled Herefords

Thomas Farm

“Cattle for sale at all times”

K3 CATTLE REGISTERED HEREFORDS KYLE BUSH

Polled Herefords 439 Flatwoods Frozen Camp Road • Corbin, KY 40701 Kevin, Angela, Bobby & Brenda Wells Kenlea & Kyler Murray 606-523-0569 - Home 606-528-1691 - Home 606-344-0417 - Cell 606-682-8143 - Cell wells_farm@yahoo.com

Polled Hereford and Gelbvieh Cattle 3459 KY Hwy. 1284 E. Cythiana, KY 41031 (859) 234-6956 Ben, Jane, Shelby and Lincoln Eric & Ronnie Thomas 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 623-5734 • Eric’s Cell (859) 314-8256

Contact Earlene Thomas for more information: 859-623-5734 www.kentuckyhereford.org

Bulls • Heifers • Show

TS

F

TS TS Tucker Stock Farms F F

“Registered Angus and Polled Herefords”

TUCKER STOCK FARMS TUCKER STOCK FARMS

Jackie D. Perkins II 367 Mt. Pisgah Rd. • Bremen, KY 42325 270-543-3586 Breeding to produce good cows since 1981.

TUCKER STOCK FARMS

“Breeding Polled Herefords for over 58 Years” John Tucker “Registered Angus and Polled “Registered AngusHerefords” andIIPolled Herefords” 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Breeding cattle for sale at all times. John A. Tucker II John A. Tucker II Hudson, KY 40145 HiddenHerefords” Valley Lane 1999 Walnut Hill Rd. • Lexington, KY “Registered 40515 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Angus and 1790 Polled 270-617-0301 Hudson, KY 40145 Hudson, KY 40145 (859) 271-9086 • cell (859)533-3790 (270) 257-8548 (270) 257-8548 Offi 257-8167 Office for (270) 257-8167 John A. Tucker IIce (270) “Bulls always Sale”

Old Fall Creek Farms AHA & KHA member • Proven bloodlines

Popplewell’s Herefords

Registered Hereford & Angus Farm

Hudson, KY 40145 (270) 257-8548 Office (270) 257-8167

Polled LINEBRED Hereford Bulls For Sale Private treaty sales • Visitors 18-month-old always welcome Angus & LINEBRED VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE

Service Age Bulls Open and Bred Females For Sale Vince, Tracy & Alex Home (270) 866-4480 1526 Clearfork Rd. Cell (270) 566-1852 Russell Springs, KY 42642

COW COUNTRY NEWS

1790 Hidden18-month-old Valley 18-month-old AngusLane & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale Angus & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale

1874 Old Fall Creek Road • Monticello, KY 42633

• APRIL 2018

Reed Bertram 606-348-7486 David Bertram 606-278-3630 www.ofcfarms.com

Multi-Trait Multi-Trait Selection Selection Fertility Disposition

Danny Miller

Fertility Calving Ease Calving Ease Disposition Milking Ability Milking Ability

www.jmsvictordomino.com 4850 Ridge Rd. 4850 Caldwell RidgeCaldwell Rd. Knifley, KY 42753 Knifley, KY 42753 270-465-6984 270-465-6984

270-465-6984 • 270-566-2694

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


MAKING SURE WE’RE WELCOME AT EVERY TABLE Research is changing the way consumers look at beef by showing them just how nutritious this total protein package can be. See all the other ways your investment is opening new doors at mybeefcheckoff.com/open

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Funded by the Beef Checkoff

93


For More Information: In the pasture

Commercial cattlemen trust registered seedstock breeders to make documented genetic improvements that provide them the opportunity to succeed. From 2004-2014, the 2015 AICA National Cattle Evaluation Genetic Trend illustrates Charolais seedstock breeders are doing their job!

Lower birth weight ■ MORE LIVE CALVES Increased weaning weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT WEANING

The trend shows dramatic improvements in every trait of economic importance.

In the feedlot Higher yearling weight ■ MORE POUNDS, EFFICIENTLY

2004-2014 NCE Charolais Genetic Trends BW

WW

YW

CE

CW

REA Marb

At harvest

2004 0.8 19.1 33.7 1.6 11.4 .18 .01 2014 0.4 26.8 49.0 3.4 16.9 .32 .04

Increased carcass weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT HARVEST Larger ribeye ■ BETTER YIELD GRADES More marbling ■ HIGHER QUALITY GRADES

More pounds. More profits. Charolais keep it real. © American-International Charolais Association 2016

KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

kins Ad Farms

■ Southeast Field Representative ■ Floyd Wampler (423) 612-2144

NEWS & EVENTS:

6.5x3.75 bw-Cow Country News.indd 1

TJ Adkins: 606-875-5094 Sherman & Phyllis Adkins: 606-379-5129

12/2/15 7:30 AM

KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS SPRING SHOWCASE BULL & FEMALE SALE Saturday, May 12 • Stanford, KY Selling: Cow/calf pairs, Bulls, Bred heifers, & Embryos See ad on page 43 for more info

279 Bullock Rd. Eubank, KY 42567 AdkinsFarms@hotmail.com

Montgomery Charolais

John Bruner

606-271-0582 473 Edward Meece Road Science Hill, KY 42553

Amburgey Charolais Farm

jeffries charolais

Cox Charolais

1194 Smith Ridge Road • Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-465-7584 (H) 270-403-4562 Bulls & Select Heifers for Sale

Harrod Farms THE NEXT GENERATION

Becca, Jenna and Jake 645 Evergreen Rd. Frankfort, KY 40601 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Charolais, Hereford & Commercial Cattle

94

LEANING PINE FARMS, LLC

Darby Montgomery 36 Thompson Road • Lancaster, KY 40444 859-339-3922 BULLS FOR SALE

Polled Breeding Since 1966 Robert Amburgey, Jr. 3171 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-2764 (Home) 859-404-3751 (Mobile)

Kentucky Charolais Association Chuck Druin 2291 Drane Lane Eminence, KY 40019 502-321-1160 or 502-321-5919 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Jacob Miller: 502-507-4987

paul r. jeffries 606-510-4537

1590 jeffries lane

hustonville, ky. 40437 chris cooper 606-669-9009 chris jeffries 606-669-2426

Jimmy & Linda Evans 960 Vallandingham Road Dry Ridge, KY 41035 859-428-2740

Allison Charolais John Allison

545 Eminence Road New Castle, KY 40050

502-845-2806 502-220-3170

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Bulls & Heifers For Sale at the Farm

• APRIL 2018

S A N D U S K Y FA R M S

David, Rhonda, Michael & Nicholas 3200 St. Rose Road Lebannon, KY 40033 270-692-7793

Hayden Farm 4430 Bloomfield Rd. Bardstown, KY 40004 James Hayden

Home: Office: Mobile: 502-349-0128 502-349-0005 502-507-4984 jhayden@haydensteel.com

Candy Sullivan 3440 Ruddles Mill Road Paris, KY 40361

859-338-0170

Sullivan Charolais

Quality Charolais Cattle in the Heart of the Bluegrass

Floyd’s Charolais

2039 Nina Ridge Road Lancaster, KY 40444 Home: 859-792-2956 • Cell: 859-339-2653 floydj@windstream.net

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Roy, Jessica and Cooper Canada

Events

600 Cumberland Drive • Morehead, KY 40351 859-227-7323 racekannon@hotmail.com

June 2 & 3, 2018 Swain Select Simmental

2nd Annual KY Jr. Simmental State Show Woodford County Fairgrounds in Versailles, KY Kentucky Simmental Officers President: Derek Tingle 502-845-2589 Vice Pres: Johnny Moore 270-434-4616

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

FARM NAME__________________________________

Call or visit one of these Simmental breeders for cattle that work!

ADDRSS_____________________________________

www.kentuckysimmental.com

CITY_________________STATE_____ ZIP__________ PHONE (BUSINESS)___________________________

frederickswain@bellsouth.net • www.swainselect.com

Fred & Phyllis 502-245-3866 502-599-4560

RC C

• APRIL 2018

Ratliff Cattle Company

100 Carpenter Ridge Salyersville KY, 41465 docrat2@yahoo.com Jim Ratliff 606.496-6522

“UNBELIEVABULL SIMMENTALS” Graves Grandview Simmental Farm Timothy Graves 560 Rudd Lane Springfield, KY 40069 (859) 481-3954 • gravesgrandview@gmail.com

Brian & Heather Swain 3906 Pottertown Road Murray, KY 42071 270-293-4440 wksbswain@murray-ky.net

Simmental and SimAngus Bulls for Sale 1939 Huntertown Road Versailles, KY 40383 Bulls for Sale Chris Allen 859-351-4486 callenuky@hotmail.com

Send application to: Tonya Phillips, 8190 Stonelick Rd. Maysville, KY 41056 Membership Fee is $25.00

(HOME)______________________________________

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Chi & Angie 502-477-9727 502-287-2116

Judy and Rondal Dawson 1156 Buzzard Roost Road Shelbyville, KY 40065 502-593-5136 jrdawson22@outlook.com

Secretary: Scott Mellenkamp 606-407-0440 Treasurer: Tonya Phillips 606-584-2579

KENTUCKY SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION NAME ___________________________ ____________

12113 Green Valley Dr. • Louisville, KY 40243

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

WAYWARD HILL FARM

Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755 95


Angus - The Business Breed KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION

KY Angus Association Membership Application

2016-2017 KY Angus Association Officers: President: Tim Jeffries Ÿ Camner, KY V. President: Gil Ray Cowles Ÿ Rockfield, KY Sec/Tres.: Anne DeMott Ÿ Lexington, KY

Name:____________________________________________ Farm Name:_______________________________________ Address:__________________________________________ City:__________________State:_______ Zip:___________ Phone: Bus-_______________________________________ Res-_____________________________________________ Email:___________________________________________

Return to: Anne DeMott 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, KY 40509 Annual Dues $35

Contact Anne DeMott to pay for your Kentucky Angus Association dues!

8 • COOL SPRINGS CREEK FARM Guy & Aline Babin 269 Paul Coomer Rd Gradyville, KY 42742 270-205-1669 www.coolspringscreekfarm.com • gdbabin@outlook.com 9 • COUNTY LINE ANGUS Ottis Wright 150 Busy Baker Road Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-469-0339 • Registered Angus Bulls 10 • D&D LONGVIEW ANGUS Danny & Debbie Burris 550 Willie Nell Road Columbia, KY 42728 270-348-5766 • 270-250-3701 • 270-250-1277

DD

18 • LEGACY FARMS Daniel and Lindsey Reynolds 1709 South Jackson Highway Hardyville, KY 42746 270-528-6275/270-528-6120 www.legacyfarmsangus.com

18 • MILLERS RUN FARM

William N. Offutt IV 3790 Paris Road Georgetown, KY 40324 Phone: (859) 533-2020 Email: millersrunfarm@aol.com Website: www.millersrunfarm.com Heifers for sale 19 • MUD RIVER ANGUS 10 Oak Hill Drive Russellville, KY 42276 Wayne Johnson 270/303-6354 Gary Johnson 270/498/7208

4K

20 • FOUR KINGS ANGUS 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Cary & Kim King Email: Carymking@yahoo.com Fourkingsangus.com Cary Cell - 859-613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager

1 • BOYD BEEF CATTLE 6077 Helena Rd. Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II: 606-584-5194 • Blake Boyd: 606-375-3718 www.boydbeef.com • email: cboyd2@maysvilleky.net

11 • EAGLE REST PLANTATION Jimmy Don Robinson 7665 Paducah Road Kevil, KY 42053 270-462-2150

2 • BRANCH VIEW ANGUS 927 Old Liberty Pike • Hustonville, KY 40437 859/238-0771 • www.branchviewangus.com James S. & LuAnn Coffey Donald & Donna Coffey Evelyn Hoskins Annual Production Sale- 2nd Saturday in April

12 • FALL CREEK ANGUS 448 Corder Farm Road Monticello, KY 42633 Ronnie Corder 606/348-6588

22 • PLEASANT HILL FARMS Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles 500 Rockfield Richpond Road Rockfield, KY 42274 270/843-9021 • Fax 270/843-9005 Located 7 miles west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80

13 • HAINES ANGUS FARMS 5294 Park City- Glasgow Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Kenneth Haines, Jr. 270/749-8862

Richard and Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240 Home- (270)885-4352 Cell- (270)839-2442 rstallons@bellsouth.net

3 • BURKS CATTLE CO. 531 Rick Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Eddie Burks • 270-991-6398 www.burkscattle.com

4 • BURTON & SONS ANGUS Joe D. or Karen Burton Ÿ Bryan Carman, Partner, Ridgeview Angus 480 Hominy Hill Rd. Nancy, KY 42544 Joe: 606-305-3081 Ÿ Bryan: 606-875-3453

klburton01@windstream.net

14 • HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY 502-633-1634, home • 502-633-5100, work 502-655-0164, cell

5 • CARDINAL HILL FARMS 405 Cedar Grove Rd. • Glasgow, KY 42141 Mike Elmore: (270) 404-6589 Bob Johnson: ( 270 ) 427-1410 www. cardinalhillfarms.com mike@cardinalhillfarms.com 6 • CLAIREBROOK FARMS, LLC PO Box 192, Carlisle, KY 40311 Paul B. Mulhollem, 217/621-3123 Chad Daugherty, 217/369-0466 Watch for our consignments in upcoming KY sales!

15 • HIGHVIEW FARMS 827 West Main Street Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718 Ben T. Cox DVM 270-469-5517 Registered Angus Cattle 16 • HILL VIEW FARMS Jimmy Gilles 5160 Lee Rudy Road Owensboro, KY 42301 270/686-8876 270/929-5370

Located 15 mi. W of Somerset

Bulls & females sold private treaty. Inquiries Welcome. Sell only what we would buy.

7 • COFFEY ANGUS FARMS 661 Hopewell Road Liberty, KY 42539 Matt Coffey - (270) 799-6288 Dewey Coffey - (606) 787-2620 Genetics for Maximum Profitability since 1984 96

Registered Angus Cattle

OLD BARK FARM

23 • RAGS ANGUS FARM

24 • SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, KY 42748 Cell: 270-769-8260 www.shawfamilyangus.com Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975

SF A

25 • SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642

Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith 270/866-3898 Henry & Melissa Smith 270/866-2311 26 • ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED ANGUS Eric & Sherry St. Clair 13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY 40119 (H) 270-257-2965 (C) 270-617-1079 www.stclairangus.com

17 • JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS Angus Bulls & Females Slaughters, KY Keith: 270-635-0723 Reese: 270-635-1137 COW COUNTRY NEWS

R

21 • OLD BARK FARM 370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716 Kenley Conner 270/358-8057

• APRIL 2018

Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April2016

27 • TWIN CREEK FARM Shawn, Melissa, Devin & Dylan Gibson 270/337-3072 or 270/692-5304 Dennis & Emily 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338 Watch for us in Branch View Production Sale in April

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION NEWS Anne Stewart DeMott, Secretary/Treasurer

Sweepstakes, Annual Banquet & Business Meeting Congratulations to our show winners: •

Grand Champion Bull exhibited by Ben Crites; purchased by Brian Clark

Reserve Champion Bull exhibited by Emily Johnson; purchased by Carroll Berry

Grand Champion Female exhibited by Johnson Farms; purchased by Lauren Slone

Reserve Champion Female exhibited by Emily Johnson; purchased by Rob Oakley

Congratulations to the following award winners at the annual banquet:

Family of the Year: Tyler McGinnis Family

Jerome Hunter Herdsman of the Year Award: Logan Boyd

Performance Breeder of the Year: Cardinal Hill, Mike Elmore

Joe Bill Meng Lifetime Achievement Award: Briggs & Beth Cunningham

Outstanding Juniors: Leslie Craig & Tyler McGinnis

Junior Appreciation Award: Brenda Jasper

A special thank you to the following:

Brenda Jasper for donating homemade pimento cheese; proceeds to benefit the 2019 NJAS. Purchased by Dr. Randy Smoot.

Leslie Jeffries for purchasing a wagon of goodies; proceeds to benefit the KY Junior Angus Association.

Champion Show Supply for donating a blower; proceeds to benefit the KY Junior Angus Association Roll of Victory Points Program. Purchased by Kalli Flanders.

Meade Tractor for donating a Honda generator; proceeds to benefit the 2019 NJAS. Purchased by Smithland Angus.

Congratulations to Gil Ray Cowles, the 201819 KAA President; Jason Crowe, the 201819 KAA Vice President and new Directors appointed to their first three-year terms, Jim Shaw and Anne Patton Schubert.

KY Angus Preview Mark your calendars now for the Association’s annual show! This year’s Preview will be at the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center June 14-15, 2018 and once again held in conjunction with the All American Angus Breeders’ Futurity. Ownership deadline is May 1, 2018. Entry deadline is May 1, 2018. Check the KAA website for full details and entry information. NJAS 2019 The executive committee has been hard at work! The theme for the 2019 NJAS is Win, Place, Showing for the Purple. Congratulations to Abi Smoot, Junior Chair and Caroline Cowles and Maria Day, Co Vice Chairs. KJAA Roll of Victory Points Program Kentucky Junior Angus Association members---the Kentucky Junior Roll of Victory show season is under way! The program is free to enter. Several nice awards are presented annually to the cattle who place at the top of each category. Find your enrollment forms at www.kentuckyangus.org or by contacting the junior advisors or Anne DeMott. Congratulations to the following winners from the 2017-18 Roll of Victory Points Program: •

R&K Proven Queen 706, Bred & Owned Heifer of the Year, owned by Kalli Flanders

R&K OB Conversation 601, Bred & Owned Bull of the Year, owned by Kalli Flanders

BJF Elba of DBF 3919, Cow/Calf of the Year, owned by Taylor Jeffries

FCF Proven Queen 615, Owned Heifer of the Year, owned by Kalli Flanders

DBF Solo BJF 6110, Steer of the Year, owned by Lily Jeffries

R&K OB Conversation 601, Show Animal of the Year, owned by Kalli Flanders

Premier Breeder & Premier Exhibitor, Kalli Flanders

@KyAngusAssoc

President’s Message Angus Breeders and Angus Enthusiasts, I am looking forward to serving the next couple of years as your Kentucky Angus Association President. We are in an incredible era of agricultural opportunity as science continues to make progress with all aspects of our industry. However, one of the most unique aspects of agriculture is the fact that common sense, work ethic and everyday practical application will not ever be replaced. All of this is true in the production of beef cattle and specifically the production of Registered Angus Seedstock. Since 1972, I have been an Angus Breeder. I believe in “The Mother Breed” and all of the benefits that come with an Angus Cow or an Angus Bull. Our breed is large and has great genetic variability. It is up to each of us to find what Angus genetics works best for us in our program and for our customers. It is also equally as important to work together to market our product and to collectively take advantage of all that the Angus breed has to offer. Our Kentucky Angus Association has over 350 members with lots of opportunities to get involved. The KAA committees are Activities, Membership, Beef Expo, Preview, Directory, Finance, Feeder Calf, Promotion, Sweepstakes, Legislative Rules, Junior Activities, Queen and Scholarship. There is something for everyone that wants to be a difference maker with the KAA. If you would like to volunteer or assist with the KAA, just let me or any of the Board of Directors know. The Commonwealth has such a rich heritage of Angus cattle and an impressive legacy of Angus Breeders. Our Bluegrass State is an excellent environment in which to raise, breed and market Angus genetics. I am looking forward to working together for the betterment of the Angus breed in Kentucky. Please reach out at any time if the Kentucky Angus Association or myself can be of any assistance. Sincerely, Gil Ray Cowles

@KyAngusAssoc @kyangusassociation

to subscribe to email updates, please contact us at kyangusassociation@gmail.com

kyangusassociation@gmail.com

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

97


98

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


PATRIOT NOW OFFERS ITS STRONGEST INTEGRATED SOLAR ENERGIZER Great just got better. Patriot is upping the game—again—with its strongest integrated solar energizer yet. Introducing SolarGuard 555: All the bells and whistles of the Patriot SolarGuard 155, now capable of up to 0.51 output joules. This energizer can cover 30 miles/100 acres of clean fence— combining the best traits of the SolarGuard 155 Energizer with more power to cover a larger range. The SolarGuard 555 has the familiar, portable, ‘All in One’ design including the internal battery and solar panel in a compact and convenient package. The energy efficient solar panel recharges the internal battery to power the fence line. A large storage capacitor enables the energizer to operate up

Sweetpro Feeds Offer New Scour Treatment to 21 days without sunlight.

fences can last up to 40 years

With sealed electronics and a weather and UV resistant case, the energizer is suitable for variable environments and all-year-round use. Additionally, the SolarGuard 555 is a low impedance energizer and is designed to deliver power to the end of the fence even under a heavy load (e.g. foliage, undergrowth).

Patriot, a recognized name in electric fencing and proudly owned by Tru-Test Group, has been serving farmers and ranchers in North America since 2004. Trust Patriot to give you powerful, reliable protection for all your fencing needs.

Why Use Electric Fencing?

For more information, please visit patriotglobal.com or call 800-8748494.

Animal Safety: Safe and effective alternative to barbed wire or woven fences Lower Cost: Requires less labor and material; animals are less likely to damage fence

Calf Paste from SweetPro Feeds is a new scour support treatment with added toxin binders and the MOS (Mannen Oligosaccharide) advantage. It is designed to mitigate the cascade of challenges facing a young calf. The diarrhea that accompanies scours is the body’s natural response to toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Calf Paste contains: •

Charcoal to bind toxins

Functional proteins to combat pathogenic organisms

Probiotics to seed the intestine with the appropriate population of microorganisms

ProBiotein® a prebiotic fiber blend that provides substrates for the digestive microbiome of a healthy calf

Scours can be caused by multiple organisms. The SweetPro Calf Paste is designed to be a broad spectrum intervention and preventative response to the challenge of scours.

Ease of Construction : Relatively simple and easy to build; can be installed quickly with minimal tools

ProBiotein® is a proprietary blend additive consisting of nutritional yeast culture, prebiotic oligosaccharides (MOS, AXOS, XOS, FOS and Betaglucan), digestive enzymes (fibrolytic, amylolytic, proteolytic, phospholytic) and omega3 from flax.

Flexibility:Wire spacing and fence design can be varied; temporary fence is easy to move Long Life: Using quality components and materials, electric

Available from SweetPro Feeds / 888.229.0475 / www.sweetpro.com

MARKET REPORT

SOUTHEAST FEEDER CATTLE PRICES 16 MARCH 2018 STEER weights

HEIFER

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

9-10

120-126

124-130

117-123

120-126

120-126

120-126

8-9

125-133

131-139

122-130

125-133

125-133

132-140

7-8

137-145

141-149

134-142

137-145

137-145

144-152

121-129

124-132

118-126

121-129

121-129

126-134

6-7

150-160

154-164

152-162

150-160

151-161

152-162

131-141

133-143

129-139

131-141

132-142

134-144

5-6

168-180

169-181

170-182

4-5

174-188

178-192

190-204

168-180

168-180

156-168

146-158

150-162

140-152

143-155

145-157

142-154

173-187

173-187

170-184

148-162

157-171

151-165

150-164

151-165

144-158

COWS weights

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

UTIL

59-66

59-64

56-63

60-67

55-65

57-63

CN/CUT

56-61

52-62

56-63

54-61

51-61

53-58

BULLS

78-88

83-88

77-87

86-93

84-94

80-89

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

MONTHLY MARKET BEEF UPDATE! Feeder cattle traded from $2 to $5 lower for the week. Calves were $2 to $8 higher. Market cows were steady to $3 lower. -Troy Applehans

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

99


CALENDAR OF EVENTS General April 7 Annual Cowboy Up for a Cure Rodeo, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 82 April 7 Cattle Farm Auction, Harrodsburg, KY April 14 Farm Auction, Fleming Co, KY, See ad on pg. 51 April 16 College Readiness Class, The YARDS, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 70 April 21 Consignment Equipment Sale, Blue Grass, Albany, KY, See ad on pg. 31 April 25 Spring Holstein Sale, Blue Grass Albany, KY, See ad on pg. 31 April 25 2018 Kentucky Seedstock Symposium, Shelbyville, KY, See ad on pg. 30 Angus March 31 Heritage Farm Inaugural Sale, Shelbyville, KY March 31 First Angus Production Sale, Hillsboro, KY April 2-7 Keeney’s Corner Bull Sale, Nancy, KY, See ad on pg. 32 April 7 Grassy Valley Angus 25th Annual Production Sale, Greeneville, TN, See ad on pg. 77 April 7 Lawson Family Farms Annual Spring Bull and Female Sale, Ewing, VA, See ad on pg. 36 April 7 Annual Angus Opportunity Sale, Carmen, KY, See ad on pg. 27 April 9 Grass Time Partners Annual Bull & Female Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg. 41 April 9-14 Glenview Farms Bull Week Campbellsburg, KY, See ad on pg. 57 April 14 Branch View Angus Sale, Hustonville, KY, See ad on pg. 104 April 14 Crazy K Ranch, Michie, TN April 14 Timberland Cattle Her Dispersal, Cullman, AL, See ad on pg. 60 April 21 Central Kentucky Premier Bull Sale, Danville, KY, See ad on pg. 55 April 22 Quintin Smith Family Angus Sale, Lebanon, TN, See ad on pg.16 April 28 Great Meadows Angus Spring Sale, Campbellsburg, KY, See ad on pg. 79

100

April 28 Spring Time Select Sale, Cookeville, TN, See ad on pg. 26 April 29 Black Gold Genetics, Crestwood, KY, See ad on pg. 53 May 6 Brideview Angus 2018 Sale, Stamping Ground, KY, See ad on pg. 11 Holstein April 20 Spring Holstein Sale, Blue Grass South, Stanford, KY, See ad on pg. 31 April 25 Spring Holstein Sale, Blue Grass Albany, KY, See ad on pg. 31 Charolais April 7 DeBruycker Charolais Sale, Great Falls, MT April 14 Amburgey Farm Bull & Female Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg. 60 April 20 Hord Charolais Sale, Blue Grass Maysville, KY, See ad on pg. 31 April 21 Central Kentucky Classic, Bowling Green, KY, See ad on pg. 62 and 63 May 12 Kentucky Charolais Spring Showcase Sale, Stanford, KY, See ad on pg. 43 October 6 Spirit of the Bluegrass Sale, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 57 Gelbvieh April 7 J&D Kerstiens Gelbvieh Auction, Huntingburg, IN, See ad on pg. 42 April 28 Bush Cattle Farm Complete Dispersal, Bowling Green, KY, See ad on pg. 71 Hereford April 7 Burns Farms Annual Female Event and Bull Sale, Pikeville, TN April 21 Clifford Farms & Guests Hereford Production Sale, Mt. Sterling, KY, See ad on pg. 65 April 28 Middle Tennessee Hereford Association Annual Sale, Cross Plains, TN, See ad on pg. 46 May 10 KY Certified Hereford Influence Sale, Stanford, KY, See ad on pg. 92

AD INDEX April 28 Highland Cattle Auction, Lebanon, MO, See ad on pg. 46 Limousin April 21 Smokey Mountain Limousin Classic Sale, Bulls Gap, TN, See ad on pg. 75 May 5 Ohio Valley Spring Sale, Mineral Wells, WV, See ad on pg. 44 Multi-Breed March 27 St. Clair Farms 9th Annual Bull and Female Sale, Falls of Rough, KY April 3 The Right Kind Sale, Richmond, IN, See ad on pg. 22 April 4 CPH Sale, Springfield, KY, See ad on pg. 89 April 6 Top of Kentucky Bull & Heifer Sale, Owenton, KY, See ad on pg. 3 April 7 Laurel Co. Cattlemen’s 6th Annual Commercial Open Heifer Sale, East Bernstadt, KY April 7 Bulls of the Bluegrass, Lexington, KY, See ad on pg. 31 April 14 Knoll Crest’s Total Performance Bull Sale, See ad on pg. 9 April 14 New Day Genetics Sale, Osceola, MO, See ad on pg. 42 April 19 Indiana Beef Evaluation Program, West Lafayette, IN, See ad on pg. 37 April 26 CPH Sale, Owensboro, KY, See ad on pg. 89 June 27 CPH Sale, Springfield, KY, See ad on pg. 89 May 22, West Kentucky Bred Heifer Sale, Guthrie, KY, See ad on pg. 4 Red Angus April 7 “The Adras Kind” Red Angus Bull Sale, Manchester, IL April 7 SERAA Grasstime Auction, Cullman, AL, See ad on pg. 61 Santa Gertrudis April 28 Crimson Classic Sale, Cullman, AL, See ad on pg. 54 Simmental June 2-3 KY Jr. Simmental State Show, Versailles, KY, See ad on pg. 90

Highland

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

AGRI Financial............................................................ 8 Allison Charolais....................................................... 42 Amburgey Charlolais................................................ 60 Angus Opportunity Sale............................................27 Arnett’s Trailer Sales................................................. 22 B & L Farm Cattle Company......................................56 Black Gold Genetics...................................................53 Blue Grass Stockyards...............................................31 Bobcat.33 Branch View Angus Farm........................................104 Bridge View Angus Farm........................................... 11 Burkmann Feeds........................................................76 Bush Hog..................................................................... 17 Byron Seeds................................................................35 CKAA Annual Spring Sale.........................................55 Cargill Animal Nurition............................................67 Caudill Seed..................................................................2 Caverndale Farms......................................................47 Central Farm Supply........................................... 25, 59 Central Kentucky Charolais Sale...................... 62, 63 Central Kentucky Premier Sale................................ 32 Chambliss Hereford Farms.......................................13 Clifford Farms............................................................65 Cowboy Up for a Cure............................................... 82 CowCo.54 Crimson Classic Sale................................................. 54 CPH-45........................................................................74 Dependable Livestock Testing..................................10 Dievert Sales Service................................................. 61 Dutch Creek Farm..................................................... 32 Four Kinds Angus.........................................................4 GMAA Spring Sale.....................................................79 Genex.52 Gerber Land and Cattle............................................ 22 Gilchrist Auction Co................................................... 61 Glenview Farms..........................................................57 Grass Time Partners Sale..........................................41 Grassy Valley Angus...................................................77 Green River Livestock................................................. 8 Hayes Trailer Sales.....................................................13 Heartland Highland Cattle Association.................. 46 Hinton Mils...............................................................103 Indiana Beef Evaluation Program............................37 J & D Kerstiens...........................................................76 JMS Polled Herefords................................................45 John Deere................................................................. 23 Kalarama.................................................................... 80 Keeney Angus............................................................ 32 Ken Shourds Equipment............................................15 Kentucky Angus Association............................... 96,97 Kentucky Charolais Association........................ 43, 94 Kentucky Charolais Spring Showcase Sale............. 43 Kentucky Gelbvieh Association............................... 98 Kentucky Hereford Association............................... 92 Kentucky Prime Realty............................................. 38 Kentucky Salers Association.................................... 90 Kentucky Simmental Association.............................95 Knoll Crest Farms........................................................9 Lawson Family Farm................................................ 36 Limousin Breeders of the Bluegrass.........................91 McBurney’s Livestock & Equipment.........................10 McCormick Realty...................................................... 51 Mid-South Ag.............................................................75 Middle Tennessee Hereford..................................... 46 MultiGen Reproductive Solutions..............................7 New Day Genetics...................................................... 42 Norbrook...............................................................20, 21 Oak Hollow...................................................................5 Ohio Valley Limousin Association........................... 78 P.H. White.................................................................. 49 Performance Feeds.................................................... 69 Quality Cover Buildings.............................................27 Quintin Smith Family Angus....................................16 Red Barn and Associates...........................................56 Reynolds Farm Beef Cattle........................................52 Rock Ridge Angus..................................................... 64 Silver Stream Shelters............................................... 49 Slaughter Sale Management...................................... 71 Smokey Mountain Limousin Classic Sale................75 Stone Gate Farms.......................................................13 Suger Creek Red Angus.............................................13 Sullivan Charolais......................................................57 Superior Fence Company.......................................... 80 Timberland Cattle..................................................... 60 Top of Kentucky Sale....................................................3 Tucker Stock Farms.................................................... 61 UCAA Spring Time Select Sale................................. 26 WV Red Angus Association.......................................81 Walters Buildings.......................................................14 Wayward Hills Farm................................................. 66 West Kentucky Select Bred Heifer Sale......................4 Woodford Feed Co......................................................12 Y-Tex............................................................................19 Zoetis.......................................................................... 39

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


270-836-2963 • JP@DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM

BUTLER COUNTY STOCKMAN’S ASSOCIATION

WWW.DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM

RED ANGUS • RED SIMMENTAL CATTLE PRODUCTION Butler County COW COUNTRY REDCLASSIFIEDS SIM-ANGUS • FARM FRESH BEEF

SALE Stockman’s Association

TO PLACE AN AD CALL (859) 278-0899 - $15 FOR 4 LINES AND $5 FOR EACH ADDITIONAL LINE

Registered Bulls - Bred Heifers - Open Heifers Sale Location: Eva Hawes Ag Expo Building Morgantown City Park Morgantown, KY

th

8 COUNTY MarchBUTLER 11, 2017 - Annual Registered Red STOCKMAN’S SaleASSOCIATION Time Production Angus Bulls 8th ANNUAL 1:00 p.m. CST

Sale

PRODUCTION SALE

Registered Bulls - Bred Heifers - Open Heifers Catalog Will be Available Feb 2017

Sale Location: HEREFORD BULLSMarch 10, 2018 Eva Hawes Ag Expo Sale Time Building Low birth weight and high growth. Charles T Black City Park 1:00 BSE Tested. 18 months old.p.m. CST Morgantown, KY

For Sale

• Free Delivery March 10, 2018 Four Winds Farm

Castle, Sale time—1:00New PM CSTKY Sweet T Farm. 859-684-1509

502-296-1044

Mel Bowles (270) 589-8975 Chad Tyree (270) 999-1243 REGISTERED GELBVIEH BULLS Rhonda Merideth (270) 999-6515 6 registered Gelbvieh bulls. Passed BSE. Ready for service. 14-20 PERFORMANCE TESTED RED HEREFORD AND BLACK months old. Calving ease, lowPUREBRED birth d BULLS RegiBULLS e r ANGUS FOR SALE HEREFORD e stHEIFERS t ered & weight, docile bulls. Starting price at 25 BLACK-CROSS s i g Call 270/202-7186 for more info or Low birthweight and high growth. e N R o s n $2,250. Jones. Calves by18side. Some lwww.oakhollowangus.com -Rold. checkBout for months ulTrent egcalves is ered 270-590-5266 weighing to 300-400 O current availability. Sweet Tup Farm 859-684-1509 pen & tlbs. CHAROLAIS BULLS FOR SALE 859-481-5143 Bred HeSIMMENTAL ANGUS BULLS FOR LEASE OR SALE REGISTERED BLACK BULLS. Harmon Charolais 812-738-7958 SIMMENTAL BULLS ifeFOR rs SALE Low birthweight Registered Angus & Excellent EPD’s. Semen Tested. Delivery Performance tested All Breeds Bulls Black and polled. 18 months-2 Charolais bulls for lease or sale. Starting Available. Maximize your profit with http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/ibep/ year olds. Semen checked. $2,500 at $350. McCrory Farms, Benton,Ag KY Expo proven performance. Adam Wheatley Eva Hawes Building 812-279-8554 Bowling Green, KY 270-529-9215 270-527-3767 502-349-2665 T Black City Park FOR SALE LIME-LITTER-FERTILIZERCharles SPREADERS RED ANGUS FOR John SALE Deere ANGUS BULLS SALEOlds, In Stock Stoltzfus Brand Bulls: Yearlings and FOR 2 Year Morgantown, 19-20 month old Polled Hereford bulls. KY 42261 Registered & commercial. 6400 - cab Good loader -wd Open and Bred Great Heifers selection. Yearling to 2-year-olds. Genetics. For more information contact www.redbarnandassociates.com Contact: Johnnie Cundiff Low birthweight, medium frame. Free Rand Angus Farm 502-639-4085 Bowles (270) 589-8975 Chad Tyree (270) 999-1243 DeliveryMel Available. Call Charlie: 859-608-9745 606-305-6443 or 606-871-7438 Rhonda Merideth (270) 999-6515

JMS Polled Herefords, Knifley, KY Danny 270-566-2694 Trent 270-566-2000

ERS

FOUNDATION SALE IV October 6, 2018 United Producers, Bowling Green, KY Selling FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN Genetics For info call : A C H Holdings, LLC Stephen Haynes 270-799-8685

ced Breed

REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BRED HEIFERS 18 month old bulls. Docile. Qualify for KY Cost Share. Diana Poe. Triple P Angus. 606-724-5524 REGISTERED ANGUS HEIFERS FOR SALE Open and bred 606-787-7307

REGISTERED ANGUS FOR SALE RED ANGUS FOR SALE Bulls: 18 months old. DNA WILLIS FARMS Danny Willis SALERSBulls: Yearlings and 2-year-olds, Open & BSE •tested. AI Fall Bred 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 ohnson and Bred Heifers Heifers. Contact Happy at Contact: Johnnie Cundiff 502-803-5011 606-271-1201 – Somerset, KY • drwc21@aol.com Eubank, KY 42564 606-305-6443 or 606-871-7438 Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821 -1558 OVER 30 BREEDING AGE HEREFORD REGISTERED BLACK GELBVIEH BULLS BULLS FOR SALE CAIP Qualified. Purebred &Association Balancers. Over 60 years of Line 1 Hereford117 cation of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Coming yearlings. Starting at $2500. Genetics. Also selling 35 cows. Contact Trent Jones Chambliss 270-590-5266 Hereford Farms. 270-668-7126 COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS

&

Jeff, Michelle Nolan Pettit 5745 US HWY 41 SOUTH, SEBREE, KY 42455 270-836-2963 • JP@DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM

WWW.DIAMONDPCATTLE.COM RED ANGUS • RED SIMMENTAL RED SIM-ANGUS • FARM FRESH BEEF

35 years of AI Breeding Low birth weight to high yearling weight EPDs

WOLF FARM

(859) 991-3484

BALE UNROLLER FOR SALE Perfect Condition. $950. 502-477-2637 REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD BULLS Meet CAIP and TAEP guidelines. Jackson Farms. 615-478-4483 REGISTERED HORNED AND POLLED HEREFORD BREEDING STOCK See Middle TN Hereford Assn’s ad on Pg. ## for more info. Stoltzfus Lime/Fertilizer/Litter Spreaders Leo 500 TMR Mixer - $22,000 Great Plains 7/10/12 ft drills start @ $10,000 Glencoe 7 shank chisel - $5,500 Cat 242B skid loader - $16,000 John Deere 7410- 2wd cab -$26,500 www.redbarnandassociates.com Call Charlie @ 859-608-9745

We would like to thank last year’s purchasers of Purebred Hereford Bulls, Bred Cows, and Show Calves. For your Purebred or crossbreeding needs, contact us:

Anne or M.J. Bakke

4646 N. CR. 100E Rockport, IN 47635

(812) 649-2821

REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE See bull videos and sale details www.skeanangus.com or call Tim at 270-535-4123 ANGUS BULLS AND FEMALES FOR SALE White Farm. Service-age Angus bulls and females. Tim White. 859-509-5401

kenshourdsequipment.com

SEE YOUR AD HERE!

REACH OVER 10,600 CATTLEMEN EACH MONTH. ADS AS LOW AS $15 PER MONTH. FOR AD PLACEMENT CONTACT JACOB REDWAY

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

859-278-0899

101


FEATURE

TIMELY TIPS FOR APRIL

“THIS IS A FAMILY BUSINESS? DR. ROY BURRIS UK Extension Beef Specialist After more than forty years of visiting farms, I still cringe when folks describe their farming operation as a “family” business. That’s the way it should be and there’s no better place to raise a family, but I still find that statement “cringe worthy”. It’s because family is family and Business is Business! A family business may have to ultimately decide whether it is a family or a business. And sadly, business principles usually win out. I’ve seen that too many times. Dave Pratt, a ranch management consultant, says that we have only three choices in any business: (1) We can be profitable, (2) We can subsidize the business, or (3) We can go out of business (bankruptcy). Many family farms choose the second option until they are sometimes forced into the third one. Any business needs to be profitable and all family members or employees need to work toward that goal. I was on a recent farm visit when I suddenly realized that I had been there before – many years before. This farm had been the home of a herd of registered cattle and its owner was also a seemingly successful businessman – a family business. The family business consisted of the father and his two grown children. The father was so proud of his cattle that, on that particular farm visit some thirty years ago, after we had left the farm he turned around and went back. There standing in the fence row under some trees was the lone cow that he had forgotten to show me. And last week I was standing in that exact spot again. I inquired about the history of this particular farm. It seems that the past owner had lost his farm and business because of bad business practices by the family. The same business practices that would never be acceptable in a normal business yet are frequently seen as normal in a “family” business. Things like unchecked spending, taking money out of the till, operating without a real plan, bad habits and, perhaps, a sense of entitlement. Communication would seem to be easy but it is generally a problem. Accountability is also lacking. The loss of a family business is very traumatic to the entire

102

family, especially those family businesses and farms that have been held for several generations. Bankers have a saying that money lasts for three generations – the first one makes it, the second saves it and the third spends it. That’s not always true but it does shed some light on how difficult it is to pass farms and wealth to subsequent generations. Sometimes the third or fourth generation may feel entitled and not realize how difficult it can be to hold everything together. Young folks might benefit from working elsewhere and becoming successful in their own right before rejoining the family operation. Some people are just lazy – like “Ralph”. His brothers caught him napping and told him that he had just won five dollars for being the laziest man in the county! Ralph said “just roll me over and put it in my back pocket”. Would a real business keep a “Ralph” as an employee? What about family? The most important piece of equipment in a family business may be the kitchen table. Sit down frequently and talk about what each family member’s goals are. Then develop a mission statement and vision statement that is shared by all parties. Have a clear vision of each person’s responsibilities – too many cooks spoil the stew. Someone has to be in charge. That position is usually held by the parent until they choose to give it up. A succession plan for retirement and death is a good idea but most people don’t want to talk about it. If the younger generation is going to plan for the future, those things need to be ironed out. Don’t wait until you die and leave your family with a legal mess. Many family farms that had been held for several generations were lost in the farm crisis of 1981. Take the time and make the effort to be sure that you are not the generation that loses your family business. Obtain legal and financial advice from experts and keep your affairs in order. Operate your family farm as a real business. This tax season is a good time to review your operation. Do it for your family.

COW COUNTRY NEWS

Spring Calving Cow Herd

Fall Calving Cow Herd

Watch cows and calves closely. Save every calf (you can cull/sell them later). Calves can be identified while they are young and easy to handle. Commercial male calves should be castrated and implanted. Registered calves should be weighed at birth.

Pregnancy check cows now and cull open ones at weaning.

Cows that have calved need to be on an adequate nutritional level to rebreed. Increase their feed after calving. Don’t let them lose body condition. Keep feeding them until pastures are adequate. Don’t “rush to grass” although it can be really tempting. Be sure that grass has accumulated enough growth to support the cow’s nutritional needs before depending solely upon it. Cows may walk the pastures looking for green grass instead of eating dry feed. This lush, watery grass is not adequate to support them. Keep them consuming dry feed until sufficient grass is available to sustain body condition. We’ve spent too much money keeping them in good condition to lose it now! Prevent grass tetany! Provide magnesium in the mineral mix until daytime temperatures are consistently above 60oF. Mineral supplement should be available at all times and contain a minimum of about 14 percent magnesium. Make sure that your mineral mix also contains adequate selenium, copper and zinc. You can ask your feed dealer about the UK Beef IRM High Magnesium Mineral. Make final selection of heifer replacements. Consider vaccinating with a modified-live BVD vaccine. Purchase replacement bulls at least 30 days prior to the start of the breeding season. Have herd bulls evaluated for breeding soundness (10-20% of bulls are questionable or unsatisfactory breeders). Get all bulls in proper condition for breeding. If you are going to use artificial insemination and/or estrus synchronization, make plans now and order needed supplies and semen. Prebreeding or “turn‑out” working is usually scheduled for late April or May ‑ between the end of calving season and before the start of the breeding season (while cows are open). Consult your veterinarian about vaccines and health products your herd needs. Make arrangements now for products needed and have handling facilities in good working order. Dehorn commercial calves before going to pasture.

• APRIL 2018

Reimplant feeders. Consult with your veterinarian about a preweaning working of the herd. You may let calves creep-graze wheat or rye, if it is available. Calves will benefit from extra feed until spring grass appears. Plan marketing strategy for feeder calves. Stockers Don’t go to pastures too soon, give plants some growing time. Then stock at two to three times the July rate and rotate rapidly. “Condition” purchased calves prior to grazing. They should be processed and fed a conditioning diet prior to being placed on pasture. You can also use this time to introduce them to electric fences which are used in rotational grazing. Provide a good mineral supplement which contains a rumen modifier (Rumensin, Bovatec, etc.) along with adequate levels of copper and selenium. General We’ve made a muddy mess this winter, so be prepared to reseed bare spots. Make plans to improve hay feeding areas to avoid muddy conditions like we have faced this winter. Consider geotextile fabric with gravel or concrete feeding pads. Prepare for the grazing season. Check fences and make necessary repairs. Check your corral, too. Get everything ready to make high quality hay in May! Have equipment serviced and spare parts on hand. Order baler twine now. Be prepared to harvest an adequate supply of hay when you have the opportunity. Resupply the extra hay that you fed out of the barn. This past winter caused most producers to exhaust their hay supply, so it’s time to re-stock. Plan now for fly control ... decide what fly control program that you will use but don’t put insecticide eartags on cattle until fly population appears.

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


All the brands your grandpa would trust, at prices he would approve of.

Hinton Mills Crop Services provides a wide range of seed varieties, fertilizer, and crop protectants, as well as spraying, spreading and soil testing services. We offer the same quality products, service & logistics in Crop Services that you’ve come to expect from our feed mills.

Frank Hinton & Son 591 Plummers Landing Rd. Plummers Landing, KY (606) 876-3171

COW COUNTRY NEWS

• APRIL 2018

Jabetown Mill 99 Ewing Rd. Ewing, KY (606) 267-2161

May’s Lick Mill 6538 U.S. Hwy. 68 May’s Lick, KY (606) 763-6602

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N

Fleming County Farm Supply 1724 Maysville Rd. Flemingsburg, KY (606) 845-1821

Hinton Mills Cynthiana 332 Lincoln Ave. Cynthiana, KY (859) 234-2122

103


APRIL 14, 2018 Hustonville, KY

selling:

Largest Angus Sale in Kentucky 225 Females sell 75 registered and 150 commercials. Commercial female info at branchviewangus.com

100 bulls 75 femalES

& 150 Commercial Females

interval of 6/360 with progeny ratios of WW 6/101, YW 5/101, IMF 5/106, and RE 5/100.

BV Fortress 7048| Reg#18911496 • You can have simultaneous improvement in all traits. Fifteen EPDs in top 25%. Double digit calving ease with top 2% $F and 3% $W, $B. Top 3% WW, 5% YW. Rare to find a bull that ranks in top 1% RADG and 4% DMI. Top 25% for carcass traits CW, Marb, and RE. Dam has been a solid producer. 3020 maintains a calving interval of 3/374 with progeny ratios of WW 3/101, YW 2/100 and RE 2/106. Second dam maintained a calving EPD % Rank

CED

10 20

BW

0.2 25

WW

72 3

YW

122 5

CW

0.37 1

RE

$W

$F

BV Fortress 7103| Reg#18962947 • One of only nineteen non-parent bulls in the breed with 7103’s combination of $W, $F, and $B indices. Top 1% $W, $F, $B. You can have across the board improvement in your herd. • Top 1% WW, YW, RADG, CW, 2% RE. Rare combination of top 1% RADG and 30% DMI. More gain on less feed. • Son of the popular Select Sires bull, KCF Bennett Fortress out of the great 262S.

$B

-0.49 75.36 104.64 168.28 4 3 2 3

EPD % Rank

BV Southside 6583| Reg#18773363 • Add pounds to your calf crop. Maternal power paired with extreme growth genetics. • Maternal brother to the ABS sire, BV Pinpoint and to the dam of the Origen sire BV South Point 6007 and Basin Yuma. • Posted a WW of 747, an ADG of 3.75 to arrive at a YW of 1,344. 5.78 IMF to ratio 138. EPD % Rank

CED

2 85

BW

4 95

WW

78 1

YW

124 4

CW

70 1

RE

$W

$F

CED

4 70

BW

3.2 90

WW

81 1

YW

144 1

CW

76 1

RE

$W

$F

$B

0.98 82.08 132.81 206.44 2 1 1 1

BV International 7404| Reg#18911501 • Top of the breed EPD profile on the son of the $400,000 SAV International 2020. Top 1% $F, $B, 3% $W. Top 1% EPDs WW, YW, CW, 10% HP, Milk. • Second dam is the $350,000 Basin Lucy 3829 and third dam is the famous Basin Lucy 178E.

$B

0.87 60.90 90.42 186.93 15 15 4 1

EPD % Rank

CED

6 50

BW

3.6 95

WW

78 1

YW

147 1

CW

83 1

RE

$W

$F

$B

0.67 74.09 124.63 178.44 20 3 1 1

Sale book available now: branchviewangus.com

Danny Smith 606-706-0355 John Ethington 859-533-1301

James S. Coffey 859-238-0771 james@branchviewangus.com Donald S. Coffey

Cow Country News - April 2018  
Cow Country News - April 2018  
Advertisement