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YOU’RE ONLY AS HEALTHY AS YOUR HERD

The health and wellness of your animals is top of mind, and that all starts with their feed. Available on our Zero Series round balers, the MegaWide™ HC2 precutter puts what’s in the windrow into the bale. That means your herd gets leafy, nutritious feed, cut down to a size that they can easily eat without a lot of waste. Talk with your John Deere dealer and learn why you now have zero reasons to use any other baler.

With the MegaWide HC2 precutter, you’ll INCREASE TONNAGE PER HOUR BY 80%* AND CUT MIXING TIMES AS MUCH AS 58%.* That’s an efficient feed system for you, and nutrient-rich feed for them. * Tonnage per hour estimates compared to competitive models. Mixing time estimate compared to bales that do not contain precut crop.

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Henderson

1700 S Green St 270-831-2525

Owensboro

801 Commerce Dr 270-683-3488

Ashland

10699 US Route 60 Suite 103 606-928-0202

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Muhlenberg

145 Copper Creek Dr 270-338-3555

Winchester

951 Bypass Rd 859-744-0858

Madisonville

1650 S Main St 270-821-1214

Radcliff

5985 North Dixie Highway 270-735-1472

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Shelbyville

181 Boone Station Rd 502-633-4443

Paducah

4711 Cairo Rd 270-443-9590

Pikeville

3889 N Mayo Trail 606-432-2419

Maysville

1581 US Highway 68 606-759-0466

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TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNISTS

7 Tim White: President’s Thoughts 8 Ryan Quarles: Help Feed Those in Need 10 Dave Maples: From Dave’s Desk 12 Baxter Black: Inheriting the Family Farm 20 Chris Teutsch: 26 Dr. Michelle Arnold: Part II: Preventing Summer Mastitis in Beef Heifers Begins with Horn Fly Control

FEATURE STORIES

11 Kentucky Market Value of Products Sold Up 13 Percent from 2012 16 How Can You See Soil Health? 18 NCBA Welcomes Legislation Aimed to Help Livestock Haulers 19 Cattle Industry’s Beef Quality Assurance Program Develops, Distributes Extensive National Manual 22 Quarles Applauds Canada, Mexico, and Japan Trade Progress 23 Stephenson Named Director of UK Cooperative Extension Service 28 Extension Program Helps Producers Improve their Operations 29 UK Ag Economists Offer Info for Farmers Dealing with Financial Challanges 30 First Quarter Beef, Prok Exports Below Last Year’s Pace; Lamb Exports Trend Higher 32 Kentuckians Step Up to Help After Devastating Nebraska Flooding 37 USDA Seeks Input on the Feasibility of Establishing a Livestock Dealer Statutory Trust 49 Top 10 Misconceptions in Grazing Management 54 Seedstock Producers: Make the Most of Your Genetic Evaluation to Enhance the Success of Your Commerical Cattleman Customers!

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14-15 County News 24-25 Economic & Policy Update 38-39 Membership 34-35 Kentucky Beef Council 40-41 Kentucky Beef Network ?? News Releases 47 Kentucky Angus Association News 51 Market Report 52 Calendar of Events 53 Advertisers Index 53 Classifieds

Start Creep Feeding Today In Glasgow: 1-800-859-2174 In Danville: 1-800-786-2875 www.burkmann.com

Cover photo by: Santa Gertrudis Breeders International

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We’ve always known we have the most profitable cow herd. Now we have the numbers to prove it.

OAK HOLLOW

PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS CATTLE

Oak Hollow females must be profitable for the commercial cattleman. If females are not profitable selling their pounds of weaned calf at steer price, they will no longer be in the herd. The traits of the utmost importance include fertility, calving ease, optimal milk production, longevity, and structural soundness. After these basic requirements are met, the calves must grow and grade. By first selecting for maternal traits of economic importance, we can produce the highest quality beef at the lowest cost of production. Above is the paragraph that I wrote several years ago to describe our breeding philosophy with over forty years of breeding history. We have always said we have the lowest cost of production for the value of the calves we wean. However, we never had a number to truly prove that we had the most profitable cow herd. Recently, the American Angus Association released a true maternal index they call $M to help producers better define efficiency in a commercial cow-calf environment. Traits in the new index include calving ease direct and maternal, weaning weight, milk, mature weight, heifer pregnancy, docility and foot score. Those are all numbers we have emphasized for over 40 years. While other breeders were accepting a bigger, and less efficient cow for a few pounds of yearling weight, we were weighing and measuring cows to ensure we were weaning bigger calves with the same inputs. Our cow herd has over 50 females in the top 1% of the breed for $M and an average across over 400 females that falls within the top 15%. Over 20% of the sale bulls we produced last year were in the top 5% of the breed for $M. For years, our genetics have been throughout the Mid-South creating efficient commercial females and profitable feeder calves. We have always known they were the most profitable, but now we have the numbers to prove it.

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Kenneth D. Lowe (270) 202-7186 - Joe K. Lowe II (270) 202-4399 www.OakHollowAngus.com - Smiths Grove, KEntucky COW COUNTRY •

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KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION 2019 LEADERSHIP KCA REGIONAL DIRECTORS: REGION 1

Daniel Hayden, Vice President*(270) 570-2815 Bobby Bell................................(270) 547-8547 Gary Woodall...........................(270) 725-0819 Ricky Haynes............................(270) 945-9057 Don Pemberton........................(270) 889-3885 Wayne Johnson.......................(270) 303-6354 John Walpole..........................(270) 542-7534 Martin Hayden........................(270) 281-4076 John (JJ) Tucker....................(270) 617-0301 Dennis Wilson.........................(270) 952-1714 Caleb Jenkin...........................(270) 952-0767

REGION 2

KCA 2019 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OFFICERS: PRESIDENT

TREASURER

Tim White 3664 Military Pike Lexington, KY 40513 (859) 509-5401

Ken Adams 90 E Horseshoe Ave. Upton, KY 42784 (270) 734-1443

PRESIDENT ELECT

PAST PRESIDENT

Steve Dunning 8200 Antioch Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 498-8180

Bobby Foree 2440 Eminence Road Eminence, KY 40019 (502) 939-4607

VICE PRESIDENT Chris Cooper 2140 Tates Creek Road Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 200-7711

KCA PROGRAM CHAIRMAN Jeff Pettit 5745 US Highway 41 S Seebree, KY 42455

(270) 836-2963

KBC CHAIRMAN

Andy Bishop 6135 High Grove Road Cox’s Creek, KY 40013 (502) 350-7609

KBN CHAIRMAN

Cary King 250 Bright Leaf Drive Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 734-2173

KCA’S PAST PRESIDENTS: 1972-73

Jere Caldwell† - Boyle

2001

Larry Clay - Perry

1974-77

Smith T. Powell† - Lincoln

2002

Jack Kimbrough† - Shelby

1978-79

Larry Lovell - Union

2003

Mark Williams - Crittenden

1980-82

John Masters† - Mason

2004

Paul Napier - Lincoln

1983-85

Seldon Hail† - Laurel

2005

Eddie Young - Washington

1986-87

Bob Vickery† - Wayne

2006

Greg Ritter† - Barren

1988

Glenn Mackie - Bourbon

2007

Don Pemberton - Christian

1989

Dale Lovell - Muhlenberg

2008

Billy Glenn Turpin - Madison

1990

Steve Henshaw† - Union

2009

Scotty Parsons - Christian

1991

Jerry Fraim - Grayson

2010

Corinne Kephart - Shelby

1992

Glen Massengale† - Wayne

2011

Greg Robey - Mercer

1993

Dell King - Christian

2012

Mike Bach - Bath

1994

Kenneth Lowe - Warren

2013

Don Reynolds - Hart

1995

Dr. J.L.Cole - Monroe

2014

Steve Downs - Marion

1996

Harvey Mitchell - Mercer

2015

Gary Woodall - Logan

1997

Jim Naive† - Spencer

2016

David Lemaster - Clark

1998

Shelby Hughes - Logan

2017

Chuck Crutcher - Hardin

1999

Hoppy Lovell - Barren

2018

Bobby Foree - Henry

2000

Charles Miller - Jessamine

†(Deceased)

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Joe Lowe, Vice President*......(270) 202-4399 Craig Thompson......................(270) 590-5174 Trent Jones.............................(270) 590-5266 Chuck Crutcher.......................(270) 272-6269 Alison Brockman....................(270) 403-3205 Steven Green..........................(270) 528-1720 Reva Richardson.....................(270) 735-2959 Mike Bullock..........................(270) 563-5012 Dr. Kenneth Green...............(270) 589-7175 Adam Maulden.......................(270) 590-1005 Kirk Cecil.................................(270) 692-7698 Hunter Galloway....................(731) 332-0098 Rayetta Boone........................(270) 230-5488 Gerry Bowman........................(270) 427-6922 Adam Estes..............................(270) 537-3761 Phyllis Gentry..........................(502) 331-1146

REGION 3

Nathan Lawson, Vice President*(502) 836-3879 Danny Cooper..........................(606) 782-4809 Wanda Hawkins......................(502) 321-5602 Irvin Kupper.............................(502) 807-5617

Allan Bryant..............................(502) 548-1379 Kevin Perkins............................(502) 269-7189 Larry Bryant.............................(502) 706-1777 Maynard Stetten......................(502) 609-4986 Jerry Oak.................................(502) 525-7248 John Allison.............................(502) 220-3170 Lincoln Clifford........................(859) 954-0102

REGION 4

Jeremy Jones*.........................(859) 749-2233 Lisa Baesler.............................(859) 509-5020 David Lemaster.......................(859) 749-0258 Ron Ray...................................(859) 825-8516 Bo Tate....................................(859) 661-2325 Donovan Pigg..........................(859) 749-9675 Randy Werner........................(859) 771-5280 Danielle Harmon.....................(606) 748-8059 Ronnie Lowe...........................(606) 782-5058 Clay Wills.................................(859) 749-8248 Jason Crowe............................(859) 582-0761

REGION 5

Phillip Reese, Vice President*(859) 339-0450 Herman Benge.........................(606) 862-6451 Steve Downs...........................(859) 805-1278 Brent Woodrum......................(859) 397-1078 Ian Thomas..............................(859) 613-2453 Anne Bays................................(615) 478-8450 Danny Ray Spalding................(859) 336-0444 Greg Robey...............................(859) 734-0067 Eddie Young.............................(859) 262-5682 Adam Chunglo.........................(859) 613-2985 C. Mike Spalding....................(270) 669-6587 Tommy Glasscock....................(270) 692-4336 * Denotes member of Executive committee

VOLUME 32 • ISSUE 7 176 PASADENA DRIVE • LEXINGTON, KY 40503 • PHONE: (859) 278-0899 FAX: (859) 260-2060 • WWW.KYCATTLE.ORG • INFO@KYCATTLE.ORG Executive Vice President Dave Maples

Membership Coordinator Nikki Whitaker

Staff Accountant Kelly Tucker

Communications Manager Jacob Redway

Director of Kentucky Beef Network Becky Thompson

Publication Coordinator Carey Brown

KBN Industry Coordinator Dan Miller

Graphic Designer Todd Brown

KBC Director of Education Niki Ellis

Office Manager Mackenzie Miller

KBC Director of Product Development Katelyn Hawkins

National Advertising Sales, Livestock Advertising Network, Debby Nichols (859) 321-8770, Bernie Scheer (859) 421-5783, Cathy Campbell (609) 581-7644

KBC Director of Consumer Affairs Anna Hawkins

COW COUNTRY NEWS is published monthly by THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any material which he feels is unsuitable for the publication. Although the highest journalistic ethics will be maintained, the KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION limits its responsibilities for any errors, inaccuracies, or misprints in advertising or editorial copy. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements made against the publisher. J U LY 2 0 1 9

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PRESIDENT’S THOUGHTS TIM WHITE Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association President The month of July brings a celebration of the founding of our country. In 1776, the United States of America was founded on certain inalienable rights such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These rights, have been the backbone of our country and led us through many great successes. As we live our lives and pursue our own form of happiness, may we remember the important role that agriculture has played in shaping our country. Cattle ranching/ farming has served as a vital source of food, labor, and income throughout our history. The importance of beef production and agriculture holds true to this day. The statement “Farmers Feed the World,” is not an overstatement, in fact, I think it’s an understatement. The knowledge and ability of the American farmer is severely undervalued in today’s time. I don’t think most people are aware of the impact farmers have on our country. So, as we enter this time of patriotism, let’s not forget the large role that agriculture played in the founding of our country. July is historically the highest month for beef consumption. It marks the time of the

year that the grills are burning and you invite friends over to share a great tasting cut of beef. Amy and I enjoy having friends over that did not have the privilege of growing up with an agricultural background. Throughout the meal and during our time of fellowship we enjoy telling our story and sharing about our life on the farm. We feel this helps them connect with the farm and correct any untrue statements about our healthy product. As producers, we need to make sure that we stay informed and up to date with current issues in the beef industry. I encourage you to contact the KCA office for help with questions. Once again, It looks like we are in the same weather pattern as last summer. Keep in mind the lessons learned from last year, and make proactive plans to make adjustments for lower forage quality if needed. 2019 is almost half gone and the time has absolutely flown by, I look forward to seeing everyone at county meetings this summer. As always, have a blessed month.

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COMMISSIONER’S CORNER

BEEF MONTH GIVES BACK RYAN QUARLES Commissioner of Agriculture The results of this year’s Beef Month T-shirt sales are in, and once again, they demonstrate our generosity toward our neighbors in need as well as our pride in Kentucky’s beef cattle industry. This year, our friends at Wildcat Wearhouse sold 233 commemorative “Raising the Steaks” T-shirts for $20 each, with half the proceeds going to Feeding Kentucky. That means the T-shirt sales raised $2,320 for the Berea-based food bank. Based on an average cost of $2.66 per meal in Kentucky, that translates to 873 meals for low-income Kentuckians. We are grateful to Wildcat Wearhouse for participating in this May Beef Month fund-raiser for the second year

in a row. We also appreciate everyone who bought a T-shirt to raise awareness of the importance of the beef industry to Kentucky’s economy – not to mention for the pleasure of buying a high-quality T-shirt! These sales figures follow an announcement by our partners at Kentucky Hunters for the Hungry that Kentucky sportsmen and women donated a record 1,460 deer to Kentucky charities in 2018. That amounts to more than 62,000 pounds of processed venison, or 310,960 servings. Many thanks to Kentucky’s hunters for generously sharing their harvest with Kentucky’s hungry. I launched the Hunger Initiative three

years ago to look for creative ways to combat food insecurity in Kentucky. We are moving the needle, but there is much work to be done. Please look for opportunities to help the hungry in your community, whether by donating beef or venison, making a cash contribution, or taking the time to help your local soup kitchen. *** If you have an exhibit for the 2019 Kentucky State Fair, but you don’t have a way to get it there, we can help – but you’d better hurry. The state fair, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA), and the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service will

transport your best preserves, crafts, honey, vegetables, and other exhibits to Louisville from five locations across the Commonwealth. To participate, exhibitors must mail a general entry form or enter online at kystatefair.org/ participate/compete by July 1 with the fee of $15 per exhibitor. Mailed and online entry forms submitted July 2-10 will be charged a late fee, making the cost $20 per exhibitor. Don’t let distance or transportation issues prevent you from participating in your Kentucky State Fair! Go to kyagr.com/marketing/show-and-fair. html for more information, including the entry form and a list of exhibits that may and may not be shipped under the program.

Watch for the Internet Roundup Sale & BBQ Coming in August! Upcoming Sales Blue Grass Lexington Angus Influence Purebred Sale Saturday, August 10, 2019 1:00 PM Let us help put more dollars in your pocket! 24/7 Cattle Receiving

KY Simmental Sale Saturday, September 14, 2019 1:00 PM Sullivan Charolais—Spirit of the Bluegrass Sale Saturday, October 19, 2019 1:00 PM

No Wait Time Quick Turn-Around Check In Hand Same Day 40+ head sell together $13 per hd 30+ head feeders on ticket $20 per hd

Follow us on the Facebook for all upcoming sales and events!

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FEATURE

2 0 1 9 YO U N G C AT T L E M E N ’ S C O N F E R E N C E PA R T I C I PA N T S P R E PA R E T O TA C K L E T H E F U T U R E After ten days of intensive leadership training and a three-city tour which showcased every facet of the beef industry, 60 beef leaders have successfully completed NCBA’s 2019 Young Cattlemen’s Conference (YCC). The event, which is sponsored by Corteva Agriscience, Elanco, Farm Credit, Five Rivers Cattle Feeding, John Deere, Tyson and NCBA, is designed to give participants exposure to the full supply chain. Completion of YCC prepares participants to serve as leaders within their state associations in addition to being advocates for NCBA and the beef community. The 2019 class began its journey in Denver, Colo., with classroom sessions designed to provide background knowledge about NCBA and the work it conducts on behalf of its members and the beef community. In Denver, participants took part in leadership development sessions, media training, and hands-on demonstrations of the work NCBA does as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. The group made a visit to Greeley, Colo., to tour Five Rivers Cattle Feeding’s Kuner Feedyard, the JBS processing plant and an opportunity to meet with the executive team at JBS Headquarters. Prior to leaving Denver, participants also stopped at a nearby Safeway flagship store to learn how beef is being marketed to consumers at the retail level, giving the group an in-depth understanding of every aspect of the beef supply chain. “The market for beef is becoming increasingly complex and it’s important that the next generation of leaders has a complete understanding of how changes in the marketplace impact our product,” said NCBA President-Elect Marty Smith. “The participants in YCC return to their respective state COW COUNTRY •

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associations and serve in a wide variety of leadership roles and many of them rise to the national level, so providing them with the background knowledge they receive during this trip, helps prepare them for that future in leadership. It’s an important function for NCBA and one we take seriously.” Visits in Chicago included stops at Hillshire Farms and McDonald’s global headquarters office. Participants also gained a behind the scenes look at the manufacturing facilities of OSI, Inc., one of the nation’s largest beef patty manufacturers. The 2019 YCC class finished its whirlwind tour in Washington, D.C., where participants learned how NCBA’s policy work impacts their operations and the broader industry. After an in-depth policy issue briefing from NCBA’s lobbyists and staff experts, participants took to Capitol Hill, visiting more than 200 congressional offices to advocate for industry policy priorities. “This week, we had participants from across the nation, come together both as a class and as leaders, to serve the beef industry. The knowledge and friendships that have been gained over the past 10 days will last a lifetime and each of the 2019 participants will leave their mark on the future,” said 2019 YCC Chair Andy Bishop, a cattleman from Kentucky. “Visiting the offices of elected officials in Washington, D.C., to advocate for the issues that affect us, was particularly meaningful for our class and we’re proud of the impact we’ve had this week. After spending time with each of these talented individuals, I’m absolutely confident that the future of the beef industry is bright.”

Kentuckians Kenneth Lowe, Andy Bishop, and Bran Smith atternded the NCBA Young Cattlemens Conference

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FROM DAVE’S DESK DAVE MAPLES Executive Vice President Curveballs, I never could hit one. From the little league baseball games throughout high school I never got the eye for hitting a curveball. As people move along life’s pathways they encounter changes both foreseen and unexpected. Just like the curveball the pitcher would set you up with several straight fastballs and then here it would come straight at you and then curve across home plate. Operating in the ag world delivers its fair share of surprising results. The month long series at the church that my family attends has been titled curveballs. It has been a very good and interesting study. This week the minister talked about changes in the church. He said that the projection was that 7500 churches across America would close in 2019. That is a lot of churches. He was

discussing how his church was addressing the fact that people do not go to church like they did in the past. His church has had a television show but now they are moving to online direct messaging. We had just had a beef council meeting on Thursday where the leader of the meeting was explaining analytics and artificial intelligence where you could pinpoint what consumers were looking for. You can now predict what they plan on buying and when they are on social media and the searches they are making. The preacher was saying the same thing. They know when the high use times are when people are online and they can direct the church message to the people that do not choose to go to church. This particular church is growing and they have no debt. However, everyone

does not agree with the direction that the church leaders are going and that online messaging is giving people an excuse to not go to church. But remember 7500 churches are going to go out of business this year. People are changing and the ways people do business are changing just like the way churches are changing. I get the feeling that people in the cattle industry are about like the people that the preacher is trying to figure out. They don’t want to do business like they have done in the past. There are a lot of pessimistic views about the cattle industry now. The beef packers seem in control of the market and all of the margins available for bringing cattle through the beef supply chain. This has left the cow-calf, stocker operators and cattle feeders with little to squeeze from the operations where the

one constant seems to be higher operating cost and now rising feed costs. The future is built on hope and several positive events are on the horizon for a more optimistic future but you can’t take hopes to the bank. The Mexican tariff deal is resolved, at least for now, but that does not do anything for the current situation, it only stops a threat. The Chinese trade war is far from over but does hold the promise, if resolved, of providing a large marketing opportunity. Awaiting the day is the secret to staying in the fight. While it may have been a long time since finding a surprising windfall, experience tells us it may come when least expected. And you, at last, hit the curveball out of the park.

HEARTLAND HIGHLAND CATTLE ASSOCIATION & REGISTRY REGISTRATION FOR HIGHLAND CATTLE Interested in a Heritage Breed? Research Highland Cattle! For a Free Informational Packet, email or phone heartlandhighlandcattle@gmail.com www.heartlandhighlandcattleassociation.org/registry Info to register Highland Cattle, email: hhcaregistry@gmail.com call: 417.345.0575 text: 417.733.3201

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ON THE EDGE OF COMMON SENSE

THE COST OF RECYCLING BAXTER BLACK, DVM On the Edge of Common Sense We try to be faithful recyclers around the house. I make regular runs to town with the pickup full of newspapers, bottles, aluminum cans, cardboard boxes and tin. I take old pipe and steel to the scrap metal yard and buy car parts at G & B Salvage. Yesterday I noticed our toilet paper was labeled “100% unbleached, 100% recycled paper, 100% post consumer content and 59.4 sq. ft. in total area.” It’s a little like newsprint and I feel odd using toilet paper somebody else had used but I guess we’re doin’ the right thing. Sister Sue said they were using it, too. But it struck her as one of the incongruities of modern times that recycled toilet paper costs more than a roll of the new. I remember the same thing happened

with gasoline when they introduced unleaded. It cost more than regular to which they had to add the lead. How ‘bout sugarless gum? Bottled water? Egg substitutes? Hamburger Helper cost more per pound than hamburger. Are we being skewered on our noble quest to be green and healthy?

realize God intended it for taco meat. But if that same steak goes into a specialty health food meat counter it cost twice as much. It is labeled Au Bouf DeLite and guaranteed to contain less than .01% fat. Cooking instructions are explicit: Boil for three days and pound until flat as hammered gravy.

Several years ago the cattle business went on a binge to recycle manure and feed it back to the steers. Concrete pens, elaborate washing systems, dryers and millions of dollars yielded us a product with the nutrition and palatability of bedding for the price of caviar.

My mother saved and reused tin foil, wax paper, jelly glasses, bacon fat, soup bones, old bananas, cloth diapers, baby clothes, string, ribbon, wrapping paper and cottage cheese containers. There are still those around who straighten and reuse old nails, buckets of bolts, fence wire and lumber.

The trend towards lean beef gives me second thoughts, as well. Just looking at a hubcap size Holstein round steak, you

Maybe, in truth, if you counted the labor, it costs more to straighten old nails than

to buy new ones. But thriftiness forced recycling. Today the high cost of recycled, sugarless, lean, unleaded products is the price we pay to do our part in makin’ the world a better place. So when pondering the use of environmentally correct antique toilet paper we can envision the historical significance and gain some satisfaction knowing this same paper might have been used by Davy Crockett, Oprah Winfrey or Chief Sitting Bull. And if that don’t make it worth the price I’ll send you some slightly used corn cobs. www.baxterblack.com

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FEATURE

C AT T L E PRODUCTION IS A MAJOR C O N T R I BU TO R TO K E N T U C K Y A G R I C U LT U R E Cattle dot the hillsides all across the Commonwealth, in fact more than two million of them, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture. Cattle are raised on 38,657 farms in the state, which is just more than half of all farms. Cattle and calf sales totaled $1.0 billion in the state, or 17 percent of all agricultural sales, making it the commodity with the second largest value of sales. “Raising cattle is both a way of life and a business in the Commonwealth,” said David Knopf, Director, Eastern Mountain Region. “Rural economies and communities are supported by livestock production and the Census data shows cattle production continues to be a strong economic driver.” In Kentucky there were 38,657 cattle operations, with 2,155,894 head of cattle and calves. Both the number of farms and number of cattle have decreased since the last Census of Agriculture in 2012. The number of farms fell by four percent, while the number of cattle and calves was down five percent. Barren County had the largest inventory of cattle and calves with 85,544 head. Madison had the second largest inventory, followed by Pulaski, Lincoln and Bourbon. Forty-seven of the counties had inventory increases from 2012. Allen county increased by 7,630 head, while Wayne County dropped by 14,344. COW COUNTRY •

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Breckinridge County had the largest increase in the number of farms, 92 farms, while the largest decrease was 124 farms in Lincoln County. Other cattle facts for Kentucky include: •

Top 5 Counties ranked by number of operations: Barren, Pulaski, Warren, Madison, Breckinridge.

Top 5 Counties ranked by sales: Allen, Madison, Bourbon, Lincoln, Mercer.

Average cattle sales per farm was $31,218. Allen County had the largest average sales per farm, $104,044.

Average number of head per farm was 56. Boyle County had the highest average, 121 head per farm.

Operations with 1 – 9 head, 24 percent; 10 – 19 head, 18 percent; 20 – 49 head, 28 percent; 50 - 99 head 16 percent ; 100 – 499 head 13 percent; 500 or more head, 1 percent.

All Census of Agriculture information is available at www.nass.usda.gov/ AgCensus. Conducted since 1840, it remains the only source of comprehensive agricultural data for every state and county in the nation and is invaluable for planning the future.

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FORAGES

MANAGING COOL-SEASON PASTURES FOR FALL GRASS GROWTH CHRIS D. TEUTSCH UK Research and Education Center at Princeton

FEATURED VIDEO

It seems early to be thinking about stockpiling cool-season grasses for winter grazing, but how we manage pastures now, can have a profound impact on fall growth. How closely and frequently we graze pastures this summer, can either enhance or reduce our ability to stockpile grass this fall. The objective of this article is to provide some tips that will help to keep cool-season pastures healthy this summer.

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Fertilize and lime according to soil test. If you have not already done it, take a soil sample and apply any needed phosphorous, potassium, and lime. Avoid summer applications of nitrogen to cool-season pastures. They are generally not economical since coolseason grasses are not actively growing during the summer months. In addition, they can inadvertently weaken coolseason grass stands by promoting the growth of summer weeds. Do NOT graze cool-season pastures too closely. Grazing pastures closely during the summer months can weaken cool-season grass stands and promote the growth of warm-season grasses such as bermudagrass or crabgrass in these stands. There is nothing wrong with warm-season grasses, but we want to minimize them in pastures that will be stockpiled for winter grazing. Maintaining 4 to 6 inches of residue in cool-season pastures can also moderate soil temperature and conserve soil moisture. Rest cool-season pastures during the summer months. Resting pastures during the summer months allows them to acclimate to the hot and dry conditions often found in Kentucky. It allows plants to replenish and maintain stored carbohydrates (energy reserves) that can be mobilized in late summer and fall to full rapid growth during the stockpiling period. Graze warm-season grasses during the summer months. During the summer months, warm-season grasses will produce about twice as much dry matter per unit of water used when compared to cool-season grasses. The beauty of warmseason grasses is that they allow you to get off of cool-season pastures when they 14

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are most susceptible to overgrazing. There are a number of perennial warmseason grasses that can used, but in western Kentucky the most productive, persistent, and tolerant to close and frequent grazing is bermudagrass. Johsongrass is another warm-season perennial grass that can provide high quality summer grazing. I am going on record to make clear that I am NOT encouraging anyone to plant johnsongrass, but sometimes it is just there. Because johnsongrass is extremely palatable, it can be grazed out of pastures if not rotationally stocked. Warm-season annual grasses like pearl millet, sorghum-sudangrass, sudangrass, and crabgrass can provide high quality summer grazing. The primary disadvantage with summer annual grasses is that they need to be reestablished every year, which costs money and provides the chance for stand failure. The exception to this is crabgrass COW COUNTRY •

that develops volunteer stands from seed in the soil. Although most people don’t realize (or want to admit it) crabgrass has saved many cows during dry summers in western Kentucky. Feed hay in sacrifice area. During the summer months, it is tempting to just open the gates up and let the cattle free range. However, a better plan is to confine animals to the weakest paddock that you have and feed hay. You will likely damage this paddock, but it will allow you to maintain strong and vigorous sod in the others. This sacrifice area can then be renovated in late fall. When it comes to stockpiling cool-season grasses for winter grazing, what you do during the summer months really does matter! So as we roll into the hottest and driest part of the grazing season, make sure and give your cool-season pastures a little tender loving care. It will pay big dividends this fall!

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Identify pastures to be stockpiled. Choose pastures that are well drained, have a dense sod, and have not been overgrazed. Use UK Variety Testing Results to select varieties to plant in the fall and order seed. If pastures are not growing, confine animals to a sacrifice area and feed hay.

FENCING TIP Install cutoff switches to isolate fence sections. Cutoff switches can be used to isolate fence sections trouble shooting and maitenance. They should be installed at gates or crossings. They can also be used to isolate lower strands of fence that cross flooded creeks or become weeded in late spring. Choose high quality swithces constructed of UV stabilized plastic.

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FEATURE

W H AT I W A N T I N T H E P E R F E C T B E E F C O W Ryon Walker, Ph.D., Livestock Consultant Back in the early 1990s, headlines generated some interest in developing a “green cow.” This green cow was supposed to produce (synthesize) its own food, just like our green forages. I believe it had something to do with photosynthesis, using sunlight as energy. Theoretically, that would have significantly contributed to making the perfect cow: low input with high output. So, did science fail because there is no such thing as a green cow? To the contrary. Science has helped us understand how to identify best management practices that allow us to produce an efficient, sustainable product. However, management is only part of the equation. The animal and the environment are the other parts. We can manage only as well as the cow and her offspring will allow us to. If we can produce a “perfect cow,” then we can more easily manage that cow. So what should the perfect cow look like? What a perfect beef cow looks like phenotypically depends on the eye of the beholder, but what she is capable of should result in the same goals. The perfect cow can possess all the traits you are looking for through genetic selection, phenotypic evaluation, management and production measurements. Fair enough? Not only do I want the perfect cow to possess certain traits, but I think some traits are more important than others. Here is how I rank these traits based on importance, as a percentage. Ryon Walker’s Top Traits in a Beef Cow

Preferred

One: Environment Fit her environment. (35%) How the cow fits with her environment is the most important trait for me. This means she will deliver a healthy calf every year and maintain her body condition throughout the year as she accomplishes that. She will be more efficient at forage utilization because she likely has a lower

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intake, can metabolize and prioritize nutrients more efficiently. If a cow cannot maintain a body condition score (BCS) 5 throughout the year, this can have negative impacts on fertility, milk production and health. Two: Fertility Must calve every 365 days, no exceptions. (25%) In my mind, fertility is one of the most important traits in a female. However, if the cow does not fit her environment, she won’t survive. Because of this, I rank it second. From an economic standpoint, however, fertility ranks the highest. To deliver a healthy calf every year, the cow must calve by 24 months of age (in non- or low-percentage Brahman crosses). Age and weight at puberty are moderately to highly heritable traits. By selecting for these traits in your replacement heifers, you increase their chances of reaching their target calving dates. This cow must calve every 365 days. No exceptions. The average gestation period for a cow is approximately 283 days. Based on what we know, if a cow calves in adequate body condition (BCS 5-6), she needs 60 to 75 days after calving to begin cycling again and have an opportunity to become pregnant naturally. To meet that goal, she needs to conceive within the first 30 days of the breeding season and calve in the first 30 days of the calving season. If she calves at a lower body condition, her recovery period after calving is longer, reducing the likelihood of her conceiving early in the breeding season. Three: Effenciency Be efficient throughout production cycle. (15%)

her

This can be defined in many ways: as a single trait (reproductive, forage, what she produces, etc.) or she can be efficient

in every stage of production. I want a cow that can be efficient in all of the traits listed above and throughout her production cycle. I am looking for a cow that can:

protein prior to weaning. Major factors that can impact the genetic potential of a calf are: •

Length of calving season.

Mother’s milk production.

Forage resources.

Wean a calf greater than or equal to my average weaning weight.

Be moderately framed and weigh less than or equal to 1,300 pounds.

Environmental conditions.

Health.

Maintain a BCS of a 5 (± 0.5) throughout the year.

Five: Disposition

Four: Production Provide the nutrient resources for her offspring to reach their genetic potential. (15%) If the cow fits her environment and calves when she needs to, that calf is likely your biggest source of income. The cow must provide sufficient resources for the calf to reach its genetic potential. This not only includes the genetic potential for this calf to grow, but also the mother’s nutrient resources available during lactation and the conversion of feed and forage resources (other than from its mother) to

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Must not be crazy. (10%) A cow’s disposition is becoming more important as we find ourselves not having the time to deal with poorly dispositioned cattle. Because the average herd size in the U.S. is approximately 40 head, many beef producers have a full-time job outside of raising cattle. So, my cow must not be crazy. Research has shown us that poor disposition in cattle causes stress, resulting in increased risk for reductions in fertility and animal performance as well as higher susceptibility to sickness and disease. So, cull based on disposition. We do!

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BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY

MADISON COUNTY

Submitted by Darla Wethington

Submitted by Janice Jackson

On May 23 Breckinridge County Cattlemen’s held a meeting during BEEF MONTH. The topic of the meeting was the Beef Checkoff Dollar. The speaker was Dave Maples.

On May 23, 2019 Madison County Judge Executive Reagan Taylor read a proclamation declaring that today and every 4th Thursday in May thereafter would be “Madison County Beef Day.” The event was held at Central Kentucky Ag Credit. The Madison County Beef Cattle Association was on hand to grill the hamburgers which were free to the public. Sponsors for the event were: Central Kentucky Ag Credit, MCBCA, Madison County Farm Bureau, Kentucky Beef Council, and Madison County Cooperative Extention Service.

Photos were provided by member Judy Nottingham.

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MCLEAN COUNTY Submitted by Nathan Howard

TODD COUNTY Submitted by Lee Ann McCuiston

The McLean County Cattlemen are proud to present the 2019 $500 Scholarship to Mallory Robertson. Mallory is a 2019 graduate of McLean County High School and will be attending Murray State in the fall majoring in Agriculture Science and Systems Technology. Her family farming operation includes cattle and she is a member of the McLean County Cattlemen’s Association.

The Todd County Cattleman’s Association awarded $500 scholarships to Todd County Central High School Seniors Abigail Berry and Clay Henderson. The award was presented by Tony Berry and Don Laster, President.

At the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, we are powered by people. Since 1973, the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association has served as a resource for information and education for producers, consumers, and the industry. At the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, we are powered by people.

Our membership is growing and we need you to help us stay strong.

Join or renew your KCA membership today!

(859) 278-0899 COW COUNTRY •

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TWIN LAKES

WEBSTER COUNTY

Submitted by Steve Peddicord

Submitted by Carolyn Tapp

The Twin Lakes Cattlemens Association awarded two $500 scholarships to Clinton county seniors that are planning to continue their college studies in agriculture fields. Left to right, Ben Prewitt (Clinton County Vo-Ag teacher), Makayla Cope recipient, Emma McClellan recipient, and Steve Peddicord President of Twin Lakes Assn.

Dennis Wilson, President of the Webster County Cattlemen along with our 2019 scholarship recipients, Gracey Kelley and Shelby Shadrick.

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5 pm to ?: Dinner and visiting at Mill Springs Battlefield Museum with readings by Sean Sexton; Florida rancher, artist, and poet laureate of Indian River County. We hope you can spend the day with us, but you are welcome to come when you can, and leave when you must... nothing special or glamorous, just cattle that graze, and people that work and think of doing things more efficiently and profitably now, and for the generations to come.

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Give Darrel a call for all of your feed bin & cattle handling equipment needs.

Darrel Eastridge Ÿ 270-469-5389 J U LY 2 0 1 9

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FEATURE

UK TO HOST PEST MANAGEMENT FIELD DAY Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky The University of Kentucky will host a Pest Management Field Day July 2 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.

disease management side, plant pathologists will discuss foliar fungicides and in-furrow and seed fungicides available for corn.

During the field day, UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment scientists will share research data to help producers make weed and disease management decisions in corn and soybeans. This is the first time researchers are hosting this field day, which aligns with the UK Grain and Forage Center of Excellence’s commitment to provide producers with timely educational programs.

Certified crop advisers can receive three hours of continuing education units in integrated pest management. Pesticide applicators can receive two general and one specific hours in categories 1A, 10 and 12.

Among the topics weed scientists will discuss is the new herbicide tolerant traits available in soybeans. They will also talk about using cover crops for weed control, application technology and dicamba stewardship. On the

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The field day is from 8 a.m. until noon CDT and will occur rain or shine. To help with meal planning, organizers are asking participants to preregister for the free event at http://bit.ly/2WIp0lv The field day is funded in part by the United Soybean Board’s Take Action Herbicide Resistance Management program.

UK weed scientist Erin Haramoto speaks at a recent field day. Photo by Steve Patton, UK agricultural communications.

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FEATURE

A P R I L B E E F A N D P O R K E X P O R T S B E LOW 2 018 LEVELS; LAMB STILL TRENDING HIGHER April exports of U.S. beef and pork were lower than a year ago while U.S. lamb exports continued their upward trend, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Beef exports totaled 105,241 metric tons (mt) in April, down 5% year-over-year, though export value was down only slightly at $674.2 million. For January through April, exports were 4% below last year’s record pace in volume (412,547 mt) and 1% lower in value ($2.58 billion). On a per-head basis, beef export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $305.61 (down 7% from April 2018). The January-April average was $308.34 per head, down 3% from a year ago. April exports accounted for 12.5% of total U.S. beef production and 10.2% for muscle cuts only, down from 14.1% and 11.3%, respectively, a year ago. For January through April, these ratios were 12.7% and 10.2% (down from 13.4% and 10.8%). Pork exports totaled 216,757 mt in April, down 6% from a year ago, valued at $535.2 million (down 8%). JanuaryApril exports were also 6% below last year’s pace in volume (817,025 mt) and were down 12% in value to just over $2 billion. Pork export value averaged $50.58 per head slaughtered in April, down 13% from a year ago but the highest in 10 months. For January through April, export value averaged $47.25 per head, down 15% from the same period last year. April exports accounted for 26.6% of total U.S. pork production and 23.3% for muscle cuts only – down from 29.9% and 25.8%, respectively, in April 2018. January-April exports accounted for 24.9% of total pork production (down from 27.4%) and 21.8% for muscle cuts (down from 23.7%). Beef demand strong in Korea and Taiwan; Japan edges lower South Korea remains the export growth leader for U.S. beef, with April volume up 18% to 22,584 mt. April value surged 22% to $164.3 million, surpassing Japan

20

as the month’s leading value market. January-April exports to Korea were 11% ahead of last year’s record pace in volume (78,757 mt) and climbed 15% higher in value ($578.5 million). U.S. share of Korea’s total beef imports climbed to 47.5%, up a full percentage point from last year. U.S. share of Korea’s chilled beef imports reached 60%. Taiwan is also coming off a record year for U.S. beef exports and posted a strong April at 5,118 mt (up 15% from a year ago) valued at $47.9 million (up 14%). Through April, exports to Taiwan totaled 18,605 mt (up 6%) valued at $165.6 million (down 2%). In Japan, where all of U.S. beef’s major competitors have gained tariff relief in 2019, April exports were down 6% from a year ago in both volume (24,149 mt) and value ($156.8 million). Export volume through April was steady with last year’s pace at 98,296 mt while value increased 2% to $637.2 million. U.S. market share in Japan is still more than 41%, but this is down from nearly 45% in the first four months of 2017. For chilled beef, U.S. share has slipped two percentage points to 47.4%. In April, Japan’s imports from Mexico more than tripled year-over-year and imports also increased from Canada (up 52%), New Zealand (up 41%) and Australia (up 9%) as competitors of U.S. beef benefited from lower tariff rates. “U.S. beef is holding its own in Japan, but the April numbers are telling,” cautioned USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “With the April 1 rate cut, Australian, Canadian, New Zealand and Mexican beef are now subject to a 26.6% duty while the rate for U.S. beef remains at 38.5%. It is absolutely essential that the U.S. secures an agreement that will level this playing field. U.S. beef’s exceptional growth in Korea is a great example of what’s possible when tariffs are less of an obstacle.” Other January-April highlights for U.S. beef include: • Beef exports to Mexico continue to post strong results, especially for muscle cuts. Combined beef/beef variety meat exports through April COW COUNTRY •

were 2% below last year’s pace at 76,870 mt, but value increased 9% to $372.4 million. For muscle cuts only, exports to Mexico climbed 8% from a year ago in volume (47,379 mt) and 11% in value ($293.3 million). • Strong growth in the Philippines fueled a 20% increase in beef exports to the ASEAN region as volume reached 17,770 mt, valued at $86.9 million (up 6%). Export volume also trended higher to Indonesia and Vietnam. • An exceptional performance in the Dominican Republic is fueling a strong year for U.S. beef in the Caribbean. Exports to the Dominican Republic soared 56% above last year’s pace in volume (3,068 mt) and 50% higher in value ($25 million). The Caribbean was up 16% in volume (9,826 mt) and 18% in value ($65.2 million) with exports also trending higher for Jamaica and the Bahamas. • Exports to Hong Kong slipped 36% from a year ago in volume (27,825 mt) and were 29% lower in value ($236.6 million). Despite a 25% retaliatory duty, U.S. beef exports to China increased 5% to 2,417 mt, but value was down 15% to $18.2 million as most of the tariff cost was borne by U.S. suppliers. China’s beef imports already eclipsed $2 billion through the first four months of this year, up 54% from last year’s record pace, but the U.S. holds less than 1% of China’s booming beef import market. • Exports to Canada were down 15% in volume to 31,070 mt and 14% in value to just under $200 million. Demand has been impacted by larger Canadian beef production in 2019, but elimination of the 10% retaliatory duty on prepared beef products from the U.S. will help exports in this important category rebound. Latin America, Oceania, Taiwan bolster pork exports On May 20, the 20% retaliatory duty on most U.S. pork entering Mexico was removed, as the U.S., Mexico and

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Canada reached an agreement on steel and aluminum tariffs. This was obviously too late to boost April pork exports to Mexico, which sank 30% from a year ago in volume (54,971 mt) and 29% in value to $94.5 million. For January through April, exports to Mexico were down 18% in volume (232,391 mt) and 29% in value ($356.5 million). “Lifting of Mexico’s retaliatory duties was the most welcome news the U.S. pork industry has received in a long time,” Halstrom said. “Now let’s hope the duty-free access U.S. pork has enjoyed in Mexico since late May isn’t short-lived.” President Trump has proposed a 5% tariff on all goods imported from Mexico unless more steps are taken to curb illegal migration at the U.S.-Mexico border. The tariff would take effect June 10 and increase to 25% by Oct. 1, but negotiations are ongoing and Mexico has not yet announced any retaliatory measures. U.S. pork also faces a significant disadvantage in China, where retaliatory duties remain in effect and competitors are positioning to fill China’s looming African swine fever-driven pork shortfall. January-April exports to China/Hong Kong were 16% below last year’s pace in volume (128,200 mt) and down 32% in value ($242 million). Leading value market Japan has not imposed any new tariffs on U.S. pork but its main competitors (European, Canadian and Mexican pork) have gained tariff relief in 2019. January-April exports of U.S. pork to Japan were down 7% from a year ago in volume (123,166 mt) and fell 9% in value ($493.3 million), as U.S. share of Japan’s total imports fell from 36% last year to 32%. The sharpest decline was in Japan’s imports of U.S. ground seasoned pork, which were down nearly $40 million. January-April highlights for U.S. pork include: • A strong performance in mainstay market Colombia and excellent growth in Chile and Peru drove exports to South America 44% above

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last year’s record pace in volume (57,005 mt) and 42% higher in value ($136.9 million). In Colombia, where USMEF has helped bolster demand for U.S. pork through promotional campaigns, educational seminars and enhanced efforts to overcome technical barriers, exports climbed 25% from a year ago to 37,283 mt valued at $79.6 million (up 17%). Last year, even with domestic production on the rise, the Colombian market took more than $215 million in U.S. pork, more than double the value exported in 2016. • Exports to Central America are also coming off a record year in 2018 and climbed 11% in volume (29,321 mt) and 8% in value ($68.3 million), led by growth in Guatemala, Panama and Costa Rica. • April exports to Australia were the largest of 2019, pushing JanuaryApril volume to 37,979 mt (up 37% from last year’s record pace) valued at $98.6 million (up 21%). Exports to New Zealand are also performing extremely well in 2019, climbing 53% in volume (3,390 mt) and 36% in value ($10.1 million). Oceania is a strong region for U.S. hams used for further processing, which is especially important at a time when ham exports to Mexico and China were being pressured by tariffs. • Despite facing ractopamine-related restrictions in Taiwan, exports increased 80% in volume (8,819 mt) and 55% in value ($19.3 million). Exports to Taiwan slumped in 2016 but have been rebounding over the past 2½ years. Momentum continues to grow for U.S. lamb

Strong variety meat demand in Mexico and muscle cut growth in the Caribbean, the Middle East and Panama have fueled an upward trend in U.S. lamb exports. April exports totaled 1,227 mt, up 26% from a year ago, while value was up 15% to $2.2 million. For January-April, exports were up 56% year-over-year in volume (5,400 mt) and up 26% in value ($9.1 million). Muscle cut exports were up 17% in volume to 828 mt and climbed 19% in value to $5.4 million.

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Complete January-April export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics Web page. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online. If you have questions, please contact Joe Schuele at jschuele@usmef.org or call 303-547-0030. NOTES:

• Export statistics refer to both muscle cuts

and variety meat, unless otherwise noted.

• One metric ton (mt) = 2,204.622 pounds. • U.S. pork currently faces retaliatory

duties in China. China’s duty rate on frozen pork muscle cuts and variety meat increased from 12 to 37% in April and from 37 to 62% in July. Mexico’s duty rate on pork muscle cuts increased from zero to 10% in June 2018 and jumped to 20% the following month. Beginning in June 2018, Mexico also imposed a 15% duty on sausages and a 20% duty on some prepared hams. Mexico’s duties were removed in May 2019 but were in effect for the period reported above.

• U.S. beef faces retaliatory duties in China.

China’s duty rate on beef muscle cuts and variety meats increased from 12 to 37% in July 2018. Canada imposed a 10% duty in July 2018 that applied to HS 160250 cooked/prepared beef products. Canada’s duty was removed in May 2019 but was in effect for the period reported above.

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21


FEATURE

KENTUCKY FENCING SCHOOLS HELP PRODUCERS BUILD STRONGER BOUNDARIES Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Livestock producers know a wellconstructed fence can minimize a lot of management headaches. A University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment school is helping producers learn how to improve their fences. The Kentucky Fencing Schools are oneday events organized by Chris Teutsch, UK forage extension specialist, and are in high demand, with each of this year’s three regional schools exceeding initial capacity. Through a mixture of classroom instruction and hands-on demonstrations, UK specialists and fencing industry experts teach producers from across the region the basics of a well-built fence. “If you have ever driven around the countryside, there are a lot of fences but not a lot of well-constructed ones,” Teutsch said. “One of the goals of this school is to help people get the basics of fencing down. That way they can build a strong, durable fence that will last 25 or 30 years or if they decide to hire a contractor to build it for them, at least know what a well-constructed fence looks like.” An added bonus of the school is that the techniques producers learn are ones that can help them qualify for cost-share dollars from the Natural Resources and Conservation Service for new fence construction. The Fencing School is just one of the numerous UK forage- and livestockrelated programs that Logan County cattle producer Butch King has attended since he began farming five years ago after retiring from the military. He said each event has been a positive learning experience for him. “There’s always more information than 22

you can ever use in a year, but I like coming here and talking to other people,” he said. “I always try to target four or five different things that I can go back and evaluate in my operation. He attended the fencing school, because he’s interested in improving his current system. “I have had the farm for five years, and I’ve just been in a state of repair with my fences,” King said. “I have been wanting to start doing some fencing, and some of it I know I can do myself. I have been looking forward to seeing some of this and putting it to use at the farm.” Logan County is home to many livestock producers like King. Knowing there was a local desire and interest for educational programing like this in her county, Leann Martin, the county’s agriculture and natural resources agent with the UK Cooperative Extension Service, was happy to co-host the school with the Logan County Cattlemen’s Association. “Fence construction is something that tends to be passed down through generations, but there are a lot of different things to consider, especially on the law end of it, and there are new techniques and new technologies out there to make it easier,” Martin said. “We have producers that are wanting to learn, wanting to grow and wanting to improve their overall land and products.” Gallagher USA, ACI Equipment Distributers and Stay-Tuff Fencing are integral industry partners for the schools. Additional sponsors are the Kentucky Master Grazer Program and the Kentucky and Forage Grassland Council.

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Copper (min.) Selenium (min.) Zinc (min.) Manganese (min.) Iodine (min.) Cobalt (min.) Vitamin A (min.) Vitamin D (min.) Vitamin E (min.)

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE

M AY W A S D E Q U I C K LY O V E R - S H A D O W E D B Y T R A D E A N D W E AT H E R N E W S Todd Davis, Grain Marketing, UK Research & Education Center, Princeton, KY, Dept of Ag Econonomics USDA provided the first estimate of the marketing year average (MYA) farm price for corn, soybeans, and wheat on May 10, 2019. The May report garners a lot of attention as this is the first estimate of ending stocks and demand for the three primary crops produced in Kentucky. In a typical year, the market would react to information in this report and trade these numbers until the July report provides updated acreage information. This is not a typical year. The WASDE report was partially overshadowed by trade news as the administration raised tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods from 10% to 25%. This news pummeled soybean futures over the fear of a prolonged trade dispute. The other factor diminishing the May WASDE news is the slow start to corn and soybean planting.

May 10 to $4.13 on May 22. 2018-19

2019-20

Change

Ending Stocks (Million Bushel) Corn

2,095

Soybeans Wheat

2,485

+395

995

970

-25

1,127

1,141

+14

U.S. Marketing Year Average Farm Price Ending Stock Corn

$3.50

Soybeans Wheat

$3.30

-$0.20

$8.55

$8.10

-$0.45

$5.20

$4.70

-$0.50

Table 1. Comparison of U.S. Farm Price and Ending Stocks for the 2018 and 2019 Marketing Years for Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat.

The projected ending stocks and marketing year average price for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 marketing years are shown in Table 1. The May report projects corn stocks to increase by 395 million bushels and wheat stocks to increase by 14 million bushels from the 2018 crop. Both corn and wheat stocks are expected to be the largest since the 2016-17 marketing year. Soybean stocks are projected to decline modestly; however, a projected 970 million bushels would still be the second largest on record. The increase in stocks is projected to push the U.S. marketing year average farm price lower to $3.30 for corn, $8.10 for soybeans, and $4.70 for wheat. Kentucky prices tend to be $0.25 to $0.35 per bushel higher than the U.S. price. The price projections suggest continued tight profitability margins unless aboveaverage yields are harvested. The futures market didn’t respond to the bearish market news because of other fundamental news. The next round of tariffs did push soybean prices lower by about $0.06 ½ for most soybean contract months. The extremely slow corn planting progress has pushed the December 2019 contract from $3.72 on 24

Figure 1. Statistical Corn Area Remaining to be planted on May 19, 2019 APH Projected Price Coverage Level

180 $4.00 Initial Revenue Guarantee

55% of Revenue Guarantee Prevented Planting Payment

85%

$612

$337

80%

$576

$317

75%

$540

$297

70%

$504

$277

65%

$468

$257

60%

$432

$238

55%

$396

$218

50%

$360

$198

Table 2. Example Prevented Planting Insurance Payments for a Western Kentucky Corn Farm. COW COUNTRY •

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Soybeans and wheat were carried along and have increased from $8.33 to $8.47 and from $4.25 to $4.76 for soybeans and wheat, respectively. Figure 1 shows the estimated corn area remaining to be planted as of May 19, 2019. The acreage reported in the Prospective Plantings report and the weekly Crop Progress estimate of the corn planting progress is used to calculate the amount planted and the amount remaining to be planted each week. The states are shown in the declining amount of acreage to be planted. The average ranking in corn production is included with the state label. For example, Illinois is the second largest corn-producing state and is estimated to have 8.5 million acres remaining to be planted. The other top five corn producing states are colored green in Figure 1 and are expected to have 23.7 million acres remaining to be planted. Based on NASS data, the U.S. corn crop has 47.3 million acres unplanted as of May 19. The market is reacting primarily to the fear that 50% of the unplanted area is in the topfive corn producing states. Kentucky is projected to have 415 thousand acres remaining to be planted on May 19, 2019. What might happen if the U.S. corn planted area falls by 3.5 million acres and the national yield is reduced by 3% to a yield of 170.7 bushels/acre? Under this scenario, the U.S. corn crop would be reduced by 1 billion bushels to a projected 14.03 billion bushels. Corn stocks would decline by 1 billion bushels and would push the U.S. farm price to $3.75 per bushels assuming no change in the other balance sheet items (Table 2). The rally in the corn futures market is trying to motivate farmers to plant every acre possible as the current cushion in corn stocks could evaporate. What might happen if the soybean area increases above the May 2019 projected area? An increase in soybean planted area of 2.5 million acres combined with trendyields would increase production by 128 million bushels from the projections

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ECONOMIC & POLICY UPDATE in the May report. Assuming the same projected use, ending stocks would increase by 128 million bushels and the U.S. marketing year average farm price would be pushed lower to $7.89 per bushel. Weaker than expected use would further increase stocks and result in an even lower marketing year average price. Will intended corn acres automatically switch to soybeans? Most university budgets across the country suggest that the futures market price is below the breakeven price, assuming farmers are trying to cover all of their economic costs. A wildcard in this discussion is anticipated MFP payments. The administration announced MFP payments will be made on both corn and soybean based on planted acreage. The other details will be provided at a later date. The anticipation of receiving an MFP payment might encourage soybean area to be planted instead of late planted corn or prevented planting payments. What might keep intended corn acres from switching to soybeans? Besides a rallying corn futures market trying to motivate corn area, the crop insurance prevented planting payment could keep some corn acres idled in 2019. Table 2 provides an example of prevented planting insurance payment for an example Western Kentucky corn farm. The initial revenue guarantees provided by revenue protection (RP) insurance for a farm with an APH yield of 180 bushels/acre are shown for the 50% to 85% coverage levels. Farmers that have not completed corn planting by May 31 have the decision to continue planting corn and have reduced insurance coverage or to receive the prevented planting payment. The prevented planting payment is 55% of the revenue guarantee and would be higher than $300 per acre for those that purchased 80% or 85% coverage. Farmers that have not planted all of their intended corn acres by May 31 need to talk with their crop insurance agent to fully understand their crop insurance benefits and responsibilities. COW COUNTRY •

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C A N Y O U R F A R M I N G O P E R AT I O N B E T O O D I V E R S E ? Michael Forsythe, Area Ex tension Specialist in Farm Business Management Pennyroyal Farm Analysis Group Diversity in a farming operation is generally a good thing and serves multiple purposes. Weather and price are two reasons for diversity in a farming operation. Weather may cause a disaster in one crop, but another crop may thrive with those same weather conditions. The same situation may occur with prices where the price for one commodity drops while the price of another stays the same or increases. There may also be premiums for growing one crop versus another crop. The reasons for diversity and the ways to diversify are both endless, but the big question is can you be too diverse?

too much?” Many crops either require equipment that can only be used for that crop or at least special attachments for existing equipment. A farmer may also have to build special storage facilities for these additional crops that they did not need before. This may require a farmer to spend money on equipment/attachments and buildings that could be better used in a different area that would provide more benefit to the operation.

The days of farmers just growing conventional corn, wheat, beans and tobacco have gone by the wayside. The options in types of corn alone are endless. You have yellow, white, blue, amylose, and waxy corn. You can grow corn organically, with GMOs or non-GMOs. Many farmers now also grow barley, canola, and rye instead of just growing wheat. Hemp is also being reintroduced and has added additional layers of diversity to farming because it can be grown for oil, fiber, and seed. Many farmers grow multiple types of vegetables so it is reasonable that a farmer could grow as many as 10-15 different crops in the same year. We are starting to see this more and more with the KFBM farmers. Many of them grow multiple types of corn, including organic and non-GMO, along with wheat, canola, barley, full season soybeans, double crop soybeans, hemp, and as many as three types of tobacco.

THE OLD SAYING “DON’T PUT ALL YOUR EGGS IN ONE BASKET” APPLIES TO FARMERS

The concern with being too diverse is “Are you spreading your resources out

Another issue may be labor management. Having multiple crops ready to plant or harvest at the same time requires the farmer to match his labor availability with the labor requirements. This much diversity may also lead to hiring more employees in order to spread the workforce out more and maybe even more

highly skilled employees to operate all of the equipment. Market availability may also be another issue a farmer needs to consider, especially when considering adding specialty crops like vegetables, hemp, and organic crops. A farmer should not consider a new crop without understanding the market for that crop. They should also do some research on different markets or processors to make sure they will not be hung out to dry once harvest time comes around. This is very important with specialty crops because there are so many new ones that pop up and then they disappear just as quickly as they came up. One other issue with specialty crops that should be considered is the ability to absorb the loss from that crop because of disaster or any other reason. Unlike the traditional crops, a farmer cannot receive crop insurance or government payments on these crops, so if the farmer does not have a good crop and a reliable buyer he will have to count that crop as a complete loss. The old saying “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” applies to farmers and one reason you see farmers planting so many different crops and even spreading those crops out over a larger area. The one thing a farmer needs to remember is that they do not need to become so diverse in their operation that they actually hinder the operation more than they help it. Any farmer considering adding new crops to his operation should closely examine the costs of that crop and comparing it to the additional revenue that could be added by that additional crop.

The Agricultural Economics Department publishes the Economic and Policy Update towards the end of each month.  Each issue features articles written by extension personnel within the department and other experts across the country.  Topics will vary greatly but regularly include marketing, management, policy, natural resources, and rural development issues. If you would like to recieve this newsletter by email, please contact Kenny Burdine at kburdine@uky.edu. You can also view current and past issues online at https://bit.ly/2PoHsZj Co-editors: Kenny Burdine, Alison Davis, and Greg Halich

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KENTUCKY JUNIOR CATTLEMENS ASSOCIATION Submitted by Niki Ellis

The Kentucky Junior Cattlemen’s Board of Directors met on June 5th for their second quarter meeting. The juniors spent the early morning in Danville for an educational program at Burkmann Nutrition. They had employees from Burkmann speak to them about future careers in the agriculture industry and how to correctly mix a ration while the juniors themselves spoke on their own personal future plans. Next, they were served lunch by the Boyle County Cattlemen’s. After the educational program and lunch was complete, they began with their business meeting. The meeting began with each committee giving their reports while members pitched in and gave advice to ideas and events that they will be hosting throughout the year. The juniors discussions mainly consisted of different forms of improving their publicity, finances, membership, and their biggest event of the year, Fall Classic. Once the business meeting was complete, they ended the day off by finishing their Burkmann educational program with a tour of their Danville shop. Upcoming events with the Junior Cattlemen’s: •

Leadership Camp on July 25-27 will take place in Western KY this year. We will be focusing on the finishing and conditioning of cattle before entering the feedlots. Applications are on the KCA Website, limited seats with only 25 available!

Fall Classic on October 4-6 and will be held at Derrickson Agricultural Complex at Morehead, KY, more details to come!

More events to come!

The “Dish on our Directors” This month’s section about one of our directors focuses in on Director at Large, Mandy Cloe. Mandy has been raised on a cattle farm where they raise Red Angus and Shorthorn cattle in Harrison County with her parents, Randall and Susan Cloe and sister Morgan. Mandy has served on the board for two years as a Director at Large. She shows cattle and market lambs while also serving as her high schools FFA President and the Northern Kentucky Regional FFA Vice President. Mandy is currently a senior at Williamstown High School and after graduating plans to attend either Kansas State or Iowa State University and major in Animal Science.

26

COW COUNTRY •

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Mandy Cloe

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COW COUNTRY •

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27


FEATURE

JOHNE’S DISEASE AND DETECTION IN BEEF CATTLE F R E Q U E N T LY A S K E D Q U E S T I O N S MICHELLE ARNOLD DVM-Ruminant Extension Veterinarian, University of Kentucky

What is Johne’s Disease? Johne’s (pronounced Yo-knees) Disease is a chronic disease of profuse, watery diarrhea and weight loss or “wasting” in adult cattle (Figure 1) caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, commonly referred to as “MAP”. This is a slow, progressive disease that begins when calves (not adult cattle) are infected with the MAP bacteria, most often around the time of birth but infection can occur up to 6 months of age and very rarely after. Once MAP gains entry into a calf, the organism lives permanently within the cells of the large intestine where it multiplies and causes the intestinal lining to slowly thicken. With time, the thickened intestine loses the ability to absorb nutrients, resulting in watery diarrhea. There is no blood or mucus in the feces and no straining. The clinical signs of diarrhea and extreme weight loss in spite of having a good appetite, do not show up until 2-5 years of age or even older. There is no treatment available and the animal eventually dies due to starvation and dehydration. The MAP organism is “shed” in the feces before diarrhea starts and continues until the animal’s death. Map bacteria are very hardy due to a protective cell wall that allows survival for long periods (potentially years) in the environment. How do calves get infected with MAP bacteria? Johne’s infection is mainly caused by calves ingesting MAP-contaminated feces from nursing dirty teats. In beef cattle, this is possible in high traffic areas (around hay rings, feeding areas) when mud and manure are splashed on the udder, when calving cows in dirty sheds or barns, or when cattle are held in close confinement. MAP is also shed in colostrum and milk of infected cattle. There is great opportunity for transmission thru colostrum and milk in beef calves since they remain with dams 6-7 months or more and calves steal milk 28

from other cows, too. There can be some spread from an infected cow to her fetus during pregnancy but this is infrequent. Transmission by bulls from semen has never been proven but infected bulls still contaminate the environment with their MAP-infected feces. How did Johne’s Disease get on my farm? In almost all cases, the MAP bacteria arrived when an infected animal was purchased and added to the herd. The bacteria can be hiding in replacement heifers, cows, breeding bulls, recipients used for embryo transfer, or even in an infected calf grafted on a cow. As cow/ calf producers, it is easy to buy (and sell) infected, young breeding age animals with no obvious symptoms even though they are already incubating the disease. The problem is difficult to detect early in subclinical cattle (subclinical=before diarrhea and weight loss develop) but these infected animals can and often do shed high numbers of the MAP organism, contaminating the farm long before there is evidence of a problem. Colostrum from other herds, especially from dairies, is another potential source. Diagnosing a clinical case: Does this animal exhibiting weight loss and diarrhea have Johne’s disease? Options for testing individual cattle: •

Best test: Submission of a dead animal to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. The affected animal should be humanely euthanized by a veterinarian then promptly taken to the lab for a necropsy (similar to a human autopsy). Histopathology (with special staining) on necropsy-collected tissue including confirmation of the MAP organism is the most definitive confirmation of Johne’s. This is necessary if no prior Johne’s cases have been diagnosed on the farm.

COW COUNTRY •

Figure 1: Recently calved cow with signs of Johne’s disease; dull hair coat, profuse watery diarrhea and weight loss. Photo from “Management and Control of Johne’s Disease in Beef Sucker Herds” by Drs.Isabelle Truyers and Amy Jennings. In Practice July/August 2016/Volume 38, page 348. •

Best test in a live animal: PCR on a manure (fecal) sample can be used as a primary diagnostic test to confirm the clinical signs of diarrhea and wasting suggestive of Johne’s disease. PCR is an “organism detection test” meaning it detects the DNA of the MAP bacteria in the feces. The PCR result is also a good indicator of the amount of MAP being shed in the feces (see Figure 2). A fecal culture in which MAP bacteria is grown in the lab is another “organism detection test” available but it is quite slow. Johne’s liquid culture is incubated 42 days while solid media culture is incubated 13 weeks before results are known. Culture allows growth of the

J U LY 2 0 1 9

organism and acid-fast staining for identification. •

The blood test (known as a “Serum ELISA”) is an “antibody detection test”. It is not the preferred test for confirmation of an individual clinical case but can be used reliably if the herd is already known to be Johne’s-infected. The test is not perfect; occasionally, sick cattle with advanced Johne’s disease can test negative on serum. Similarly, healthy uninfected animals can test positive (a “false positive”). However, the blood test is considered a good herd screening test for MAP antibodies and positives should be confirmed with an organism detection test.

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FOLLOW US ONLINE www.kycattle.com www.kybeef.com www.beefinthebluegrass.com www.kybeefnetwork.com www.edenshalefarm.com www.slnllc.com www.cph45.com www.livestockadvertisingnetwork.com

Figure 2: Sample result from a Mycobacterium paratuberculosis real time PCR test for detection of the MAP organism (UKVDL)

www.kentuckycattlemensbeef.com www.beefsolutionsllc.com

Why should I care if I have Johne’s Disease in my herd? Economically, Johne’s disease can be costly in a beef operation. It is believed that for every clinical (sick) cow with Johne’s in a herd, there may be 10-20 more who are infected but not yet showing signs. This is why Johne’s is often referred to as an “iceberg disease”. Obviously death loss and premature culling will mean higher replacement costs to keep herd numbers stable. Perhaps less obvious is that MAPinfected cows showing no signs of disease are less fertile and produce less milk, resulting in lighter calves at weaning and more open cows at pregnancy check. Seed stock operators (including farms that sell any breeding stock, registered or commercial) should enter a rigorous testing program to eradicate this disease once identified. Many are reluctant to test for Johne’s Disease for fear that a positive diagnosis will ruin their reputation. However, a seed stock herd’s reputation

may be damaged much more severely by selling a MAP-infected animal to a customer and introducing a contagious, incurable disease into a buyer’s herd. Not only a tarnished reputation but litigation could result from transactions when the source herd is known to be MAP-infected. Once a diagnosis of Johne’s Disease is made, what are the next steps? Once a diagnosis is made, the first step is to determine the goals for the operation. If selling seed stock, the goal should be to classify as test-negative or work towards it as quickly as possible. Commercial operations may opt to reduce the disease prevalence gradually through testing and management. After the goal is established, decisions on which animals to test and what test to use will depend on the answers to the following questions. What management changes are the herd owners willing to make based on test results? Are they willing to cull positives and/or create test

positive and test negative herds based on results? How much money are they willing to spend on testing? How quickly do they want to see progress towards goals? Remember that herd testing is done on healthy animals so decisions should be made in advance on how a positive result will be handled. If no changes will be instituted, then testing is a waste of time and money. Where can I learn more about Johne’s Disease? The Johne’s Information Center at the University of Wisconsin maintains an excellent website with good producerlevel information at https://johnes. org. An easy-to-understand video about Johne’s can be found at https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=u0Y0ew5yMo8 although it is dairy-oriented. Next Month- Part II: Recommended Herd Testing for Johne’s Disease

www.beefsolutionsverified.com youngproducerscouncil.weebly.com www.learntheyards.com KCA Facebook: @kycattlemen KCA Twitter: @kycattle KCA YouTube: The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Assoc. The YARDS: @TheYARDS KJCA Facebook: @kyjuniorcattlemen YPC Facebook: @youngproducerscouncil ESF Facebook: @EdenShaleFarm KBC Facebook: @kybeef KBC Instagram: @kybeef KBC Twitter: @kybeef

DON’T FALL BEHIND THE HERD! COW COUNTRY •

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KBC Snapchat: @kybeef KBC Pinterest: @kybeef KBC YouTube: KYBEEF Kentucky Cattlemen’s Beef Facebook: @kycattlemensbeef Kentucky Cattlemen’s Beef Instagram: @kycattlemensbeef

29


BREED SPOTLIGHT: SANTA GERTRUDIS

D ATA D R I V E N : I N F L U X O F D ATA , N E W G E N E T I C T O O L S L AU N C H S A N TA G E R T R U D I S T O G R E AT E R H E I G H T S Jessie Topp-Becker, Freelance Writer It’s been nearly eight decades since the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) recognized Santa Gertrudis as a distinctive beef breed. Santa Gertrudis breeders have long admired the breed for its maternal traits, feed efficiency and ability to adapt to harsh environments, but the breed has often stayed in the shadows due, in large part, to a Bos indicus bias from a portion of the beef industry. In the last decade, the tides have changed. Santa Gertrudis is no longer a small breed with limited performance data and genetic tools; instead, it’s an innovative breed using cutting-edge tools and technology to compete globally with other breeds. This dramatic shift is the result of leaders with vision, committed breeders and a knowledgeable geneticist. King Ranch® Legacy King Ranch developed the Santa Gertrudis breed of cattle in the 1920s in response to a need to have cattle that could perform in the challenging South

Texas environment. Since the breed was recognized by the USDA in 1940, the King Ranch has continued to breed and develop Santa Gertrudis cattle, using them as seedstock for their commercial cattle operations. Simultaneously, cattlemen throughout the Unites States, Mexico, South America, Australia and other countries also took interest in the breed and started using them in commercial herds and/or establishing seedstock operations. After decades of building its Santa Gertrudis seedstock herd with a focus on fertility, longevity and performance in their tough environment, King Ranch began collecting and utilizing data with the ultimate goal to remain competitive in the beef industry. In 2003, King Ranch began working with John Genho, now the senior director of technical services at Neogen Corporation, to collect data and develop a genetic evaluation program. The result was its own withinherd Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) system.

Since launching the within-herd EPD system, carcass quality has been a primary focus, while still maintaining selection pressure on maternal, growth and functional traits. In the last decade, King Ranch has made dramatic improvements to its Quality Grades. “We have seen an increase in our percent Choice and Prime Quality Grades of more than 70 percent, and we have maintained growth and continued to improve fertility simultaneously,” says Tylor Braden, area manager for cattle operations at King Ranch. “It’s the definition of a balanced approach, and what we believe is the most profitable long-term approach.” King Ranch recently created its own suite of fertility EPDs, including Heifer Pregnancy, Breed Back and Stayability EPDs, as well as its own Fertility Index. “While we do highly value RFI and feedlot feed efficiency, and consider these traits, along with carcass traits, in our selection process, our top priority continues to be to select for and make the most fertile

King Ranch’s top priority is to select for and make the most fertile females possible. Here a King Ranch Santa Gertrudis firstcalf heifer and her calf graze a South Texas pasture.

cows possible,” Braden explains. “We go to extensive lengths to manage our correlations between traits to make sure we never sacrifice cow efficiency. “We still breed cattle today with the original focus, which we started, and that’s to make the most profitable animal we can,” Braden adds. “It’s why we’ve made such dramatic improvements.” Decades of data collection, balanced selection pressure and a focus on profitable production in challenging environments resulted in King Ranch Santa Gertrudis cattle that had growth, fertility and carcass quality – and the data to prove the performance. The value of such a large data set to the entire Santa Gertrudis breed became obvious and a few years ago, King Ranch offered to share the data with Santa Gertrudis Breeders International (SGBI), hoping it would help launch the breed into a new era. New Tools, New Possibilities In 2012, King Ranch loaned all its Santa Gertrudis herd data to SGBI. There was only one catch – the data must be used to help promote the breed. During a time when the issue of data ownership is topof-mind for many breeders and breed associations, King Ranch’s decision to voluntarily share its data with SGBI is almost unheard of. “King Ranch continues to move forward, looking for new tools that are beneficial to the breed,” says John Ford, SGBI executive director. “It’s great to have a member who has that kind of vision and is willing to work for the betterment of the breed.” That data set, along with the association’s dataset collected by other Santa Gertrudis breeders, enabled SGBI to strengthen the breed’s genetic evaluation. Santa Gertrudis was the first beef breed to utilize the single-step model, which most other breeds have now adopted, that utilizes genomic relationships to estimate the genetic merit of an individual animal. CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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To beef up your herd, attend the 41st Kentucky National Show and Sale, or contact these breeders. Pat & Beverly Heath Heath Farms 387 Goodin-Williams Rd. Hodgenville, KY 42748 270/358-4820

Larry Osborne Mosby Creek Ranch 385 Mosby Creek Road Sparta, KY 41086 937/604-4999

The Smith Family Rebel Ridge Santa Gertrudis 1501 Rebel Ridge Road LaGrange, KY 40031 502/222-9667

Cody and Whitney Mattingly 488 Rock Haven Road Brandenburg, KY 40108 270/668-2310

Randall & Barb Beckman Beckman Farms 2899 Memory Lane Lanesville, IN 47136 812/952-2190

John & Karen Taylor Windcrest Farms 1238 Claggett Road Leitchfield, KY 42754 270/879-9556

Charles and Deanna Parker Parker Farms 5552 Jackson Highway Cave City, KY 42127 270/678-5302

Doug Estes Estes Farm 2805 New Glendale Road Elizabethtown, KY 42701 270/765-7869

Osborne Livestock Company 385 Mosby Creek Road Sparta, KY 41096 859/991-2438

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Jewett Borden III Cedar Creek Farm 696 Cundiff Lane Shepherdsville, KY 40165 502/718-5441

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District VI Show and Sale Contact: Larry Osborne 385 Mosby Creek Road Sparta, KY 41086

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BREED SPOTLIGHT: SANTA GERTRUDIS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30

In 2013, SGBI released the first genomicenhanced (DNA-verified) EPDs for Bos indicus-influenced cattle. “As a breed, we’ve been quietly taking some very positive steps forward that have, in turn, benefitted the whole industry,” Ford says. “The single-step methodology allows all breeds the opportunity to develop genomic-enhanced EPDs,” he adds. “Whereas the double-step methodology would’ve been cost prohibitive to a majority of breeds in America and limited genetic improvement across all breeds within the industry.” Just five years later, the association released two new fertility EPDs – Heifer Pregnancy and Breed Back – and a new genetic selection tool, Igenity® Santa Gertrudis, a DNA-verified genetic selection tool that enables ranchers to evaluate candidate replacement heifers sired by registered Santa Gertrudis bulls. “We’ve got some of the best tools within the industry for our seedstock producers to make breeding or mating decisions,” Ford says. “But we’ve also got indexes and tools for our commercial cattlemen – the kind of tools that don’t overwhelm them.” Breeders Helping Breeders While King Ranch’s contribution helped strengthen the breed’s genetic evaluation, breeder support was key in the breed’s ability to make such drastic changes in a relatively short time frame. Ford, Genho and Braden agree that all SGBI members played a vital role in building the data set that has allowed the association to provide a suite of valuable tools to its members. “There’s a whole lot of people who have brought this together,” Braden says. “You have a lot of people who came together at the right time to adopt technology and develop tools, and then use those tools,” Genho adds. SGBI members have come on board in unique ways; some by providing DNA results, others by collecting carcass data and others by ultrasounding their cattle. “They are definitely participating and are improving their cattle because of the data they’re turning in and the tools they’re using,” Genho says.

32

Decades of data collection, balanced selection pressure and a focus on profitable production in challenging environments have resulted in King Ranch Santa Gertrudis cattle that have growth, fertility and carcass quality – and the data to prove it. After working with the breed for the last two decades, Genho has had a front-row seat to the 360-degree turnaround. “It’s a cool process to watch a group of people who weren’t innovators 20 years ago, become innovators,” he says. “It’s neat to watch people pick up technology and say, ‘this really works; we can use this.’ That’s really what happened – they have become innovators.” Significant Improvements The influx of data and, ultimately, the variety of new tools available to breeders have had a profound impact on the breed – enabling breeders to better identify profitable genetics and put selection pressure on the traits the breed needed to improve. Carcass quality is one area that was in desperate need of improvement. Bos indicus-influenced breeds aren’t often recognized for carcass quality, but Santa Gertrudis is changing that. Nearly seven years since implementing the single-step method the results speak for themselves. Cattle in the 2018 SGBI Steer Feedout graded 96 percent Choice, with 51 percent hitting the Premium Choice mark. The new tools have allowed breeders to put selection pressure on carcass traits, but Ford is confident Santa Gertrudis cattle have always been capable of grading well.

COW COUNTRY •

“Once we had these new genetic tools in place, we were better able to identify those genetics within our population that helped us make these improvements,” Ford says. While breeders have increased their selection pressure on carcass traits, the tools have also allowed them to keep a close eye on reproductive, efficiency and growth traits – traits that have the greatest impact on profitability for cowcalf herds. “I hope the Heifer Pregnancy and Breed Back EPDs are just the beginning of the maternal-type traits,” Genho says. “Because ultimately, most of the profitability in bull selection has to do with maternal ability in the cow-calf segment, not carcass quality.” “While prioritizing your genetic selection to maximize calf production yields higher short-term dividends, selecting to maximize cow quality and fertility maximizes long-term profitability and operational sustainability,” Braden adds. Validating Profitable Performance In recent years the association has used the tagline Data Driven…Profit Proven. And while the results from the steer feedout and individual operations are positive and exciting, it’s not the only way the association is working to validate this information. SGBI has progressively

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sought out research partners at the university level. Over the last two years, the association has announced research projects at Auburn University and Utah State University, while simultaneously working to identify additional research opportunities to validate the breed’s profitable performance. “Sometimes I feel like we’re off the industry radar,” Ford says. “A lot of people don’t think of Santa Gertrudis, but we remain out here on the cutting edge of genetic technology and also eager participants in the kind of research that validates profitability for commercial cattlemen.” Not unlike other Bos indicus-influenced breeds, Santa Gertrudis fights for acceptability in the marketplace, especially as it relates to carcass quality and fertility. Today, with nearly 11,000 genotypes on record and data to back up the breed’s claims, Santa Gertrudis has earned its rightful place in the beef industry. “We have a stigma of being a small, niche breed, but we have a place at the table to compete with any breed across the nation at any level,” Braden says. “We are not a carcass breed and we are not strictly a maternal breed; we can play in both arenas.”

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PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM State and National Beef Promotion and Research Programs Information is required by 7 CRF 1260.201. Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential per 7 CRF 1260.203.

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Both the seller and the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Kentucky Beef Council. DATE OF SALE

STATE OF ORIGIN*

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X

$1.OO per Head State Checkoff

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Send Report and Remittance to: Kentucky Beef Council 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 For additional information: call 859-278-0899 or email beef@kycattle.org According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0581-0093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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BREED SPOTLIGHT: SANTA GERTRUDIS

S A N TA G E RT RU D I S CAT T L E M A K E M E S M I L E F RO M E A R TO E A R ! John S. Taylor, KSGA President Growing up a “city” boy in the small town of Leitchfield just west of Elizabethtown, I was always excited to visit my grandfather’s farms in Ohio and Hopkins counties. But I learned more about cattle and farming closer to home on farms owned by J. C. Lee and Sons right here in Grayson County. Their colorful commercial cattle herds and the many, many square bales of hay hauled on the back of a refitted school bus helped develop my love of farming (and the joy of round hay bales). But it was my Uncle Carlton Larkins who sparked my interest in Santa Gertrudis cattle. He hosted the first Alabama Santa Gertrudis field day/ meeting as the first President of Alabama Santa Gertrudis Association at his Circle L Ranch near Elba, Alabama. I was a high schooler then and learned so much about these gorgeous, red cattle that day. Growing up in the sixties, being a cowboy was always a popular dream for many kids. The cows and cowboys seemed to come from Texas and that’s exactly where this first American beef breed originated—deep in the south of Texas on King Ranch. So owning my first few head of Santa Gertrudis cattle in 1983 made my cowboy dreams come true. Maybe a KING RANCH edition Ford truck will appear in my driveway one of these days…another dream. So, how do Santa Gertrudis (named for the river running through King Ranch) cattle fair in Kentucky and areas beyond? With their bos indicus breed type of 3/8 Brahma and 5/8 Shorthorn, Gerts were developed to handle heat. But several university studies and my own experience with some rough winters in the 36 years since we established WindCrest Farm has proven these big, red beauties can handle (not just tolerate) the heat and the cold. In the hot, humid summers of Kentucky, you won’t find Gerts standing in a pond. They’ll be out picking grass and keeping their production at peak performance. Their short coats make it a lot easier to prepare for the show ring too. My oldest son, Nolan, and I started showing our registered heifers and bulls when he was eleven years old. The miles pulling our 34

second to none as a commercial cow. Ask anyone who has tried them and they will confirm this. The Red Angus Association has recently approached SGBI (Santa Gertrudis Breeders International) to do some embryo and A’I work together. They have seen the value in these females and the demand for Star 5 bulls is growing every year. This year the national champion Star 5 was a Gert/ Red Angus cross bred by Heath Farms in Hodgenville, KY and shown by Cody Heath. The Santa Gertrudis Breeder’s now utilize DNA markers as well as EPD’s, so any information you want is available on our animals. Data that includes tenderness, marbling IMF, REA, a carcass score, and a few others. There are also growth indicators. All these figures provide breeders with pertinent information for breeding the best cattle possible. Learning to select good breeding stock can start young. As always, the Junior Santa Gertrudis Show will follow the KY National Sale on July 20th. Kids eight years to 21 years can be members of the Kentucky Junior Santa Gertrudis Assoc. and participate in the show with animals they bring (or buy at the sale that day—if they are eligible to show). Kids younger than eight can “borrow” a heifer and show in the Peewee class with help from an experienced cattleman and learn what is involved in showing. Prizes are given to all who participate in this learning class.

Kentucky Santa Gertrudis President, John S. Taylor, and longtime KY Gert breeder, Pat Heath, enjoy showing their cattle. cows down the highways to cattle shows from Texas to Ohio and most places in between have about wore out our first trailer, but the memories of wins, losses and friends along the way keep us rolling down the road. Santa Gertrudis cattle offer many advantages over other beef breeds. They are highly resistant to pink eye. Gerts are wonderful mothers from both ends COW COUNTRY •

of the hoof…their milk production and quality is superb while their mindfulness in protecting their young from predators (buzzards, coyotes, dogs, etc.) is remarkable. Their disposition is quite calm and gentle, but as with any breed, an occasional rodeo can occur. If you are a commercial cattleman take a hard look at Santa Gertrudis. The F1 Gert (known as the Star 5 in the breed) is J U LY 2 0 1 9

Make plans to see for yourself how great Gerts are by coming to the Kentucky National Santa Gertrudis Sale at the WKU Ag Expo Center in Bowling Green, KY on Saturday, July 20th at 11:00 c.t. The Futurity Show of sale animals will be held Friday, July 19th at 9 a.m. You’ll be able to see all the sale animals and meet breeders from several states who will be bringing their animals to the 41st KY Nat’l sale which will include both purebred Santa Gertrudis and Star 5 cattle. For more information contact Sale Manager: Darren Richmond at (423)364-9281

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BREED SPOTLIGHT: SANTA GERTRUDIS

Two-year old Luke Taylor is the fourth generation raising Gerts in Leitchfield

Kentucky Santa Gertrudis Juniors: Shelby Smith (L) and Ashley Osborne (R) help Scott Taylor show a calf in the KY Nat’l Junior Show in Bowling Green

The 2018 National Star 5 Points Champion. A F1 Hereford/Santa Gertrudis bred by Heath Farms of Hodgenville and owned by WindCrest Farm in Leitchfield. COW COUNTRY •

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35


MEMBERSHIP DIVISION 3 (UP TO 75 MEMBERS)

Fayette

MEMBERS CAN ENJOY $250

DISCOUNT WITH

FLAHERTY TRACTOR COMPANY, LLC • CORNER OF HIGHWAY 144 & 1816, FLAHERTY, KENTUCKY www.fahertytractorco.com • (270) 828-3173 • (270) 877-2173

2019

2018

Difference

77

75

2

Taylor

74

67

7

Muhlenberg

73

75

-2

Webster

72

70

2

Grant

72

75

-3

Pendleton

66

57

9

Out of State

65

67

-2

Todd

63

67

-4

Nelson

62

65

-3

Union

61

45

16

Ohio

60

62

-2

Woodford

55

57

-2 49

Knox

55

6

Hancock

54

48

6

Oldham

53

59

-6

DIVISION 2 (76-150 MEMBERS)

2019

2018

Difference

Monroe

157

148

9

Northern Kentucky

153

149

4

2

Metcalfe

133

130

3

29

Daviess

131

132

-1

Franklin

126

122

4

Fleming

122

105

Caldwell-Lyon

114

89

Northeast Area

113

123

-10

Nicholas

42

39

3

Jackson

106

107

-1

Wayne

41

39

2

Scott

105

105

0

Lewis

39

36

3

DIVISION 1 (151+ MEMBERS)

2019

2018

Difference

Barren

492

500

-8

Breckinridge

410

571

-161

Shelby

355

353

Adair

317

288

Marion

299

329

-30

Bath

271

306

-35

Rockcastle

53

51

2

Twin Lakes

51

69

-18

Estill

49

44

5

Whitley

49

51

-2

Highlands

44

40

4

Mason

44

71

-27

17

Montgomery

44

53

-9

25

Carroll

42

42

0

Madison

265

249

16

Hart

250

224

26

Clark

249

217

32

Lincoln

248

237

11

Trimble

104

104

0

Bullitt

37

31

6

Logan

247

286

-39

Trigg

102

106

-4

Clay

35

28

7

Grayson

244

268

-24

Pulaski

101

108

-7

McCreary

35

34

1

Jessamine

214

160

54

Anderson

96

109

-13

Simpson

33

42

-9

Bracken

193

189

4

Edmonson

93

91

2

Robertson

32

20

12

McLean

32

23

9

Hardin

193

202

-9

Boyle

93

90

3

Washington

193

204

-11

Owen

90

83

7

Hopkins

31

21

10

Meade

190

165

25

Louisville Area

78

86

-8

Butler

29

36

-7

Casey

187

172

15

Campbell

78

77

1

Christian

176

190

-14

Russell

78

88

-10

Larue

172

198

-26

Purchase Area

78

84

-6

Warren

166

172

-6

Garrard

77

89

-12

Mercer

164

185

-21

Clinton-Cumberland

76

81

-5

Bourbon

75

85

-10

Mountain

71

81

-10

Henry

157

159

-2

Green

151

153

-2

Harrison

150

166

-16

Laurel

147

159

-12

Allen

132

167

-35

2019

Totals as of: June 17, 2019

10648

2018

10861

Difference

-213

If you need anything for membership, please contact Nikki Whitaker at (859) 278-0899 or nwhitaker@kycattle.org 36

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Crittenden

26

23

3

Livingston

25

23

2

Calloway

21

27

-6

Menifee

18

28

-10

Henderson

12

10

2

Magoffin

10

8

2

Powell

8

8

0

River Hills

7

9

-2

Pike

5

7

-2

Eastern Foothills

4

9

-5

Gallatin

4

0

4

Bell

1

1

0

Harlan

1

2

-1

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2018-19 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION * MEMBERSHIP YEAR 10/1/18– 9/30/19

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COW COUNTRY •

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$

Allen ................................$40 Anderson ........................$25 Bourbon ..........................$20 Boyle ...............................$35 Bullitt ...............................$20 Butler ..............................$25 Franklin ...........................$25 Highlands .......................$20 (Boyd, Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, & Martin)

Hopkins ...........................$35 Laurel ..............................$35 Lewis ..............................$35 Lincoln ............................$25 Louisville Area ................$20 (Jefferson, & Spencer) McCreary ........................$25 Magoffin ..........................$20 Menifee ...........................$25

Mountain........................$25 (Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Morgan, Owsley, Perry & Wolfe) Oldham ...........................$35 Taylor ..............................$20 Twin Lakes ......................$20 Warren ............................$40 Wayne .............................$25 Whitley ............................$25 Woodford ........................$25

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1,251-1,500

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251-500

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1,501-1,750

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501-750

$650

1,751-2,000

$1,900

751-1000

$650

> 2,000

$1,900 + .38/HD

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37


KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL

THE POWER OF INFLUENCE ALISON SMITH Retail and Food Service When I first started with the Kentucky Beef Council, we would hear statistics about how one person could influence nine other people with just one statement. So, we focused on those people who would naturally be talking to a lot of people, folks like dietitians and teachers. We also ran expensive television advertisement or multiple radio spots to try to reach the masses. Fast forward 15 years, now a person can get on Facebook or Instagram, scroll down a few times, and be influenced by whoever they are following in about 30 seconds multiple times a day and share it with all their friends and then their friends share it! Oh, how the times have changed! According to fb.com, as of March 2019, there were an average of 1.56 billion active users on Facebook. Instragram has one billion users every month. Today, the amount of people that one person can influence with just one pin/post/story is huge!

Knowing all that, it would behoove KBC not to be involved with influencer marketing. But what is influencer marketing? According to Forbes Community Voice, influencer marketing is creating a relationship between an influencer and a brand while the influencer promotes the brand’s products or services. Influencers usually have a loyal following who want to know or learn more about what they are posting. The influencers create content while incorporating the brand’s messages. Anyone can become an influencer allowing them to reach large target audiences. With the creation of online platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, people have a smorgasbord to choose from when they are online. The advantage of influencer marketing, the influencers have built trust with their followers, they are engaging with them on a daily basis, thus they can influence a large audience who might otherwise be

skeptical of a commercial or social media ad. So, what is KBC doing when it comes to influencer marketing? This past year KBC teamed up with an agency, 2060, to work with a group of food and lifestyle Instagrammers. From January to April, we contracted with six influencers who created 69 Instagram stories and posts which organically reached 37,835 followers and had 4,610 likes and 257 comments. The posts and stories were also promoted which resulted in 772,422 impressions and reached 128,216 followers with 99 post engagements (comments, shares, etc.) and 69 link clicks. KBC will continue to work with the influencers through June and will revaluate for the rest of the year. However, influencer marketing is not just paying for posts. It’s about developing relationships and influencing the influencers. Thanks to partnership with the Kentucky Beef Council, a mix of blogger, channel and nutrition influencers attended the Raising the Steaks at the Y.A.R.D.S. tour, March 20-21 in Lexington, KY. Attendees received an afternoon butcher lesson, photography session, distillery tour, taste testing panel, tour of the Blue Grass Regional Marketplace and a tour of Eden Shale Farm over the course of the twoday trip. Sixteen influencers joined us for the tour, with a focus on sharing beef’s sustainable footprint and how it plays a role in a healthy and sustainable diet.

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Prior to the tour, a few had reservations about including beef in a healthful diet but after learning about beef’s lifecycle and the sustainability efforts taken by beef farmers and ranchers, all attendees had a positive opinion about beef and beef production, intending to share its positive message with their clients, followers, students and circles of influence. KBC plans to continue building relationships with influencers. Currently, they are building a core group of influencers that blog, vglog (videos), post, and pin and will be providing them rich beef content they can share with their followers. Now you might be asking, “How can I get involved and influence?” Well, you can start by following some of our influencers: Rachel Ballard @feastandfarm Sarah Caton @spaceplaceandgrace Alan Cornett @eatkentucky Jess Kielman www.mom4real.com Karen Ray @themrskray Emily Riddle @gatheredliving Chris Sussman @the_bbq_buddha Rachel Wallace @rachelshealthyplate You can also start your own Instagram stories or posts, blog, or videos! We always need more farming folks telling their stories! Why not you?

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KENTUCKY BEEF COUNCIL EVENTS: May 8th Trigg County Cookout Trigg and Christian County Cattlemen’s partnered with WKDZ and KBC to sample Adobo Beef Steak Tacos and provide shoppers with summer grilling tips.

BEEF MONTH WRAP-UP KATELYN HAWKINS Director of Product Marketing Kentucky Beef Council traveled throughout the Commonwealth this May celebrating Kentucky’s beef farmers Raising the Steaks in providing consumers nutritional, delicious beef products they can feel confident feeding their families. KBC joined county cattlemen’s associations and industry partners to host numerous events sampling beef month specific recipes to kick off summer grilling season and answer questions about beef production and preparation. Thank you to everyone who madethese events and beef month a huge success! During our celebration of beef month, the Kentucky beef industry wanted to assist those who are not certain where their next meal may come from as 1 in 6 Kentuckians is food insecure. KBC continued the #BeefMonthGivesBack campaign this year in partnership with Wildcat Wearhouse to offer Raising the Steaks t-shirts with 50% of the proceeds donated to Feeding Kentucky. Through the sale of shirts this May, over 900 meals were donated to families in need across the state.

May 10th Hinton Mill’s Mother’s Day Grill Out KBC and local radio stations hosted onair cooking shows with local celebrities showcasing Ribeye Steak with a Blue Cheese Butter and Adobo Beef Steak Tacos at Hinton Mills in Flemingsburg. May 16th Beef Month Dinner Blue Grass Regional Marketplace hosted a progressive dinner featuring recipes from Beef Its What’s For Dinner. KBC provided tips on preparation of these dishes and how to select beef dishes for your summer grilling parties. May 17th Bath County Beef Day Bath County Cattlemen’s Assn. hosted a beef month event in Owingsville selling burgers with KBC providing samples of Adobo Beef Steak Tacos. May 23rd Madison County Beef Day Central Kentucky Ag Credit in Richmond hosted the first annual Madison County Beef Day event with free Kentucky Cattlemen’s Ground Beef burgers provided by the Madison Co. Cattlemen’s Assn. and Adobo Beef Steak Taco samples from KBC. May 25th Muhlenberg County Farmers Market KBC sampled Spicy Korean Beef and Cucumber appetizers with the Muhlenberg County Cattlemen’s Assn. as well as discussed cuts of beef and grilling tips with shoppers. May 28th Boone’s Butcher Shop Customer Appreciation

WEED CONTROL IN PASTURES PAGE 20

2019 FARM INCOME FORECAST PAGE 28

Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503

NON PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID LOUISVILLE KY PERMIT #879

COW COUNTRY •

KCA LEADERSHIP CLASS SELECTED

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KBC joined Nelson County Cattlemen’s Assn. for Boone’s customer appreciation event providing hamburgers and samples of beef steaks with blue cheese butter as well as summer grilling information.

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK BECKY THOMPSON Director of Kentucky Beef Network

Last week I attended the National Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Coordinators meeting in Fort Collins Colorado. This conference is a chance to collaborate with other BQA Coordinators from across the United States and learn about BQA’s role in exporting US Beef, Consumer

Perceptions of BQA and using a responsible beef message for consumers, along with discussing challenges, issues, and opportunities for the Beef Industry. We did a tour of three operations in Colorado to see how they are using BQA in their operations.

Coyote Ridge Ranch- Hereford Ranch: “BQA starts in the cowherd with a foundation focused on quality genetics. Sound structure, fertility, adaptation to the environment will all help to improve our market cattle performance, prevent animal welfare issues later, and provide the best start for cattle in the beef chain. In other words...Stockmanship” said Hampton Cornelius.

Wolf Creek Dairy is two years old and milk 5000 cows on a rotating carousal two times a day

Kuner Feedyards manages 52 miles of bunk space for their cattle and has nearly 100K animals on feed. The crew does a great job of taking care of all of the animals. Calves on feed at Kuner’s will complete a three step ration process as part of their finishing phase. Here is a picture of flaked corn which is a main ingredient in all of their rations.

BQA Coordinators representing Beef Councils, Cattlemen’s Associations and Land Grant Institutions. 40

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KENTUCKY BEEF NETWORK

EDEN SHAL E FA R M U PDATE DAN MILLER KBN Industry Coordinator

Man, June was a wet month! It certainly created a problem with trying to make hay, but any time it is cool and wet in the summer and the grass keeps growing, I will not complain. On May 31st we AI bred all our cows at the farm. Keeping the commercial herd in mind, we bred to three different bulls. We used a Hereford bull on our black cows, hoping for a black baldy calf. For our colored cattle (Baldies, smokes, & reds) we used either an angus or black simmental bull, again shooting for a black baldy or a smoke. Ten days after breeding all the cows are turned out with black cleanup bulls for 60 days. I would like to thank David McGlothlin and Lance Fisher with Genetics Plus for coming and doing the breeding work at Eden Shale Farm. They do a phenomenal job and I would highly recommend their services to anyone who would like to artificially breed their cattle.

This past month we have stayed busy making hay when the weather allows and spraying pastures when its too wet to do hay. We try to spray about 60-80 acres a year which, when done on rotation, allows us to spray the entire farm every 5 years. We spray with GrazonNext HL. This product is used for broadleaf control and it also has a residual that will last the entire season, keeping unwanted weeds from coming back later in the season. In June we had some damage repaired from a storm back in May that tore some metal roofing off of a few barns. Joshua Johns Contracting made the repairs and I would like to thank them for their prompt and professional service. This summer has been much busier than others in terms of tours and hosting folks at the farm. In late May we hosted a journalist from south Georgia who was writing a story and wanted to include some

of the management practices that we are doing at Eden Shale. In June we averaged one tour per week. We hosted the new director for NRCS in Kentucky, along with some of his staff. We hosted a leadership group that was with the Division of Conservation. We gave a tour for a group of Agriculture and Natural Resource agents. We hosted the new EPA director in Kentucky. And lastly, we had a well attended field day which featured the fenceline feeding system and the large bale feeder. We certainly appreciate all those that took time to come to the farm and see what we are doing. If you would like more information on any of our practices, check out our website at www. edenshalefarm.com and be sure to look at the resources tab for more details on specific projects.

K E N T U CK Y B E E F N E T W O R K F ACI L I T AT O R S

Ben Lloyd

Whitesville, KY (270) 993-1074 strridge@aol.com COW COUNTRY •

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Charles Embry

Cave City, KY (270) 646-5939 dale.embry@yahoo.com

Jacob Settles

Springfield, KY (859) 805-0724 jacob.settles4@yahoo.com

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Ron Shrout

Winchester, KY (606) 205-6143 ronshrout@bellsouth.net

Jeff Stephens

Ewing, KY (606) 782-7640 stephensbeef@gmail.com 41


For More Information: Commercial cattlemen trust registered seedstock breeders to make documented genetic improvements that provide them the opportunity to succeed. From 2004-2014, the 2015 AICA National Cattle Evaluation Genetic Trend illustrates Charolais seedstock breeders are doing their job!

Lower birth weight ■ MORE LIVE CALVES Increased weaning weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT WEANING

The trend shows dramatic improvements in every trait of economic importance.

In the feedlot

2004-2014 NCE Charolais Genetic Trends BW

WW

YW

CE

CW

More pounds. More profits. Charolais keep it real. © American-International Charolais Association 2016

KENTUCKY CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

kins Ad Farms

6.5x3.75 bw-Cow Country News.indd 1

TJ Adkins: 606-875-5094 Sherman & Phyllis Adkins: 606-379-5129 279 Bullock Rd. Eubank, KY 42567 AdkinsFarms@hotmail.com

Montgomery Charolais

Higher yearling weight ■ MORE POUNDS, EFFICIENTLY

REA Marb

2004 0.8 19.1 33.7 1.6 11.4 .18 .01 2014 0.4 26.8 49.0 3.4 16.9 .32 .04

At harvest

Increased carcass weight ■ MORE POUNDS AT HARVEST Larger ribeye ■ BETTER YIELD GRADES More marbling ■ HIGHER QUALITY GRADES

■ Southeast Field Representative ■ Floyd Wampler (423) 612-2144 12/2/15 7:30 AM

Austin Flaugher 9810 Hwy 159 N Butler, KY 41006 513-604-2975 • aflaugher@gmail.com

LEANING PINE FARMS, LLC John Bruner

Darby Montgomery 36 Thompson Road • Lancaster, KY 40444 859-339-3922 BULLS FOR SALE

606-271-0582 473 Edward Meece Road Science Hill, KY 42553

Amburgey Charolais Farm

jeffries charolais

Polled Breeding Since 1966 Robert Amburgey, Jr. 3171 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-2764 (Home) 859-404-3751 (Mobile)

Harrod Farms

paul r. jeffries 606-510-4537

1590 jeffries lane

hustonville, ky. 40437 chris cooper 606-669-9009 chris jeffries 606-669-2426

Becca, Jenna and Jake 645 Evergreen Rd. Frankfort, KY 40601 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745

Jimmy & Linda Evans 960 Vallandingham Road Dry Ridge, KY 41035 859-428-2740

Allison Charolais John Allison

David, Rhonda, Michael & Nicholas

THE NEXT GENERATION

Charolais, Hereford & Commercial Cattle

545 Eminence Road New Castle, KY 40050

502-845-2806 502-220-3170

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In the pasture

Bulls & Heifers For Sale at the Farm

Kentucky Charolais Association Chuck Druin 2291 Drane Lane Eminence, KY 40019 502-321-1160 or 502-321-5919 Jeff Harrod: 502-330-6745 Jacob Miller: 502-507-4987

S A N D U S K Y FA R M S 3200 St. Rose Road Lebannon, KY 40033 270-692-7793

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NEWS & EVENTS: 2019 KY CHAROLAIS FALL SHOWCASE SALE SEPT. 7, 2019 • 12 PM • STANFORD, KY BLUE GRASS STOCKYARDS SOUTH NOMINATIONS DUE ASAP CALL WES CHISM: 281-761-5952 SPIRIT OF THE BLUEGRASS SALE SULLIVAN CHAROLAIS OCT. 5, 2019 • LEXINGTON, KY BLUE GRASS STOCKYARDS

Candy Sullivan 3440 Ruddles Mill Road Paris, KY 40361

859-338-0170

Sullivan Charolais

Quality Charolais Cattle in the Heart of the Bluegrass

Hayden Farm 4430 Bloomfield Rd. Bardstown, KY 40004 James Hayden

Home: Office: Mobile: 502-349-0128 502-349-0005 502-507-4984 jhayden@haydensteel.com

Floyd’s Charolais

2039 Nina Ridge Road Lancaster, KY 40444 Home: 859-792-2956 • Cell: 859-339-2653 floydj@windstream.net

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A P PA R E L WINDBREAKER (NAVY BLUE)

1/4 ZIP PULLOVER (BLACK)

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POLO (BLUE)

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$20

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MENS LADIES

IF PAYING BY CREDIT CARD

DELIVERY INFORMATION NAME

Visa

NAME ON CARD

MasterCard Discover American Express

+ SHIPPING & HANDLING

ADDRESS

CREDIT CARD NO.

CITY

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$6.00 = TOTAL ENCLOSED

Cash

STATE

ZIP

PHONE

CVC

SIGNATURE

Check Credit Card

Mail PAYMENT and COMPLETED FORM to: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association • 176 Pasadena Drive • Lexington, Kentucky 40503 Or Fax: (859) 260-2060 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery.

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FEATURE

P R O V I D I N G WAT E R F O R B E E F C AT T L E I N R O TAT I O N A L G R A Z I N G S Y S T E M S Steve Higgins and Lee Moser, University of Kentucky

Significant effort is placed on pasture improvement, hay quality, and diets for cattle. However, water is an often overlooked, critical requirement for cattle production. Water is used in almost every bodily function, including digestion, milk production, and excretion. Given the role and function of water in relation to animal production, health, and welfare, it is critical that abundant, clean water is available in any livestock production operation. It is essential that livestock have immediate access to water within every paddock of a rotational grazing system to realize maximum efficiency and production. Although water may be available to cattle, the sources vary significantly within and among farms. Sources for water on farms range from full access to streams and ponds to city water fed waterers located throughout the operation. The quantity, quality, and location of the water supplied can greatly influence feed intake, forage utilization and persistence, herd behavior, and manure distribution. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, type of animal, shade availability, and distance to water also play important roles in determining the water intake rates of cattle. When designing a watering system, it is important to budget around 30 gallons per head per day, during the summer months, to make sure that water is plentiful for your herd. Taking a thoughtful approach to water quality and quantity may help cattle producers achieve their long-term goals of increased production and profitability. Not all water resources on a farm are equal. Depending on the source, there could be any number of contaminants in water that could affect cattle production. Research has demonstrated a positive relationship between access to clean drinking water and performance factors such as growth, reproduction, and milk 44

production. Animals that drink clean, contaminant-free water are generally less prone to illness and disease, gain more weight, and produce more milk. Producers should exercise as much control as they can over both the quality and quantity of water provided to their animals. An optimized rotational grazing system should be designed to provide water so that cattle do not have to travel more than 800 feet. However, the guidelines for providing water extend beyond just distance travelled. If cattle come to water as a group, then 10% of the group needs to be able to drink at once. To put this in perspective, at 10%, two animal in twenty would need to have access to a waterer. This means that a single-hole, automatic watering fountain may be suitable when animals tend to drink one at a time. This might be possible for small herds (less than 20), when the cattle do not travel more than 800 feet. There may be times of the year when a single-hole waterer would cause herd stress and displays of dominance. When travel distances increase to 800 feet and above, cattle may come up as a group, especially if the thermal heat Index (THI) is in the medium to high range. Again, at least 10% of the group needs to be able to drink at once. Along with providing enough space for more than one animal to drink at a time, the water supply needs to be adequate. The water supply rate, volume of water, and allotted space needs to be greater than or equal to the demand in order to allow non-dominant animals an opportunity to drink as much water as they need. Cattle are known to drink water at a rate of two gallons per minute and as high as six gallons per minute, when extremely thirsty. If more than one animal can drink at once, the supply rate must be equal to the combined drinking capacity of the animals that can drink COW COUNTRY •

at once. If the flow rate cannot keep up with demand, then storage or additional volume in the form of increased tank size should be provided to offset the difference. It has been shown repeatedly that abundant, clean water provides production benefits. Production benefits can be translated directly into economic benefits. Increased animal production (gain) and the potential to increase the carrying capacity of pastures through more efficient water and forage utilization are achievable benefits when properly designed alternative water systems are combined with a rotational grazing system. Increasing production through better water availability and quality means animals can be finished quicker and producers can get them off the farm faster. The result could provide potential reductions in feeding costs, management, and medication costs. Alternative water sources vary in quality depending on site specific conditions. City water is preferred by most institutions as a means of alleviating issues with source quality. However, city water can be expensive, especially if the waterer or the pipes leak. Developed water sources such as ponds, springs, and harvested water from a roof have their own set of advantages and disadvantages. The point is that they can be developed to provide abundant, clean water. For instance, a pond by itself has more disadvantages to production than advantages. But it can be developed by excluding animals from defecating directly into the water using fencing. An adequate vegetative buffer can be provided around the pond to filter runoff before it enters the catchment. Cattle can drink from a gravity filled tank below the pond. This is what is meant by developed; water quality is protected from contamination and the cattle have a working area where they can obtain water. Conversely, a stream J U LY 2 0 1 9

does not lend itself to being developed. There are options such as exclusion with nose pumps or ram pumps to provide off site water, but there is a high risk that the water could be polluted from upstream sources and by your herd. The choice of a water source is a decision made by the producer. Any option will have costs associated with the project and the materials chosen. Depending on the number of pastures served, costs can typically be recovered within 5 years through economic gains associated with increased production and operational efficiency. Summary Rotational grazing systems are not as effective if water is not readily available to every paddock. If the watering source is of poor quality, improperly located, or a limited resource due to inadequate flow rates or space limitations, then production may become limited. As a result, animal performance will not be optimized. There is also the potential for livestock to be more prone to diseases and illnesses if the supply is contaminated and intake rates are reduced. Ultimately, a producer’s goal should be to always keep cattle hydrated and limit stress. Beef cattle producers have the opportunity to enhance herd health and performance by improving water quantity and quality throughout their operation. On-farm water sources should be evaluated for water quality based on Drinking Water Quality Guidelines for Cattle (UK Cooperative Extension Service (ID-170)). A critical evaluation of water sources and managerial adjustments to create ideal watering sources may result in improved performance and profits. For additional information, references, and resources, please download Providing Water for Beef Cattle in Rotational Grazing Systems (ID236) from the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

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UPCOMING GELBVIEH EVENTS:

KENTUCKY

GELBVIEH A S S O C I AT I O N

David Slaughter, President..........................(270) 556-4259 Joe Piles, Vice President..............................(502) 507-3845 Pat Tilghman, Secretary/Treasurer.............. (270) 670-8449 CLIFFORD FARMS

3459 KY HWY 1284E Cynthiana, KY 41031 Since 1937 (859) 234-6956

Cattle for sale at all times.

Randy & Wanda Wade (859) 234-4803 Mike, Shelley & Ronin Meyer (859) 298-9931 Kevin, Shannon, & Kamber Farrell (859) 588-9122

Gelbvieh, Simmental, & Commercial Cattle

Brian W. Dyer DVM

Owner/Manager GELBVIEH/BALANCERS

2050 Glasgow Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Brian, Lauren, Kristen Barry, Emily & Julia

Bar IV Livestock

Barry, Beth & Ben Racke • Brad Racke 7416 Tippenhauer Rd. • Cold Spring, KY 41076 Phone (859) 635-3832 • Barry cell (859) 991-1992 Brad cell (859) 393-3677 • Ben cell (859) 393-3730 Fax (859) 635-3832 • bar4@twc.com

Bee Lick Gelbviehs

Pleasant Meadows Farm Gary & Pat Tilghman Lindsey Tilghman Jones Family Carrie & Daryl Derossett Family 690 Lick Branch Road Glasgow, KY 42141

270.646.7024 • pleasantmeadowsfarm@hotmail.com

Mockingbird Hill Farms

Eddie Reynolds 277 Old Bee Lick Rd. Crab Orchard, KY 40419 606-379-2281(H) 606-305-1972(C) Bulls & Females for sale

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Shane Wells 10172 Provo Rd. Rochester, KY H: 270-934-2198 C: 270-791-8196 swells@logantele.com

For General Information & Contest Rules: gelbvieh.org/juniors/agja-events/junior-classic

KENTUCKY STATE FAIR Entry Deadline: July 10 Open Show: Arrival of Cattle - 8 AM, August 22 to 8 AM, August 23 Show: 11 AM, August 24 4-H/FFA: Arrival of Cattle - 10 AM, August 20 to 10 AM, August 21 Show: Beginning 8 AM, August 22 (show order TBA) Full Circle Farms

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Brad Burke 989 Metcalf Mill Rd. • Ewing, KY 41039 (H) 606-267-5609 • (C) 606-782-1367 gbb789@windstream.net

Kilbourne Gelbvieh East Bernstadt, KY 606-843-6583 cell 606-309-4662

Black Replacement Heifers & Bulls Available Embryo transplant & AI sired calves

Larry Clark & Sons LLC

Clayton & Debbie Cash 1214 Ottawa School Road Brodhead, KY 40409

Gelbvieh-Balancer Bulls & Heifers For Sale by Private Treaty

COW COUNTRY •

(606)-308-3247 (606)-758-8994

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Registered Gelbvieh Cattle 106 Clark Houk Road - Greensburg, KY 42743 Larry Clark, Owner & Operator (270) 299-5167 (270) 405-6848 Lpclarkandsons@msn.com

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Meeting modern industry demands: • Added Fertility • Increased Efficiency • More pounds of calf weaned American Gelbvieh Association 303-465-2333 | www.gelbvieh.org

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ANGUS THE BUSINESS BREED

2018-2019 KAA Officers President: Gil Ray Cowles, Rockfield, KY Vice President: Jason Crowe, Irvine, KY Secretary/Treasurer: Anne DeMott, Lexington, KY

C ontact Anne DeMott to pay your Kentucky Angus Ass o ciation Dues 1 • BOYD BEEF CATTLE 6077 Helena Road Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II: (606) 584-5195 • Blake Boyd: (606) 375-3718 www.boydbeef.com • cboyd2@maysvilleky.net

11 • HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY (502) 633-1634, home • (502) 633-5100, work (502) 655-0164, cell

21 • RAGS ANGUS FARM Richard and Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 Home: (270) 885-4352 Cell: (270) 839-2442 rstallons@bellsouth.net

2 • BRANCH VIEW ANGUS 927 Old Liberty Pike • Hustonville, KY 40437 (859) 238-0771 • www.branchviewangus.com James S. & LuAnn Coffey, Donald & Donna Coffey Evelyn Hoskins Annual Production Sale- 2nd Saturday in April

12 • HIGHVIEW FARMS 827 West Main Street Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718 Ben T. Cox DVM (270) 469-5517 Registered Angus Cattle

22 • SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, KY 42748 (270) 769-8260 www.shawfamilyangus.com Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975

3 • BURKS CATTLE CO. 531 Rick Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Eddie Burks • (270) 991-6398 www.burkscattle.com

13 • HILL VIEW FARMS Jimmy Gilles 5160 Lee Rudy Road Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 686-8876 (270) 929-537

23 • SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642 Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith: (270) 866-3898 Henry & Melissa Smith: (270) 866-2311

14 • JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS Angus Bulls & Females Slaughters, KY Keith: (270) 635-0723 Reese: (270) 635-1137

24 • ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED ANGUS Eric & Sherry St. Clair 13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY 40119 Home: (270) 257-2965 • Cell: (270) 617-1079 www.stclairangus.com Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April 2016

5 • CARDINAL HILL FARMS 405 Cedar Grove Rd. • Glasgow, KY 42141 Mike Elmore: (270) 404-6589 Bob Johnson: (270) 427-1410 cardinalhillfarms.com • mike@cardinalhillfarms.com

15 • LEGACY FARMS Daniel and Lindsey Reynolds 1709 South Jackson Highway Hardyville, KY 42746 (270) 528-6275/(270) 528-6120 www.legacyfarmsangus.com

25 • TAMME VALLEY FARM Jacob Tamme, Owner-Operator (859) 583-7134 jacob.tamme@gmail.com www.tammevalley.com & Find us on Facebook!

6 • COFFEY ANGUS FARMS 661 Hopewell Road Liberty, KY 42539 Matt Coffey: (270) 799-6288 Dewey Coffey: (606) 787-2620 Genetics for Maximum Profitability since 1984

16 • MILLERS RUN FARM William N. Offutt IV 3790 Paris Road Georgetown, KY 40324 (859) 533-2020 • millersrunfarm@aol.com www.millersrunfarm.com Heifers for sale

26 • TWIN CREEK FARM Shawn, Melissa, Devin & Dylan Gibson (270) 337-3072 or (270) 692-5304 Dennis & Emily 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338 Watch for us in Branch View Production Sale in April

7 • COOL SPRINGS CREEK FARM Guy & Aline Babin 269 Paul Coomer Rd Gradyville, KY 42742 (270) 205-1669 www.coolspringscreekfarm.com • gdbabin@outlook.com

17 • MUD RIVER ANGUS 10 Oak Hill Drive Russellville, KY 42276 Wayne Johnson: (270) 303-6354 Gary Johnson: (270) 498-7208

4 • BURTON & SONS ANGUS Joe D. or Karen Burton • Bryan Carman, Partner, Ridgeview Angus 480 Hominy Hill Rd. Nancy, KY 42544 Joe: (606) 305-3081 • Bryan: (606) 875-3453 Located 15 miles West of Somerset klburton01@windstream.net

Bulls & females sold private treaty. Inquiries Welcome. Sell only what we would buy.

KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME

FARM NAME

8 • D&D LONGVIEW ANGUS Danny & Debbie Burris 550 Willie Nell Road Columbia, KY 42728 (270) 348-5766 • (270) 250-3701 • (270) 250-1277

18 • FOUR KINGS ANGUS 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Cary & Kim King Carymking@yahoo.com • fourkingsangus.com Cary Cell: (859) 613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager

9 • FALL CREEK ANGUS 448 Corder Farm Road Monticello, KY 42633 Ronnie Corder (606) 348-6588

19 • OLD BARK FARM 370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716 Kenley Conner 270/358-8057 Registered Angus Cattle

10 • HAINES ANGUS FARMS 5294 Park City- Glasgow Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Kenneth Haines, Jr.: (270) 749-8862

20 • PLEASANT HILL FARMS Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles 500 Rockfield Richpond Road Rockfield, KY 42274 (270) 843-9021 • Fax (270) 843-9005 Located 7 miles west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80

46

COW COUNTRY •

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ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

PHONE 1

PHONE 2

ZIP

EMAIL

Return to: Anne DeMott • 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, Kentucky 40509 • Annaul Dues $35

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KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION NEWS Anne Stewart DeMott, Secretary/Treasurer

KY ANGUS PREVIEW SHOW SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Dear Angus Breeders and Beef Cattle Producers,

2019 CHAMPION SPONSORS

It is JULY! Lots going on in the world of ANGUS in Kentucky! I would invite and encourage all of you to attend the 2019 National Junior Angus Show in Louisville, July 14 - 20. It is one of the greatest beef cattle events of the year in the United States. There are 1859 entries and 889 exhibitors from 40+ states entered. The greatest part of the NJAS is the experiences that the agricultural youth gain during this week and throughout the year with this organization. Kentucky is proud to host this event for 2019! If you would like to volunteer or to assist with any of these activities, please let any member of the KAA Board know and they will point you in the right direction. On behalf of the Kentucky Angus Association, a huge THANK YOU to all of those that have worked so hard and given so much to make sure that the 2019 NJAS is as great an event as it possibly can be!

JUNIOR SHOW SPONSORS

Gil Ray Cowles KAA President

CHAMPION & RESERVE CHAMPION STEER HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS CHAMPION BRED & OWNED COW/CALF HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS RESERVE CHAMPION BRED & OWNED COW/CALF HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS CHAMPION OWNED COW/CALF HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

AMERICAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION

CHAMPION BRED & OWNED BULL HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

ABS GLOBAL, GENETICS PLUS, LLC

RESERVE CHAMPION BRED & OWNED BULL HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

CHAMPION BRED & OWNED HEIFER LYNN CREEK FARM, KRIS & SARA LYNN

LYNN CREEK FARMS, KRIS & SARA LYNN

RESERVE CHAMPION BRED & OWNED HEIFER HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

ROSE LANE FARM

CHAMPION OWNED HEIFER TIM DIEVERT, DIEVERT SALES SERVICE

SELECT SIRES MIDAMERICA

RESERVE CHAMPION OWNED HEIFER HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

VITAFERM

OPEN SHOW SPONSORS CHAMPION COW/CALF APS ANGUS, ANNE PATTON SCHUBERT RESERVE CHAMPION COW/CALF HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

to subscribe to email updates, please contact us at kyangusassociation@gmail.com

2019 GOLD LEVEL SPONSORS

CHAMPION FEMALE SMITHLAND ANGUS, HENRY B. & MELISSA SMITH

A SPECIAL THANK YOU IS EXTENDED TO ALL SPONSORS AND DONORS WHO HELPED MAKE THIS SHOW POSSIBLE!

RESERVE CHAMPION FEMALE HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS CHAMPION BULL SMITHLAND ANGUS, HENRY B. & MELISSA SMITH

@KyAngusAssoc

@KyAngusAssoc www.kentuckyangus.org

@kyangusassociation

RESERVE CHAMPION BULL HERITAGE FARM, TOM MCGINNIS

kyangusassociation@gmail.com

SAVE THE DATE • 2019 NATIONAL JUNIOR ANGUS SHOW JULY 14 - 20, 2019 • LOUISVILLE, KY FULL SCHEDULE AT WWW.NJAS.INFO COW COUNTRY •

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48

CAREY BROWN cbrown@kycattle.org

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BUSINESS OR NATIONAL ACCOUNTS

FARM ACCOUNTS

CALL US TODAY! COW COUNTRY •

J U LY 2 0 1 9

(859) 278-0899

• A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E K E N T U C K Y C AT T L E M E N ’ S A S S O C I AT I O N


Kentucky Hereford Association KHA Invites any Hereford Breeder to Become a Member! Dues are $25. Send to 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 Upcoming Events: 2019 Vitaferm Junior National Hereford Expo “Herefords On The Hill” July 6 - 13, 2019 Denver, CO

Wells Farm

KHA Officers

Polled Herefords 439 Flatwoods Frozen Camp Road • Corbin, KY 40701 Kevin, Angela, Bobby & Brenda Wells Kenlea & Kyler Murray 606-523-0569 - Home 606-528-1691 - Home 606-344-0417 - Cell 606-682-8143 - Cell wells_farm@yahoo.com

President: Tim Wolf Secretary/ Treasurer: Earlene Thomas 859-623-5734 thomasep@roadrunner.com

-HEREFORDS -

Codee Guffey • 1815 Grassy Springs Road Versailles, Kentucky 40383 Phone: 502-598-6355 Email: rockridgeherefords@gmail.com www.rockridgeherefords.com

Polled Hereford and Gelbvieh Cattle 3459 KY Hwy. 1284 E. Cythiana, KY 41031 (859) 234-6956 Ben, Jane, Shelby and Lincoln

Thomas Farm

Eric & Ronnie Thomas 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 623-5734 • Eric’s Cell (859) 314-8256 “Cattle for sale at all times”

WOLF FARM

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Females for sale Tim & Peggy Wolf 12939 Peach Grove Rd. Alexandria, KY 41001 Home: 859-635-0899  Cell: 859-991-3484

Peyton’s Well Polled Herefords The Lowell Atwood Family 133 Edgewood Drive Stanford, KY (606) 365-2520 home/fax (606) 669-1455 cell

Chambliss Hereford Farms Brad, Carla, Clay and Clint Chambliss 916 Winchester Blvd. Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Home (270) 982-3905 • Cell (270) 668-7126 fax 270-735-9922 www.chamblissherefordfarms.com

L.W. Beckley D.V.M L. Wayne Beckley 284 Pyrse Lane 1420 Fitchburg Rd. Irvine, KY 40336 Ravenna, KY 40472 Cell: 859-779-1419 Home: 606-723-3021 Clinic: 606-726-0000 Cell: 859-779-0962 www.beckleyherefords.com

Hansell Pile, Jr. 12045 St. John Rd. Cecilia, KY 42724 270-735-5192•270-862-4462 12 miles West of Elizabethtown

859-588-4531

Jackson Farms

Registered Polled Herefords 8103 Bill Moss Road • White House, TN 37188 Home/Fax: 615-672-4483 Cell: 615-478-4483 billy@jacksonfarms.com ® “Farming the Same Land Since 1834”

Pile Stock Farm

WCN Polled Herefords Since 1961

Bill & Libby Norris 2220 Celina Road Burkesville, KY 42717 Phone (270) 433-7256 Cell (270) 433-1525 “Every calf needs a white face”

TS

F

TS TS Tucker Stock Farms F F

“Registered Angus and Polled Herefords”

TUCKER STOCK FARMS TUCKER STOCK FARMS

TUCKER STOCK FARMS

“Breeding Polled Herefords for over 58 Years” John Tucker “Registered Angus and Polled “Registered AngusHerefords” andIIPolled Herefords” 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Breeding cattle for sale at all times. John A. Tucker II John A. Tucker II Hudson, KY 40145 HiddenHerefords” Valley Lane 1999 Walnut Hill Rd. • Lexington, KY “Registered 40515 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Angus and 1790 Polled 270-617-0301 Hudson, KY 40145 Hudson, KY 40145 (859) 271-9086 • cell (859)533-3790 (270) 257-8548 (270) 257-8548 Offi 257-8167 Office for (270) 257-8167 John A. Tucker IIce (270) “Bulls always Sale”

1790 Hidden18-month-old Valley 18-month-old AngusLane & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale Angus & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale

Old Fall Creek Farms AHA & KHA member • Proven bloodlines

Reed Bertram 606-348-7486 David Bertram 606-278-3630 www.ofcfarms.com

K3CATTLE@YAHOO.COM

198 HICKS PIKE CYNTHIANA, KY 41031

Registered Polled Herefords

BECKLEY HEREFORDS

1874 Old Fall Creek Road • Monticello, KY 42633

Victor- influenced cattle bred for performance on grass.

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Jackie D. Perkins II 367 Mt. Pisgah Rd. • Bremen, KY 42325 270-543-3586 Breeding to produce good cows since 1981.

Private treaty sales • Visitors always welcome

“Black cows need a good Hereford Bull”

Paul L. Hancock 8559 KY 56 Owensboro, KY 42301 270-771-4194

Annual Bull Sale second Saturday in March Hereford and Angus Bulls

Windy Hills Farm

K3 CATTLE REGISTERED HEREFORDS KYLE BUSH

Registered Polled Herefords

Boyd Beef Cattle

Tony & Kathy Staples 992 Knotts Road Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-4220 tstaples@bbtel.com

Contact Earlene Thomas for more information: 859-623-5734 www.kentuckyhereford.org

MPH Farms

6077 Helena Road • Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II · 606-584-5194

TK4 Herefords

COW COUNTRY •

2019 Hereford Show at the Kentucky State Fair 8 AM - Friday, August 23, 2019 Louisville, KY Entries due July 10

Hudson, KY 40145 (270) 257-8548 Office (270) 257-8167

GET YOUR AD HERE! CONTACT EARLENE FOR MORE INFO

18-month-old Angus & Polled Hereford Bulls For Sale

LINEBRED VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE LINEBRED VICTOR DOMINO CATTLE

Multi-Trait Selection Multi-Trait Selection Fertility Disposition

Danny Miller

Fertility Calving Ease Disposition Milking Ability

Calving Ease Milking Ability

www.jmsvictordomino.com 4850Rd. Caldwell Ridge Rd. 4850 Caldwell Ridge Knifley, KY 42753 Knifley, KY 42753 270-465-6984 270-465-6984

270-465-6984 • 270-566-2694

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49


Roy, Jessica and Cooper Canada 600 Cumberland Drive • Morehead, KY 40351 859-227-7323 racekannon@hotmail.com

Swain Select Simmental

12113 Green Valley Dr. • Louisville, KY 40243 frederickswain@bellsouth.net • www.swainselect.com

Fred & Phyllis 502-245-3866 502-599-4560

Chi & Angie 502-477-9727 502-287-2116

Judy and Rondal Dawson 1156 Buzzard Roost Road Shelbyville, KY 40065 502-593-5136 jrdawson22@outlook.com

Kentucky Simmental Officers

President: Chris Allen 222 Stourbridge St Versailles, KY 40383 859-351-4486

Vice President: Brian Swain 3906 Pottertown Rd Murray, KY 42071

Secretary/Treasurer: Lindsay Phillips 8308 Orangeburg Rd Maysville, KY 41056

KENTUCKY SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME ___________________________ ____________ FARM NAME__________________________________ ADDRESS_____________________________________ CITY_________________STATE_____ ZIP__________ PHONE (BUSINESS)___________________________

Call or visit one of these Simmental breeders for cattle that work!

www.kysimmental.com

Rocking P Livestock 8308 Orangeburg Road Maysville, KY 41056 Chan: 606-584-7581 Keith: 606-584-5626

rockingplivestock@maysvilleky.net

Brian & Heather Swain 3906 Pottertown Road Murray, KY 42071 270-293-4440 wksbswain@murray-ky.net

Simmental and SimAngus Bulls for Sale

Send application to: Lindsay Phillips, 8308 Orangeburg Rd, Maysville, KY 41056 Membership Fee is $25.00

(HOME)______________________________________

50

Shelbyville, KY • 502.639.4337 Bill Kaiser

WAYWARD HILL FARM

COW COUNTRY •

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1939 Huntertown Road Versailles, KY 40383 Bulls for Sale Chris Allen 859-351-4486 callenuky@hotmail.com Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755

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FEATURE

U K K A T S T O H O S T S P R AY C L I N I C Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky The Kentucky Agricultural Training School will host a Spray Clinic July 18 at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center in Princeton. The clinic will include field demonstrations and interactive experiences for participants. “The goal of the Spray Clinic is to take the complex topic of pesticide applications and break it down into simplified pieces of information,” said Travis Legleiter, UK weed scientist. “We would like farmers, applicators and crop consultants to take

this information back to their operations and make informed and confident decisions about their spray applications.”

CDT and will occur rain or shine. Lunch is provided. Preregistration is required and available online at https:// ukkatssprayclinic19.eventbrite.com.

UK specialists will cover the following topics: spray technology overview, herbicide drift management, fungicide application considerations, sprayer equipment maintenance, nozzle selection for herbicide application and nozzle nomenclature.

Certified crop advisers can receive 3.5 hours in continuing education units each in pest management and crop management. Pesticide applicators can receive four general and two specific hours in categories 1A, 10 and 12.

The field day is from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The schools are funded in part by

the Kentucky Small Grain Growers Association and are a part of the UK Grain and Forage Center of Excellence’s mission to provide producers with timely, hands-on trainings throughout the growing season. Additional information on upcoming KATS workshops is available online at http://kats.ca.uky.edu/upcomingworkshops.

MARKET REPORT

SOUTHEAST FEEDER CATTLE PRICES 14 JUNE 2019 STEER weights

HEIFER

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

110-116

113-119

107-113

110-116

111-117

120-126

8-9

117-125

120-128

116-124

120-128

121-129

126-134

7-8

124-132

129-137

121-129

125-133

127-135

6-7

136-146

137-147

128-138

133-143

5-6

146-158

145-157

142-154

4-5

160-174

159-173

151-165

9-10

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

137-145

111-119

115-123

109-117

113-121

112-120

115-123

135-145

144-154

117-127

123-133

115-125

119-129

115-125

122-132

142-154

143-155

152-164

125-137

129-141

127-139

123-135

126-138

132-144

152-166

155-169

156-170

136-150

136-150

132-146

131-145

134-148

136-150

COWS weights

Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Louisiana/ Mississippi

Kentucky/ Tennessee

UTIL

57-64

58-65

56-63

67-74

54-61

59-66

CN/CUT

48-55

52-59

49-56

53-60

48-55

51-58

BULLS

79-87

78-86

85-93

87-95

83-97

81-89

MONTHLY MARKET BEEF UPDATE! Feeder cattle traded mixed, but mostly steady to $3 higher on the week. Calves ranged from $3 lower to $3 higher. Market cows were steady to $2 higher. -Tanner Aherin

COW COUNTRY •

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CLASSIFIEDS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS General

July 20 September 26 Angus August 3 August 10 October 26

Meade County Cattlemen’s Beef Cook Off Brandenburg, KY Beef Bash 2019 Versailles, KY

Keeney’s Angus Field Day Angus Influence Purebred Sale Yon Family Farms Fall Sale Oak Hollow Fall Bull Sale & Female October 28 Open House February 15, 2020 Yon Family Farms Spring Sale Oak Hollow 41st Annual First Choice March 30, 2020 Bull Sale Charolais Sullivan Charolais Spirit of the BlueOctober 19 grass Sale Mixed Breeds July 7 CPH Sale August 8 CPH Sale December 3 CPH Sale December 5 CPH Sale December 10 CPH Sale January 28, 2020 CPH Sale Santa Gertrudis 41st Annual KY National Santa GertruJuly 19 & 20 dis Show & Sale Simmental September 14 KY Simmental Association State Sale

Nancy, KY Lexington, KY Ridge Spring, SC

pg. 18 pg. 8

Smiths Grove, KY

pg. 5

FOR SALE 19-20 MONTH OLD POLLED HEREFORD BULLS. GOOD SELECTION. LOW BIRTHWEIGHT, MEDIUM FRAME. FREE DELIVERY AVAILABLE. JMS POLLED HEREFORDS, KNIFLEY, KY DANNY 270-566-2694 TRENT 270-566-2000

Ridge Spring, SC Smiths Grove, KY Lexington, KY

pg. 5 pg. 8

FOUNDATION SALE V OCTOBER 5, 2019 UNITED PRODUCERS, BOWLING GREEN, KY SELLING FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN GENETICS FOR INFO CALL : A C H HOLDINGS, LLC STEPHEN HAYNES 270-799-8685

Guthrie, KY Owensboro, KY Guthrie, KY Owensboro, KY Richmond, KY Guthrie, KY Bowling Green, KY Lexington, KY

pg. 18 pg. 8

AD INDEX ADM Nutrition

11

Arrow Farm Equipment

27

Blue Grass Stockyards Burkmann Feeds

8 4

Central Farm Supply

55

CPC Commodities

56

Gallagher

22

Green River Fence

19

Hayes Trailer Sales

4

Heartland Highland Cattle Assoc.

10

Innovacyn

21

John Deere Keeney Angus Kentucky Angus Association

2 18 46, 47

Kentucky Charolais Association

42

Kentucky Gelbvieh Association

45

Kentucky Hereford Association

49

Kentucky Salers Association

53

Kentucky Santa Gertrudis Assoc.

31

Kentucky Simmental Association National Santa Gertrudis Show & Sale Oak Hollow Pasture Management Systems Rural King Santa Gertrudis Breeders International

REGISTERED GELBVIEH BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE LOCATED IN SMITHS GROVE, KY CONTACT TRENT JONES 270-590-5266 RED ANGUS FOR SALE BULLS: YEARLINGS AND 2-YEAR-OLDS. OPEN HEIFERS. SHOW HEIFER PROSPECTS. CONTACT: JOHNNIE CUNDIFF 606-305-6443 OR 606-871-7438 REGISTERED BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS EXCELLENT EPD’S. SEMEN TESTED. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. MAXIMIZE YOUR PROFIT WITH PROVEN PERFORMANCE. ALL BULLS QUALIFY FOR NEW CAIP COST-SHARE. ADAM WHEATLEY 502-349-2665 J & D KERSTIENS GELBVIEH AUCTION FALL 2017 BULLS FOR SALE REGISTERED GELBVIEH/ANGUS BALANCER BULLS. HOMO BLACK AND BLACK. BREEDING SOUNDNESS EVALUATION. BVD AND SEMEN TESTED. CALVING EASE EPDS. HUNTINGBURG, IN J&D KERSTIENS 812-482-2688 OR DUANE CASSIDY AT 812-661-8005

OVER 25 BREEDING AGE HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE OVER 60 YEARS OF LINE 1 HEREFORD GENETICS. ALSO SELLING 30 HEIFERS. CHAMBLISS HEREFORD FARMS. 270-668-7126 THANK YOU TO THE BUYERS FROM COLUMBIA, TN. 4 AI-BRED REGISTERED HEIFERS. 3 BREEDING AGE BULLS LOOKING FOR LOVE. CALL ANNE & M.J. BAKKE. 559-348-3818 OR EMAIL DAIRYNUTR@AOL.COM ONE NICE 2-YEAR-OLD ANGUS BULL HEIFER ACCEPTABLE. BRANCH VIEW BREEDING. CALL FOR PRICING INFO. TODD AT 270-402-3242 9 BIG STOUT SIMMENTAL CROSS COWS EXCELLENT MAMAS. CALVING LATE SUMMER TO EARLY FALL. $1250 EACH. CALL TODD AT 270-402-3242 ARTEX 200 VERTICAL BEATER SPREADER - $25,500 NEW HOLLAND 680 MANURE SPREADER - $5,000 JOHN DEERE 5603-CAB-4WD-LOADER - $39,000 STOLTZFUS F50 SPREADER - $16,000 KNIGHT 8118 MANURE SIDE SPREADER - $11,000 JOHN DEERE 7405-CANOPY-4WD - $23,000 NEW HOLLAND 450 BALER-LIKE NEW-STRING - $12,000 JOHN DEERE 457 BALER - $11,000 NEW HOLLAND 688 BALER - $7000 JOHN DEERE 4030 WITH LOADER - $12,500 FARMCO BALE CARRIERS - CALL CALL CHARLIE - 859-608-9745 WWW.REDBARNANDASSOCIATES.COM

Dirt Cheap Prices •Treated Fence Post •1x6-16 Oak Fence Boards •1x6-16 Treated Poplar Fence Boards •1x6 and 1x8 Tongue & Groove Pine •2x6 Tongue and Groove Stall Liner •7 Acres of Building Materials

A.W. Graham Lumber, LLC 877-845-9663 • 606-845-9663 www.grahamlumber.com

50 19, 31 5 12 3 7

Shady Bottom Ranch

10

Southern States

23

Stone Gate Farms

7

Walters Buildings

21

WM. E. Fagaly & Son, Inc.

13

52

PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE CALL 270-202-7186 FOR MORE INFO OR CHECK OUT WWW.OAKHOLLOWANGUS.COM FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITY.

COW COUNTRY •

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FEATURE

H OW YO U M AY N E E D L E S S F E R T I L I Z E R I N T H E F U T U R E Wolf Scheible, Ph.D., Professor and Michael Udvardi, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Noble Foundation Most Oklahoma soils are limited in major plant nutrients like nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Therefore, many farmers rely on synthetic fertilizers for crop and forage production. Generally speaking, fertilizer is one of the biggest items, other than land, in an annual budget for many farmers and ranchers. Fertilizer Is Necessary but Costly The use of fertilizer chemicals is indispensable in a world with a continuously growing human population, but it comes at a monetary and environmental price. Only about one-third of the applied N and P fertilizers can be found in crops at harvest. The other two-thirds become unavailable to plants through processes in the soil or are lost to the environment through runoff, leaching, eluviation or erosion. This causes problems such as pollution of drinking water, eutrophication and tipping of freshwater and marine ecosystems, toxic algal blooms, and fish kills. For example, there are 6,000 to 7,000 square miles of dead zone in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the Mississippi River (learn more). In the United States alone, health and environmental damages of man-made N pollution are estimated to be over $200 billion a year. Phosphorus Reserves Are Limited Production of N fertilizers is theoretically almost unlimited, as 78 percent of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas that can be

chemically or biologically converted to ammonia. However, the future availability of rock phosphates for production of P fertilizers is a potential threat for food security. This is even more so for countries that rely on rock phosphate imports. It has been estimated that, at the current and projected future use, the known high-quality rock phosphate deposits (found mainly in Northern Africa or China) will only last for several more generations. Each ton of P that reaches and is diluted in the oceans is ultimately lost to mankind, as it takes millions of years for new, minable P deposits to form. In the light of such situations, fertilizer savings and higher fertilizer efficiency are needed especially in agriculture, where more than 90 percent of the produced N and P chemicals are used (Figure 1).

not capable to perform this process (“synthetic N fixation”). • The study of naturally existing genetic variation in major crop and forage species to identify lines with higher nutrient efficiency. • The study and use of specific genes to improve plant nutrient acquisition from the soil. Through these efforts, farmers and ranchers will someday be able to use plants with improved nutrient efficiency due to selection, plants with inherent mechanisms that allow them to perform

nitrogen fixation, and/or plants that work in association with soil microbes to enhance nutrient absorption and provide nitrogen fixation. Integrated with improved management practices that enhance soil health and ecosystem function, successes from this work will ultimately reduce farmer and rancher reliance on synthetic fertilizers and mitigate the negative effects of fertilizers on the environment. This would benefit both producers and consumers in the United States and beyond.

How Science Is Working to Help You Reduce Fertilizer Needs Scientific research and better management practices are our best bets to deliver much needed solutions to these issues. Plant scientists at the Noble Research Institute pursue different approaches in this regard, including: • The study and application of specific plant-associated microbes (bacteria and fungi) for better soil nutrient absorption and nitrogen fixation. • The transfer of biological nitrogen fixation to crop species that are usually

SALERS

The Balanced Breed STRINGER FARMS Bruce Stringer 128 Teresa Avenue Ÿ Somerset, KY 42501 606-875-3553 COW COUNTRY •

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DIAMOND J SALERS Donald Johnson 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564 606-379-1558

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WILLIS FARMS • Danny Willis 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 502-803-5011 • drwc21@aol.com Matt Craig, Farm Mgr. 502-604-0821 53


FEATURE

TIMELY TIPS FOR JULY

T H E P R O C E S S A N D T Y I N G YO U R S H O E S – M A N A G I N G T H E D E TA I L S KEVIN LAURENT University of Kentucky

Being a diehard LSU football fan, the first Saturday in November for the last eight years have been pretty rough and Nick Saban and Alabama have been the reason. What makes this worse is I get to annually spend this weekend with all my friends and coworkers at the NAILE. That Sunday morning walk into the South Wing of the KFEC has not been very enjoyable. Let’s just say my “friends” have not been very comforting. Maybe a similar example for UK basketball fans could be the John Wooden UCLA teams of the 70’s. The accomplishments of great coaches like Saban and Wooden are not accidental. Books have been written and countless interviews have attempted to explore and determine the secrets of their success. At the end of the day, the common theme is their attention to detail and the focus on getting better each and every day. Saban’s methods have become known as “The Process”. It’s his belief that methodical preparation on a daily basis is the key to success. Coach Wooden took his attention to detail to the minute level. If you haven’t heard the story, do a web search for “how to tie your shoes” by John Wooden. Every player on arrival to UCLA was instructed in not only tying their shoes but also in the proper way to put on their socks. Now that’s detail! Attention to detail in the management of our cattle operations could also pay dividends especially during this period of depressed prices. Daily details include checking the cow herd regularly, catching foot rot or pinkeye early, maintaining water supplies and mineral feeders, rotating pastures on a timely basis, to name a few. The following is a mix of timely details and big picture items that can be considered this summer. 1. Establish a grazing cell. Take advantage of this wet weather and forage growth by practicing some form of rotational grazing on at least a part of the farm. This could be as simple as dividing a large pasture with existing water into 3-4 paddocks. This will allow growth to accumulate elsewhere and be used 54

if we have a dry spell, when cows are weaned, or even later in the winter. An investment of $500 -$1000 will buy a lot of high quality tread in posts and 9 strand polywire that will last 5-10 years. 2. Test your soil and test your hay. Test now so proper plans can be made for late summer/fall fertilization and the winter feeding program. Enter your hay test results in the UK Beef Cow Forage Supplement Tool (http:// forage-supplement-tool.ca.uky.edu/) to easily determine your supplementation needs. Often, supplements can be prepurchased in the summer at a discount to winter prices. 3. Evaluate your calves. As summer progresses ride through the herd and cast a critical eye on the quality of the calf crop. Are most of the calves large and medium frame 1s and 2s? If not, a new bull could be the first step in improving the situation. If you are not comfortable making this evaluation find someone who is. If a new bull is needed, and you are currently calving year round, selling the old bull sometime in late summer will be the first real step in establishing a calving season. 4. Prepare your calves for marketing. Castrate and dehorn calves prior to weaning. Discounts for 500-600 lb. bulls have averaged $11/cwt since 2010. That’s more than $50 per head. Realize that when prices trend down, discounts usually trend higher. Consider weaning and preconditioning calves before selling. Talk to your local ANR agent or KBN facilitator about enrolling in the new PVAP-Precondition program. Hopefully this summer timely rains will continue, the market will rebound and feed prices will not get too high. Here’s hoping that your calves and grass will continue to grow and who knows, maybe this November might be the year. My son-in law has promised that if UK and LSU play for the SEC Championship in football that he will buy the tickets. Hey, it could happen! COW COUNTRY •

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Spring-Calving Cow Herd • Remove bulls from the cow herd by the end of the month and keep them away from the cows. A short calving season can concentrate labor during the calving season; group calves by age so that it is easier to find a convenient time to vaccinate, castrate, dehorn, etc.; and provide a more uniform group of calves at market time. • Mid-July (when the bulls are being removed) is a good time to deworm cattle, use a product that is effective against inhibited ostertagia. Reimplant calves which were implanted at birth if the type of implant and amount of time indicate. Calves which haven’t been vaccinated for blackleg should be. Spraying or using a pour-on for flies while cattle are gathered can supplement other fly control methods. Remember to work cattle early in the morning when it is cool and handle them gently to minimize stress. • Watch for pinkeye and treat if necessary. Minimize problems by clipping pastures, controlling face flies and providing shade. Monitor the bulls’ activity and physical condition as the breeding season winds down. • Fescue pastures tend to go dormant in July and August, so look for alternatives like warm season grasses during this period of time. Try to keep the young calves gaining weight. Go to pastures which have been cut for hay to have higher quality re-growth when it is available. • Consider cutting warm season grass pastures for hay, if reserves have not been restored yet. Fall-Calving Cow Herd • De-worm cows in mid-July with a product that is effective against inhibited ostertagia. • Fall-calving cows should be dry and pregnant now. Their nutrient needs are minimal and they can be maintained on poor pasture to

avoid over fattening. Keep a good free-choice mineral mix available at all times. You can use a lower phosphorus mineral supplement now, if you want to save a little money. These cows are regaining body condition after a long winter feeding period. • Get ready for fall calving and plan to have good pasture available at calving and through the breeding season. Stockers • Sell heavier grazing cattle before rate of gain decreases or they get into a heavyweight category. This will also relieve grazing pressure as pasture growth diminishes. They can be replaced with lightweight calves after pastures recover. • Lighter cattle which are kept on pasture need to be rotated to grasslegume or warm-season grass pastures to maintain a desirable level of performance. Re-implant these calves and deworm with a product that is effective against inhibited ostertagia. General • Check pastures for downed wild cherry trees after storms (wilted wild cherry leaves are toxic to cattle). • Be sure that clean water is always available, especially in hot weather. Make routine checks of the water supply. Cattle need 13 to 20 gallons of clean water in hot weather. Cattle should have access to shade. • Maintain a weed control program in permanent pastures and continue to “spot-spray” thistle, honey locust, etc. • Have forage analyses conducted on spring-cut hay and have large, round bales covered. Begin planning the winter feeding program now. Most of the hay was cut late due to a wet spring. • Start soil testing pastures to determine fertilization needs for this fall.

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SAVE

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Profile for The Kentucky Cattlemen's Association

Cow Country News July 2019  

Cow Country News July 2019  

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