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Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

Planning Phase 1.1. Purpose Objective: The purpose of this project is to unite the community in an effort to reduce pollution flowing into bodies of water, recharge the groundwater, support a natural habitat for wildlife, and beautify the landscape. Scope: To create a dual functioning Rain Garden/bioswale located on the property of Lone Pine Elementary School.

1.2. Project Team Organization Plans This project team shall consist of the Lone Pine PTO “Green Team” and “Beautification Team”.

1.3.

Project Team Role

Project Team Member(s)

Responsibilities

Sponsor

Dr. Hillberry

Provides approval and overall supervises the project.

PTO President

Julie Hirsh

Provides overall guidance regarding PTO timelines

Green Team

Gina Delidow

Team Lead - Planning and Execution

Green Team

Leah Abel

Team Lead - Planning and Execution

Green Team

Michelle Adamczyk

Team Lead - Planning and Execution

Beautification Team

Nicole Pollack

Team Lead - Planning and Execution

Project References There are several sites that explain how to plan a Rain Garden. Links https://www.raingardens.org http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_garden http://www.littlesprites.blogspot.com http://www.ci.maplewood.mn.us/DocumentView.aspx?DID=247 ftp://ftp-fc.sc.egov.usda.gov/MT/www/technical/water/Bioswale.pdf http://www.kidsgardening.org/sites/www.kidsgardening.org/files/Final_Rain_Garden%20(2).pdf http://www.uplanddesign.com/wp

1.4. Goals and Objectives Goals

Objectives

1.4.1 Secure a location site

We'll need walkthrough the Lone Pine property and begin observing the flow of water and a few of the "trouble spots" after a heavy rain. Per the Rain Garden guide, it is best not to create the garden at the lowest part of the site, but just before the lowest part. Thus allow the water to filter through the Rain Garden.


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

1.4.2 Determine the appropriate size

We have to be sensible as far as the size of the Rain Garden. Much of soil in West Bloomfield, MI is composed of clay. The amount of effort to clear this area can be a daunting task. Also, the cost of filling the Rain Garden must be considered.

1.4.3 Rain Garden Design

The design should enhance the curb appeal from the Lone Pine school entry point. It should also be visible from walking path and allow an area for a small crowd to gather and observe the garden.

1.4.4 Rain Garden Fill

Local Tree Removal companies often offer free shredded wood chips. We may find a company willing to donate or discount sand, compost, and wood chips.

1.4.5 Plant Selection

We can involve the community by requesting native plant donations. Volunteers were sent a letter encouraging them to look in their own backyards for native plants.

1.4.6 Build Out

Another opportunity to involve the community through an ad campaign. We are requesting anyone that can wield a shovel to come October 12 th – 14th and assist us with building the Rain Garden.

1.4.7 Accreditation

Become certified with MI Green School - http://michigangreenschools.us/ Become certified wildlife habitat - http://www.nwf.org/

1.5. Project Estimated Costs & Duration Project Milestone

Date Estimate

Deliverable(s) Included

Cost

1.5.1 Secure a location site

2/20/2012

Receiving approval from Sponsor on the location for the Rain Garden. There is no risk of interfering with the property sinking fund. Agreement of Project Team

N/A

1.5.2. Size

3/15/2012

Measure the location (possible size) Identify and measure the water entry points Measure the existing bioswale that directs water into the drain Measure the draining system including the drain holes.

N/A

1.5.3 Design

4/15/2012

Decide on a design that addresses the risks documented in 1.6.3

N/A

1.5.4 Rain Garden Fill

10/13/2012

Kevin Main will supply the “fill”: Rocks, boulders, sand, Compost, and Woodchips

Donated

Compost Soil for planting...2-3 yards

Stone (mixture of Pea Pebbles, Small Cobble, Eggrock & Large Cobble) for the "dry riverbed look"...2-3 yards

Irregular Flagstone for stepping stones through the


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

garden...200 Pounds (about 10 pieces?)

1.5.5 Plant Selection

1.5.6 Build Out

10/15/2012

10/13/2012

Boulders to be used at a "splash block" for incoming water flow...500 Pounds (about 8 medium stones?)

Hardwood Mulch to use in the planting beds...2-3 yards

Mason Sand to be layered underneath the compost...12 yards

Plant selection

Donated

Tall coreopsis

Culver's root

Missouri Ironweed

Blue Vervain

Purple Meadow Rue

Riddles goldenrod

Mountain Mint

Black eyed susan

Southern Blueflag

Sand coreopsis

Each Team Lead to direct volunteers on what needs to be done.

Donated

1.6. Project Risks #

Risk Area

1

Location

Medium

Dr. Hillberry

The location site cannot be in a high traffic area. There must be ways to discourage foot traffic from the parking area to the front door.

2

Size

Medium

Gina Delidow

The size of the Rain Garden will be determined by the amount of excavation required as well as the cost of the materials to fill the garden.

3

Design

Medium

Gina Delidow

Must allow a walking path to encourage foot traffic to walk around the garden.

Likelihoo d

Risk Owner

Project Impact-Mitigation Plan

Border with evergreen hedges to discourage foot traffic throughout the year (i.e. boxwood, …). Design must not obscure visibility of anyone walking from the parking area to the front of the school.


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

#

Risk Area

4

Fill

Likelihoo d

Medium

Risk Owner

Kevin Main

Project Impact-Mitigation Plan

Sand: Must be a clean fill that Compost: Compost must come from a reliable source. Compost must not contain manure, meat by product, or from plant clippings that are too large or have been heavily treated with herbicide or pesticide. Mulch: Typical residential mulch has been dyed and double/triple shredded. This creates an “unnatural” look and will allow the mulch to float away.

5

Plant Selection

Medium

Nicole Pollack

The plant selection must be monitored for the following: •

Must be a Michigan native plant

No thorny plants

Growing rate is not too aggressive

Non poisonous

Root ball can be covered sufficiently with compost

Plants must not grow taller than 3 feet as to not obscure pedestrians from oncoming traffic.

Anticipating donations from the community but may have to supplement our garden with purchased plants. 6

Design

Medium

Gina Delidow

Per Jeffrey R. Lanier, a Soil and Materials engineer, from a SWPPP standpoint, please be sure to communicate the requirements of existing plan and measures to prevent soil erosion/sedimentation from entering the storm drain. Put in a silt sack or silt fencing at the drain and possibly any nearby drains (depending on the area to be disturbed). Be sure to document, in your SWPPP file, any communication and implementation of SESC action.

Execution


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

1.7. Goals and Objectives – Addressing Goals and Objectives Goals

Objectives

1.7.1

Reference: 1.4.1 Secure a location site The team has decided to create a Rain Garden and bioswale within the island near the Reserved Parking. This area is known for having drainage issues after heavy rains. There is a high volume of water that enters from the street and is directed to the storm drain.

1.7.2

Reference 1.4.2 Determine the appropriate size There are two adjoining trees and a flag post within the island. The border of the Rain Garden will defined 12” from the tree’s canopy. (This is in effort to avoid the tree’s root system that should span the distance of the tree’s canopy.) (*Pulled from: Kids Gardening Rain Garden template referenced above*) How to Calculate Drainage Area: To determine the size of the area that will drain into the Rain Garden, measure the amount of impervious surfaces surrounding the location of your Rain Garden. length (ft) x width (ft) = 1280 ft2 (drainage area) Determine and record the following information to assist you in your calculations and Rain Garden design. Outside driveway Drainage Area (Impervious Surface): 70 ft x 4 ft = 280 ft2 (length) (width) (Drainage Area) Inside driveway Drainage Area (Impervious Surface): 50 ft x 20 = 1000 ft2 (length) (width) (Drainage Area) Total Drainage Area = 1280 ft2 Pit Test: Is water still standing in a 6-inch hole after 24 hours? If yes, choose another location. If no, proceed to the next step. (*Pit test was not performed due to possible trip hazard*) Flagpole side Slope: (9.5/280) x 100 = 3.8% height (inches) length (inches) slope Maple tree side Slope: (9.5/90) x 100 = 10.5% height (inches) length (inches) slope


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

Rain Garden Depth flagpole side: 3-5 inches (Using the table to determine garden’s depth) Rain Garden Depth Maple tree side: 8 inches (Using the table to determine garden’s depth) Soil Type: clay Size Factor: 0.43 (Using the table to determine the garden’s size factor and considering at the deepest depth.)

Size of the Rain Garden: 0.43 Size factor x 1280 Drainage Area (ft2) = 550 (ft2)

1.7.3

Reference: 1.4.3 Rain Garden Design The design should enhance the curb appeal from the Lone Pine school entry point. It should also be visible from walking path and allow an area for a small crowd to gather and observe the garden. To encourage interaction within the Rain Garden and to anticipate the natural flow of traffic with existing design, we are including a foot path that bisects the Rain Garden. Using the calculations in 1.8.2, the Rain Garden will have the following dimensions:

1.7.4

Reference: 1.4.4 Rain Garden Fill Compost - 4 Leaf bags will be stationed at a “Compost Drop-off” area. There will be a volunteer stationed as quality control and ensure that the donation meets the standards documented within the campaign ad. Native Plant – Donators can drop off their plant donations throughout the project. The plant’s root system will be wrapped in moist newspaper and categorized based on type and size. There will be a volunteer stationed as quality control and ensure that certain plant species do not enter the Rain Garden. Kevin Main of Main Landscaping will be donating the fill material based on our walkthrough design: October 13th, 2012 the following will be delivered and deposited within the island for distribution: •

Compost Soil for planting - 2-3 yards


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

1.7.5

Stone (mixture of Pea Pebbles, Small Cobble, Eggrock & Large Cobble) for the "dry riverbed look" - 2-3 yards

Irregular Flagstone for stepping stones through the garden - 200 Pounds (about 10 pieces)

Boulders to be used at a "splash block" for incoming water flow - 500 Pounds (about 8 medium stones)

Hardwood Mulch to use in the planting beds - 2-3 yards

Mason Sand to be layered underneath the compost - 1-2 yards

Reference: 1.4.5 Plant Selection We can involve the community by requesting native plant donations. Volunteers were sent a letter encouraging them to look in their own backyards for native plants. Additional plants will be purchased week of October 15 th and planted immediately to avoid early frost.

1.7.6

Reference: 1.4.6 Build Out Another opportunity to involve the community through an ad campaign. We are requesting anyone that can wield a shovel to come October 12 th – 14th and assist us with building the Rain Garden. 1. The existing sod and clay will be placed around the adjoining trees. 2. Several stakes will be marked to explain the depth of the Rain Garden and fill lines at the various points in the garden.

1.7.7

Reference: 1.4.7 Accreditation Once the Rain Garden is complete, we can complete the application to become certified wildlife habitat - http://www.nwf.org/

1.8. Monitor & Control Goals

Objectives

1.8.1 Ongoing upkeep

The garden will need to be maintained throughout the year. This includes weeding, redefining the borders, adding additional layers of mulch, and transplanting plants that are not thriving.


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

1.9. Lessons Learned Reference

Comments

1.7.3

Raised flowerbeds border the Rain Garden to further discourage traffic within the garden.

1.7.6

Be prepared to repurpose the existing sod and soil to the areas where erosion has washed away the turf.

1.7.6

Staking the area before the sod was removed was unsuccessful. Once the top layer was removed, the stake could be driven into the ground at the desired level.


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

*************Campaign Ad for community involvement************* Rain Garden and Bio-swale The purpose of this project is to unite the community in an effort to reduce pollution flowing into bodies of water, recharge the groundwater, support a natural habitat for wildlife, and beautify the landscape. A Rain Garden and bioswale are composed of these basic components: sand, rock, compost, topsoil, native plants and mulch.

Native plants Hey wait!! Those aren’t weeds!! Okay, so I sound a bit dramatic, but it is often that we pull and discard native plants in order to make a place for exotic, out of region plants. Native plants are attractive to birds, butterflies and other wildlife. Native plants do not require fertilizer, watering, or additional maintenance. Not to mention, the native plant variety can tolerate the varying Michigan weather. To learn more, check out the Michigan Native Plant database: http://www.nativeplant.com/plants/search/input

Tall coreopsis

Culver's root

Missouri Ironweed

Blue Vervain

Purple Meadow Rue

Riddles goldenrod

Mountain Mint

Black eyed susan

Southern Blueflag

Sand coreopsis


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

A week of composting Many of the things we discard or shove down the garbage disposal can be recycled into rich soil we pay top dollar for at a Home and Garden Center. This list describes the type of house hold waste we are looking to add to the Rain Garden/bio-swale. Within a bucket or a pail, begin to collect the following: •

Coffee grounds with filters

Tea bags

Crushed eggshells

Fireplace ashes

Rotted fruit from a fruit tree

Dead leaves from houseplants

Fruit and vegetable peels or rinds

Shredded newspaper

Lint from the dryer cleaner lint trap

Crushed dry leaves (not from the black walnut tree as pictured)

There will be drop-off stations on <<date>> at <<time>> for you to make your contribution. We very much appreciate your support!

Lend a hand! What we could use most of all is a helping hand from the community. We’ll be digging up the existing sod and soil to make room for our Rain Garden. Come join us and bring a shovel! Reach out to Gina Delidow (248-539-9330 or kiskisdrr@aol.com) to inquire on how to help with the Big Dig!


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

*****Rain Garden flyer intended to be printed in black and white*****

Come one, Come all… And bring your shovels! We’ll work on the digging, prepping, and planting of Lone Pine's new RAIN GARDEN! Saturday and Sunday, October 20th and 21st, from 11 – 4 The purpose of this project is to unite the community in an effort to reduce pollution flowing into bodies of water, recharge the groundwater, support a natural habitat for wildlife, and beautify the landscape. A rain garden and bioswale are composed of these basic components: sand, rock, compost, topsoil, native plants and mulch. What we could use most of all is a helping hand from the community. We’ll be digging up the existing sod and soil to make room for our Rain garden. Please contact Gina Delidow at 248 539-9330 or kiskisdrr@aol.com for more details. Things to bring with you: Tools: Flat head shovel, work gloves, bottled water Native Plants: Native plants are attractive to birds, butterflies and other wildlife. Native plants do not require fertilizer, watering, or additional maintenance. Not to mention, the native plant variety can tolerate the varying Michigan weather. To learn more, check out the Michigan Native Plant database: http://www.nativeplant.com/plants/search/input. Here are a few selections you may already have in your garden: • Black eyed Susan

• Culver's root

• Blue Vervain

• Riddles goldenrod


Lone Pine Elementary School – Rain Garden / Bioswale Project

• Tall coreopsis

• Missouri Ironweed

• Purple Meadow Rue

• Mountain Mint

Rocks: We are looking for egg sized to grapefruit sized rocks. Compost: Many of the things we discard or shove down the garbage disposal can be recycled into rich soil we pay top dollar for at a Home and Garden Center. This list describes the type of house hold waste we are looking to add to the Rain Garden/Bio-swale. Within a bucket or a pail, begin to collect the following: • Coffee grounds with filters

• Tea bags

• Crushed eggshells

• Lint from the dryer cleaner lint trap • Fruit and vegetable peels or rinds

• Rotted fruit from a fruit tree

• Dead leaves from houseplants

• Shredded newspaper

• Crushed dry leaves (not from the black walnut tree) • No MEAT or DAIRY

Rain Garden / Bioswale  

Rain garden project being done at the Lone Pine Elementary School in Bloomfield Hills, MI.

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