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modern living with a prairie twist

SOUTH POINTE STYLE A MIX OF BOLD, BRIGHT, WHITE AND LIGHT

+A  T HOME WITH

THE JETS +T  HE SWEET LIFE +S  UMMER RETREATS

OUTDOOR LIGHTING TIPS FROM THE PROS


6 CONTRIBUTORS The great friends and talents we have met along the way, that have given of themselves to make Covet.

7 EDITOR’S PAGE

OUT AND ABOUT — Local businesses we would love you to know about.

8 TINY FEAST Splendid stationery and decor.

10 NORMANDY SHOP High quality, handmade goods and menswear.

12 WE LOVE Items we have spotted here or there that we think you will love too.

STYLE DEFINED — A design lesson. A period, style, or piece explained.

“Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”~ Henry James Mairen Kops

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ABODE

A peek inside Manitoba homes and cottages completed by local design talent or design-savvy homeowners.

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MODERN AMUSEMENT A colourful infusion to a sprawling new-build.

DESIGNED BY NATURE This country setting brings the family closer together.

40 TIMELESS TRANSFORMATION Strong lines and modern surfaces mingle in this Lindenwoods renovation.

46 CURVE APPEAL Custom cottage exceeds owners' expectations.

58 14/22 ADDITION = 20/20 VISION A clever add-on realizes a young family’s cottage dreams.

SUMMER IN THE HOT SEAT Lakeside or poolside, explore the history of Adirondack chairs.

COLLECTIONS — Admittedly, we like stuff. Here we showcase people and their stuff, and their knowledge of their stuff.

11 REMEMBERING THE SUMMER: COLLECTING WITH CHILDREN

GET CRAFTY - We can get into good craft projects, and love the satisfaction creating something brings.

16 TINY TERRARIUM Whimsical magnetic gardens.

PROFILE — Allow us to introduce you to the great, local design talent available in Winnipeg for you to tap into.

18 CAROL STANDIL COLOUR AND DESIGN

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! d e v o m We’ve : t a n e p now o aminmoore-mb.ca nj | be d r a v le u o b d el 2 5 -5 s cu r fi

Keep an eye on our Facebook page for more information about our grand opening!

p: 204.487.3666


ta b l e o f co n t e n ts

SUMMER 2014 Jessica Stephens

Bahia Taylor Editor in Chief Co-founder Leigh McKenzie Creative Director Co-founder

TIPS O’ THE TRADES Expert advice. You didn’t solicit it but we’re giving it to you anyway.

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76 SIMPLE STEPS TO MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DECK PROTECTION

OUTDOOR LIGHTING

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Darren Grunerud Managing Editor

COVET TALKS — Yup, we’re chatterboxes... and you’re gonna love who we chat up.

Jim Taylor Props Coordinator

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TOOLS Great gadgets, tools, and task-busting items we thought you should know about.

Barbara Chabai Copy Editor

Graphic Design Hinge Design www.hingedesign.ca Styling Envy Paint and Design www.benjaminmoore-mb.ca Owned and Published by: Covet Magazine For inquiries, please contact us at info@covetmagazine.ca 1811 Assiniboine Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0A5 www.covetmagazine.ca info@covetmagazine.ca Cover Photography - Tara Craigon and Shandra Hees While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, Covet Magazine cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for informational purposes only. The views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editor. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Typeset in Chronicle Roman and Whitney Printed in Canada Publications Mail Agreement No. 42575014 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to info@covetmagazine.ca

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY CDECA lends a hand at this new-home build.

26 COVET CARAVAN Travel with photographers Brian Johnson and Rachael King Johnson throughout the city and province, and take in the sights through their camera lenses. This issue, Beekeeper Phil Veldhuis.

CHOW — Food, glorious food and everything to go with it.

64 OUR JETS AT HOME A behind the scenes scoop on the making of our NHL team's cookbook.

PRAIRIE PALLETTE — A glimpse into the Winnipeg art community or profile of a great local artist.

74 GMB CHOMICHUK

LIVING WELL — Reviews, ideas, a little form and a little function.

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80 WORKING WITH AN INTERIOR DESIGNER Tips from the Professional Interior Designers Institute of Manitoba

82 2 BY 4 LIFE Follow radio personality Dez Daniels and her family as she blogs her way through the start-to-finish journey of a new home build. 

DIG - Get outside and get gardening.

84 ORGANIC FOOD

86 GOT MILKWEED?

87 WHIMSICAL BUTTERFLY BEVERAGE STATIONS

88 WHERE TO FIND

90 DESIGN DILEMMA

MAKE THE MOST OUT OF SUMMER WITH AN URBAN RETREAT Hear what four local designers have to say on the matter. modern living with a pr airie t wist

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CONTRIBUTORS TOM BIMA ticoswinehouse.com BLISS STUDIOS bliss-studios.ca RYAN BOWMAN @ryanjbowman SAMANTHA BRAUN ecotones@mts.net V. Braunstajn BARB CHABAI bccreativehouse.com MARISA CURATOLO marisacuratolo.com DARREN GRUNERUD Man-about-town IKEA ikea.ca RACHAEL KING JOHNSON MAIREN KOPS luckygirl.ca BRIAN JOHNSON gooddogphotography.ca MIKE JOHNSON STEPHEN LAMOUREUX adigroup.ca ARTHUR LIFFMANN benjaminmoore-mb.ca STEPHANIE MIDDAGH artfulowl.ca ROBINSON LIGHTING rlrbc.com CAROL STANDIL carolstandil.wordpress.com JESSICA STEPHENS jstephensphoto.com JIM TAYLOR Go-to Guy DEZ WENGROWICH twobyfourlife.com KASSIA WOLOSHYN benjaminmoore-mb.ca


e d i to r ' s pag e Covet is free, and if you'd like to receive a copy visit covetmagazine.ca to subscribe. You can view a digital version of this issue there, too. See you soon! The sun is shining and the peonies are in bloom; sweet summer, we've missed you. We're sure this finds some of you midrenovation, or planning your next trip to a building supply shop with a list long enough you might need a trailer to bring it all home. Bahia is racing towards her new store's grand opening, setting the stage and putting all the beautiful displays together, while Leigh is starting to tear down walls, trying to avoid the sawdust showers that rain from the ceiling as her renovations get underway. We are always excited to see what is on the menu for summer in Winnipeg, festivals and barbecues abound and lake country always beckons. There is never a dull moment while we try to soak it all in. This issue takes us to a couple of waterfront retreats, a very ambitious update in a Lindenwoods home as well as a spectular gardenscape and a beautiful new abode in the city's south end. The spaces are all so different and we hope you find inspiration for your home between our covers. We also are excited to share some of the behind the scenes scoop from the making of Our Jets at Home, True North's cookbook that our extremely talented chef Marisa Curatolo championed for a great cause. Get a cold beverage, some sunscreen and read on in the heat of Winnipeg's lush, green summer!

UPCOMING EVENTS • Original, accessible, cheeky — these are just some of the adjectives used to describe the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival, now known as North America’s second-largest fringe theatre fest. Get your theatre on with nearly two full weeks of comedy, drama, dance, improv, musicals and more presented by more than 160 companies from around the world, all while Old Market Square comes alive with non-stop entertainment at the Cube stage. July 16th to 27th at various venues throughout the Exchange District. Complete details and ticket information at www.winnipegfringe.com or by calling 204.943.7464. • What’s long been suspected is finally official: Winnipeg’s Folklorama has been declared the largest and longest-running multicultural festival of its kind in the world by the International Council of Organizations of Folklore Festivals and Folk Arts. Celebrate life and culture with world-class entertainment, delicious authentic food and beautiful cultural displays at the 43

pavilions taking part in this year’s festival — there’s a good reason why it attracts over 400,000 visits every year to its cuturally-diverse collection of pavilions located throughout Winnipeg. August 3rd to 16th at various venues throughout Winnipeg. Complete details at www.folklorama.ca or by calling 204.982.6210. • Take the best in local, national and international blues performers, baste liberally with the Winnipeg Free Press Pit Masters BBQ competition, and you’ve got a recipe for the tastiest fest in town. This year’s Winnipeg BBQ & Blues Festival features a stellar music lineup including the Robert Cray Band, Colin James, Big Dave McLean and hometown favourite Romi Mayes; the winner of the barbeque contest may secure invites to two international food competitions. Other events include an artisans village, food vendors and multiple beverage gardens, so put on your eating clothes Winnipeg — this is gonna be a gooder. August 16th and 17th at Shaw Park. Complete details and ticket information at www.winnipegbbqandblues.ca.

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out and about

TINY FEAST text COVET MAGAZINE photography TINY FEAST FIND IT: 217 McDermot Avenue 204.942.5889 Tuesday-Saturday 11am-6pm www.tinyfeast.com HISTORY: Self-described creatives and homebodies, husbandand-wife team Danika Bock and Drex Serduletz have always been drawn to well-made products that integrate usefulness, thoughtful design and communication. With backgrounds in graphic design and printmaking, they connect with products that are both a pleasure to use and nice to look at. While opening a shop had been on their radar screen for as long as they’d known each other, it was their travels through cities like Berlin, Amsterdam and Copenhagen that helped affirm their vision. Once they saw that most of their beloved product lines could not be found anywhere in Winnipeg, they realized the potential to open a really unique shop here in the city.  THE SPACE: Auspiciously located in the Bate Building in the Exchange District, Tiny Feast follows in the footsteps of other print purveyors who have called the building on ‘Newspaper Row’ home since its construction in 1883 — the Winnipeg Free Press operated out of this building in the early 1900s. “It was

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important for us to create a comfortable, modern setting that would be functional for us, enjoyable for customers to visit, and one that allows us to truly showcase our products,” says Danika. Working with local designers, they installed banks of tall steel shelving units to display products along the perimeter of the store; custom made black wire cage pendants with Edison bulbs hang from the original tin-tiled ceiling, suspended over hairpinlegged consoles that run through the centre of the space. MENU: Tiny Feast offers a carefully curated selection of products with an emphasis on high quality, functionality and timeless design. Goods on the shelves include letterpress printed greeting cards, modern workplace supplies, Scandinavian-designed homewares and handmade accessories. “We’re extremely interested in knowing the people who we’re supporting by stocking their lines, ” notes Danika. WINNIPEG: While both Danika and Drex love to travel, coming home to Winnipeg and being surrounded by family and their community of friends is important to them. They also feel a sense of pride for opening their shop in the city and taking ownership of what’s happening in Winnipeg. “It’s so encouraging to see others doing the same. Whether buying houses, starting families or opening businesses, it feels like there are a lot of people choosing to commit to Winnipeg and making the effort to contribute to a dynamic, exciting, enjoyable city.”


st y l e d e f i n e d

SUMMER IN THE HOT SEAT: A D I RO N DAC K C H A I R S text ARTHUR LIFFMANN No matter where you live, no matter where you grew up, and no matter your background, the chances are good that if asked to describe some of the quintessential style elements in a traditional North American “camp” style summer retreat, you’ll come up with a list of items that matches those of people from across North America. And topping that list very often is the ever-popular Adirondack chair. Defined by its simplicity, durability and relaxed comfort, this particular style of chair — and indeed, the overall style that it represents — is a product of the late nineteenth century design revolution. Supplanting the highly ornate and often fussy styles of the Victorian era, the Arts and Crafts movement swept across the pond from Europe like a breath of fresh air into the homes of North America, relaxing the way that people approached both their architecture and furnishings. In this particular battle of the ongoing design wars, function trumped form as furniture makers began producing the beautiful wooden chairs, benches, tables, and beds that exemplify the Craftsman design principles. And so it’s not surprising that after a century, the Adirondack chair — the era’s poster child — is still one of the most sought-after pieces of furniture in North America. The original Adirondack chair was conceived in 1903 by Thomas Lee, who owned a summer home in the cottage country of Westport, New York. In need of furniture for his patio, he began dreaming up a design for outdoor chairs that would provide his family with comfort and ease during their holidays. Various prototypes were created and tested in his attempts to perfect his design; after a number of attempts, he eventually settled on a deeply-

angled, low-seated and spacious chair constructed of eleven pieces of wood cut from a single board. Of particular note were the wide armrests, which served double duty as a table top — a design element still embraced today as a perfect place for resting a tall, cool glass of lemonade on a hot summer afternoon. It’s entirely possible that these generous and comfortable chairs would have been reserved purely for the Lee family’s enjoyment had fate (and Mr. Lee) not brought them to the attention of his friend Harry Bunnell. The carpenter was looking for a new revenue stream to sustain his business in the cold East Coast winters and recognized the appeal that the chairs might have to his Westport clientele. In a move that to this day still gives intellectual property lawyers chest pain, Mr. Lee loaned his friend the plans to his chair. Bunnell quickly began producing the chairs, which he christened the Westport Plank chair; in 1905, apparently without asking Lee’s permission, Bunnell filed for and received U.S. patent #794,777. While the true details of the story are murky, it's safe to suggest that the old friends never chilled on the patio together again. Constructed in hemlock and basswood, Bunnell’s Westport chairs were painted a deep green or medium dark brown and individually signed by him. Over the span of the twenty years that he manufactured them, the wide appeal of the chairs lead to other furniture makers creating similar chairs of their own; over time, the entire genre of the low-seated, slat-backed, slanted chairs came to be called Adirondack chairs, after the Adirondack mountain range in which Westport is located. The final significant modifications to the Adirondack chair that we are used to seeing today were made by Irving Wolpin

in 1938. While Wolpin’s rounding of the back of the chair created the definitive signature look of the modern Adirondack, it’s perhaps his comfortable contouring of the wooden seat that has guaranteed the chair’s ongoing popularity. Today, the Adirondack chair is synonymous with times and places of respite. They are extremely popular for use as beach furniture, mountain cabin furniture and, like the original, rustic lakeside seating. Available in a variety of woods including cedar, redwood and maple, they can easily be stained or left to weather naturally. However, most wooden versions are still painted, though in a vastly expanded palette from Bunnell’s original options. Modern technology has also delivered lighter, stackable and inexpensive versions, produced from recycled plastics and metals and widely available in almost every marketplace. While contemporary furniture-makers take some liberties with modified seat heights or exaggerated curves, the styles should always feature the swayed back that Thomas Lee originally designed to better accommodate the irregular land levels of mountain landscape. And while some may enjoy adding seat cushions to their Adirondack chairs, a well-made example should be perfectly comfortable as-is. Hitting up the antique fairs or flea markets this summer? Keep your eyes open for one of Harry Bunnell’s original Westport chairs; identifying its authenticity is made simpler by the fact that each original Westport chair is stamped with the patent date and the words “H. C. Bunnell” across the backrest. A Westport chair, in fair condition with the original rusty-brown or green stain, can be worth multiple thousands in today’s antiques market… and that can keep you sitting pretty all summer long.

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out and about

NORMANDY SHOP text and photography COVET MAGAZINE

FIND IT: B791 Corydon Ave 204.995.3386 Tuesday-Saturday 11am-8pm; Sunday Noon-5pm www.normandyshoppe.com HISTORY:Established in 2013, Normandy Shop is a menswear and lifestyle store owned by husband and wife team Chris Saniuk and Amanda Redmond. Specializing in high-quality handmade goods, the store features an eclectic mix of men’s apparel, objects, bags, footwear, accessories and vintage items. Each piece they sell is thoughtfully selected, and all have a different story to tell. THE SPACE: Located along the hip Corydon strip just off the corner of Arbuthnot, the wide space is bathed in sunlight that streams through the banks of huge southern-facing windows. Much of the interior was revamped by Chris using found and recycled items. “We were on a strict budget, and I’d say about 80per cent of the space was built using recycled materials. I just worked with what I had and made it exactly how I wanted it.” Original exposed bricks walls, slab concrete floors and wood panelling create a hip envelope; racks and fixtures made of steel pipes, long wood tables and vintage pieces of furniture lend a decidedly masculine vibe to the space.

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MENU: The ever-changing collection features an assortment of new emerging brands and lines that the owners have admired for years. Current faves include 3sixteen denim from New York and premium casual pieces from Denmark’s Norse Projects. Adam swears by the The West Is Dead chinos (“by far the best in the city”) and their exclusive offering of leather footwear and accessories from Red Wing Heritage. Make sure to check out the all-natural grooming products by Prospector Co., but hurry — they sell out regularly. WINNIPEG: Born and bred ‘Peggers, the pair say they were spurred to open their shop because they weren’t happy with the state of available menswear in the local market. “We felt the men of this city weren’t getting what they deserved as far as quality and selection. We saw these beautiful stores in Vancouver and New York that carried these amazing brands and thought, well, we deserve something of this calibre in Winnipeg.” The result? A cool boutique where local guys can find some of the nicest clothes in the city, hang out and chat, toss a record on and have a coffee. 


co l l ect i o n s

REMEMBERING THIS SUMMER Collecting memories with children The idea of collecting is rooted in the acquisition of objects. Generally these objects are sought after and bought they can come as gifts or inherited wealth but for the most part collectors like to acquire their own objects. What if these objects didn’t cost anything and were a way of chronicling the passage of summer? This is a much less celebrated form of collecting, one that can be introduced to children as we all embark on a summer full of adventure. There are lots of ways to collect memories of a summer well spent. Here are a few ideas to get your children engaged in the art of collecting. • Collect flowers or leaves from your summer destinations and press them between phone books and create a specimen board in an inexpensive

frame complete with descriptions of the locations in which the specimens were collected. • Start a visual journal with a large sketch book and have your child paint or draw every landscape location that you visit in the summer with a title that reflects the location. • Should your adventures take you near or far get maps of the places you visit and use markers to illustrate right on the maps the kinds of things you saw. • Before summer vacation begins, draft a list of all the things you want to do in the summer. Keep this list in a prominent spot and take daily photographs achieving each of the goals. • Borrow a book all about the indigenous birds in your area and

draw them as you spot them (with your homemade binoculars) outdoors.

Collecting doesn’t have to mean “buying” it should mean “preserving” and how better to preserve a summer full of memories than with a conscious effort to stay in the moment, soak in the sun and all the adventure. Our collections specialist Stephanie Middagh has spent the past 12 years being inspired by museum collections while working as a curator for various museums and galleries. Concurrent to her curatorial work, she took this inspiration to her sessional positions at the University of Manitoba where she continues to teach Introduction to Art and the History of Textiles.

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w e lov e

STAR LIGHT, STAR BRIGHT Laying out on the deck on a hot summer night, staring up at the starry sky; you spot the Big Dipper, or maybe you know some less common constellations. With a little star-spiration you can add some twilight to your home decor. Modern and sophisticated, star-themed accessories have come a long way from the glow-in-the-dark stickers that adorned many ceilings to keep the monsters at bay. Whether it be a stunning ceiling mount or some constellation dish towels, these accessories are timeless and sure to delight the star gazer in your family.

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Interior or exterior renovations, over and above your expectations. Over & Above Custom Homes can help with your next renovation project.

overandaboveconstruction.com

Call us for your free estimate

204.999.5351


POWER SMART LED BULBS Light emitting diode (LED) bulbs are the most energy efficient type of lighting available. LED bulbs use up to 80 per cent less electricity and last up to 25 times longer than incandescent bulbs. Over the last few years, the technology has evolved to offer a wide range of alternatives for general household lighting applications, including safe and durable night lights. THE BENEFITS OF LEDS INCLUDE: • Up to 80 per cent more energy efficient than incandescent bulbs • Can last up to 28 years (25,000 hours) • Bulb life not affected by turning the light on/off frequently • Ideal for hard-to-reach fixtures because they don't need to be replaced frequently - fewer bulb changes equals less waste • Available in many different colours, sizes and shapes • Cool to the touch • Durable and shatterproof • Do not contain mercury or lead • Achieve full brightness immediately • Most are dimmable • Suitable for a variety of locations and fixtures • Perform well in cold temperatures

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get crafty

TINY TERRARIUM This vertical terrarium garden is composed of a series of magnetic spice jars. Affix them to the refrigerator or any other surface you please to add a little green to your kitchen. You'll need: gravel, air plants, cactus or succulents (you will need a small amount of potting soil if not using air plants), moss, spray paint, magnetic metal tins, dremel tool and painter’s tape. Cover your tins with painter’s tape before you begin spray painting the inside of them. Spray tins with 3-4 light coats until they are opaque in solid white. While your tins are drying, remove the acrylic top from the lids. Measure the diameter and mark a line with a permanent marker. Using the diamond cutter tip of your Dremel tool, slice all acrylic lids in halves. Lightly sand the edges using a sander tip of your Dremel tool. Once your tins are dry from spray paint, remove tape and wash tins with water and soap. Close all tins, now with open-front lids. Add gravel, misty moss and air plants.

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Furniture for the Way you Live Located 15 minutes North East of Winnipeg, on the edge of Birds Hill Park www. pin er idgeh ol l ow. c om 2 04. 7 7 7 . 3881 Open 7 Days a Week

Furniture ~ Gift ~ Home Decor Clothing ~ Restaurant ~ Wedding Venu

PINERIDGE HOLLOW


p ro f i l e Fuelled by her passion to help her clients harness the power of colour in their homes, she has studied with some of North America’s leading colour experts, including Maria Killam and Janice Lindsay. “Colour can make us feel serene or energized, moody or exuberant. We respond to it on a primal level as well as a very personal one. My role is to understand how my clients want a space to feel, listen to their ideas for how they want to get there, and then use my knowledge of colour to help them create a harmonious palette that accomplishes their goals. That’s what good colour is all about.” WHICH DECORATING TRENDS ARE YOU EMBRACING THIS SEASON?

PROfile is a chance to meet and get to know a local Winnipeg talent.

Covet has partnered with CDECA (Canadian Decorators' Association) to bring you the inside scoop on one of their members from the Central Prairie Chapter. To learn more about CDECA or for a list of CDECA decorators in your area, visit them at www.cdeca.com.

I’m all over the move toward happy colour. And gray. Which may sound like a contradiction until you realize that gray is actually a great backdrop for happy colour. I like the trend toward gray kitchens. I’ve always loved white kitchens for their ability to take pops of great colour, but colour isn’t the only thing that stands out sharply against white. Finger marks and clutter also “pop” against it! Gray is a bit more forgiving in this sense, while still allowing you to inject beautiful colour, so it’s both pretty and practical. COLOUR IS BACK IN A BIG WAY THIS SEASON — WHAT SCHEMES ARE EXCITING YOU THESE DAYS?

CAROL STANDIL COLOUR & DESIGN

I am really drawn to the combination of soft blues and greens right now – whether it’s a clean aqua and leaf green or a more grayed out version. I find it very fresh and optimistic.

Carol Standil is a certified interior decorator who helps her clients create classic contemporary interiors filled with good colour.

WHICH INTERIOR DESIGNER OR DECORATOR’S STYLE DO YOU ADMIRE MOST?

She is a graduate of Red River College’s Residential Decorating program, an Accredited member of the Canadian Decorators’ Association (CDECA), and a committed lifelong learner.

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After the dreary winter we had, I have also been obsessed by a warm yellow that borders on orange. I love it with gray and cream. My kitchen island might turn up in that colour before summer’s done!

I don’t know if I can pick just one favourite, as there are several I admire for different reasons. Sarah Richardson has an amazing hand with colour and pattern, and a great knack for mixing old and new in a way that’s fresh and

interesting. I love Jonathan Adler’s manifesto and his fearless use of colour. I’m also really inspired by Janice Lindsay. Her background is in theatre design, and she truly understands how to harness the power of colour to enhance and support the quality of people’s lives. GARAGE SALE SEASON IS IN FULL SWING — WHAT ARE YOUR BEST-EVER FLEA MARKET OR SECONDHAND FINDS? One of the first things you see when you come into my house is a large painting I found at a second-hand store many years ago. It’s a colourful, 1950s-vintage floral that still makes me smile every time I look at it. I also bought a great nine-drawer midcentury Drexel dresser for $50 at the Sally Ann a couple of years ago. I’ve had visions of turning it into a really great painted piece, so I’m hoping to finally pull out the paintbrush this summer. IF YOU COULD SPEND UNLIMITED TIME (AND MONEY!) IN ONE STORE, WHICH WOULD IT BE? Does a travel agency count as a store? If you’re offering me unlimited time and money, I’d love to go hang around the Bon Marché in Paris and then hit the flea markets for awhile before starting the rest of my European tour! WHAT ARE THE TRICKS FOR FULLY EMBRACING AN INDOOR/OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE? For our climate, I think the screened porch is the key element to fully enjoying an outdoor lifestyle. Screened gazebos in the yard are good, but I’m talking about a porch that’s attached to the house, so that it’s just as easy to use as any other room. Many of us have decks, and they are great, but with a deck you are either inside or outside. There’s no in-between. The screened porch lets you be outside without going outside, and I think that some primitive part of our brain responds to that. We might not be consciously saying “Hey, this is safe,” but deep in our DNA, that’s the message we’re getting. And from a practical perspective, you can use a screened porch more often


and for more purposes than you would a deck. What drives us in off the deck? Hot sun, rain, bugs – all kept at bay with a screened porch. WHAT IS THE MOST OVERLOOKED DESIGN CONSIDERATION IN AN OUTDOOR SPACE? I think it’s the same consideration that’s often overlooked in indoor spaces. We never quite get around to adding the comfortable touches that really make it both convenient and pleasurable to use. I see a lot of decks with maybe a table and a few stackable chairs, but there’s not much else around. The space gets some use, but not a lot, because frankly, it’s just not that enticing. We don’t spend hours on sites like Pinterest ogling photos of spaces that look stark and empty. We are drawn to the spaces that make us wish we were there. Imagine if our own spaces invited us in. How would our lives change if the sight of our own backyard was so appealing that we felt enticed to enter it whenever we caught a glimpse of it through the window? Taking the time – and making the investment – to complete those seemingly small details at the end of the project can actually be the thing that allow us to get the most value from the whole investment. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVOURITE ITEMS TO INCORPORATE INTO A SUMMER DECORATING SCHEME? Only three? Hmm. Fresh colour (is that an item?). A piece of old furniture painted white. And seagrass, sisal or striped cotton rugs. Summer always feels like the most casual and spontaneous season, to me, so I think of summer décor in that same way. TELL US YOUR VISION OF HOW TO SPEND A PERFECT SUMMER DAY. When I think back to my favourite summer days, they always have two things in common: they’re spent outdoors and they’re shared with family and friends. Oh, and there’s usually food involved. www.carolstandil.wordpress.com carol.standil@live.ca

+ DESIGN SERVICES + BELOVED BRANDS + NEWLY DISCOVERED TREASURES 444 Academy Road t: 204.487.1151 | bluehillsdesign.ca

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tips o' the trades

LANDSCAPE LIGHTING With ROBINSON LIGHTING

There has been a strong movement in design towards furnishing our outdoor living spaces. These furnished outdoor spaces increase the usable space of your home, and integrating lighting systems into these outdoor lighting spaces is a necessary component for a successful design. Adding lighting in garden area makes it more inviting, while also increasing security. It creates pleasant views from within the home, which help to expand the feel of the interior space. All of these factors can help you to enjoy your home; perhaps as importantly, they can also increase its value. We may have snow five months of the year, but that doesn't mean you can’t enjoy the benefits of landscape lighting. Snowscapes lit up at night can be majestic, and halogen heads can actually melt the snow around them. With some careful thought and planning, you can design a system that can help deal with snow, highlight significant architectural details, provide safety lighting for walkways and stairs, light seating areas, and create dramatic lighting effects like moon lighting, up-lighting and grazing. Quality systems are important for lasting lighting effects. Many solar systems are poor quality and produce a light that is too blue in colour. A properly wired system spreads light to create an intended effect; solar lights, by contrast, are often distracting.

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FALL TERM2014

th r 6th, September 15 Decembe

AGES 2 TO 6 PRESCHOOL ART FOR 6 SCHOOL AGE ART 6-1

nching point Using art histor y as our lau ful Owl for a studio practice the Art making fun. inspires creativity and art ar t Ho ot hoot, love artfulowl.ca T: 204.487.2012 create@artfulowl.ca 16-1700 Corydon Winnipeg, Manitoba R3N 0K5

These safe, easily-installed systems are wired using low-voltage wire, a variety of heads for different effects, and a transformer to change the voltage from 12V to household 120V current. With the development of LED components in the systems, the transformer can be smaller; this means saved money for you. LEDs do not melt the snow, but can create a nice light-up dome. Start with seeking the advice of a lighting specialist, like the ones available at Robinson Lighting; bring in a rough sketch of your property, location of power, features you would like to highlight, and areas you need illuminated. Photos and a brief description of the foliage and trees are also helpful. From this, we can assist you in developing a lighting plan to create a beautiful outdoor living space. Robinson Lighting, now in the 4th generation, has been in business for over 75 years. Our focus is on the very latest styles & trends, and ensuring our staff is on the cutting edge of lighting innovation, such as LED. Every sales staff member is a certified American Lighting Association Lighting Specialist.

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CDECA LENDS A HELPING HAND Details of a day at a Habitat For Humanity Build

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Since its creation in 1976, Habitat for Humanity — an international and non-governmental organization — has dedicated itself to addressing the issue of poverty housing around the world. With a mandate to build “simple, decent and affordable” housing, Habitat has helped more than 4 million people construct, rehabilitate or preserve homes since its inception, making it the largest not-for-profit builder in the world. This past May, members of the Manitoba branch of CDECA participated in a build that will provide a new, affordable home for a Winnipeg partner family who will purchase their first home at fair market value; Covet caught up with Habitat’s Vice President of Marketing, Communications & Philanthropy Michelle Pereira, as well as some of the CDECA volunteers, to talk about how Habitat is helping to build a better community. How is Habitat active in the local community? Habitat isn’t just active in the community, it builds community. Since 1988, HFHM has built over 300 homes for partner families. We spend more than $4 million annually purchasing goods and services from local suppliers. The houses built in the 2008–12 period paid $1.6 million in direct taxation and that does not even include the income tax of our staff working exclusively on building those houses. The homes that HFHM has built pay close to $750,000 every year in property taxes. We provide skills training to Stony Mountain inmates who are approaching their time to be paroled. Whenever we build on infill lots we see other homeowners in the area start to work on improving their homes. We have four signature fundraising events that support our efforts: three cycling events, Cycle of Hope, Ride Around the Lake and Muddy Waters.  We also host a gala dinner in late fall which is themed differently each year. We have an incredible Women Build Program that is building its 11th home this year. These amazing women raise their own funds to sponsor the home, including organizing four events other than the ones listed above, and have their own Blitz Build where over 300 women collaborate to build. We partner Women Build with a single mother to build her home. Our ReStore diverts approximately 2.5 million pounds from the local landfill sites every year. Are Habitat homes given away free to the new homeowners? No, Habitat partner families go through a lengthy application process in order to be selected.  One adult in the family must have had a full-time job for a minimum of two years, must have good credit, must agree to partner with Habitat to help build their home by completing a 350 Sweat Equity hours for a oneparent family or 500 hours for a two-parent family.  They need to display a need for safe affordable housing and have the ability to pay a mortgage.  Once the home is built, HFHM has the home appraised by an independent party, and sells the home to the

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family at fair market value with no interest on the mortgage and no down payment. The mortgage payment is based on their ability to pay: we take 25 per cent of their household income, paid in monthly installments.  With each mortgage payment, we set aside a portion to pay the property tax bill with the remainder being applied against the mortgage balance. Each payment to us immediately becomes equity for the family. How many homes does Habitat For Humanity build in Manitoba each year? This varies based on the funding we are able to raise.  On average, we build between 20–28 homes per year.  This year, we are on track to start 14 homes in Winnipeg and 8 in rural communities.  What is the Habitat ReStore and how does it work? The ReStore was invented in Winnipeg in 1991. There are now almost 1,000 stores in Canada and the USA with stores opening in Europe and Australia. Our main store is at 60 Archibald Street and we have just opened a second store at 1081 Ellice Avenue. We plan to open a store in Brandon this fall. The margin from the ReStore is used to cover our overhead and administration expenses, thus allowing donations to go into our build program. We receive donations of new and used products from individuals, manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers.   

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Covet caught up with the CDECA volunteers about their experience that day and here's what they had to say: Why did you choose to get involved in this Habitat build? Tiffany Sheldon: This is my second build. I first volunteered with the women of my church a few years back.  I loved the experience of participating in a volunteer event that relates to the field I work in on a daily basis.  I also thought it was a great opportunity to spend time with my colleagues for the day — we all often work on our own and see each other now  and then at various events for a bit. Sandra Gilbert: I chose to get involved in this Habitat build because I’ve always thought it was an excellent program.  It provides an opportunity for families, who might not otherwise have the chance, to own a home. Tara Spencer-Nairn: I wanted to give some time to help those that are less fortunate or in the need of some help.  We are always trying to teach our kids to help others so I felt this would be a great way to show them one way of doing that. Tannis Redekopp: This is something that I have always wanted to do, it was on my bucket list.  I was so grateful for the opportunity to participate.


Lesli Trottier: I decided to volunteer for this build for two reasons. I have always wanted to be a part of a Habitat build, to be able to help a great cause, but also wanted to be a part of a CDECA event. Perfect combination! What did you learn through the experience of being part of the home’s construction? Tiffany: I improved some of my skills with tools! The importance of team work and most importantly how hard of physical labour it is to build a house. Lastly, I learned some of the aspects that go into building a house that you don’t see as a designer, as those things are all behind the drywall or under the floor. Tara: I learned that next time I will wear knee pads, but all joking aside, every job is important whether big or small because it all needs to get done. Tannis: For the most part, by the time we get to a job site the majority of the home is already built and we are now working with the “pretty” which is exciting in itself. We know in theory how a home is built but to actually see how, what, where and when and to be part of it brings it to another level. Very cool! Lesli: Everyone is volunteering. Some have experience and some don’t. But you get help along the way and you can do it! People come together and make a great team to get a job done. What was it like to drop the fabric swatches and start swinging a hammer for the day? Tiffany: Really hard work physically — we were putting the floor in place so carrying  sheets of plywood and setting them and then screwing them in place.   Sandra: Dropping the fabric swatches and swinging a hammer for the day gave me the opportunity for a much more physical work day (and boy, is it hot under those hard hats). Even though it was just one day, it was extremely satisfying to know that the nails I was hammering contributed in the actual construction of a home. Tara: I was nervous but it felt great to help a family get one step closer to moving into their dream home. Tannis: Oh my, I’ll take my fabric swatches any day! I am going to give my contractor a big hug and kiss next time I see him.  Working physically all day is extremely hard, add in the weather elements and then times that by, oh I don’t know, maybe 100.  I’ll confess, I went home and went to bed!  Lesli: Hot, tiring, but extremely rewarding at the end of the day! How did participating on this build impact you?   Tiffany: It is such an interesting organization to be involved with.  They have such a successful program with their homeowners.  I love how the applicants must volunteer a certain amount of hours as part of their conditions.  It is also heartwarming to look around at the completed homes and see the families there and hope that their life is in a better place.  Even though I was so tired at the end of the day, I would show up again the next day and do it all over again! The team leaders were so patient with us — they give you total confidence in yourself and you also respect them so much as

they often give 2-3 days a week of their time throughout the summer. Tara: I was so impressed with all the volunteers and team leaders. Their dedication to such a great cause brings great pride to all those who are involved. Tannis: How great it feels to be able to give back in some small way and be so grateful for what we do have.  Lesli: It’s a wonderful feeling to  know that I have helped (in a small way) a family get a new home and new start in their lives. In your opinion, what’s the most important thing Manitobans need to learn about Habitat? Tiffany: That the applicants don’t just get the home for free.  I have such respect for all the hard work they must do to get their home, volunteering all those hours and many of them are single parents and have children too. I have a lot of respect for them. Sandra: I think the most important thing Manitobans need to learn about Habitat is that the provision of these homes for families is not a hand-out, but a hand-up. Habitat’s website explains that “families living below the poverty line who are able to repay an interest-free mortgage can qualify to become a partner family. Future homeowners must share in the labour of homebuilding, contributing 500 hours of sweat equity, and must participate in valuable training and preparation sessions. In return, their lives are transformed by the positive impact of receiving the hand up of homeownership.” And all mortgage payments are reinvested back into the program ensuring continued benefits to the community. Tara: Habitat for Humanity provides a hand up for those who need and want it, not a hand out.  These families have to put in many hours of “sweat equity” as well as make monthly interest free mortgage payments.  Habitat for Humanity makes it possible for many families to build a home which otherwise may not have been achievable. Tannis: How by giving just one day of your time goes such a long way in helping someone else.  If everyone was able to give just one day, can you imagine what could be achieved! Lesli: It's not just a new home, but a new start in life.  A responsibility and pride that may not otherwise be possible. What options are available for people wanting to get involved with Habitat? • Donate to support the general build program or a specialty build • Donate your old clunker for crushing – partnership with Urban Mine • Donate product to  and shop at the ReStore • Participate in special events and  fundraisers • Have your own fundraiser • Advocate and tell others what you have learned about Habitat • Volunteer at a build site, in the ReStore, in our offices, or on a Committee or the Board of Directors For more information about Habitat for Humanity visit: www.habitat.mb.ca

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COVET CARAVAN … honeybees

The Sweet Life

Photography by BRIAN JOHNSON AND RACHAEL KING JOHNSON Written by BARBARA CHABAI

This Manitoba family’s beekeeping operation is a hive of activity

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26 m e rto n roa d a n d … p i n e r i d g e h o l low Twenty-three years in the bee biz and the honeymoon’s still not over for Phil Veldhuis, owner and operator of Phil’s Honey. “At this time of year, the hives are very gentle and peaceful. The days are long and warm. You sit in the yard while you’re working with the sun shining on your back, the birds singing and the trees blooming. It’s very pleasant,” says Veldhuis, whose apiary is nestled against the banks of the La Salle River near Starbuck. Recently chosen as the 2014 Farm Family of the Year by the Red River Ex Association, Veldhuis, along with his wife Vona Guiler and their children Timmy and Jayna, run a 1,000-hive operation that yields approximately 250 barrels (each

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weighing 600 pounds) of honey annually. “We start pulling the honey around the end of July and continue until the middle of September so that we can, hopefully, harvest each hive three or four times,” he explains. Most of the crop is canola honey, but they also produce clover, alfalfa, sunflower and buckwheat varieties. A third generation apiarist, Veldhuis’ grandmother started keeping bees in 1917 and was a founding member of the Manitoba Cooperative Honey Producers. Veldhuis joined the cooperative in 1991, serving several stints as a director and a term as chairman. Today, 90 per cent of his production is sold through the cooperative under


BeeMaid Honey, the only honey packer to sell 100 per cent pure Canadian honey. The remaining honey is sold directly from farm gate to customer. Phil’s Honey was one of the first local businesses at the St. Norbert Farmer’s Market and two decades later, you’ll still find Phil manning his vendor stall on Saturday mornings. “It’s very much a father-and-son thing for us,” Veldhuis says. “When things slow down, Timmy will get out his fiddle and do some busking next to the table. The fiddle music is how many people find us in the market.” Talking with customers has also provided an invaluable opportunity for Veldhuis to discuss the nature of his business. “When a mom of three wants your word that your food is safe and healthy to feed her family, it forces you to take

what you do very seriously,” he says. “So I have a standard to keep for my own integrity that is reinforced by the expectations of my customers.” For its efforts in sustainable farming practices, Phil’s Honey has been certified by Local Food Plus, a Canadian nonprofit committed to growing sustainable food systems. “Sustainability is important, not only because consumers expect it, but because I have kids and hopefully someday, grandkids; plus I am the grandchild of someone who farmed and looked after things well. To contemplate this coming to an end because of avoidable mistakes you made seems pretty unacceptable to me.” With the honey bee population dwindling because of numerous threats, Veldhuis says considerable challenges lie ahead.

“As bee populations shrink, there will be more tendency for beekeepers to focus on professionally pollinating rather than producing honey. This could mean that good quality honey will someday be priced as a luxury item instead of a staple. It will be more like caviar than peanut butter,” he says. “It’s a doomsday scenario to think that there will be no honey in the future, but it is conceivable that there won’t be as much of it available.” In the meantime, Veldhuis is just glad there is good buzz surrounding his pure, locally-made honey. “Like most products on the shelf, there is some very good honey and some sub-par honey. The truth is, not every jar is the same,” he cautions. “Canadian honey is the best quality in the world; no other kind tastes better and no other industry has better control of how its

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bees are treated or how its honey is produced. Even if someone thinks they don’t like honey, I’d encourage them to try some good, homegrown honey before giving up on it.” www.philshoney.com Try your hand at one (or both) of these delicious recipes that use honey!

HONEY GREEK YOGURT POPSICLES

½ cup strawberries (or other fruit of your choice) 1 cup nonfat Greek yogurt 2 tbsp BeeMaid Honey In a small food processor or blender, puree the fruit for 30 seconds to 1

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minute. (Do not blend for too long or the puree will become too watery). In a measuring cup or bowl with pouring spout, stir together the yogurt and honey. Fold in about 2 tablespoons of the fruit puree. Taste and add more honey or fruit puree as desired. Pour fruit and yogurt mixture into popsicle molds, filling about ¾ of the way. Add wooden sticks and freeze for at least 3 hours. To remove: run warm water over the bottom of the popsicle mold and gently twist and pull out the popsicles.

HONEY CUCUMBER SALAD

3 medium cucumbers, thinly sliced and halved ¼ cup BeeMaid Honey ½ cup white balsamic vinegar


(can also use white wine vinegar) Âź cup water 2 tbsp red onion, diced salt Place cucumbers in bowl and sprinkle with salt. Toss and set aside. In a small mixing bowl, stir together honey, white balsamic vinegar, water and diced red onions. Pour the mixture over the cucumbers and toss. Allow the salad to marinate in the refrigerator about 1 hour prior to serving.

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A spectacular collection of vases displayed in the ling area echoes the soundwave patterns of the wool rug, creating a perfect harmony of texture living in the otherwise subdued space.

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MODERN AMUSEMENT Happiness is Just a Colour Away design by ENVY PAINT AND DESIGN photography TARA CRAIGON AND SHANDRA HEES

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“Bahia challenged our design sensibilities and took us further than we’d ever have gone on our own. The result is simply outstanding — we love it.” ~The Homeowners

When the homeowners of this new build first walked through the doors of the house that was to become their home, they knew they’d found ‘the one’. Backing onto a lake in a new development in southwest Winnipeg, the open floor plan featured highly desirable architectural features like ten foot ceilings and a walk-out lower level… but that was it. “Essentially, it was a white box,” laughs the wife. Not a problem, though. “I knew that I wanted a neutral and classic envelope, something that would work on it’s own and still allow us to decorate and redecorate as time went on without worrying about having to change the big stuff, like cabinets or flooring” says the wife. And so they quickly got to work selecting their hard finishes and having the house completed — in went the oiled hardwood floors, the custom millwork, glass-panelled interior openings, and a six-burner Wolfe cooktop. But even with all that in place, it still didn’t feel quite like home. “We were thrilled with the light and the openness. It was lovely, but we wanted to add a sense of fun,” says Christie. And so she called upon designer Bahia Taylor of Envy Paint & Design to help inject the space with some inspired and vibrant decorating. “The bones of he house were good,” says Taylor, “but this is a young, active family with a sophisticated design sense. The house needed some whimsy.” Opposite: An original canvas by local superstar artist Kal Barteski hangs above a custom bench in the grand foyer; a quirky coat rack by BluDot injects a bright shot of colour. Top: A playful series of bowls mounted on the wall descending to the lower level softens the hard edges of the millwork; a trio of classic metal stools by Harry Bertoia offer a casual yet stylish place to perch at the oversized kitchen island.

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Clockwise from top left: A builtin sideboard in the formal dining area provides abundant closed storage and excellent space on top for serving or display; even Otis joins the homeowners’ sons Max and Jake in the kitchen for snack time; the homeowners’ collection of a menagerie of ceramic sculptures is proudly displayed in the living area.

Creating a space that delivered the vibrancy the clients were seeking, while complimenting the existing high-end finishes? A dream project, indeed. And upon entering the home, guests are greeted with a vignette that beautifully demonstrates the dream realized. Taylor designed a custom bench made from a slab of walnut and steel hairpin legs; she plucked an original canvas by Winnipeg’s Kal Barteski off the artist’s own living room wall (featured in Covet’s Summer 2013 issue) and installed it over the bench in lieu of a mirror. A shot of colour and humour is delivered by a fabulous yellow-dipped coat rack from modern design powerhouse Blu Dot. Together, the design elements represent the sensibility that now infuses the entire home. Taylor’s selection of a bold area rug to ground the living area of the great room not only introduced visual texture to the space, but also determined the colour palette that was used throughout. The bold blues and yellows mix beautifully with the neutral envelope of the home’s hard finishes and allude to the bright sunshine and wide prairie sky outside the banks of massive windows used throughout the house. Two large leather sofas providing comfortable seating are complimented by a pair of sculptural Barcelona chairs in white leather (Mike’s single request for the space); a steel and glass table anchors the area without hiding the rug from view. Across the massive mantelpiece dance the homeowner’s collection of vases, creating a gentle yet dynamic focal point without detracting from other elements in the large space.

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Shell chairs by mid-century icons Charles and Ray Eames surround an ultramodern Sprout table in the casual eating area off the kitchen.

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In the informal dining area off he kitchen, the designer selected a bright yellow and brushed stainless steel table from Blu Dot and surrounded it with Eames shells on metal Eiffel bases. Illuminated from above by an airy Kina fixture, the dining area is now one of their favourite places to gather. “I would never have chosen a round table on my own, let alone a bright yellow one,” says the wife. “Bahia instinctively knew not only what was going to work, but what would work for us. It was like working with a magician.” And what could be more fun than that? Custom cushions, button-tufted and piped in the same colours pulled from the area rug, make for awesome snuggling on the comfortable leather sofas in the great room.

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GE T T H I S LOOK 3. 4. 1.

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1. Barcelona chair, available at Envy Paint & Design Ltd. 2. Rhino and elephant ceramic sculptures, available at Envy Paint & Design Ltd. 3. Blu Dot splash coat rack, available at HutK 4. David Trubridge green Kina lamp, available at Envy Paint & Design Ltd. 5. Sprout dining table, available at HutK 6. Benjamin Moore Oxford white CC-30 7. Surya wool rug, CAN-2029, available at Flatlanders Flooring

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T I M ELESS TRANSFORMATION

IN The open-concept living room, diningroom, kitchen creates an ease of conversation and ample space for the family to spread out. Beautiful oiled maple floors contrast the quartz counters; instead of a backsplash, the beautiful picture window floods the kitchen with light.

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NTO

Strong lines and modern surfaces mingle in this Lindenwoods renovation design and photography by DESIGN-BUILT Thoughtful design planning, trust and a true collaboration took this mid-90s Lindenwoods home to a new level upon the completion of an extensive renovation. Homeowners Mike and Jacqueline are no strangers to the renovation process, having completed numerous past projects, including a space in the bloc 10 condos. For their own home they enlisted the expertise of Clayton Salkeld and the Design-Built team, handing over the keys as soon as they took posession. The challenge of this project was to turn a base-level suburban home into a timeless solution using materials that lend quality of space. "Good architecture should inspire the homeowner to live better" is a position that Salkeld is passionate about, and it is the job of the designer and architect to educate the homeowner or developer that this can be achieved through proper planning and execution. Renovation projects don't come without challenges, and this was no exception. To create a more open-concept floor plan, the team opted to remove a wall that separated the dining room from the kitchen. In order to maintain the structural integrity, they had to keep a header — but instead of boxing it in, they opted to lower the ceiling height above the dining room table to 7 feet. This eliminated a bulkhead and created a more intimate environment. This design decision wasn't something that was in the initial plans, but an on-site solution that was made; this is the benefit of working with a design build team. Design-Built has a crew of designers who are hands-on with their projects, this ensures that proper evaluation of the space is ongoing and design decisions are made at the moment they crop up. Other design solutions include installiation of beautiful oiled maple flooring throughout, a custom-built dining room table and an expansive maple staircase. The showstopping, custom staircase is 27 feet from top to bottom and the centrepiece of the home. It lets light flow from front to back, is sculptural and functional. Mike also wanted a space for his young family to be able to work, study and read, so they converted the previous living room into a modern library. It's something that works well for them, and will evolve over time as the family grows.

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“Appropriate design solutions provided by a qualified architect or designer should always net you money in the long run... restrained and authentic material selection and detailing will produce a home that maintains value despite the ever-changing market trends. When adhered to from the outset this approach would eliminate waste and maintain market relevance by achieving a home that keeps its ‘turn key’ status for decades to come." ~Clayton Salkeld, Design-Built

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The kitchen boasts beautiful custom shelving paired with affordable IKEA cabinets. A previous bump-out was reworked to create an extra-deep counter and ample space behind the sink. Instead of a decorative backsplash, Clayton designed a picture window to add light and allow the parents to keep an eye on their young children in the backyard. This house is an excellent example of good design planning and a solid understanding of how a family uses a space. Design-Built took the time to learn about the homeowners, collaborated on solutions that work and executed them with a timeless beauty. Like many other homes, it isn't the amount of square footage that makes it a dream, it's the thoughtfulness and execution of the design solutions, the evaluation of the entire volume rather than bits and pieces, and it was achieved with a modest budget and a vision. Opposite: The homeowners' modern library houses a space for studying and crafts as well as lounge for relaxing. Top: Custom designed by Clayton at Design-Built, the minimalist dining table is paired with white Eames chairs. Right: The sculptural staircase raises from the basement to the second story. Built from maple, it is the focal point of the main floor and another custom design from the talented Design-Built team.

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Clockwise from top right: the master bath, complete with a stunning soaker tub, custom vanity and classic penny tiles. The master bedroom, a beautiful retreat that has been thoughtfully composed. IKEA closets keep the couple organized and custom bedside lights add a bit of whimsey to the minimalist space.

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whitespace . g rid. repetitio n. alig nmen t .

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you n oti ce de s i gn eve ry wh e re . we do too. Hinge is a strategic branding and interactive design agency. We are passionate about culture, and how we can create conversations between our clients and their target audiences. We believe that style reflects who you are and what you do; and in today’s competitive marketplace, having a distinct style is an advantage that will help you stand apart from the crowd. A meaningful style is a powerful way to define your purpose, represent your values and effectively communicate your brand to customers. Design thinking is crucial when approaching and solving business problems in a culture full of change. We’re honest, approachable, down to earth and would like to help.

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1. Orange pendant light cord and porcelain socket, available at Envy Paint & Design Ltd. 2. Cow hide rug, available at Flatlanders Flooring 3. Sayl task chair, available at EQ3 4. Oiled maple hardwood flooring, available at Flatlanders Flooring 5. Eames molded plastic Eiffel side chair, available at HutK 6. PAX wardrobe, available at IKEA 7. Egg shape soaker tub, available at Envy Paint and Design Ltd.

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This page: The crescent shape of the cottage mimics the shape of the bay. The 122 stairs down to the water keep you in shape during the summer! Opposite: An expansive deck atop the boathouse provides a perfect waterside area for entertaining, sunbathing and taking in the spectacular views of Clearwater Bay

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CURVE APPEAL Custom cottage exceeds owners' expectations design by EVERITT DESIGN | photography LUCKYGIRL PHOTOGRAPHY

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abode The colossal crescent-shaped cottage towering over the bright blue water could easily be mistaken for a mansion on Lake Tahoe. It is, in fact, a family cottage less than 200 kilometres from Winnipeg. The vision for the waterfront palace started eight years ago, when Leon Rutherford and his wife, Charlotte, bought six acres of undeveloped land on Lake of the Woods. “I told the architects I wanted a simple square box,” recalls Rutherford, who is semi-retired after a career in real estate development and construction. “Six months later they showed me this rendering of a semi-circle. They knew I was a sucker for anything architecturally unique.” With Rutherford’s stamp of approval, the architects got to work. About a year and a half in, however, Rutherford didn’t like the direction the project was taking and parted ways with the firm he was working with. Enter Rob Everitt, owner of Everitt Design Associates Ltd. “Things immediately got much better,” says Rutherford, who knew Everitt personally from past projects. “We were on the same page design-wise, and we were on the same page of practicality and paying attention to detail.” While Everitt was essentially given carte blanche, he says Rutherford had a few caveats. “He wanted to be as environmentally-friendly as possible,” Everitt recalls. “He also had some preconceived ideas of what he wanted the outside finishes to look like.” One of those ideas was to keep the arc design, which Everitt fully supported: “it flowed beautifully with both the bay and the layout of the property.” But Everitt, who has experience designing cabins of all shapes and sizes, says the assignment came with several challenges. “It was an unusual project because it’s on a crazy slope. There’s almost no flat land and it just drops off like a cliff.” Everitt’s solution was to build the structure on 18 steel stilts ranging from six to 12 feet in height. And while the elevation meant the cottage would be farther from the lake — 122 steps, to be exact — it certainly had its benefits. “With the cabin away from the water you can look out and see the bay from anywhere in the cottage,” says Everitt, who added floor-to-ceiling windows and a 10-foot walkway from the deck to the boathouse. “Sitting out on the deck, it’s like we’re in an eagle’s nest,” Rutherford adds. “The views are just mind-boggling.” Another unique challenge facing Everitt and Rutherford was the contoured wall; everything from the windows to the cupboards to the bolts had to be custom-made. “As you can imagine, nothing off the shelf is made for a semi-circular structure,” Rutherford says. “There are no right angles, so everything had to be custom. There was just no way around it.” Opposite: Anchored by the expansive fireplace, the lounge area offers ample space to relax with your favourite summer reading; This page: Red Dragon granite countertops paired with custom cherrywood cabinets create a chef's kitchen.

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“Sitting out on the deck, it’s like we’re in an eagle’s nest. The views are just mind-boggling.” ~ Leon Rutherford

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Add to that the fact that Rutherford was set on sparing no expense to achieve the cottage of his dreams, and it made for a massive — and costly — undertaking. “We wanted all of the bells and whistles, and we didn’t want to skimp on luxury,” says Rutherford, who expects his three children and future grandchildren to enjoy the cottage for decades to come. As the project progressed, those bells and whistles came to include a steam shower, an Italian whirlpool with 150 jets, a mammoth fireplace, porcelain flooring, Red Dragon granite throughout the kitchen, a solid wood ceiling, and six kilometres worth of Douglas fir trim – all of it custom milled from trees Rutherford had bought in Oregon. Given the numerous speed bumps, the size of the cottage, the surgical attention to detail and the desire for luxury, the project took nearly four years to complete (the foundation alone took six months). But according to Rutherford, the finished product was well worth the wait. “It exceeded expectations,” he says. “It was a long, long labour of love, but it all paid off.” Everitt, too, says the project was one of the most rewarding he’s ever been a part of: “When you walk in, there’s this beautiful feeling of not knowing where you are; you could be in Colorado, you could be in the Alps." “It’s quite simple and subtle,” he adds, “but the space feels like it’s all connected.” For a living space divided into distinct sections and spread across 6,000 square feet, that’s no small accomplishment. In addition to the family’s living space on one side of the cabin and the guest area on the other, there is a screened breezeway in the centre and a sprawling deck overlooking water. “It feels like you’re sitting in a treehouse,” says Rutherford, adding it’s his favourite spot in the entire cottage. It was there that he was having breakfast with one of his sons one morning, when it finally hit him that his dream cottage was complete. “My son said, ‘Listen, dad,’ and I said, ‘Listen to what?’ He said, ‘Exactly. You don’t hear any saws, you don’t hear any hammers.’ “It was this beautiful Eureka moment,” Rutherford says, “and I knew it was done.” Logs stacked in the tall niche behind the fireplace allude to the trees just outside the patio doors and creates a pleasing focal point from the dining area; the custom dining table is topped by a massive wooden door salvaged from a building in Italy.

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GE T T H I S LO O K

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1. Calligaris ICE bar stool, available at Kesay Furniture Studio 2. Cobalt blue pyramid pendant, Tech Lighting 3. Surya Frontier FT-454, available at Flatlanders Flooring 4. Oak harvest dining table, available at Envy Paint & Design Ltd. 5. Red Dragon granite countertops, Carrara Tile 6. Slate wall tile, The Floorshow 8. Yellow decorative vase, available at Homesense 9. Metal decorative orb, available at Homesense


designed by nature This country setting brings the family closer together

design by PINERIDGE HOLLOW | photography by JESSICA STEPHENS

Flanked by perennial gardens, the walkway up to the Regehrs' home is rustic and inviting. Opposite: the pond, complete with waterfall is a soothing backdrop to the sprawling grounds.

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Looking at the immaculate landscape on the outskirts of Oakbank, it’s hard to imagine the property tarnished by knee-high weeds and piles of garbage. But when Ralph and Jan Regehr purchased the lot back in 1991, that’s exactly how they found it. “It was called the junk yard when we bought it,” recalls Jan. “But as the old saying goes, I love to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. I think I see the potential in things and people.” It’s that optimistic thinking that allowed the Regehrs to look beyond the surface flaws and focus instead on the sprawling five-acre property with rolling hills and a legion of towering trees. Twenty-three years and three kids later, the couple has no regrets.

What they do have is a 4,200-square foot heritage home surrounded by flourishing greenery. In addition to the trees — lilac, birch, poplar, silver maple, blue spruce, green ash, apple, pear, chokecherry and a prized black walnut — there are gardens galore. And not only colourful collections of annuals and perennials spread throughout the yard, but also raised beds dedicated to tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, carrots, peas and herbs. Then — bordered by a collection of rocks shipped from Pinawa and overlooked by “Walter’s Bench” (named for Ralph’s late father) — there’s the pond with a pair of cascading waterfalls. Whether it’s reflecting beside that pond, picking vegetables from the garden or watching the sunset from the porch, Jan says she tries to appreciate her property every chance she gets. modern living with a pr airie t wist

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“I grew up in rural southern Manitoba, where I was surrounded by gardens and fields and fruit trees,” she says. “Although growing our own food was a way of life, the flowers were also a priority as well. Gardens are food for the soul.” In addition to appreciating the natural beauty of her surroundings, Jan uses her expertise in home décor to complement it. In the fall, she adds kale and mums to the front landscape, while over the winter holidays she focuses more on baskets filled with berries and evergreen boughs. As much as Jan loves to spruce up her own home, her passion for design expands beyond her own abode.

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“Whether it’s bringing birch trees in the house or using colours that evoke the feeling of being out on the lake, the connection to the land is in my roots and it is really part of the fibre of my being.” ~Jan Regehr

Opposite, clockwise from top left: a stunning succulent arrangement; an inviting porch-scape, a perfect spot to enjoy an ice cold drink on a hot summer afternoon; The old barn; The Regehrs' front porch, flanked by raised beds and beautiful buds; a must-have in Manitoba — the screened in porch; a creative alternative to a welcome mat, this bench is designed to fit the season. This page: waiting for a group to sit, the table inside the screen porch is topped with airy baby's breath and simple pillar candles.

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Cascading plants top this old wine barrel. Above right: a romantic swing sets the scene for an evening date.

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Shortly after moving to the country in ‘91, she decided to start a home décor business from an old log house tucked away on the family property. Within seven years, Pineridge Hollow had moved to its current location near Birds Hill Park and evolved into a multi-service company including a shop, a restaurant and an elegant event venue specializing in weddings. Whether it be for work or home, Jan says her design philosophy is always the same. “My inspirations are always connected to my surroundings,” she says. “Whether it’s bringing birch trees in the house or using colours that evoke the feeling of being out on the lake, the connection to the land is in my roots and it’s really part of the fibre of my being.” Perhaps the most revealing design choice Jan has made at any of her properties — and the most fitting — is the John Lennon quote hanging in the family cottage: “Love is like a precious plant. You can’t just accept it and leave it in the cupboard or just think it’s going to get on by itself. You’ve got to keep on watering it. You’ve got to really look after it and nurture it.” And while the metaphor may have been written more than 30 years ago, it is one the Regehrs have come to live by. “A home is all about creating a space where your family and friends feel welcome and nourished,” Jan says. “Whether that’s through cooking together, an in-depth discussion with our home church, or just a hilarious game night, the focus is on connecting. “What makes our house a home is the people, the love and the laughter.”


G E T T H I S LOOK

3.

1.

4. 6. 2. 1. Indoor/Outdoor lamp with carved slate and hammered copper: Pineridge Hollow 2. Teak outdoor coffee table 36x36: Pineridge Hollow 3. Bramble: Available in your color choice: Pineridge Hollow 4. Pond Stripe Indoor/Outdoor,Lake effect 10x14: Pineridge Hollow 5. Nandina outdoor sectional: Pineridge Hollow 6. Martha outdoor lantern: Pineridge Hollow

5.

We sell wine from all over the world. Cottage cases, private seminars, exclusive wines! We provide excellent customer service. Come visit us. We love wine.

110 -1600 Columbia Drive (Kenaston Commons) 204 275 6660 | www.thewinehousewinnipeg.com Mondays 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays from 12 noon to 6 p.m.

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abode

14/22 ADDITION = 20/20 VISION A Clever Add-On Realizes a Young Family’s Cottage Dreams design by URBAN THEORY INTERIOR DESIGN | photography V. BRAUNSTAJN

Bathed in light from three sides, the new addition offers the family great opportunities for entertaining, dining and relaxing together.

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“When we bought it in 2009, we just had this vision of what we wanted it to be, and now it’s fully realized. We’re just thrilled with it.” ~ Claudia Oldcorn

Previously a dark and confined space, the inviting new kitchen is a favourite of used both the homeowner and her nephew renovator Vibrant printed textiles throughout the space inject a young and playful energy to the otherwise soothing palette.

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For many of us who grew up in Manitoba, summers have always meant spending time at the lake. Whether hiking through the woods, swimming with cousins, early morning fishing or a championship cribbage game on a rainy afternoon, the memories of those sunny days are etched deeply into our hearts and minds. And so it’s not surprising that when Claudia Oldcorn and Todd Laluk welcomed their daughter into their lives, they both began dreaming about creating a summer cottage to provide her with the same sweet experiences they had growing up. Deciding where to look was a no-brainer. Both Claudia and Todd had grown up cottaging around Clear Lake, and the property they found in 2009 in Grey Owl Estates was right where they wanted to be. The space, however, was less than dreamy — not a nightmare, but definitely not something worthy of the memories they hoped to create. “It was a little rough,” laughs Claudia. “Originally built in 1973, it still featured all its original finishes, including avocado appliances and dark woodwork everywhere you looked.” Monogrammed coasters ordered online from an Etsy dealer include the cottage’s owl theme; a pair of blue sofas provide a soothing hit of colour that nods to the lake setting; a striking vignette welcomes people into the new space.

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But the couple instinctively knew that it could be better, and they immediately began putting together plans for a simple 14´ by 22´ addition that they believed would redefine the way they could use the entire space. In 2010, they called in designer Crispin Butterfield of Urban Theory Interior Design, with whom they had collaborated on their primary home several years earlier, to review their plans. That first summer, Butterfield worked with the couple to update the existing cottage, focussing their efforts on painting and updating the finishes, replacing flooring, lighting, window coverings and hardware. And while she consulted with the homeowners on their plans to undertake the new addition the next year, she credits much of the final results to them. “They had a very clear vision as to what they wanted to achieve, and had done their homework. Claudia came armed with samples and images, and we found ourselves agreeing on most of her selections almost immediately.” Many of those selections are the ones first noticed upon entering the space, which was completed over the next few summers. The striking distressed oak flooring, one of three options the homeowners brought to Butterfield, were everyone's top choice; they immediately impart a sense of patina and give the new space a sense of history and age. The tongue-and-groove pine panelling, run horizontally across all the walls all the way up to the vaulted ceiling, was a decision Claudia and Todd made for both aesthetic and practical reasons. “The entire home, including

the addition, is uninsulated. Rather than worry about potential damage to drywall from extreme temperatures and moisture, we chose to install the panelling instead,” says Claudia. Rather than staining the wood (as many suggested), she followed her instincts and painted them out in a sunny yellow. “It would have been just too much wood otherwise. And, I really like the way the knots and grain are still visible under the paint.” The furnishings throughout the space all have their own fun stories to tell. The Parson-style dining table, a serendipitous find at a warehouse sale, had inexplicably arrived with unfinished wood legs and was being sold at a fraction of its retail price. Claudia and Todd snapped it up, treated the legs to a few coats of paint, and now enjoy telling the story every time guests sit down to dinner. A simple glass cabinet in the dining area, originally a wedding gift to Claudia’s grandparents, was also updated with a new colour scheme and now adds a sense of history to the space. In the sitting area, a simple pair of pale blue sofas create an intimate place for conversation, games or simply curling up with a good book. “We chose to leave the TV in the living room,” notes Claudia. “This space is more for hanging out together and enjoying each other’s company. Some evenings, Todd and I will sit in here with a glass of wine and just talk.” The cottage’s second dining area allows the family more opportunities to entertain comfortably; a built-in leaf allows the table to easily expand for larger get-togethers.

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abode

abode One of the most interesting areas in the space is the welcoming vignette that greets guests as the enter the new space from the original cabin. “The homeowners had a pair of sconces that they had purchased many years earlier, hoping to one day have a place to use them,” says the designer. “Although originally intended for candles, we selected simple frosted glass light fixtures and had them hardwired during the build; the candle sconces were then mounted over them, creating a custom installation.” The original sketch for the vignette, quickly drawn as an aside during an early conversation to illustrate the concept, has come to life exactly as it was drawn. The same can be said for the rest of the project. Guests who knew the original incarnation of the house have been known to drive past when coming to visit, as they can’t believe that it’s the same place. “Everyone is quite shocked,” laughs Claudia. “They don’t recognize it — many people think that the whole structure was replaced.” With the final job this summer being left to the landscapers, Claudia and Todd are now dedicating their lake time and energy to enjoying their peaceful and laid back cottage with their daughter. Now six years old, she’s probably ready for a swim with the cousins and a marshmallow roast... and creating some of the memories her parents envisioned for her when they first undertook this project. The glass breakfront cabinet, originally a wedding gift given to the homeowner’s grandparents, was treated to a custom paint job and a new home adjacent to the dining area; Bottom: Who needs tree branches when you can perch on these stunning floorboards?

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GE T TH I S LOOK 9.

7.

1.

9.

2. 8. 3.

4.

5.

6.

11.

12.

13.

14.

1. Gus* Modern Bloor sofa, available at Kesay 2. 15 oz Organic, Burnt Orange, available at Envy Paint & Design 3. Flatiron, Grey, available at Envy Paint & Design 4. Night Owl, Natural, available at Envy Paint & Design 5. Outdoor-Soho, Robin, available at Envy Paint & Design 6. InHaus Sensa Urban Loft Whitewashed Oak #26353, available at Flatlanders 7. BOJA Pendant, available at IKEA 8. Customizable Boating sign, available at Pineridge Hollow 9. STORNAS buffet, available at IKEA 10. Harvest dining table, available at EQ3 11. Walls & Ceiling: Benjamin Moore CC-90 Natural Linen 12. Trims: Benjamin Moore CC-70 Dune White 13. China Cabinet (exterior): Benjamin Moore CC-80 Gray Mist 14. China Cabinet (interior): Benjamin Moore 2175-20 Pilgrimage Foliage

your neighbourhood orthodontic office

• Certified Specialists in Orthodontics

Dr. Christie Laberge BSc, BSc (Dent), DMD, MSc (Ortho), FRCDC

• Braces & invisalign™ for children and adults

• referrals not necessary

1719 Kenaston Blvd | 204-940-STR8 (7878) | www.str8.ca

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c h ow

Pretty mismatched teacups and unpolished silver make for a lovely yet casual approach to the Mother’s Day table.

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After meeting Katerina Jokinen at lunch (their daughters are friends) she asked if Marisa would join forces with her and Brandy Ladd to champion a cookbook for the Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation. The end result is a beautiful book, full of simple, delicious meal ideas that also gives a glimpse into the players' kitchens and lives by sharing some favourite meals and treats. Each menu item is accompanied with a story about the "chef" and how it fits into their families' history or daily meal routine as well as some lovely candid photos of their families. The dishes keep them going from practice to postgame and are a staple in their daily regimes. Marisa put her expert's touch on the recipes, tweaking the ingredients and adding some delicious accompaniments, like a simple blueberry compote and a delicious maple cream to Evander Kane's French toast. Simple and satisfying, the dishes go beyond chili (even though that was a worry at the onset) and cover breakfast through to dessert. Since the team is made up of players with

Rachael King Johnson

Our Jets at Home, Their Favourite Recipes & Food to Share is a collaborative effort by Covet's Marisa Curatolo, The Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation, the players and their wives.

Marisa Curatolo and Katerina Jokinen

backgrounds from all over the world there are samplings from Scandinavia to the Midwest and many places in between. Marisa's hope is that the book "encourages you to gather, cook, share, and remember what's important: surround yourself with family and friends." If you would like to support the Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation

and our Chef, Marisa Curatolo, pop by the Jets Gear store to pick up a copy — it won't disappoint. Marisa Curatolo is a Paris-trained chef, food stylist and culinary instructor. She inspires cooks with her simple, easy recipes that are beautifully presented.

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Shot by the talented duo of Rachael King Johnson and Mairen Kops from LuckyGirl Photography, these candid outtakes didn't make it into the Our Jets At Home cookbook. Inside the book captures more of a sneak peak into the homes and lives of your favourite local NHL heroes as well as some of their favourite meal ideas. Support the Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation by picking up a copy at the Jets Gear store.

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c h ow

Scrumptious buttermilk biscuits and asparagus wrapped in prosciutto are both elegant and easy to prepare.

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PELUSO'S BBQ RIBS DRY RUB

Heat oil in medium saucepan over low heat. Add garlic and onion; cook until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients. Bring to boil. Reduce to simmer and cook, uncovered, for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool. With hand blender, blend sauce until smooth. Cover and chill up to two weeks. Makes 3 ½ cups.

¼ cup brown sugar 1 tbsp sweet Hungarian paprika 1 tsp ground chili powder 1 tsp dry mustard 1 tbsp freshly ground black pepper 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground espresso powder 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tbsp garlic powder 1 tbsp onion powder ½ tsp salt

PARDY'S STRAWBERRY RASPBERRY CRISP

Mix all ingredients in small bowl.

TOPPING

BBQ RIBS 2 strips (2 ½ lb) baby back ribs 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 cup Peluso's BBQ sauce (below) Brush ribs with olive oil and then rub generously with spice mixture on both sides. Allow ribs to stand 1 hour before cooking or refrigerate up to 8 hours. Preheat one burner of two burner BBQ; reduce to medium heat. Place ribs fat side up on oiled grill over unlit burner. Temperature should read 275°F. Close lid and cook ribs 2 ½ to 3 hours or until meat is tender. Slather ribs with BBQ sauce. Place ribs over heated burner and grill 10 minutes per side. Serves 4.

PELUSO'S BBQ SAUCE 2 tbsp canola oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 small onion, finely chopped 2 cups canned diced tomato 1 cup ketchup 1 tsp ground cumin ½ tsp sweet Hungarian paprika 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce 1 tbsp molasses 1 tbsp cider vinegar 1 tbsp Dijon mustard 2 tbsp brown sugar

The closet of your dreams

½ cup all purpose flour ½ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup quick cooking oats ½ tsp ground cinnamon ¼ tsp salt ½ cup unsalted butter, chilled and cubed Combine flour, sugar, oats, cinnamon and salt. Add butter and rub between your fingers until butter is incorporated and medium size crumbs are formed. Makes 3 ½ cups.

FILLING 4 cups fresh strawberries, sliced 2 cups frozen raspberries ½ cup brown sugar 2 tbsp all purpose flour 1 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp fresh lemon juice Vanilla ice cream, to serve Preheat oven to 350°F. In large bowl, combine all ingredients except ice cream. Toss gently to combine. Transfer to shallow 2 quart baking dish or 8 individual ramekins. Sprinkle generously with topping. Bake until topping is bubbling: 35 to 45 minutes for 2-quart baking dish or 20 to 25 minutes for ramekins. Serve warm with ice cream. Serves 8

forspacesake.com 1824 Grant Avenue | 204 488-2633

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c h ow

Pardy's strawberry raspberry crisp. Recipe on page 69.

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pa i r i n g s

For summer weekends, or the days in-between, fire up the grill as the sun sets or sit around the table with a glass; surely there is something for everyone with one of these.

SMASHBERRY WHITE

Napa Valley Fruit (sourced from Lodi) for under $20! Honeysuckle, peaches, and pears on the nose with guava, mango, and tropical fruit on the palate. Bright acidity and a lingering finish makes this a delightful summer sipper — not too over-thought, just enjoyed. (Blend — Roussanne, Muscat Canelli, Riesling).

SMASHBERRY RED

Bright Raspberry on the nose and boysenberry and coco flavours on the palate. Rich and deep with a supple mouth-feel yet with firm tannins and a clear finish. Aged for 9 months in American oak to add a touch of character. (Blend — Merlot, Petite Sirah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc).

SANTA DON SIMON MARGHERITA SANGRIA PINOT GRIGIO 1.5L $15.99 375ml. $12.49. The world's number one selling Pinot Grigio is always welcome in the wine rack at home, but some summer days, a full 750ml bottle is a little much. The Santa Margherita is also available in a 'split' size (a half bottle) — great for sharing a glass with a friend on a patio. No more leftovers from the day before; each bottle is as fresh as when the winemaker sealed it.

A summer isn't complete without a pitcher of sangria. The Don Simon Sangria is new to Winnipeg. Available in a 1.5L PET container, you don't have to worry about glass in transport. This is a sweet red sangria that is light and refreshing on any hot summer day. We recommend having it on ice with a little cutup citrus fruit of your own mixed in.

YALI WETLAND MERLOT ROSE

750ml. $11.99 This is our favourite rose for the summer. A dry style rose that comes from Merlot grapes harvested in the Colchagua Valley Chile. The wine tastes like it has a strawberry/ watermelon backbone with hints of cherry on the palate. With a beautiful colour and supreme mouth-feel this wine is a guaranteed guest-pleaser that overdelivers for the price.

The Winehouse, located in Kenaston Common, puts together Covet's pairings. Their attention to detail and genuine interest will exceed your expectations. Pop in to try something special.

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ask a designer

MAKE THE MOST OF SUMMER WITH YOUR OWN URBAN RETREAT by CAROL STANDIL

Prairie summers are as fleeting and precious as childhood, and if this last, brutally biting winter taught us anything, it is that we can’t waste a single glorious day of it. Vacations and weekends are great, but they’re not enough to tide us through another winter like that one. The fact is that most of us will spend a good portion of our summer at home. Getting up. Going to work. Coming home and trying to get a healthy dinner on the table. Counting the days until the weekend and yearning for our two weeks of vacation. Praying that the weather holds, and that our days will be the really good ones. Thinking to ourselves, “Today is so beautiful — I wish I was on vacation now.” Since every day can’t be a vacation, how about bringing a bit of vacation to every day? You don’t have to have a huge estate with a swimming pool and tennis courts to enjoy summer in the city (or town). With just a bit of work and creativity, even the tiniest downtown balcony or suburban yard can become an inviting retreat where you can maximize your enjoyment of summer whenever you have a few hours, or moments, to spare. Start by thinking about your ideal summer vacation spot — whether it’s a place you’ve been or one you’ve always dreamed

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of. What are the elements that make it appealing? Consider colours, styles, fragrances, and amenities. Beauty is nothing without function, so you will also want to consider both the people with whom you will share your outdoor space and how you want to use it. And if you’re not making as much use as you’d like of your outdoor space today, make a list of the things that are stopping you. Do you need an area to prepare food? A place to stash cold drinks or store extra chairs? Shelter from the sun? Light for after sunset? A spot for kids to play? You’re more likely to use and enjoy your space if it is already set up for the way you want to live in it. Once you’ve listed both your practical and aesthetic considerations, it’s time to think about how you can introduce these features to your space. You might be surprised by the creative solutions you can find. Summer’s waiting. Grab every moment! Carol Standil is a certified interior decorator and colour specialist in Winnipeg with a passion for helping people surround themselves with good colour. She blogs about colour and design at carolstandil. wordpress.com. You can reach her at carol.standil@live.ca.


We asked designers: What are your must-have elements to turn a back yard or balcony into a summer retreat?

d ec ' t h e wa l l s Darlene Chimilar To me the most important part of creating an outdoor retreat is comfortable seating that invites you to spend time there. Outdoor furniture has evolved from folding lawns chairs to durable resin pieces with weather resistant cushions in beautiful colours. In addition to the seating, a fire pit would be the perfect focal point for an outdoor space, and nothing is more relaxing than the sound of trickling water in a fountain or pond. Lighting can be added with candles in decorative lanterns, or strings of small outdoor lights. Pots of flowers and plants are a must. Try getting creative with container planting, and climbing plants, or tiered plant stands especially on a balcony where space is limited. Ph: 204.330.4300 www.decthewalls.ca dar1fc@mymts.net

g r a n d m o n t d e s i g n s Joan Grandmont To create the perfect retreat I would begin with lots of greenery and flowers – pots or plots! The visuals, the sweet aromas, the hum of birds and bees and the soft breezes moving through the different leaves will automatically bring a calmness. The addition of a water element, either large or small, will give the space even more personality. Treat this space as an interior room with the addition of comfortable furnishings and accessories and don’t scrimp on the fabrics and their patterns! The crowning complements would be a fire pit or pot, tiny lights for the evening and of course, music-music-music! www.grandmontdesigns.com info@grandmontdesigns.com

r - h o m e d eco r ato r Robin Stamler Stimulate your sense of sight with colorful outdoor cushions on patio furniture anchored by an outdoor area rug. Awaken the sense of smell with planters and hanging baskets. If you are needing a melody other than a bird’s song, use outdoor speakers disguised as rocks in your landscaping or shade umbrellas with built-in iPod docks. Maybe the scent and sound you’ve been craving comes from a sizzling grill! Outdoor kitchens with built-in mini fridges are my favorite way to please your sense of taste. As the sun sets, extend your evening with garden lights, patio heaters or a fire pit. Don’t forget the mosquito repellant... the sense of touch can be stimulated in many other ways. Ph: 204.918.6478 R-Homedecorator@shaw.ca

ca ro l sta n d i l co lo u r & d e s i g n Carol Standil Every outdoor retreat needs a sense of privacy – both visual and acoustic. Plant a hedge or install a lattice wall to make a deck or patio feel more secluded. Pots of climbing plants or outdoor curtains can screen the view of balconies and porches while also helping to soften outside noises. Comfortable, durable furniture is another priority. There have been some great advances in quick-drying, easy-care outdoor fabrics that make upholstered seating a practical option. Don’t forget colour as a perfect way to set the tone. Flowers, fabrics and accessories in spicy shades of red, pink and orange will add energy, while a palette of green leaves and white flowers will feel cool and serene. Ph: 204.226.1533 www.carolstandil.wordpress.com carol.standil@live.ca

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prairie pa l e t t e

Manitoba has a plethora of both emerging and established artists. In each issue, Prairie Palette will introduce you to some of the talented locals who share Manitoba with us, and demystify some of the intricacies of art and the art scene in the province. This issue, we are excited to introduce you to GMB Chomichuk. "Writing and illustrating graphic novels like Infinitum (May 2015 from ChiGraphic) is different from creating pieces of artwork that must hang on their own. The process of creating and selecting images that evoke a sense of place, time and character is more considered. In comics you are always building up a narrative structure with words and pictures that lead to a dramatic page turn. For a collection piece I must instead consider the physical approach to the work as part of the narrative. What you see from afar tells one story, as you walk up the tiny details reveal new layers of meaning. The one who owns the piece has the luxury of contemplation and the invitation to enter that story again and again. The most freedom from deadlines and plot structures I can have creatively is the calm of a single image that tells a whole story. It only takes a moment to fall in love with a piece of art, but it can take much longer to understand what caused those feelings. People should be very selective of the work they hang in their living spaces. That work should mean something, inspire something."

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GMB Chomichuk is a Canadian writer, teacher, artist, graphic novelist and proud Winnipegger. He is a subject of the forthcoming documentary ARTIST BY NIGHT directed by Kelly Riess. You can find his writing (without pictures, gasp!) in Fractured: Tales of the Canadian Post Apocalypse and the kid's book Cassie and Tonk (with creator/illustrator Justin Currie). The Winnipeg inspired dream odyssey Underworld (with Lovern Kindzierski and Renegade Arts Entertainment) will be in stores soon. Infinitum, the time-travel-noir-thriller launches the ChiGraphic imprint from CZP in 2015. His illustrations accompany many stories in this year's Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History. GMB Chomichuk won the Manitoba Book Award for Best Illustrated Book in 2011 for his graphic novel serial The Imagination Manifesto. His experimental sci-fi graphic novel Raygun Gothic was nominated for Canada's Best Graphic Novel and Best Illustrator by the Canadian Science Fiction & Fantasy Association. Follow him on twitter or instagram @gmbchomichuk or visit www.alchemicalpress.com


Unique

photo Robert Wilson

+ Chic

gift shop Foyer of the Millennium Library, Donald at Graham 204.947.0110

BUILDING DREAMS INTO YOUR HOME RA LL FO

E CA IMAT T S E FREE AY! TOD

Trust. Workmanship. Excellence. Integrity.

HOME SCENE RENOVATIONS SPECIALIZES IN: Basement Development

Interior Painting

Kitchen & Bath Remodelling

Flooring

Interior Renovations

Interior Design

204.291.9091 www.homescene.ca


living well

Sansin ENS™ is a durable two-coat finish that can be applied to virtually any surface – from millwork, to siding and even to improve the performance of competitive coatings. ENS enhances the natural grain and character of wood with a lustrous satin or gloss finish. Sansin ENS provides exceptional clarity and vibrant colour to any project. Available in either natural, semi-transparent or solid finishes.

Simple Steps to More Environmentally Friendly Deck Protection Summer is upon us and with mild temperatures comes the chance to assess the damage inflicted on your deck and porches by winter snow, ice and freezing temperatures. Your old finish may be worn, leaving the wood unprotected and open to rotting and splitting. The ultimate test is to apply a few drops of water to the wood. If it beads, your wood should be well protected for another season, but if it soaks into the wood, it’s time for restoration. For many years, staining wood meant working with toxic solvents and harmful fumes. But, to meet growing demand for more ‘green’ alternatives, environmentally-friendly wood stains have become more prominent on the store shelves.  “We now see eco-friendly wood stains on the market that can match or outperform more toxic, film coatings on beauty, longevity and overall performance,” according to Rob Mueller, Past President of the Paint & Decorating Retailers Association (PDRA). “While many stains simply coat the wood, these highperforming, high-quality, eco-friendly stains actually penetrate it for protection from within.”

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For a ‘green’ deck that you can expect to last, here are some essential staining tips: SELECT A WATER-BORNE STAIN THAT PENETRATES WOOD Traditionally, wood stains used oil-based solvents to simply coat the wood. For water repellency, these oil-based solvents often contain paraffins, which quickly break down with exposure to sunlight and heat. The move to water-based stains combines the benefits of both oil and water-based coatings, using water as the vehicle to get oil penetration deep into the wood for deep down protection.  An added benefit of "water-borne" alkyd wood stains is that they significantly reduce the level of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to smog or ozone depletion. “Waterborne stains perform like a solvent-based formula but provide the inherent advantages of water, such as the ability to allow the wood to breathe and the stain to bond with the wood,” says Sjoerd Bos, Vice President of Sansin. “These eco-stains don’t just sit on top ready to be chipped or scraped away and harm the environment.” (Continued on page 78)


Sansin SDF™ provides tough, effective protection for siding, logs, decks or fences. SDF’s specially formulated oils and resins penetrate into wood, providing outstanding weather and UV protection in a wide range of natural, semi-transparent and even solid colors. Thanks to SDF’s unique water-borne technology, it can provide complete protection in just one coat. SDF was designed to highly repel water which helps to protect both the outside and inside of your wood by preventing moisture causing rot.

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living well

Sansin Dec™ is formulated with higher solids and stronger pigmentation to look better and last longer holding up against rain and UV exposure. Sansin Dec is a two-coat formula that penetrates deeply, protecting wood from within. Available in a wide variety of stunning colours. Sansin Dec can be used on horizontal wood surfaces such as decks, balconies and fences.  

(Continued from page 76) CLEAN AND RINSE THE DECK Apply a biodegradable deck cleaner to remove any buildup or mold/mildew. Rinse the deck off with a hose (making sure plants surrounding the deck are covered), and let the deck dry thoroughly, making sure all signs of the previous coating are gone. For bare wood, use a minimum 3000 psi pressure washer with clean water. SANDING IS WORTH THE TIME This step may be time-consuming, but is worth the effort. An orbital sander with 60-80 grip paper should do the trick to create a level, consistently porous surface that will absorb more stain, resulting in a better wood finish. USE LESS STAIN AND APPLY WITH SPRAY, THEN BRUSH Using less is always more for the environment.  To reduce the need for multiple coats, wood stains now come in ‘onecoat’ formulations that penetrate deep into the wood to repel condensed water while allowing water vapor to escape. “With water-borne wood stains, you can even protect wood with high moisture content with one coat, since the stain allows the wood to ‘breathe,’ preventing moisture from getting trapped inside the logs or wood and causing decay,” says Bos.

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It’s best to apply the stain with a garden sprayer followed by "back-brushing." MAINTENANCE PAYS OFF How long should your deck stain last? That’s a common question, and it does depend on the stain and the preparation as described above, but two to five years is the average. To extend the life of your wood stain, apply a maintenance coat if the deck no longer repels water. Prior to the maintenance coat, best to use a deck cleaner or pressure washer. Even for home owners with pressure-treated wood on their decks or porches, a good stain will inhibit the eventual fading, graying and cracking from outdoor exposure.   “No matter the wood or pre-treatment for your deck, it’s important to protect your investment. Now, homeowners can get high-quality protection with the added bonus of low VOC, low toxic wood stain products that can be applied in one coat,” says Bos. For more information and answers to any of your exterior or interior coating questions, contact Envy Paint and Design, 25-5 Scurfield Boulevard, Winnipeg or call (204) 487-3666. Reprinted with permission by Sansin Corporation.  Copyright © 2014


to o l s

1.

4.

3.

2.

5.

1.

Never again will you need separate polishes for silver, brass, or copper: Cape Cod Metal Polishing Cloths work on all fine metals. Safe and easy to use, the vanilla-scented cloths leave a revolutionary anti-tarnish finish — simply wipe away tarnish to reveal a mirror-like shine. Comes with twelve 4"x 6" Cape Cod® Metal Polishing Cloths, one Cape Cod buffing cloth, plus a pair of reusable nitrile gloves to keep hands clean.   Available at For Space Sake

2.

Designed by noted style-maker Karim Rashid, the Onda Broom & Dustpan set is as much a work of art as it is a functional cleaning tool. The set features an integrated, ergonomic design for comfortable use, effective cleaning and simple, compact storage. Exploded bristles catch and hold debris, and the dustpan stands alone when sweeping — no more stooping over!  Available at For Space Sake

3.

Creators of goodlooking, fun and functional housewares for twenty five years, Casabella cleaning products embrace ergonomics and good looks. Their supremely effective Round Dish Brushes, available in three vibrant colours, are perfect for cleaning pots, pans, and dishes. Available at For Space Sake

4.

5.

Abbott’s Smiley Dustpan brings a cheerful and nostalgic quality to even the dreariest of chores. It features a convenient hand broom that compactly attaches to the steel smiley-faced dustpan, bringing a light and cute touch to the kitchen, bathroom or laundry. And get this — it comes in two sizes and your choice of four vintage-feeling colours (red, ivory, light blue and mint green).

These whimsical Hibiscus lids by Charles Viancin are the new alternative to plastic wrap! By simply placing these smooth silicone lids on a smooth-edged bowl or platter made of almost any material, you instantly create a super-strong airtight and watertight seal. They’re temperature resistant to 425 degrees making them perfect for oven, microwave, and dishwasher as well as freezer use.

Available at Envy Paint & Design

Available at Blue Hills Design

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pidim

WO RKI NG W I T H A N I N T ERI OR DE SI G N E R By STEPHEN LAMOUREUX Have you purchased a new home and want to make changes prior to moving in? Have you been considering renovating your current residence but are overwhelmed about where to start to make your design dreams a reality? Are you unsure as to where to begin when you want to create a well thought out space, yet keep your project on schedule and on budget? Do you have the time to worry about all the necessary details? Avoid costly mistakes and headaches by hiring a professional interior designer. An interior designer can help save you time, aggravation and money. Good design begins with you. Before meeting with an interior designer, create a wish list for the project — include details about the work you’d like done, images of the design you want to achieve, and your budget. The more information you can provide initially, the greater the understanding will be of your requirements. An interior designer will then turn your wish list into a proposal of services, which is a reflection of what you want to accomplish. This is an important step in the process, as it will allow you to review and determine what is truly essential to the project. The more involved you are in the design process, the smoother the project will run. Word of mouth is an excellent way to start your search for an interior designer. Check with friends, family and coworkers for a referral. Online portfolios and websites, like FINDinteriordesigner.org, by Interior Designers of Canada — the national interior design association — can form the start of your research. Each design firm’s profile has project images from past work to help narrow down your search. Another way is to contact the provincial association for a list of qualified members. Take the time to interview several interior designers and check their references before making a final decision. An interior designer should explain their design process, how they work, and what they charge for their services. They should also ask you about your needs, timeline, and expectations. A professional interior designer’s primary objective will be to get to know you, understand your project requirements, and to develop a design concept that will fit your specific needs. It’s important that both parties feel comfortable with the relationship before a contract is signed and work begins.

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As with any professional service, a clearly written contract is essential. The agreement should outline what both parties expect to receive from the arrangement, the work that is to be done, and the fees to be charged. You may wonder if hiring an interior designer is within your budget. What many people don’t realize is that hiring a professional is not expensive — fees represent just a small percentage relative to the overall construction costs. The designer will prepare complete and detailed plans and contract documents, which allow contractors to provide accurate pricing at the onset of the project, reducing the probability of unforeseen costs and delays. Most importantly, a qualified interior designer will keep costs in front of you during construction because they are accountable to you. Ultimately, you’re saving money by doing the job right the first time. Design professionals across Canada are required to meet the highest standards of education, examination and experience as set by their provincial associations and government. As a member, they must carry liability insurance, participate in ongoing professional development and uphold a professional code of ethics and standards of practice. Stephen Lamoureux is a Professional Interior Designer and owner of ADI group, an interior design studio in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He is the current President of the Professional Interior Designers Institute of Manitoba (PIDIM) and is a past Director for the Interior Designers of Canada (IDC). www.adigroup.ca The Professional Interior Designers Institute of Manitoba (PIDIM) is committed to enhancing the practice of Interior Design in Manitoba, and to educating the public about the benefits of interior design. As a professional body, its aim is to improve quality of life, and protect the health, safety and welfare of the public through the design of the interior environment. www.pidim.ca www.idcanada.org www.findinteriordesigner.org www.ncidq.org


PI CT U RE I T Eagerly anticipated, the IKEA catalogue lands in Winnipeg residents' mailboxes every August. This year you can expect more inspiring rooms as well as a fantastic extra for those of you who have smart phones. The free IKEA Catalogue App allows you to place more than 300 of their products in your own house helping visualize the style and size of the product. It will also help answer the questions: Will it fit in this space? Will it go with my other furniture? Amazing! The 2015 IKEA catalogue is all about bedrooms, bath and living with children. We're sure you're as excited as we are to see what has happened to the EXPEDIT range — don't worry record collectors, surely the replacement is new and improved. We're also excited to see the relaxing solutions for bedrooms as both Bahia and Leigh are getting new ones this year!

BOD 1, 2, 3 Winnipeg

with Kimberley Seldon Gain 1.9 CEU credits or 19 learning hours

www.businessofdesign.com/events

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TWO-BY-FOUR LIFE By DEZ DANIELS `Project house build: the bulk of the work is done (save for a room here or there), and worst is behind us. When I think of the physical labour that’s gone into building a house by our own hands, it’s almost too much to bear. Like... what were we thinking? But here we are, and there is no going back, and save for an “act of God,” nothing can take this experience away from us. The relief is palpable as we stand back and survey what we have done. So the thing to do — obviously — is to pick up a shovel and keep going. Landscaping is either something you love to do, or something you would sell your soul to avoid. I’ve found there’s not a lot of middle ground... and I am firmly in the first camp. Ironically, I grew up working in and surrounded by gardens and tree patches and fields and resented every minute of it. It was only after I bought my first home — a wee Wolseley fixer upper —that I became obsessed with gardening. It came on as mild curiosity, as I wondered during our first spring there what “those pointy things” coming out of the ground were (hostas), progressed to general interest (potting a hosta and taking it indoors for the winter just to see what would happen, which was not much), and eventually bloomed into a deep and abiding love. I taught myself (with considerable help from Lois Hole, bless her) when the best time was to prune lilacs, the optimum fertilizer to use on new perennials, and why you really shouldn’t get the leaves of the phlox wet. Plant names — foxglove, beebalm, bleeding heart — all sounded like stories waiting to unfold. It was an incredible realization to know that not only did I LOVE gardening — I was pretty good at it. I kind of kicked ass out there, and it made me feel good. Five houses later, and we are on the precipice of doing it all over again. I have never landscaped a yard on this grand a scale, and in a way, it’s terrifying. But I am eager to start. I feel deep empathy for our neighbors, who have had to deal with this eyesore of a property for the last couple of years. But mostly, after three years of not doing ANY gardening, I need to put my hands in the earth to feel sane again. I found it so grating

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when things went wrong during our house build — the wrong color this, the wrong size of that. It all has to be just right. But gardening is more forgiving. And if you really do something “wrong,” the plant will let you know, and you can tweak accordingly (although yes, a plant dying is a message, too). It is free-form creativity, improvisation, with a tactility that is sorely lacking in most other areas of life. If my kids are snively, a little time outdoors always makes it better. If that outdoor time happens to include working in the “fairy garden” we created (if you’ve never seen one, go on Pinterest and get ready to be sucked into the vortex), all the better. Once you’re in there, it’s almost as if you are dealing with a different child... one you actually want to take back into the house with you. We don’t ever know what the future holds, and that sometimes makes the present moment unbearable. If your mind is like mine and you’re typically thinking ten things at once — wondering how you’re going to keep it all together, how you’re going to keep everything under control — gardening can help melt those thoughts away better than Lorazepam. And don’t assume the word “garden” automatically means plural. I’ve discovered putting one single plant in soil, and nurturing it, is enough to shut off the autopilot and turn on the lights. Put something in a pot. Pour some water in. Encourage it. Taking the focus off what’s in your head and putting it on something else is perhaps the only secret to happiness there ever was. It’s moment of sanity, right here, in this moment of time. That being said, I couldn’t wait another damn second to plant anything around my house. So I hijacked a friend’s garden — a wicked mess, by her own admission — while she was working out of town. I ripped out weeds, edged the beds, freshened the soil, picked plants, dug holes, fertilized, watered, got muddy, ruined my back... and felt better than I have in three years. I made friends with the neighbours, fellow gardeners who murmured appreciation and understanding. Then I stood back, and had a good long look at what I had done. I can’t wait to see what’s going to come up next.


How much

Canadian honey is in your bottle?

pure % 0 N 10 ADIA y N e A n C ho

You know your honey is going to your family’s table. But do you know where it’s coming from? Some things are hard to see, like the origin of honey inside the bottle you buy. With Bee Maid, you know what’s inside. Proudly owned by Canadian beekeepers for over 60 years, Bee Maid produces the highest quality, 100% pure Canadian honey. Read the label. Choose 100% pure Canadian honey from Bee Maid.

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dig

ORGANIC FOOD OR WHAT OUR GRANDPARENTS CALLED “FOOD text SAMANTHA BRAUN

Yup, we’ve all had the discussions. How do we eat less junky chemicals? How do we really know what’s on our food? Well one of the simplest ways to know what you’re eating, and get the most nutritional value out of what we’re eating is to grow it ourselves. While you won’t have a certified sticker on your carrots; you’ll know they’re organic enough for your kids to pull and chomp on. In terms of nutrients, the 10 foot diet has to be even better than that 100 mile one, right!? Break out the tillers — let’s do this thing!? Yeah, that’s not really going to work is it? Maybe it works for the friends that we used to think were a little weird… those who utter the words “chickens” and “goats” in certain company? (You can pretend, but we all have at least one friend teetering on the line who makes their own deodorant and soap). Seriously though, most of us don’t have the time or a quarter section to grow the food for a family of four like grandma used to… The good news is that we can still make a pretty good dent in growing some staples. All you need is a small space, some dirt, and something good to put the dirt in. We’ve got a couple of ideas for turning an underused space into a plethora of produce.

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STEP 1. Something to hold dirt (ahem “soil”).

Here we have a super-easy option of an old crate turned painted planter box. We just took the base out and popped it into a space already surrounded by perennial herbs and fruit bushes. For those with some carpentry talent, building raised beds is a great option. These ones were custom designed to make the most of a section of driveway (centre and bottom) that wasn’t being used for anything— and raised for optimum accessibility.

STEP 2. Fill with soil. For the deeper crate, we threw old plants that didn’t overwinter, annual scraps, and a big pile of half composted leaves and wood mulch to fill up some of the bulk (it will break down over the summer to compost) and topped with 10” of compost and planting mix. For adequate drainage in shallower square foot gardens use a blend of peat, vermiculite or perlite (use a mask with this stuff, it can get right into lungs), and really well broken down compost. Planting mixes are not bad, but are often “soilless” and need compost and some mineral soil added so there’s enough nutrients to feed the veggies. About equal parts of each works for a very light and well-drained mix. STEP 3. Plant your veggies and seeds. Treat the

crate like an over-sized planter. Big tomatoes are propped up to maximize light to the peppers and greens underneath. And edible annuals and colourful herbs are used to keep it both pretty and salad-ready (yellow ground sorrel, pineapple sage and pansies are stars for this one). Lettuces and kale can be repeatedly harvested, and even reseeded to keep them coming. Our custom bed is set up specifically for square foot gardening. Similar idea to a very packed bed, but takes the science and art of planting and timing to a whole new level of efficiency. There are loads of websites, books and even local seminars devoted to the ins and outs of who to seed when and how far apart; but ultimately, cycling crops and spacing so you never waste space, water and time is the mantra. Long gone are the high maintenance space-hogging rows of the 40’ sprawling veggie patch—because we all love working smarter, not harder. Almost as much as we love the taste of fresh garden tomatoes.

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dig

GOT MILKWEED? We already know the bee populations are having trouble… well now we’re talking butterflies. It’s not shocking that this group of pollinators is also suffering from the status quo of environmental degradation, loss of habitat and (to be blunt) getting squirted and squashed. We’ve all heard that saying that if you want butterflies, you need to put up with caterpillars. So the first and foremost step to helping our little lepidopteron friends is to keep pesticides out of the garden—they not only kill the caterpillars (AKA baby moths and butterflies), but they can harm the adults through contaminated nectar sources. So that’s the basic damage control (and avoids the silliness of knocking out your own army of beneficial bugs by accidental exposure). While there are loads of different butterfly-y things (and a myriad of host plants), probably one of the most beloved and hardest hit, is the Monarch. Here’s a very abridged what’s-what for the big orange and black guys: Monarchs migrate north from Mexico in the spring, and travel primarily through what is now agricultural land. Historically, milkweed (the only plant their bambino caterpillars can eat) was found through the prairie, and later was relegated to ditches and un-tilled ribbons through the landscape (like rail lines, for example). The modern and extensive use of herbicides like 2-4D and glyphosate across

North America have decimated milkweed populations on a landscape level, and like bees, the contaminated nectar is thought to impact adults feeding on their way through. Add nasty weather to their wintering grounds in Mexico and you have a pretty serious ecological whammy going on. Now as anyone who’s been subject to Dora and Diego’s Monarch adventures knows; it’s time for the animal rescue part (we couldn’t talk doom and gloom without a happy ending?!). Plant milkweed. Really, just plant milkweed. To quote another great cinematic achievement, “If you build it, they will come.” Bugs are resilient little dudes, really — they have the advantage of making loads of babies (I’ve seen estimates as high as 500 for monarch females). So plant milkweed. Specifically swamp milkweed. Common milkweed (the one you see in ditches) will likely take over your neighbourhood if you go that route, so unless you want the weed guys out (and to be labeled an eco-terrorist), go for the better behaved sibling. Whorled milkweed works too, but Monarch caterpillars are voracious and will strip a single plant in a couple of days—then you’d have to move your babies or watch your new little stripy buddy go hungry. Ideally native stock is best, but cultivars from white to deep rose are available and absolutely worth the ecological compromise.

swamp milkweed is a lovely 100 - 150 cm needs at least 5 hours of sun does well in moist to medium soil 88

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butterfly beverage stations Add a little whimsy in your garden beds by setting up these refuelling stations for our winged-friends.

Repurpose mismatched teacups with saucers (top); create a rustic pool (above); or add a little kitsch (right).

Samantha Braun is a landscape ecologist and designer with over 15 years experience in the horticultural industry. Her company, Ecotones, specializes in creating Habitat in Harmony with Design.

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w h e r e to f i n d If you liked what you saw, check out our digital version at www.covetmagazine.ca for links to the product and talent featured in this issue. In addition, we are happy to help you source one of your “gotta haves” from within our pages. Simply visit us on Facebook at Covet Mag where you can post your query, and one of our team will reach out with the information... while you’re there, be sure to “like” us too! Designers in this issue: Modern Amusement Envy Paint and Design Ltd. Designer: Bahia Taylor 204.487.3666 www.benjaminmoore-mb.ca

Timeless Transformation Design-Built Designer: Clayton Salkeld 204.999.0954 www.design-built.ca Curve Appeal Everitt Design Associates Limited Designer: Rob Everitt 204.925.9797 www.everittdesign.com

Design By Nature Pineridge Hollow Designer: Jan Regehr 204.777.3881 www.pineridgehollow.com 14/22 Addition = 20/20 Vision Urban Theory Interior Design Designer: Crispin Butterfield 204.761.3533 www.deignchick.ca

Thank you for taking the time to get this far! If you enjoyed our Summer 2014 issue of Covet perhaps you might give your patronage to our advertisers. Their support has allowed us to create what you have enjoyed. ADI group

Home Scene Renovations

Artful Owl

Gallagher Group

BeeMaid Honey

J and M Window and Door Co.

Benjamin Moore & Co. Ltd.

Linden Ridge Orthodontics

Best of Friends Gift Shop

Manitoba Hydro

Blue Hills Design

Over and Above Custom Homes

Ecotones Envy Paint and Design Ltd. Expedia Travel Flatlanders Flooring For Space Sake

Pineridge Hollow The Floor Show The Wine House Urban Theory Interior Design

Hinge Design

204.255.4204

GallagherGroup.ca 942 St. Mary’s Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba

F R E E CO

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Helping You Every Step Of The Way Gallagher group for Remax Performance Realty

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design dilemma

Do you have a design dilemma? Send us your questions and some photographs to info@covetmagazine.ca for your opportunity to receive free design advice from the talented design team at Covet!

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The wall is not your enemy. It’s not there to fence you in. No, the wall’s wide open, nothing but sky. Notice we didn’t say blue. That’s the beauty of the wall. You’ve got your own colour for unbridled freedom. For possibility. For love and surprise. For loyalty, adventure, beginnings and happy ends. For everything that matters, there’s a deep, rich, enduring colour. And the wall always approves.

© 2013 Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited. Benjamin Moore and the triangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks.

Find these colours and more at benjaminmoore.ca

The premium paint preferred by paint and design professionals. The colour and quality preferred by you.

Covet Summer 2014  

Covet is a design and lifestyle publication from Winnipeg, Canada. Our mission is to provide inspired, beautiful design and amazing local ta...

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