__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

modern living with a prairie twist

ALL SQUARED UP a creative use of bamboo cubes

+

A ROOM FOR GIFTING A HIGH-STYLE LOWER LEVEL CELEBRITY DESIGN GAL SAMANTHA PYNN

SAVOUR SUMMER MOUTH WATERING EASY RECIPIES


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR DESIGN | PROJECT MANAGEMENT ACCESSORIES | PAINT, WALLPAPER, AND SUPPLIES southwest


e d i to r ' s pag e

Here comes the sun! As evening twilight lingers many people start to ponder summer projects. There seem to be a never-ending supply of jobs to do around our homes every year and with our short Manitoba summers, a dwindling supply of time to accomplish them! As always, we’d love to know what our readers are up to, so drop us a line or show us your projects on Facebook. Are you carving out a new flower bed or maybe a pond? Make sure you check out our Dig section for great tips from Sam in this department. Do you have some exterior painting to do? We were shocked to learn that our PROfile designer, Anne Johnson, paints her exterior facade almost every year. What a nice idea, but if it’s not for you how about changing up your front door colour as a start? Maybe you’d like to tackle a small weekend DIY project? Check out the awesome porch swing you can whip up on page 16! Once it’s made, you can lounge there all season long sipping some fabulous infused concoctions with the help of one of our scorching hot

Covet is free, and if you'd like to receive a copy visit covetmagazine.ca to subscribe. You can view a digital version of this issue there, too. See you soon!

upcoming events • F irst Fridays in the Exchange: This monthly event dedicated to bringing together artists, artist run centres, galleries, businesses and the public for a greater understanding, appreciation and promotion of the arts and the further development of a strong and vital Exchange area community. July 5; August 2; September 6; Various events and locations - check website for details; www.firstfridayswinnipeg.org; 204.942.6716 • Jazz in the Leo Mol Sculpture Garden: Escape the noise and heat of the concrete jungle and enjoy jazz amid blooming flowers, flowing fountains, and beautiful works of art. July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 11, 18, 25; Hours: 3pm to 4pm; Leo Mol Sculputure Garden, 55 Pavillion Cresent; www.assiniboinepark.ca

finds from our We Love department! For us, we have been busy dreaming up our own to do lists... one member of the Covet team is pondering a large addition to her own home and the other has welcomed an addition to her family! Alright, so only one of us is making a to-do list; the other has her hands full!

• F olklorama: Experience the energy of the largest and longest-running multicultural event of its kind in the world. 40-plus cultural pavilions over 14 summer nights in one extremely diverse and impressive city. August 4-17; Various events and locations - check website for details; www.folklorama.ca; 204.982.6210 • 100 Masters: Only In Canada: Rembrandt and Renoir. Van Gogh and Gainsborough. Matisse and Picasso. The Winnipeg Art Gallery's centennial year culminates with an historic show featuring 100 masterworks borrowed from 26 museums across Canada. Until August 11; Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd; www.wag.ca; 204-786-6641

modern living with a pr airie t wist

7


out and about

hutK text COVET MAGAZINE | photography hutK

good stuff in a cool spot Find It: 74 Princess Street 204.894.7639 Monday-Saturday 11am-5pm or by appointment ask@hutk.ca History: Dane Kofoed and business partner Tim Borys share a love for modern furniture design. While not every visitor to hutK will be familiar with the suppliers, the partners have confidence in the design and know that the furniture speaks for itself. Says Kofoed, “People tell me that they don't want modern furniture and I tell them this - the furniture that we live and work with doesn't have to be outlandish or strange to be modern it just has to be simple, and functional... and should look really good!” The Space: Located at the corner of Princess Street and McDermot Avenue, hutK occupies the main floor of a heritage building in the design-savvy Exchange District. The voluminous 3000-square-foot space boasts original hardwood and terrazzo floors, exposed brick and high beamed ceilings, making it perfectly suited to highlight the modern designs displayed throughout the store. A 13-foot-high feature chair-wall running the length of the showroom boasts an incredible variety of modern seating options unparalleled in the province.

8

summer

2013

DESIGN PALETTE: hutK focuses on a number of internationally recognized manufacturers and design lines in a range of aesthetics, materiality, and price points. Lines like Blu Dot, Tom Dixon, Bensen, Emeco and Kartell are represented in the showroom. Local and boutique Canadian designers and manufacturers are featured as well, providing a feeling of connection and authenticity to the showroom. Sculptural pieces by Tom Dixon, Kartell, and Modernica (including the iconic George Nelson Bubble Lamp collection) deliver a variety of lighting solutions. While the current lines point toward residential options, hutK also provides clients with commercial and office solutions, including shelving, storage, desks and seating options. Winnipeg: hutK is all about bringing true modern design to the Prairies. The company believes that too many people were shopping outside of Manitoba for their modern furniture or were being forced to settle for whatever they could find inside the Perimeter. Their goal? To make the best designs in modern furniture locally accessible to everyone, from design professionals to the average consumer. “Whether it's the discovery of an obvious solution or just the simple aesthetic, modern design is inherently appealing to many consumers. And we're trying, with every demographic in mind, to help make this possible in Winnipeg”. www.hutk.ca


st y l e d e f i n e d

mad mid mod man text ARTHUR LIFFMANN From time to time, we see the return of a style that once dominated the design scene before fading away, replaced by the Next Big Look. Often, it's in the form of a rediscovered colour scheme or particular style of furniture - think bentwood bistro chairs, or blue and yellow sunrooms. But periodically, perhaps only once every decade or two, popular culture revisits a period of time that was so well-defined by its look that it brings about a comprehensive revival of the style for a new generation to enjoy. And although the return of modern style was simmering for a while, it really boiled over when the AMC series 'Mad Men' hit the air. To be clear, both Mod style and Midcentury modern – while very similar in influence and both born in the 1960s, a period of tremendous change – each express that time period in different ways. Mod style, hugely popular in 1960s Britain, typically involves psychedelic colours, tie-dye or hippie/ethnic looks. Mid-century modern, on the other hand, embraces clean lines, flowing forms and martini shakers. Think Austin Powers vs. Don Draper and you'll see where I'm going here. Yeaaaah, baby. The massive popular resurgence of Mid-century modern style is a boon

for Winnipeg style aficionados; our city is blessed with many spectacular examples of this popular architectural style. Drive through St. James, south River Heights or Fort Garry and you'll find beautiful examples of low-slung bungalows and split levels, featuring strong horizontal lines and large floorto-ceiling expanses of glass that strive to bring the outdoors in. And once you're in... well, the first thing you'll notice is the sense of comfortable minimalism. In the words of Don Draper himself, "make it simple, but significant". With such a focus on lines and forms, mid-century interior design and furnishings generally work best with a certain degree of 'negative space' - that is, some room to breathe around each piece. That's not to say, however, that a mid-century modern home is sleek and spartan. Thick carpeting (think shag or cut pile), tactile fabrics and pleated draperies add warmth and texture to a mid-century modern look, as do wood paneling, stone or brick. When it comes to interior furnishings, expect to see samples of some of the most iconic furniture pieces from design masters of the 20th century. Living and dining rooms often feature sculptural chairs by Arne Jacobsen, Harry Bertoia and Charles & Ray Eames; coffee tables

by Isamu Noguchi; dining sets by Eero Saarinen, all of whom are well known for utilizing modern forms of fabrication to create beautiful organic shapes and clean lines that are just as modern today as they were fifty years ago. Crisp monotone upholstery in shades of avocado, mustard and tangerine are key to this look, and mix well with ash and teak wood tones. Simple white walls often provide a clean background for large art canvases, which usually feature some of the only loud patterns found in these spaces. Metallic finishes play a significant role in a Mid-century modern scheme. Dramatic space age light fixtures in polished chrome or matte gold celebrate the enthusiasm of the period and are often found hanging in dining areas or sitting on bedside tables. And let's not forget that the entire modern look revolves around cocktail culture; a well stocked metal-framed bar cart is a must! Sourcing vintage pieces or licensed reproductions isn't very difficult, but be prepared for a wide range of prices. Prime originals from Herman Miller and Hans Wegner, among others, can easily run into multiple thousands of dollars. However, many reproductions and less costly interpretations of these designs can be found in today's market, thanks to the newfound demand for mid-century style.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

9


out and about

Not your grandma's wicker text and photography COVET MAGAZINE Find It: 120 McPhillips Street 204.779.2900 M-F 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5 History: The original company, a Winnipeg institution long known for the outdoor furniture and accessories fabricated from the material for which it was named, was reborn in 2001 as Wicker World Home & Patio. In the ensuing years, it has grown to become one of Canada's leading outdoor furniture retailers providing high-end, brand name furniture for all areas of the home - both indoor and outdoor - as well as home and patio accessories. Space: Longtime customers will well-remember the days of walking into a massive space seemingly filled to the rafters with wicker baskets, but times have changed. The 24,000 square feet facility just off the corner of McPhillips Street and Notre Dame Avenue now includes large well-lit showrooms on two floors. The main level features multiple lines of outdoor furnishings in various fabrications. Venture upstairs and you'll be pleasantly surprised by a vast showroom of quality high-style options for your indoor space.

10

summer

2013

Design Palette: The use of rattan in home furnishings is not new; it dates back over four centuries to Asia and the Philippines, where rattan was used to craft many household articles. Rattan, a vine that grows like ivy, is a solid timber (unlike bamboo, which is hollow). Although pliable and highly flexible, the lightweight material is as strong as any wood used for furniture making, and able to withstand tough daily usage (as proven by the Golden Girls' living room set). Canadian’s love affair with wicker and rattan began back in the 1920’s, when practically everyone longed for a porch full of white wicker furniture. Winnipeg: The most common question is whether wicker and rattan is a suitable choice for Winnipeg's extreme weather fluctuations. Being a natural fibre, the elements will gradually break down the colour of rattan, and make the wicker brittle. For these reasons, most natural wicker products are today primarily used in indoor settings. Modern all-weather synthetic wicker products, also known as resin wickers, offer a very similar look with increased durability, making it the material of choice for swimming pool lounges, patio dining sets, outdoor sofas and terrace bistro type settings. www.wickerworld.ca


co l l ect i o n s

confessions of a collector The act of collecting treasures from afar has long been a part of human history. There are documented personal collections as early as the 16th century. These were known as “cabinets of curiosity” and were often assortments of unique items acquired through adventure, travel or by way of gift. The objects found in these early collections were not necessarily useful; they were often objects that served as a reminder of an experience or a place representing a foreign culture. In the 21st century, the word “collector” shares a fine line with “hoarder.” However, there are many ways to start a new collection, or maintain an existing one, which does not take over your living space or life. I will share with you some strategies about collecting to make meaning within your collections and why overall collecting is important. Starting new collections The trickiest thing about starting new collections is enjoying the hunt and not amassing an entire collection in a few weeks! That is buying, not collecting! Collections should also connect thematically, or they aren’t really a collection but rather a bunch of “things.” Whether you are collecting watercolour paintings or mid-century furniture, it is important to set guidelines for yourself as

to the limits of acquisition. Is it one piece per year? To a maximum of a set dollar amount? The psyche of the collector is one of obsession, so limits are key. One further piece of advice: be subtle about your collecting, or you will suddenly be the person for whom everyone buys snow globes (or turtles, or whatever) and that isn’t always a good thing; true collectors enjoy the quest for the object. Maintaining Inherited Collections

Most of us have gained some

inalienable wealth from the passing of a family member or friend. This is a difficult issue because we can’t really get rid of these objects (I am guilty of having a full set of Royal Albert “American Beauty” dishes in my basement). There are ways to honour these collections, to give them meaning and life. In the case of the rose covered plates...well, I use them once in a while! Another way to keep these collections alive is by adding to them. For example, I received a random assortment of Cross and Olive crystal stemware (nothing near a full set) but slowly I am finding pieces to build it up to be something more substantial and full – increasing its value and meaning, and maintaining the original integrity and goal of the collection.

Lessons in Collecting Collecting never goes out of style, but our connection to objects has become a more detached one in our disposable society. Some things are disposable, sure, but others should be cherished. The idea of collecting for pleasure, memory or for monetary value teaches many lessons. I think all people, including children, benefit tremendously from the idea of a collection: something important, something special. Investing time, interest and a sense of responsibility to a collection is a wonderful experience for everyone. An object to mark an occasion or something as simple as the act of collecting beach glass as a family on a trip can turn into a jar full of memories. Collections don’t have to cost money as the importance of the collections is the meaning we attach to the objects. It is the memories that we are taking care of when we dust of them off and use them for a tea party. That is what makes them priceless. Our collections specialist, Stephanie Middagh has spent the past 12 years being inspired by museum collections while working as a curator for various museums and galleries. Concurrent to her curatorial work, she took this inspiration to her sessional positions at the University of Manitoba where she continues to teach Introduction to Art and the History of Textiles.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

11


w e lov e

1.

4.

2.

3. 1. Navigate through recipes on your tablet and keep things clean with this wooden tasting and mixing spoon plus integrated stylus. Umbra $7; 2. Gnomeo, gnomeo where art thou my gnomeo? Hanging from a tree or keeping a key! Giftcraft $17, $25; 3. Add some character or characters to your landscape. Giftcraft $17; 4. This marionette cleverly puts play and imagination into your tea sessions. Umbra $13; 5. Designed to hang onto your mug, even when sipping, we're sure he will be your cup of tea! Umbra $10; 6. Now you can make hand crafted, artisan iced tea beverages right in your own home. Airtight lid for freshness and side storage. Stain, cloud and odor proof. Customize with a tea infuser or fruit infuser to keep your thirst quenched all summer long. Takeya $25

12

summer

2013

5.

6.


SUMMER NO COST LOW COST TIPS Your hot water tank is the second biggest energy user in your home. • I nstall an energy efficient 1.5 gallon per minute showerhead. • Apply pipe insulation on the hot and cold water lines of your water heater. • Use cold water for wash and rinse cycles when doing laundry. • Do full loads of laundry and hang to dry outside if possible. • Front-loading clothes washers will save you time, as well as energy. They have an increased capacity – three to four regular-sized loads can be washed in one load. • Run a full load when using a dishwasher. • Replace leaky faucets. • Planning a vacation? Turn your water heater to vacation mode. COOLING • When buying an air conditioner, look for one that has a Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) number of 13 or more. The higher the number, the more energy efficient the model. • Turn off any exhaust fans about twenty minutes after you are done using them so that they don’t suck the cool air out of your home.

14

summer

2013

• A  bout 40 percent of the unwanted heat that builds up in your house comes in through windows. Although both exterior and interior shades can control this heat gain, exterior shades -- items such as awnings, louvers, shutters, rolling shutters and solar screens -- are far more effective, since they block sunlight before it enters the windows • Air movement created by a fan can make a room seem cooler by a few degrees or more. When used in air-conditioned spaces, ceiling fans allow you to set your thermostat at a higher-than-normal setting that will save some energy. Fans use less electricity than air conditioners do. Install ceiling fans for efficient cooling or even to replace air conditioning. • Keep your air conditioner clean. • Install a programmable setback thermostat. Your programmable thermostat allows you to control when the cooler temperatures are needed and allows you to turn you’re A/C off when the house is unoccupied for four hours or more. • Reduce cooling costs by keeping windows closed and shades drawn on the sunny side of your house. • A well-placed tree or shrub on the sunny side of your home, will provide shade in summer. • A well-insulated attic provides more comfort with reduced heat build-up in summer. • Keep the heat out of the kitchen by using frying pans, toaster/broiler ovens and slow cookers. They are energy-saving alternatives to using a conventional oven. • Microwave ovens are one of the most energyefficient cooking appliances. They are faster for most cooking jobs because the energy heats the food and not the oven or container. As an added bonus, microwaves don’t heat up the kitchen.


tips o' the trades

What’s New in Refrigeration text by Harold Kriewald, President and Owner of Stalwart Appliance by Design Refrigerators have changed dramatically over the past 15 years. Because they can have a very long life-span, this fact often comes as a big surprise to customers who have not purchased a new refrigerator in many years. This crucial appliance has changed significantly in size, style, and features. Refrigerators are much taller than those built even 10 years ago, often requiring a minimum 72” height clearance. This increase in height can be a challenge for those customers who simply want to replace their old model; some cabinetry work is often required in order to accommodate the extra height. When planning a kitchen renovation, allow for this increased height, even if you don't plan on replacing your current refrigerator right away. You'll eventually be glad you did. Both the width and depth of refrigerators have also changed; at one time most refrigerators were 30" or 33" wide, but 36” width is now most common in many categories. Shoppers also have some choice in the depth of a new refrigerator. Historically, refrigerators were only available in what the industry labeled “standard depth.” Although this depth was anything but “standard,” it meant that the unit would often protrude 6” from the cabinets. Now "counter depth" refrigerators are readily available; by design, the 24" body of the refrigerator stays within the cabinetry. Only the doors of "counter depth" refrigerators sit outside the cabinets; this gives the kitchen a much more streamlined look. In addition to the changes with the size of refrigerators, there has been a major shift in style. The "top-mount freezer" refrigerator or the "side-by-side" are no longer the dominant styles available. Over the last 10 years, "bottom-mount freezer" refrigerators have gained an increasing share of the market; with the introduction of the french door design, the popularity of the bottom freezer style has increased dramatically. Another style available is the fully integrated refrigerator that fits completely within your cabinets; it appears more like a tall cabinet than a refrigerator. Built-in refrigerators are popular and provide customers with a great deal of flexibility in design: they are available in 24” 30” 36” 48” 60” 64” and 72” widths. These units are most often 80” or 84” tall. New features in refrigeration now include LED lighting, sophisticated water and air filtration, and specialized cooling areas within the refrigerator itself. The individual temperatures of those areas are separately controlled with digital thermostats; they are designed to keep vegetables, cheese, meats and even wine and beer in their optimum environment. Many new functions have been added to ice and water dispensing units: auto-fill sensors, the capacity for extra tall glasses and water containers, and most recently, hot water

dispensers. Dual ice makers are also now available in many refrigerators as well. Energy efficiency must also be considered a feature, and today’s refrigerators are vastly more efficient than those built even 10 years ago. When considering the purchase of a new refrigerator, whether it is for replacement or to fit a new kitchen design, remember to confirm the height, width and depth of the unit to make sure it fits. Consider the style and design, features and functions of the refrigerators available to make sure it will meet your needs now and in the future.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

19


p ro f i l e

URBAN COLOUR Anne Johnson graduated from Red River College's Residential Decorating Program in 2003. She established her business, Urban Colour, shortly after that. One of her first projects was to create a Home Show for Polo Park Shopping Centre. This is where she developed a passion for eclectic decorating; as items had to be chosen from all home furnishing stores throughout the mall. A traditional lamp from Bombay had to work with the clean lines of a chair from EQ3. The challenge made the project so exciting and extremely rewarding that Anne continued to create the show for three years.

PROfiles is a chance to meet and get to know a local Winnipeg talent.

Covet has partnered with CDECA (Canadian Decorator’s Association) to bring you the inside scoop on one of their members from the Central Prairie Chapter. To learn more about CDECA or for a list of CDECA decorators in your area, visit them at www.cdeca.com.

Prior to entering the design field Anne worked in the financial sector for 20 years as a personal banker. After remodelling the home she purchased with her husband, she realized design was her passion and left the world of numbers behind. She has never looked back. Her philosophy has been to spend where you need to and save where you can. Anne says, “Never scrimp on lighting or flooring. Create a neutral canvas that you can transform every weekend, if you like, with just a new pop of colour. Everyone’s style changes and evolves and you need to be able to incorporate those changes into your existing space without having to start over.” Q. After this seemingly neverending winter, what summer projects are you anxious to undertake? My garden. It is mostly filled with perennials that are finally peeking out from the soil, but I am really excited about filling my oversized planters with as many tropicals as I can find. Canna lillies with trailing vines and some interesting succulents create that lush island getaway we all need after a cold unrelenting winter.

20

summer

2013

Q. What are your favourite summer seasonal DIY projects? I would have to say that my favourite summer DIY project is painting the exterior of my house a different colour each summer. I feel as though I have moved into a new home each year. We have lived in our current home for 14 years and there have been only 2 years that I decided to leave the colour for another season. Those are the seasons my husband is the happiest. I have tried to convince him that by painting every year we are actually protecting the wood underneath, but I'm not sure that he is buying into that theory. Q. What are you thinking about when you first begin designing a room? My first thought is always how the space will be used. If it is a living room, do we need seating for 10 or for 4? Relaxed or formal? Should it be kid friendly, pet friendly, or both? I also love to incorporate as many existing pieces as possible as they so often have a loving memory attached to them. Q. Where is your favourite summertime escape? My brother's cottage at WestHawk Lake. The cabin sits on top of a peak and offers the most amazing view of the lake. It's a great place to unwind and disconnect from busy life back in the city. Q. What are your favourite design tricks for getting your home ready for summer? Bringing in new colour with pillows, art and rugs. I had a bold, formal looking mediterranean blue rug in my living room that I recently switched out for a relaxed sisal and then layered a hip cowhide rug over it. A few quick pillow and art changes and I am ready to enjoy the summer.


Q. What is the best ice cream joint in Winnipeg? Well, I have two favourites. If I am in the mood for a Goog Special I go to the BDI. If I'm after a chocolate fudge sundae then The Banana Boat on Osborne is the place to go. Q. What hot design trends are you excited about? I am seeing a lot of tribal motifs and raw wood combined with a Moroccan flair. It is a laid back way of decorating and combining things that aren’t normally seen together. These are the spaces that always catch my eye. Q. What would/does your own dream home look like? I think my own space would be filled with floor to ceiling windows as I love the idea of bringing the outdoors in. A neutral backdrop with the ability to switch it up from blues to pinks to purples depending on my mood. As the seasons change so does my need for a change in colour. Pops of colour peppered throughout the space are just what I need to get through our Manitoba winters. Q. What never fails to inspire you? Thinking outside the box. I saw a picture of a kitchen that was so creative when it came to the art on the wall. Instead of a picture, which is what you would expect to see, a number of old cast iron pot lids were hung vertically from smallest to largest. Q. What's the best piece you've ever found for a design project? Two solid mid century modern teak chairs that I scooped up from Value Village for five bucks each. They were so comfortable and well made that all we needed was a fresh fabric to breathe new life into them. For sure the best find I have ever come across. urbancolour@shaw.ca

JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT OUTDOOR FURNITURE COULDN’T LOOK ANYMORE…INDOOR The “Dreux” Collection From EBEL, Completely Waterproof, Completly Outdoor, and Completly Relaxing, Our Entire 2013 Spring/Summer Patio Collections Now On Display.

24,000sq.ft. showroom | open 7 days a week

this is not your grandma’s wicker. 120 McPhillips Street | Winnipeg, MB Canada (204) 779-2900 | wickerworld.ca

modern living with a pr airie t wist

21


a n d r e w d ow n wa r d

Summer retreat By Andrew Downward

Ah, summer! Who doesn’t love it? I don’t think there is any country in the world that celebrates this season more than we do, and who can blame us? We suffer through eight months of winter so when the sun finally shines, so do we! My favourite summer memories are the times spent at my family cottage. It was more of a shack, really, with a resident mouse family or two, a gopher, a raccoon and a porcupine who all seemed to make a comfortable life for themselves underneath the cinder block foundation. Despite its shortcomings it was paradise, an escape. Today, many traditional cottages and cabins are being torn down and replaced by stunning homes both for permanent residences and vacation properties. And it's not cheap. Waterfront property today can be just as expensive as city homes. Folks that are building have to delicately balance building the home they want, and respecting the place they love. This was the conversation I had when Lesley and Mark called me up to choose the exterior colours for their new lakeside build. Usually, when choosing colours for the exterior of a home I must consider the elements that are already present. The colour of the shingles, bricks and mortar as well as the colours of existing homes in the neighbourhood all act as a precursor to any exterior colour choices. Lesley and Mark were adamant

22

summer

2013

that their new home on the lake be a reflection of their belief that they are guests on this land and that their home be a complement to its beauty. With this in mind I offered up some bold suggestions! Firstly, the size of the house and its many architectural features offered me some flexibility. For instance, I was able to use black as the main colour of the board and batten. Deep colours, such as black, have an amazing ability to ground a space, especially if the space is divided and varied. Bold, dark colours also make a space seem smaller and in this case more intimate. The black stain I chose was matte in finish, allowing other features of the home, such as the wooden front and garage doors, to really pop with a soft gloss finish. White windows and a neutral roof complete the palette. This fall, Lesley and Mark are set to retire to their beautiful home on the lake. This migration is being repeated over and over again across the country. Many of the new homes built in traditional cottage country are simply stunning. They are tasteful, creative and dynamic. We truely are building the homes we want and respecting the places we love! Andrew Downward is a teacher, painter and colour expert. He played a leading role on the extremely successful Divine by Design with Candace Olson on the W Network/HGTV.


to o l s

S TA N D S U P T O A G O O D PA RT Y

quickstep.com

1042 Waverley Street At Seel • 204-956-9720 • www.thefloorshow.ca


to o l s

from Wasps to weeds Covet's at home solutions for eco-friendly, do-it-yourself garden tools. Illustrations covet magazine

alternative to landscaping fabric: Items needed: a stack of newspaper 1. Lay down a carpet of newspaper (10 or more sheets thick), on top of the garden bed or raised planter where you would normally use landscaping fabric. 2. Wet it to hold it down. 3. Add soil. 4. Plant your plants. 5. Cover with mulch. The paper, which blocks sunlight and oxygen from reaching the soil, will smother weeds already sprouted, and prevent new ones from growing.

MOSQUITO TRAP: Items needed: 1 cup of water Âź cup of brown sugar 1 gram of yeast 1 2-litre bottle 1. Cut the plastic bottle in half. 2. Mix brown sugar with hot water. Let cool. When cold, pour in the bottom half of the bottle. 3. Add the yeast. No need to mix. It creates carbon dioxide, which attracts mosquitoes. 4. Place the funnel part, upside down, into the other half of the bottle, taping them together if desired. 5. Wrap the bottle with something black, leaving the top uncovered, and place it outside in an area away from your normal gathering area. (Mosquitoes are also drawn to the color black.) Change the solution every 2 weeks for continuous control.

24

summer

2013


26 m e rto n roa d a n d … s ag e g a r d e n h e r b s

seeing green text COVET MAGAZINE photography PAULINE BOLDT

26

spring

2013


A treat for the senses lies mere minutes south of the city. Sage Garden Herbs is an aromatic and tasty paradise for gardeners and chefs alike offering hundreds of different edible herb varieties, as well as a multitude of zone 3 garden solutions. Try planting a mojito or spaghetti spice garden this summer, you'll surely be inspired as you wander throughout this lush space. Dave Hanson, co-owner of Sage Garden, encourages visitors to taste the herbs, you'll encounter everything from chocolate mint to thai basil.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

27


26 m e rto n roa d a n d ‌ s ag e g a r d e n h e r b s Summer at Sage Garden is a time for learning, the greenhouse runs workshops from spring to fall with a topic for just about anyone. Plant an edible container garden, one of the easiest, most cost effective ways to grow incredible edibles, and extend the Manitoba gardening season by 4 - 6 weeks! Learn how to plan for multiple, harvest-extending sows, grow in containers, raised beds, and identify the many herbs and veggies that are truly easy to grow from seed. Another class that is sure to be popular is their Amazing Moss Globe Planter, where participants create a 360 suspended, low maintenance garden full of succulents! Visit Sage Garden's website (www.herbs. mb.ca ) to sign up for their newsletter and keep informed about their many learning opportunities. Sage Garden grows all of their plants using 100% natural fertilizers, and organic pest management. Ask co-owner Dave about organic garden management. His advice will start with encouraging you to employ a more eclectic approach, working with ever-sunny Manitoba, and focusing on forging a healthy root system. Another great tip is to interplant which yields a healthier, more vibrant garden. Along with the diversity in herb varieties Sage Garden has shrubs, trees, perennials and annuals to add to your beds. Hardy and beautiful zone 3 perennials are a long term, cost saving solution that will yield beauty for years to come. If you don't know how to start or need advice about how to plan for a colourful or butterfly-friendly garden, one of the experts at Sage Garden will direct you. Herbs can be grown indoors, on balconies, in pots and beds. They are an excellent resource, easy to maintain and a delight when you are looking to add a little garnish or pizzaz to your inpromptu dinner party.

28

summer

2013


modern living with a pr airie t wist

29


26 m e rto n roa d a n d ‌ s ag e g a r d e n h e r b s You'll be struck by the beauty of this space, the intricate details of the leaves, and the sweet smell of the luscious plants. Sage Garden Herbs is a must-visit destination to add to your list if you’re an experienced green thumb or a budding mixologist. Not only will you leave having tasted something new but wide-eyed and bursting with ideas. Sage Garden Herbs 3410 St. Mary's Road Winnipeg, Manitoba 204.257.2715 Mon-Fri: 08:30-21:00 Sunday: 10:00-17:00 www.herbs.mb.ca

30

summer

2013


modern living with a pr airie t wist

31


nto A handmade wire chandelier provides a lighthearted sculptural aspect in the dining room, and matches the scale and style of the voluminous space without feeling heavy

modern living with a pr airie t wist

33


abode

Above left:The husband's main floor office features abundant windows and a white brick fireplace. The space, just off the foyer, can be made private by closing a 100-year-old solid wood barn door; Above: An ever-changing display in the built-in living room cabinetry is one of the few places that features a shot of colour; Left: A blue mudroom off the kitchen provides a great space for flower cutting or dog grooming, depending on the day!

34

summer

2013


Having already undertaken some minor renovations, homeowners Kal Barteski and Dan Kostenchuk were getting ready to embark on a major expansion and upgrade their Wolseley house. Plans were moving along until, Kal says, "Dan came home one day and told me he'd bought a new house". Kal's reaction? Unsurprisingly to friends and fans of her inspirational quotes and artwork, Kal seized upon the opportunity to create a new dream home for her family. Carpe Renovation, so to speak. Located in the same Wolseley neighbourhood as their previous home, the century-old house offered an abundance of desirable features: additional square footage, high ceilings, all on a prime block within walking distance to many of the area's favourite local cafes, shops and bakeries. Much of the home's charm comes from its period details, something that Kal kept in mind while reworking the interior into spaces suitable for a young, hip and style-conscious family. "The black and white scheme works really well for us because I'm an artist and I have different paintings hanging in the house every month. White works for that. It helps to make our house a bit of a gallery. It feels bright and happy," says Kal. The graphic palette immediately greets visitors as they enter the

Above: A massive peninsula between the kitchen and dining area provides ample workspace; industrial Tolix stools make a great place for sipping wine with the cook or grabbing a quick weekday breakfast; Right: Works by the homeowner, a professional visual artist, are displayed throughout the home; her studio is located on the house's third floor

modern living with a pr airie t wist

35


abode

36

summer

2013


“Do what works for you. Don't buy anything you don't love.� ~Kal Barteski

foyer, a studied contrast of dark grey tile floors and white walls. A massive solid oak pocket door, originally located elsewhere on the main floor, has been repurposed and mounted on industrial barn door tracks; the door, which is hung backwards in order to clear the width of the original baseboards, closes off either the front hall closet or Dan's adjacent main floor office, depending on how it's positioned. To the left of the foyer, the large living/dining room runs the full depth of the house. Modern squared-edged furniture upholstered with solid black and white leather or high-gloss lacquer finishes is balanced by the worn patina of the original oak flooring, period trim work, and the organic shapes of Kal's art and textiles. Consideration was given when removing walls between the main living and kitchen areas. "The way the kitchen was before made it impossible to socialize with the cook," says Kal. "I feel like the kitchen is the heart of the house and everyone should be a part of it." While the spaces are now open to each other in a way that allows light and sight

modern living with a pr airie t wist

37


abode lines to flow uninterrupted, the floor plan is laid out so that the kitchen is out of sight from the foyer, only being revealed as you venture further into the space. The large dining area is centred around a beautiful long table fabricated from reclaimed boards from a grain elevator floor. While opening the kitchen to the dining area, Kal was able to create a substantial peninsula that multitasks as a prep area, breakfast bar and buffet. Eschewing upper cabinets, she installed a full wall of cabinets on the wide side of the kitchen, with space dedicated to the household's dishes, pantry and storage needs. The cabinets are fronted with black doors; the adjacent window wall is also painted black. With custom designed vinyl decals and a bright red foot stool, it creates a high impact design focus in the space. Just off the kitchen, a tiled mudroom with blue walls and white cabinetry provides space for household projects and a feeding station for the family's two French bulldogs, Norman and Frank. The success of the scheme is in the tension created from the mix of opposites: black and white, old and new, glossy and timeworn. Kal's advice? "Our design theory is that the house should act like a stage for the characters in it... we are a lively bunch, so it's nice to have a space that lets us be that way". Working carefully to set that stage - a modern living space within a period home - takes the touch of a true artist. The result? A tangible example of design sensitivity, and a fabulous family home with style to spare. Left: Pillows decorated with hand drawn script by the homeowner.

38

summer

2013


get t his look

4. 1.

5.

6.

7.

8.

1. IKEA Besta Storage Combo 2. Kal Barteski Apple Painting 3. Kal Barteski Script Paiting 4. IKEA Bastis hooks 5. Tolix Stool 6. Benjamin Moore Birds Egg 2051-67. Benjamin Moore Universal Black 2118-10 8. Benjamin Moore Mountain Peak White OC-121 2.

3.

your neighbourhood orthodontic office

• Certified Specialists in Orthodontics

Dr. Christie Laberge BSc, BSc (Dent), DMD, MSc (Ortho), FRCDC

• Braces & invisalign™ for children and adults

• referrals not necessary

1719 Kenaston Blvd | 204-940-STR8 (7878) | www.str8.ca

modern living with a pr airie t wist

39


An eclectic mix of furnishings and accessories infuse contemporary energy into a traditional-detailed renovation.

40

summer

2013


Upstairs Downstairs

design by eckstein design photography Rachael King Johnson

A new lower-level development delivers high-end details

modern living with a pr airie t wist

41


"We LOVE our basement and use it every day‌ it's better than anything we could have envisioned before we started."

modern living with a pr airie t wist

43


The standard of quality, and the considered design plan, is evident as soon as you come down the stairs to a landing as graceful as any front foyer. A cut crystal ceiling fixture and an overscale blond wood dresser from Restoration Hardware work with substantial panelled columns to create a heritage feeling that flows throughout the space. Turning left into the large family room, guests are greeted by a bar noteworthy not only for its size but also for its surfaces; the custom millwork includes display cabinets fronted with seeded glass, built-ins for wine storage and a double glass-doored stainless steel undercounter bar fridge. The Venatino marble slab countertop includes a round undermounted cast-iron Kohler sink that was customized to match the colour of the robin's egg blue cabinetry. Oval penny tiles in Carrara marble cover the backsplash. The same cabinetry is featured on the opposite of the family room in the entertainment area. Flanking the fireplace and television, these builtins provide both concealed storage for audio-visual and gaming equipment as well as provide lighted display space for family momentos. The sofas were relocated to the new space from elsewhere in the home; the modern wing chair, industrial-style coffee table and shag area rug all provide textural accents that contribute a fresh counterpoint to more traditional pieces like the black campaign and white pedestal side tables. Eckstein notes that the room's furnishings were carefully sourced over the entire span of the project, in order to give the space an organic, cultivated-over-time feeling. Throughout the space, a laminated floor

of 6" wide weathered planks, as well as an extensive lighting plan providing distinct general, task and ambient light adds to the patinated atmosphere of the entire project. Adjacent to the family room is the children's playroom. The curtained doorway between the spaces is a favourite design feature of both the designer and the homeowner. The double-sided curtains feature coordinating fabrics: a playful chevron print on the playroom side, and more traditional paisley facing into the family room. Flanked by additional panelled columns, the oversize doorway doubles as a stage from which the kids can give performances to an audience in the family room. Guests who've not yet forgotten that they're below ground will as soon as they enter the private area of the lower level, which includes a flex space and a 3-piece washroom featuring finishes worthy of any master ensuite. Bathed in Carrara marble and tile, the washroom cleverly plays with rounded and straight lines. Dramatic arches echo the seductive curves found in the sconce-like pendant fixtures, wall tiles and exposed steel of the vanity base. Rectangular and square cuts of marble cover the floor and ceiling of the shower. The large mirror above the vanity is a contemporary nod to a more traditional Venetian mirror, which would look equally at home in this luxe space. Located adjacent to a space currently used as a home gym, the washroom will eventually serve as a guest bath when the area is repurposed as a guest suite. The collaborative effort of everyone involved in the project - homeowners, designer and tradespeople - produced the hoped-for results: a high quality build that meets all of the homeowners'

In the family room, a porcelain tile fireplace surround in a classic basket weave adds texture and quiet elegance. Right: Large built-in cabinetry hides clutter and provides display space for family treasures.

44

summer

2013


design by ENVY PAINT AND DESIGN photography COVET MAGAZINE

modern living with a pr airie t wist

45


abode

Ceiling pendants hung at sconce-level light the vanity; luxurious Carrara marble covers the floor, vanity and shower stall.

needs, and even exceeds their design expectations. "From the 'perfect shade of blue' cabinets to the pattern cast on the ceiling from the crystal light fixtures, I love all details of the design. It personally makes me happy every time I go downstairs."

46

summer

2013


get t h is look 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Design Manitoba 101-326 Wardlaw Ave. Winnipeg MB 204-453-2390 Ext. 226

Blind Appeal Winnipeg MB 204-661-8017/204-995-8017 blindappeal@gmail.com

Marcel's Drapery and Blinds Winnipeg MB 204-786-8585 marcels@shaw.ca

7.

8.

1. Premier Prints Zig Zag Village, Blue/Natural 2. Premier Prints Suzani Twill, Powder Blue 3. Julian Tile Bathroom Shower Walls: Tonic Series 'White Flower' 4. Ames Tile Bathroom Floor: Honed 12x24 Carrara tile

5. Flooring: Balterio Tradition Sapphire Friesen Floor & Decor 6. Benjamin Moore HC-173 Edgecomb Gray 7. Benjamin Moore HC-171 Wickham Gray 8. Benjamin Moore CC-40 Cloud White

modern living with a pr airie t wist

47


abode

Twice is Nice

Two rooms receive a welcome refresh on a modest budget. Changing a little can change a lot!

48

summer–

2013


The Homeowners: A couple of empty-nesters with a love for entertaining, ranging from dinner parties with friends to baking with their grandchildren. The Challenge: A dark kitchen with minimal storage & prep areas; a small & dated bathroom; and a modest renovation budget. The Solution: Carefully considering the project's priorities, designer Wanda Vuignier of Designing Spaces first approached the kitchen. The existing cabinets received a fresh coat of paint; selected uppers were outfitted with new reeded glass fronts, interior LED lighting and glass shelving. Additional cabinetry was added to a previously empty wall, providing muchneeded additional storage; a long expanse of new Cambria quartz countertop is perfect for rolling out dough or holding a buffet supper. Matching the countertops, a glass and tile mosaic backsplash, that unifies the colour pallette, was added to the original work area of the kitchen. The designer splurged on a complete suite of new appliances, including a slide-in range with a flush-to-the-counter cooktop that compliments the clean lines of the revamped space. Similarly, the existing bathroom millwork was refreshed with new paint and glass-front doors; a new white vessel sink and commode dramatically contrast with the new countertop and flooring. The husband and wife, who are 6'1" and 5'4" respectively, each were provided with bathing options: an adjustable wallmounted shower head for her and an overhead rain shower head for him. They now fight to use the shower! The Results: "Wanda's expertise and creativity has given us rooms that we just love being in," say the homeowners.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

49


abode

"Wanda's expertise and creativity have given us rooms that we just love being in."

g et t his loo k 1.

~the homeowners

Shiny chrome hardware and iridescent black floor tile add glamour to the small bathroom. Large glass shower doors visually expand the feeling of the small space. 2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

8.

9.

7.

1. Imagine Inspirations Rock9 994 2. Creamstone Collection, Trama Nero, INR 27550 3. San Marco Polaris Mosaic 4. -Cambria Oak Hampton Desert Collection (Cambria) 5. Benjamin Moore Hasbrouck Brown HC-71 6. Benjamin Moore Powder Sand 2151-70 7. Benjamin Moore Natural Wicker 950 8. Benjamin Moore Bunny Gray 2124-50 9. Benjamin Moore Cloud White CC-40

50

summer

2013


Interior or exterior renovations, over and above your expectations. Over & Above Custom Homes can help with your next renovation project.

overandaboveconstruction.com

Call us for your free estimate

204.999.5351


"Having this amazing room means I can check an item off my Bucket List!" ~ Dana Jessiman

modern living with a pr airie t wist

53


abode

For many of us, creating a wish list of features we'd love to build into our dream home is, in and of itself, a satisfying experience. But realizing those dreams and building such a home is truly a gift. And if that gift could be tied up in paper and ribbons, this room in this dream house is where you'd want to have it wrapped. While constructing their new house, homeowners Dana and Peter Jessiman worked with Jan Ash of Jan Ash Interior Design to create dream house spaces worthy of anyone's fantasies. Along with an office,

Clockwise from above: Homeowner Dana Jessiman takes stock of various gift supplies stored in her home's gift wrapping room; Originally designed for laundry hampers, these bottom-hinged cabinets were repurposed as storage for rolls of gift wrap; Multiple storage options provide perfect homes for a variety of supplies, including packages of coloured tissue paper. Opposite: One of the major focal points in the room are the bright rolls of wrapping paper and ribbon suspended between banks of closed cabinetry.

54

summer

2013


modern living with a pr airie t wist

55


abode

home gym and wine cellar, their lower level features a fullyequipped gift room that provides an organized and attractive space dedicated solely to gift wrapping and storage. The L-shaped room includes features common to the rest of the home; tall ceilings, large windows and wide-plank wood floors. But it's imbued with a feeling of energy and happiness that's all its own and considering what happens in the space, that's no surprise! Designer Pauline Boisselle of For Space Sake was engaged to design and supply the storage system for the wrapping room . When it came to planning the cabinetry, Pauline carefully considered the specific storage needs the homeowners required. She designed a full wall of cabinetry with customized features that provides various types of storage for multiple types of gift wrapping supplies. Closed-front base cabinets open to

56

summer

2013

reveal roll out surfaces that hold stacks of tissue and wrapping papers; a wide bank of shallow drawers offer storage space for hundreds of ribbons and bows while allowing the homeowner to easily make selections without digging for the bow she's after. A separate peninsula offers a large unobstructed surface area perfect for cutting and taping, while other cabinets are designated for storage of unwrapped items. And though open shelving and wide countertops offer tempting space for piling stacks of supplies, everything easily manages to stay in order - a telltale sign of good design, all wrapped up with a bow. In the short portion of the room, a whitewashed desk and backpainted glass whiteboards create a graceful place for writing cards and keeping notes of upcoming special events.


g et t h is look 4.

1. 3. 2.

FALL TERM

th 7th, 2013 September 9 December

AGES 2 TO 6 PRESCHOOL ART FOR 6 SCHOOL AGE ART 6-1

nching point Using art histor y as our lau ful Owl for a studio practice the Art making fun. inspires creativity and art ar t Ho ot hoot, love 1. Benjamin Moore Lapland AF-410 2. Kate and Birdie Wrapping Paper 3. Hakwood from Heartland Floors 4. Cabinets: Org ivory shaker style

artfulowl.ca T: 204.487.2012 create@artfulowl.ca 16-1700 Corydon Winnipeg, Manitoba R3N 0K5

We sell wine from all over the world. Cottage cases, private seminars, exclusive wines! We provide excellent customer service. Come visit us. We love wine.

110 -1600 Columbia Drive (Kenaston Commons) 204 275 6660 | www.thewinehousewinnipeg.com Mondays 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays from 12 noon to 6 p.m.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

57


abode

Bamboobik's Cube design by Envy paint and design photography Rachael King Johnson

58

summer

2013


We've all been there - faced with a space that, while not in line with our personal style, is fully serviceable as it is. Not unattractive enough to call ugly, not inconvenient enough to deem dysfunctional. Acceptable, if not inspirational. And for many of us, because the space isn't a complete disaster, we choose to live with it as it is. The reasons are varied, but for most of us it comes down to two simple considerations: why undertake the 1. huge effort and 2. huge expense of ripping apart and renovating something that everyone else agrees is already perfectly okay ? And so, conscious of the expense and determined to be pragmatic, we make a few simple cosmetic changes: a coat of paint, some new tea towels, maybe a set of bright canisters. Thoughts of renovation get filed away, and life moves forward. Such is the tale of these homeowners. After purchasing their bungalow over twenty years ago, Dolores and Perry Teichroew immediately undertook some pressing renovations in order to make their new house work with their needs. Over the ensuing years, additional improvements such as exterior work and window replacement were completed as well. Through it all, the existing kitchen, although not to their tastes, was functional. The original U-shaped design offered plenty of counter and cupboard space, but massive banks of upper cabinetry isolated the work area from the dining room and created a confining feeling. Although they had hoped to improve the space when they first purchased the home in the early 1990's, the budget remaining for kitchen improvements came in at $1000. Solution - cue the tea towels. For some time, the accessories and some blue and white paint made things work... but almost twenty years later, it was time to face facts: canisters and paint weren't going to hack it anymore. Inspiration struck at the 2011 Home Expressions Show, when Delores fell for the look of some bamboo kitchen

cabinetry and decided that the time had finally arrived to install the kitchen of her dreams. Despite detailed plans that included all of her 'wish list' items, the initial attempts to design Delores' new space didn't feel quite right. She then turned to Bahia Taylor of Envy Paint and Design to cook up a plan for the space. Taking all of the homeowners' wants into consideration, Bahia put together a new plan that included a few unexpected ingredients which pulled the whole recipe together. Original plans to carry the upper cabinets all the way to the ceiling were

replaced with cubes stacked in various configurations along the perimeter walls. The dated peninsula from the original design was scrapped and a large island was added in its place. The new island, topped with a light gray Caesarstone waterfalledge countertop, provides generous surface areas for both prep work and a great place for catching a casual meal. To replace the storage that was lost by eliminating the extended upper cabinetry, the designer added banks of new cabinets along the southern wall of the kitchen. This new area features a customized pull-out pantry

modern living with a pr airie t wist

59


"Every time I walk into the kitchen, I fall in love all over again - I'm so happy I did this." ~ Dolores Teichroew

and additional storage space for the homeowner, who prefers to keep her surfaces clear. "Yes, we have a toaster and a coffee pot - I just prefer to keep them out of sight when we're not using them," laughs Delores. And with surfaces like a stunning glass-tiled backsplash and luxurious honed granite counters, who could blame her? The black granite counters are a perfect example of how Taylor added some unexpected, yet well considered

60

summer

2013

design elements to the space. "The honed surface is a departure from the polished finish usually found in today's kitchens," explains Taylor. "However, the matte surface works well with the organic feel of the bamboo cabinetry and tile flooring, and allows the backsplash and stainless appliances to really sparkle and shine." In the large dining area, a sleek glass and steel table is surrounded by a set of dining chairs refurbished by

the homeowner. The bright-coloured seats provide a fun jolt of colour in the otherwise neutral space and a comfortable place for friends and family to gather while still being fully connected to the action happening in the workzone area of the kitchen. And it's from this vantage point that Delores looks at her long-awaited dream space and announces that it was worth the 20 year wait... and that from now on, the tea towels are staying in the cupboard.


abode

A typical Lazy Susan corner cabinet is made redundant by the new pantry; instead, a bank of corner drawers provides smart storage in an often-overlooked space. Black cabinet edge banding is a signature standard of the designer

62

summer

2013


get t his look

1. 2.

3.

4.

1. Benjamin Moore CSP-105 Smoke and Mirrors 2. Caeserstone, Stone Grey, 4030 3. Brown Antique, Honed finish 4. To-Zen, Stone & Pewter Accents, 1 x 4, Oxygen Natural 5. Carbonized Bamboo

hingedesign.c a | 204.997.8857 | brand strategy

modern living with a pr airie t wist

63


c h ow

64

summer

2013


recipes and food styling Marisa curatolo photography BRIAN JOHNSON

Backyard summer dining steps up to the grownups table with gourmet twists on standard summer fare.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

65


c h ow

Forget the Packaged Soup Mix: With minimal effort, enjoy the deep, mellow flavours of an authentic Three Onion Dip

66

summer

2013


Three Onion Dip Makes 1½ cups 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium white onion, chopped 1 tablespoon minced shallot ½ cup sour cream ½ cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon finely chopped chives In large skillet, heat olive oil over medium-low heat. Add onions and shallot; cook until onions are very soft and golden, about 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from heat and cool slightly. In small bowl, combine sour cream, mayonnaise, lemon juice and Worcestershire . Add cooked onions and mix well. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with chives, Serve with kettle style chips.

Roasted Yams, Brussels Sprouts and Edamame Salad Serves 6 to 8 1 medium yam (about 2 cups), peeled and cubed 2 tablespoons olive oil Coarse salt and pepper, to taste 1 cup Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

Salad with your Fries? Flavours collide in a surprising combo of roasted yams, fresh brussel sprouts and edamame

1 leek, white top only, sliced 1 cup shelled frozen edamame

Preheat oven to 400°F.

2 teaspoons fresh oregano leaves

For dressing, in small bowl, whisk together all ingredients: set aside.

Maple lime dressing 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon Dijon 1/8 teaspoon salt

For salad, toss yams with 1 tablespoon olive oil in small bowl. Spread on parchment-lined baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper and roast 20 to 25 minutes or until tender. In same bowl, toss Brussels sprouts and leeks with remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil; season with salt and pepper. Arrange

on another parchment lined baking sheet. Roast, tossing occasionally, until sprouts are tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Meanwhile, bring small pot of water to boil, add edamame and cook 3 minutes, drain and rinse under cold water: set aside. To assemble salad, mix together yams, sprouts, leeks and edamame. In a large bowl toss with dressing and sprinkle with oregano.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

67


Take a Break from Beef: Pulled pork gets slow-cooked on the barbecue

68

summer

2013


Pulled Pork with Chipotle Aioli and Barbecue Sauce Serves 8 1 teaspoon ground paprika 1 teaspoon ground chili powder 1 tablespoon ground cumin 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper and sea salt 1 (3 to 4 lb) boneless pork butt (shoulder) roast 1 recipe barbecue sauce ( see below) 1 recipe chipotle aioli (see below) 8 soft rolls Mix together paprika, chili powder, cumin, sugar, salt and pepper. Rub pork all over with spice mixture. Refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight. Preheat one burner of a two burner barbecue to high; reduce to medium. Temperature should read 250°F to 300°F. Place pork on oiled grill over unlit burner. Close lid and cook pork for 3 to 4 hours and meat thermometer reads 160°F. Transfer to cutting board, tent with foil and let stand 20 minutes. Using 2 forks, pull pork into shreds; place in bowl. Warm sauce and pour 1 to 1 ½ cups over meat; toss to coat. Serve on buns with remaining sauce and chipotle aioli. Chipotle Aioli ¾ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons chipotle peppers, chopped Mix together in small bowl. Cover and chill. (Classic Barbecue Sauce recipe on page 88)

<< Flowers by Academy Florist modern living with a pr airie t wist

69


c h ow

Entertaining at our home doesn't need to be stressful or overwhelming.

1.

Food stylist/chef Marisa Curatolo creates a casual table top with the new summer collection from Indigo/Chapters. Here is her advice for creating great summer parties which will have you spending more time on your deck and less time in your kitchen.

How to get the party started PLANNING IS KEY A successful gathering starts with simple, delicious food, a casual and warm atmosphere and a pretty table set with fresh flowers . Spend some time organizing yourself the day before. Even if it's just pasta and salad, a little planning will make the event/ party go smoothly. I like to keep a small journal where I write down the menu , shopping list and serving pieces I will use. By keeping notes in one place, it allows me to check off lists. Your iPhone works great too, and you can take pictures of items you may want to purchase. Hosting a great dinner party has more to do with creating a warm, and welcoming environment and having fun with your guests than an overdone table and lavish food.

2.

3.

TABLE SETTING Pick a color scheme, we chose blue and white with a hint of lavender. A good rule to remember is more than two or three colors can make the look become busy. Melamine plates are inexpensive and a great addition to the summer

70

summer

2013

table. There is no need to worry about breakage and they are great to use in a picnic setting. Rattan chargers or fabric placemats add texture and color.

THE BAR Pick a signature cocktail and mix it in a decanter or carafe. Fill bowls with lemon slices or fresh fruit. Offer a choice of one red, and one white wine to guests.

MENU Try to have dishes that can be made ahead. Our pulled pork on a bun with chipotle aioli is perfect to feed a crowd. Leftovers can be wrapped and frozen for a quick weekday meal.

What we used 1. M  elamine plates, rattan chargers, white cotton napkins, cutlery 2. Candle holders, colored vases , monochromatic flowers (descriptionof types we used) 3. Ceramic and wooden bowls, salad tongs,

Additional items Wooden cutting boards, lacquer tray, carafe and glasses.


Berry Tasty: Try flavouring your drink mix with fresh summer fruits Lemon Blueberry Vodka Splash recipe on page 88

modern living with a pr airie t wist

71


c h ow

A Touch of Sweet: Nothing says summer like a simple, sticky-finger dessert

72

summer

2013


Toffee Chocolate Bark with Caramel Sauce Serves 10 40 saltine crackers 1 cup unsalted butter 1 cup brown sugar 3 cups semi sweet chocolate chips 2 tablespoons French sea salt Caramel sauce ½ cup sugar ¼ cup water ½ cup 35% cream 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter In a small heavy bottom saucepan, heat sugar and water over medium-low heat until golden-brown, stirring constantly with wooden spoon. Remove from heat and slowly add cream and butter (mixture

may seize up). Return to heat and stir until smooth, about 2 minutes. Mixture will thicken as it cools. Preheat oven to 400°F. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper and arrange crackers in single layer, make sure pan is filled. In medium saucepan, combine sugar and butter. Bring to boil and cook for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and pour over crackers. Bake for 5 to 6 minutes. Remove from oven and sprinkle chocolate chips over top. Return baking sheet to oven for 3 to 4 minutes. Spread melted chocolate evenly over crackers and sprinkle with French sea salt. Let cool in refrigerator 1 hour or overnight. Break chocolate into pieces. Serve with caramel sauce.

LICENSED, QUALIFIED ELECTRICIANS Hiring a qualified, licensed electrician to inspect your home, make repairs, and conduct installations is a smart way to protect your home’s value and safety. • Electical Wiring • House Rewiring • Troubleshooting • Service Upgrades • Renovations • Outdoor Lighting

hardwired@live.ca


pa i r i n g s

Conundrum (California) : The name says it all - a proprietary blend of a half-dozen or so varietals delivers rich aromas of honeysuckle, peach and vanilla. The round mouthfeel and fresh acidity balances the flavours of melon, pineapple, pear and citrus and pairs beautifully with the big flavours of the three onion dip. Wild Thing (California): This old vine Zin features gentle black cherry and black pepper flavours with a touch of cedar, cinnamon and spice. Named for it's wild yeast fermenting process, the oaky-smokiness and lushly jammy raspberry fruitiness of this dark ruby-coloured wine make it a perfect match for our pulled pork with chipotle aioli and barbecue sauce.

The Winehouse, located in Kenaston Common, puts together Covet's pairings. Their attention to detail and genuine interest will exceed your expectations. Pop in to try something special.

74

summer

2013

Ferrari Carano FumĂŠ Blanc (California): A zesty sauvignon blanc full of delightful aromas of tropical fruit, including kiwi, gooseberry, pineapple, and mango, complemented by creamy citrus notes. Great with simple seafood dishes and spicy cuisines, this wine will balance the mild bitterness of the roasted yams, brussels sprouts and edamame salad.

Gonet Sulcova Grand Cru (Champagne, France) From the mineral-rich soils of Epernay comes this beautiful gold champagne. The layered aromas are laced with a light freshness; a fruity nose and a delicate almond and peach finish make it a perfect pairing for toffee chocolate bark with caramel sauce to end the meal.


INTERIOR DESIGN | PROJECT MANAGEMENT

TELEPHONE: 204.997.2637 INFO@TIFFANYSHELDON.COM TIFFANYSHELDON.COM

204.255.4204

GallagherGroup.ca 942 St. Mary’s Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba

F R E E CO

NSULTA TIONS COMMFLI EXIBLE SSION R ATES FREE HO ME STA GING QUALIF IED BUY ERS

Helping You Every Step Of The Way Gallagher group for Remax Performance Realty

modern living with a pr airie t wist

75


prairie pa l e t t e

The "Fine Art' of Capturing Special Moments by J. Elizabeth adler Wedding season can be a time for invitations, celebrations and even firsthome purchases. A time of beginnings, the wedding season can also be a time for acquiring fine art as a way to capture and define special moments. For many, the purchase of original paintings or other fine art pieces is about much more than adding a design element to their home or an office. Buying art can be both a financial investment and a way to shape your environment to reflect who you are and establish a certain kind of ambience within a space. The process can be somewhat intimidating for those making their first

76

summer

2013

fine art purchase. “But it need not be,” says Jennifer DeLury, manager of Woodlands Gallery on Academy Road. “Making the right choice about artists, knowing how much to spend, and where to get the right advice are all questions asked by many first-time art buyers,” DeLury says. “My advice is to not overthink it. Visit a reputable gallery, view lots of works, and ask lots of questions.” DeLury also points out that fine art pieces can be acquired at any price point. She says most galleries will offer a range of options that make the transition to ownership of fine art a smooth one. “Fine art doesn’t have to break the bank. Start

with what you can afford, or ask about gallery payment plans.” Because of the subjective nature of art, choosing a piece of work to share your space with—often on a daily basis—is in some ways like beginning a relationship. Art is invited into our homes; it establishes its own presence, has its own personality, and can evoke a range of emotions. So it is not surprising that some couples choose to mark their wedding or other special occasions with their first fine art purchase. This is a decision that Lyn Chercoe of Birchwood Art Gallery, located on Taylor Avenue, has enjoyed sharing with many couples over the years.


“There is a dance that takes place when a couple is selecting a work together, where they gauge their partner’s reaction to a painting while expressing what they love about a particular piece,” Chercoe says. “I really enjoy the process of working with couples on finding the perfect piece for their first home or to celebrate the start of their lives together.” DeLury has also assisted many newly married couples to find that first fine art piece together. She has also seen that first purchase grow into a tradition of its own that couples embrace for years to come. “Some of these clients will continue to collect original artwork for anniversaries,” DeLury says. “While these works serve as delightful mementoes of significant life events and bring ongoing enjoyment, they can also come together over the years to create a considerable collection of fine art.” Indeed, many people now celebrate anniversaries, birthdays and other special events by purchasing art or even by commissioning pieces. As her 25th wedding anniversary approached, Wendy Nielson was inspired to do something extra special to celebrate the occasion. “My husband Ian and I had been admirers of artist Shirley Elias’ work for quite some time,” Nielson explains. “I decided to commission a painting from her as an anniversary gift for him.” For the artist, such a request can be both exciting and daunting, especially when tasked with capturing the essence of a couple, or a favourite place or time, or evoking a particular feeling. “When Wendy invited me to do that commission as an anniversary gift for her husband, it was both a thrill and a challenge,” Elias muses. “I had to try and reflect the energy of these two very diverse, creative spirits.” Nielson discovered that the commission process, in lieu of purchasing an existing piece of art, led to a very meaningful result. “Basically, I told Shirley that there needed to be wind and water and trees, and somehow, she got it and us in the painting. We were thrilled with the results, and to this day I get a big goofy grin on my face every time I look at it.”

Larry Rich, an artist whose business consists of about 80% commissioned work, says the subject matter in commissions is often so personal to the client that they could never find anything like it in the retail market. “Usually the subject matter is intimately related to the person receiving the gift,” Rich observes. “One such painting was of a large-scale row of books on a bookshelf—all the titles were the recipient’s favourites.” There are also times when the inspiration for a commission comes from current work by an artist that speaks to the clients. “I recently painted a commissioned piece for a couple who were marking a major anniversary,” says Rich. “They decided to gift themselves a large commission based on a treescape series that I had produced. Apparently they had both always admired this series and thought this would be a good way to mark the event.” But for many, a visit to an art gallery can show them a painting that moves them instantly. In an existing work, they might see something that reminds them of places they have visited or feelings or experiences they have had. “I can’t tell you the number of times someone has walked into the gallery and has seen a painting that they are instantly drawn to,” Chercoe explains. “They stand in front of the painting saying, ‘I love it—I don’t know exactly why, but I love it’.” “It could be a painting of a street in Paris that reminds them of a romantic vacation with a loved one, or it might be an abstract work that just speaks to their heart,” she continues. “Art is emotional, and I think the impact of art can be heightened during emotional times in our lives.” It seems to be just as common for parents or grandparents to celebrate a child’s milestones with the purchase of art, says DeLury. “I have a few collectors who purchase artwork upon the arrival of each new grandchild. While a child may be too young to appreciate artwork, it is something that they will have with them for their entire lives. It can serve

as a memory of their grandparents and their childhood.” Rich notes that even commissions of that nature are in demand. “The portraits I’ve done for proud parents of their young children are too numerous to count,” he said. Shirley Elias has also received a commission request from a family member who wanted to gift an original work of hers to a child—but with a twist. “I was extremely flattered when a client of mine asked me to create an original piece for her 3-year-old nephew. Although some might think a gift of fine art to a three year old is a little much, she wanted him to have a painting in his room that would inspire him,” Elias says. “But there was a catch: it had to have automobiles or trains in it!” Although known for her abstract paintings of musical instruments and “lyrical landscapes,” Elias laughs when acknowledging that she has now added a painting of a small train to her repertoire. “It was an unusual request for me, but I was honoured by it. Children have such wonderful, uninhibited imaginations, and my goal was that hopefully my work would further stimulate his own creative horizons.” Whatever the occasion, acquiring or gifting fine art to highlight special moments in our lives is something that Chercoe expects to continue. “It makes a lot of sense for someone to make a fine art investment to mark a significant occasion,” says Chercoe. “The distinctive association with when they acquired it adds depth of meaning to the painting that will bring them joy for many years to come.” “Fine art is literally a gift—to oneself or to a loved one—that keeps on giving.” Want to see more? Larry Rich www.larryrich.com Shirley Elias www.emotesart.com Woodlands Gallery www.woodlandsgallery.com Birchwood Art Gallery www.birchwoodartgallery.com

modern living with a pr airie t wist

77


living well

b o o st yo u r w e l l b e i n g w i t h s u m m e r e n t e rta i n i n g Finally it has arrived - summer on the prairies! Although we sometimes have long winters, those of us who have lived here for many years know that summer is well worth the wait.

text by SUSAN KUZ One of the things I most love about summer is getting together with family and friends to share a meal or gather around the fire pit, sipping on my favorite drink and sharing stories until the wee hours of the morning. Social time is so very important to our wellbeing. A recent Gallup study suggests we need a minimum of six hours of social time each day to help minimize stress and worry. Social time does not always have to be face-to-face to receive these benefits but if you can swing it, then absolutely do it. If your life is super busy like mine is, here are a few tips to make your gatherings easier so you can maximize your connecting time: • Keep a few ready-to-go items in your fridge or freezer so you can entertain at a moment’s notice. • Keep the food fare lighter and enjoy some appetizers paired with a selection of wines or beers. • Get the whole neighborhood involved and create a rotating event: appetizer at one house, main course at another, and dessert at yet another. Or for an early morning event, try rotating breakfast courses among your group. • One of my favs after a busy week is hosting a potluck event with everyone bringing their favorite summer dish. • Enjoy the mesmerizing experience of a fire pit. Keep some kindling and a few dried logs handy and ready to go - enough for an evening. • Put together Smores kits in advance and store in a sealed container: graham crackers, chocolate and marshmallows. • Keep some frozen desserts on hand so you can pull them out at the last minute: ice-creams, frozen yogurt, sorbet or frozen cheese cake. Simply add some fresh berries or enjoy as is.

78

summer

2013

• When the weather is rainy, prepare some make-it-now, bake-it-later items to make cooking a snap on sunny days. • Set up a collection of fun lights for gatherings that go later into the evening. Include faux or real candles or strings of garden lights. • Consider a portable heater for cooler evenings so you can stretch out the season. • Likewise, investigate some human and earth-friendly mosquito solutions to make outside gatherings bug-bite-free. • Invest in some fun and versatile outdoor furniture that can be arranged for different sized groups at a moments notice. Easy to move seating and side tables are great for creating just the right seating arrangements for your social event. Ensure seating is comfortable with a variety of pillows and seat cushions covered in sun and water friendly fabrics. Have your entertaining items ready to go and easily accessible: • Bright colored dishes and glasses that can work indoors and out. • A collection of fun summer napkins and paper plates for when you want an easy clean up. • A cooler for a quick portable cold drink caddy. • Your summer music set up on your ipod so you can quickly plug it into a portable set of speakers. What ever you do, be sure to take advantage of the outdoors this summer and up your social wellbeing with low-stress impromptu gatherings. Enjoy! Susan Kuz, a specialist in colour and healthy living spaces, is an associate member of the International Association of Color Consultants/Designers – North America (IACC-NA). She can be contacted at www.SpacialExpressions.com


ask a designer:

We asked Designers: “What top 3 things should clients consider when creating outdoor entertaining spaces? ”

w d e s i g n g ro u p Michelle Wiebe When designing an outdoor living space, start out by assessing your surroundings. If you need to create privacy or relief from the wind and sun, then decorative panels, pergolas, or landscaping will do the trick. Every successful gathering space has a focal point to draw you in. As people are naturally attracted to fire, the use of an outdoor fireplace or fire pit can create a warm ambient glow and have your guests pulling up a chair to enjoy the night. Use outdoor accessories with similar textures and colours found in the interior of your home for a seamless transition from the indoors to the outdoors. Ph. 204.736.2131

st y l e w i t h i n Tara Spencer-Nairn When designing your outdoor living space for entertaining, consider creating a continuation of your interior space by incorporating the same style and colour palette. Think of how your space will be used; it should reflect your lifestyle. Will you need specific areas for activities, entertaining, dining and cooking? The layout of your space is crucial for functionality. There’s nothing worse than not having enough room for ample seating for your guests and them having to stand all evening. Budget is another key consideration. Everything may not be able to be completed all at once. If you are planning to put in a built in kitchen but are unable to afford it at onset, make sure all the prep work is done, such as wiring and plumbing, for that kitchen later on. Creating an outdoor living space is a project that is best accomplished by identifying all your needs. If a space looks pretty but is not functional you will not be happy. Plan for your family and the end result will be a beautiful and functional extension of your home. Ph. 204.479.0338 stylewithin@mts.net

s i m p ly c h i c i n t e r i o r s Lisa Kasdorf Number one, for me, absolutely has to be comfort! Who really wants to sit on a wrought iron cafe chair all evening?!! Using thick cushions on chaise loungers and chairs will add a little luxury. Second, has to be aesthetics. Clean up your yard and add an abundance of greenery and flowers to give your outdoor patio that all-important visual appeal. The sound of trickling water from a pretty fountain will help to drown out the noise of street traffic and your neighbour’s screaming children or yappy dog! Finally, consider layout. Your outdoor space has to be functional. Once you decide how you want to use the space, divide your yard into intimate seating and dining areas using archways, fences, hedges, gates, and outdoor area rugs. Make sure you consider using different levels. Most decks are built at a height much too high to ensure privacy. Ph. 204.793.9641 lisa@simplychicinteriors.ca

s pac i a l e x p r e ss i o n s Susan Kuz First decide how you will be using your outdoor spaces and plan accordingly so they fit with your lifestyle and entertaining needs. I’m all about versatility and look for items that can do double duty when needs change, such as stools that can also work as small side tables. Summer is a visual feast for the eyes and there are so many great colours that can make an immediate impact on your outdoor spaces. But just like any decorating project, a little planning can go a long way when it comes to colour. Make sure your outdoor colour scheme complements the exterior of your home and relates to the style you’ve used inside as well. Ph. 204.801.4389 susan@spacialexpressions.com www. spacialexpressions.com

modern living with a pr airie t wist

79


Fiesta Fun! Who can't use a little Tropicana in their cabana? Bright chilli pepper reds and zesty oranges with lime greens will set the mood for a sizzlin' summer fiesta to be followed by a relaxing evening siesta! Hemstitch Grass Green Table Runner $32.95, Round Ratan Weave Moss Green Charger $17.95, Cobalt Blue Water Goblet $8.50, Coral Rock Bead Napkin Ring $6.95, Chili Umbrella $119.95, Mexicali Dinner Plate $10, Mexicali Cereal Bowl $9, Hemstitch Grass Green Placemat $8.95 all available at Pier 1 Imports; Crown Suburban Home Pattern #72047 Colour: 206 Navy, Pindler & Pindler Pattern #1699 Colour: Montara-Canary, Crown Suburban Home Pattern #72039 Colour: 206 Navy

modern living with a pr airie t wist

81


living well

Blue Bayou Cool blues and sunny yellows are a classic summer scheme. If you're new to mixing patterns just jump right in - the outdoors is a perfect place to dip your toe into the arena of pattern play. Toss in a few turtles and a playful umbrella and you're making backyard magic! Moonlight Lantern $30, Bali turtle Tealight Holder $18, Polka Dot Pinwheel $12, Bali Square Lantern $25 all by Abbott Collection available through Envy Paint and Design; Fancy Umbrella through Pier 1 Imports; Surya indoor/outdoor carpet available through Flatlanders Flooring; Halua #31718, Kanekopa #31725, Kura Kura #13 all by Windsor Smith for Kravet available at Envy Paint and Design.

82

summer

2013


Two-by-Four Life text DEZ DANIELS When people ask about our house build, now that we are almost a whole year in, invariably the response is “Oh my gosh! You guys are in the home stretch! You’re almost there!” The analogy of building a house to creating and birthing a baby is not far off. They both start with an overwhelming sense of excitement and enthusiasm (often accompanied by liquor). The positive pregnancy test/breaking ground comes with the shock of, “Oh my god...this is really going to happen!” Next comes several months of waiting - slow progress, followed by sudden and impactful changes (baby moves, heartbeat). Then the day comes when you go into labor/it’s time for your planned C section/your water breaks in the parking lot at Seven-11 while you devour a bag of oreos in your car. You know the blessed moment is nearly at hand. It’s also true that the closer you get to the end, the less likely it seems it’s ever going to end at all. Occasionally in labor, we do things that could potentially “slow down” our progress. Going to the hospital “too soon” or inviting too many people into our “birth space” can create a situation where things were chugging along nicely and then suddenly everything comes to a grinding halt. Of course, just as often, even when you are doing everything exactly “right” or according to plan, things do go from 60 to 0 in no time flat. I assumed progress on our home build would be much swifter once the warmer weather came. I was wrong. A few things have gotten in the way - some of which we brought on ourselves, and others that were beyond our control. In both cases, we have discovered a few things that, if we had access to a Delorean time machine, we would be all over: 1. Be assertive: One of the most arduous processes in our build has been choosing kitchen tile. My magazine “inspiration kitchen” was helpful to a point, but for a variety of reasons, the tile we sourced was just not going to work in our space. Our designer came up with other options and because we were feeling overwhelmed, we thought we would just order “something.” After a few days, my husband and I came to the realization NEITHER of us liked what we had chosen, and were regretting our decision. The situation threatened to turn into a big misunderstanding and did create a lag in progress. We revisited the choices and ended up choosing something totally different that EVERYONE was happy with. Don’t “go along to get along”. Whatever time you try to save could end up double in the end AND leave you with the disappointment of not getting something that feels right. After all, you’ll be the one standing in front of that tile at 1:30am making cupcakes for school because your kid forgot to tell you he needed them until bedtime that evening. You might as well enjoy the view. 2. Lists are your friend: how many times have we gone to our friendly local hardware store for more shims only to get home and realize, “Oh right! We forgot about ____”? Alternately,

going to the store for a specific item and then forgetting it completely is another “no-list” downside. When it’s tuna for tonight’s casserole, that’s one thing. Do this enough times during a home build, and it can set you back an epoch or two. 3. Don’t be married to a plan...but have one: We were never super committed to a timeline, but we never really did an overall guideline for order of jobs either. This has been difficult at times for my husband, who has more than once come to a certain job only to realize that he needed some amount of assistance - but the necessary person was not going to be available for two weeks. This sucks. Big time. We have started trying to think at least two weeks in advance after the sting of this error. 4. Don’t be married to a back-up plan...but have one: Rudy has decided to do all of our tiling himself and purchased a used tile saw that has served us very well. Unfortunately, the thing conked out, and we took it in for service expecting a short delay. Then the service guy threw his back out and was off for a week and a half. Bathroom number one, which was supposed to be close to done by now, still has no tile laid down. Having a contingency plan, whether it’s a back-up tool, or the appropriate materials at the ready for a different task, is crucial to saving time. I know we are close. We have some extra help lined up for spraying the finish woodwork. Carpet is on its way. Countertops will all be ordered in the next week. The toughest, most difficult decisions are behind us. Now, it’s just a matter of letting nature take its course, staying focused, and keeping in mind what all of this was about in the first place. Unfortunately, that last mighty push needs to come when you are already exhausted, deeply discouraged and saying things like “I just want this *%$*-ing over with!!!” to total strangers! And when in doubt...breathe.


dig

2

1

4

5

7

84

summer

2013

8

3

6

9


hard working herbs: great food and better medicine text SAMANTHA BRAUN

Here’s a selection of some of the healthiest, tastiest, and all-round best-ist herbs to add to your planters and garden this year. Bonus is they can look beautiful too! Having home-grown herbs handy will not only make you feel like a culinary pro, but their seemingly limitless health benefits with keep you happily snipping and sampling all summer. Yes, that includes Mojitos. Who needs Advil after a long day of gardening or golf ? Rum is an excellent muscle relaxant, just ask any pirate!. Basil (1)  • If you love the flavours of pesto and like to throw together bruschetta at the drop of a hat you’ll need at least one basil in your herb collection. • Like many of the herbs on our list, basil has the anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant trifecta of medicinal properties. • There are so many tasty and colourful basils to add to your planters that it’s too hard to choose just one! If you need a hot weather beauty try the “African blue” or “Thai” varieties. For classic flavour, pick out an over-sized sweet basil like “Mammoth”. Sage (2)  • The essential flavour for sausages and stuffing. • Known for its anti-microbial and antiinflammatory properties. • Use a purple or variegated variety to add easy colour to your herb planters and there’s also the zone 4 “Berggarten” variety if you want to try and overwinter your sage in the garden. Rosemary (3)  • Place a few branches inside your next rotisserie chicken for a classic Mediterranean flavour. • Another super-herb loaded with powerful antioxidants and antiinflammatory compounds. Rosemary works miracles when applied to the skin. Add it to your next avocado face mask to take down redness. • Keep it in a patio planter that’s easy to move inside for the winter.

Thyme (4)  • Used for centuries to flavour and naturally preserve food. • Thyme is loaded with powerful antifungal, antibacterial and antioxidant compounds. • Tuck thyme into the garden along sunny pathways and between stones for a special treat when you brush by. Oregano (5)  • You really can’t make a decent pasta sauce without oregano in your collection of herbs! • This is another antioxidant and antibiotic superstar, and it’s also high in iron, manganese, and fibre. Its oil is often recommended to boost functioning of the whole immune system. • Oregano makes a pretty mounding addition to rocky boarders in the garden and yellow varieties will add some instant colour to your planters. Parsley (6)  • A little sprig or sprinkle of parsley takes many dishes from dull to “fancy” without even trying! • If you eat the sprig as well you’ll get lots of vitamin K, A, and C, to name a few, plus a nice cleansing dose of chlorophyll. • Parsley is easily seeded directly into the garden or you can pick up a readyto-go parsley at the nursery and pop it straight into your planter. Cilantro (7)  • No fresh salsa or Thai dish is complete without a hand full of cilantro. • Cilantro’s numerous health benefits

include aiding liver function (it even helps remove heavy metals from the body), stimulating digestion and reducing inflammation. • Seed directly into the garden a few times through the summer so that you have a fresh supply. Mexican coriander, not even related but tastes pretty close, is a nice trailing plant for containers and doesn’t die off with summer heat like true cilantro. Mint (8)  • A very fast growing and versatile little culinary herb • It has a long therapeutic history of calming tummies and soothing irritated skin. • We know you love Mojitos (who doesn’t?) but don’t be tempted to put mint directly in the garden. Keep it in a dedicated “Mojito planter” instead. Lavender (9)  • Not really a culinary herb, but these beautiful blue spires (bastions of European elegance) warrant a place in your herb collection. • Known for its aromatherapy benefits and aiding in relaxation. Add a few sprigs to the bath with Epsom salts after a long day at work. • There’s one variety of lavender (cold-climate English) that dedicated gardeners can convince to overwinter in the garden with some luck and love. If that’s not you, then opt for the overwintering services provided by, the herb gurus themselves, Sage Garden Herbs (for a small babysitting fee).

modern living with a pr airie t wist

85


dig

Honey, I think I want a pond?! I have a confession to make, my first pond was actually a huge black water barrel with the top cut down, and I used a pile of blocks covered in burlap to raise my iris high enough to live in it. No one would ever know what the liner was because you couldn’t see any of it. The top piece of the water barrel was sunk next to it for my “marsh” with cattails. Basically, if it’s sturdy enough to keep the water in, you can make it into a pond (or a least a water feature) and create a space that has a fantastic aesthetic and habitat value. Whether your pond is a converted barrel with stone and a little pump or a 150’ dug out surrounded by willow and cattails the concept follows the same fundamentals for pond construction (at least in our climate):

86

summer

2013

Step 1. Dig a hole. Make sure you have a budget, a layout and/or a pond liner picked out before you hire a bobcat for the afternoon and three teenagers with shovels. It’s really easy to just keep digging until you realize your back yard pond needs a 30’x30’ liner and a water tanker to fill it. Draw up your plans and calculate the cost and supply of the liner, then give the boys their shovels! Get your utilities to come and mark before you dig too—better safe than sorry. Put the hole in a good spot to access for cleaning, changing filters or scooping out soccer balls and over-zealous puppies. When designing the pond think about how you want your finished pond to look. Add shelves to help support naturalizing

stones and plantings, like wild iris, sedges, marsh marigolds and sweetflag, in the actual pond. It’s really annoying to balance stones and hide the liner only to have everything drop two feet down a shear slope. Leave ample room to plant around the pond and blend out that liner too. In older neighbourhoods established trees roots can make or break your pond placement, especially with pre-fab plastic liners. Cropping or moving some smaller lateral roots will normally be okay but hacking through a 5” main root off your ash is probably not a good plan. The tree’s ideas may modify your pond shape or at least dictate the placement of a shelf . How deep you dig also depends on back-power and budget. Your pond will


freeze up whether two feet deep or four feet deep unless you add a heater through the winter. Just like the positioning of a flower bed, what you want to grow around your pond will also dictate its placement. Water lilies need high light so you need a sunny spot. If you’re adding fish you need a deeper pond so your fish don’t get too hot mid-summer. Woodland ponds, for already shady gardens, will be lush and green and likely have darker stained water (from the slower nutrient cycling and leaf tannins) in a cooler, treed location. There really is a lovely pond for every spot, it just takes a little bit of dreaming and planning before you break ground. Step 2. Ensure the water stays in the hole. Sometimes easier said than done. Pre-fabricated pond liners are relatively inexpensive, very simple to use and can take you from “I think I want a pond” to “I have a pond” in a sweaty Saturday with time to spare. It’s a great choice for a first-pond foray. They have features like built in shelves and multiple depths. The main limitation of plastic ponds is their size. No one has ever said to me, “Wow, I really wish I had a smaller pond”. The shape can be limiting too. Easy ways to camouflage the actual outline of the pond are by the use of tactful stone placement and plantings in a naturalized setting. A tip to save a bit of digging is to plan the pond in a spot where it can be unobtrusively raised up a bit with the excavated gumbo back-filling the difference in elevation. This works particularly well in raised beds with some rock work facing the main observation areas or front, for lack of a better term. Raising a solid liner also saves the removal of fill and a bit of back-ache! For a custom pond, I recommend rubber EPDM membrane. You spent a lot of effort digging a hole so spend a little bit on the liner too and protect your investment. It can be found at garden centers, in to about 8’ widths, and more recently, can be ordered through on-line pond suppliers. Online ordering opens up a whole new world of pond dimensions (20’ and beyond without risky pond

seams). The only limit to your pond is the size of your pond-budget plus a hefty shipping bill for that heavy liner, the bobcat-guy time and space. Any membrane should be lined with a protective sublayer. An old school budget-friendly pond trick is to line the hole with sand, which distributes weight and pressure in the liner, then a thick layer of newspaper followed by old carpet or heavy felt and then the actual liner. Now you have an excuse to rip out that ugly bedroom carpet you hate! When using liner, make sure you have enough to extend a full foot past the top edge of your pond excavation in all directions. We have some crazy weather, and it will slump down over time as everything settles. Remember that folds and creases in the liner need to be above the sides too. Fill your pond with water slowly so that you can tug and pull the folds exactly where you want them, you’ll need to be in the pond for this. Once it folds, with the weight of the water, you’re not moving it again and a sticky-outy fold will taunt you for years otherwise! Working with rock to anchor your edges and weigh down the centre of your pond, or decorate/camouflage the bottom, is delicate work… so be gentle with your feet and the stone. Step 3. Mosquito proofing. There are two fantastic ways to keep your neighbours from heading straight for their Deet when you mention the word pond. The first is to keep the water moving. Mama mosquitoes don’t lay eggs in moving water. So if you keep the water circulating, which you need to do to filter it in some way anyway, no mosquitoes. You’ll get some other neat bugs like water boatman, but no mosquito larvae. The second is to add fish. Fish actually help establish your pond as its own little ecosystem. The plants produce green stuff and feed mini-bugs and draw larger insects to drink. The fish, especially gold fish and Koi, eat the bugs and bits of green stuff and their waste keeps the water plants and edge plants happy. Koi are a bit fussier in terms of water chemistry and may need some Romaine

lettuce fed to them to keep their colour. For a budget reduction I suggest you toss in a couple of feeder fish from Petland and be ecosystem ready for less than 10 bucks and no fish feeding required. Just remember the fish are part of the system and you only need a couple to search and destroy larvae. If you cram in the fish, or over feed them to make them your friends, you’ll end up with too much waste in the pond. When it comes to fish in a small back yard pond less is more. Ok, so I probably should have mentioned this before you dug your massive hole 150’ from your garage… but you also want to think about how to get electricity to your water-filled hole. A proper GFCI protected conduit, buried to code, outlet is the best plan. It’s a far safer option than the 50’ extension-cord trailed around the garden fence. You need electricity to your pond to run a pump to draw water through a filter and for lighting. If you have to run electrical anyway then you might as well do some accent lighting to show off your handy work and so that the racoons can fish out your goldfish at night without having to squint. There’s another reason I like feeder fish - it makes you cry when Rocky eats a $150 Koi! Some fountain kits come with lighting already rigged up, but remember it’s a pond and not a circa 1975 hot tub at a ski chalet, so light accordingly. Back lighting a water fall can look quite lovely without making your pond feel like an aquatic stadium. Another trick is to simply up-light some nearby vegetation, like tall grasses or shrubs, flanking the pond for a subtle effect. It’s your pond, so have fun and enjoy the trickle of water in your garden; just don’t forget to shut off the sprinkler! So there you have it, a pond in a nutshell...dig a hole, make it hold water, and avoid mosquitoes at all costs. With some planning and planting you’ll have a little piece of heaven in an ecological mecca. Be proud—you are a habitat hero and your badge is in the mail! Samantha Braun is a landscape ecologist and designer with over 15 years experience in the horticultural industry. Her company, Ecotones, specializes in creating Habitat in Harmony with Design.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

87


hot blogs text by TWILA DRIEDGER

During my recent maternity leave, I spent every babynapping second scanning Pinterest, determining my next DIY project, flipping through the latest Style at Home issue, and scouring my daily dose of décor blogs. Here are a few of my favourites. HOUSE OF TURQUOISE www.houseofturquoise.com Aqua, ocean blue, mint, seafoam green, robin’s egg blue, call it what you want, but I call it colour perfection. I’m almost as obsessed about the colour turquoise as blogger Erin at House of Turquoise. Erin posts photos of beautiful bluish-green interiors that have inspired me to infuse the colour into every room of my home. It’s fresh, it’s fun, and it’s fashionable. If you’re like me, and interested in taking your turquoise fixation a step further, check out Erin’s shopping blog, Everything Turquoise at everythingturquoise.decorbycolor.com. A POP OF PRETTY apopofpretty.com A girl after my own heart, Kerri at A Pop of Pretty is out to prove that a pretty home is possible even when your abode is invaded by three kids, including twin boy toddlers. The Canadian home decorating blog showcases Kerri’s own DIY projects, which include before, during, and after photos, kid-friendly furniture, and relatable family-oriented posts. Popular posts are usually ones that entice the penny-pinching mom to create one of 25 do-it-yourself pieces of wall art or tackle a seasonal decorating project like door décor or mantle decorating. A Pop of Pretty also has a Blogroll, or a best of the blogs list that Kerri refers to for inspiration. Blogs topping the list are Young House Love, Centsational Girl, and The House of Smiths – a few more of my absolute favs. Like pretty spaces? Pop in and view her blog. CASA SUGAR www.casasugar.com A self-confessed pop culture junkie, I’m just as addicted to PopSugar’s home decor branch, CasaSugar, as I am to the celebspotting homepage. Stop by the Casa to see what’s trending – from textiles and decorating tips, furniture and lighting, to designer spotlights and favourite things. The last time I surfed down to the Casa, design guru Genevieve Gorder (judge on HGTV Star and host of HGTV’s Dear Genevieve) shared a few of her favourite things. If the article doesn’t cover the content you’re looking for, Ask A Designer your design dilemma. Casa Sugar can pretty much make anything cool – even glamping, aka glamorous camping! Just add 400 thread count sheets and retro-chic folding chairs! Plus, it doesn’t hurt that the site features the home design styles of the stars, like Drew Barrymore’s newlywed pad.

modern living with a pr airie t wist

89


The wall is not your enemy. It’s not there to fence you in. No, the wall’s wide open, nothing but sky. Notice we didn’t say blue. That’s the beauty of the wall. You’ve got your own colour for unbridled freedom. For possibility. For love and surprise. For loyalty, adventure, beginnings and happy ends. For everything that matters, there’s a deep, rich, enduring colour. And the wall always approves.

© 2013 Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited. Benjamin Moore and the triangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks.

Find these colours and more at benjaminmoore.ca

The premium paint preferred by paint and design professionals. The colour and quality preferred by you.

Profile for Covet Magazine

Covet Summer 2013  

Covet is a design and lifestyle publication from Winnipeg, Canada. Our mission is to provide inspired, beautiful design and amazing local ta...

Covet Summer 2013  

Covet is a design and lifestyle publication from Winnipeg, Canada. Our mission is to provide inspired, beautiful design and amazing local ta...

Advertisement