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covet turns one! modern living with a prairie twist

5 spaces just for kids tour a light-filled luxury home

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gaga for green three no-fail nursery schemes start your seeds


AS K A CDECArator Visit the CDECA booth at The Home Expressions Show to meet local chapter members who can help you decode your design dilemmas. For more information about one of our members visit www.cdeca.com

Affiliate Members

Accredited Members

AR Ceramics 360 Winterton Ave. Phone: 204-230-3247

Wind & Water Interiors 807-468-7843 or 204-795-7133

Blind-Shiners Designs For Living 835 Marion Street Website: blindshiners.com Envy Paint and Design Ltd 130 - 1600 Kenaston Boulevard Website: benjaminmoore-mb.ca Floform Countertops 125 Hamelin St Website: floform.com Imagine Painting and Decorating 906 Spruce St Phone: 204-781-8165 Interior Illusions 100 Princess Street Website: interiorillusions.ca Kesay Design Centre 693 Taylor Avenue Website: kesaydesigncentre.ca/ Mr. Electric 3155 Assiniboine Avenue Website: mrelectric.com Richelieu Hardware 1372 Mountain Avenue Website: richelieu.com Rosehill Woodcrafters Unit 380A-550 Century Street, Winnipeg 58089 Service Road S, MacGregor, MB Website: rosehillwoodcrafters.ca The Floor Show 1042 Waverley Street Website: thefloorshow.ca Western Paint 521 Hargrave Street Website: westernpaint.ca Wicker World Home + Patio 120 McPhillips Street Website: wickerworld.ca

Dec’ the Walls 204-330-4300 Bliss Interiors 204-998-9444 Interior Style & Comfort 204-667-8529 Inclusive Design Group 204-918-4118 Infinite Interiors 204-999-3384 Fiorillo Home Decor and Renovation 204-996-3461 Interior Motives By Design 204-223-0097 A Sense of Style 204-471-1024 GrandmontDesigns 204-461-0113 Lee-Ellen Green lee@aqua-tech.ca Studio 48 North 204-883-2265 Sweet Lime Home Design 204-523-4068 Amethyst Design 204-414-6638 Brandi Habing msbhabing@hotmail.com Living Concepts 807-623-5004 Urban Colour 204-477-6970 Tiffany Sheldon Design 204-997-2637 Simply Chic Interiors 204-793-9641

Trendy Looks 204-799-7181 Cocoon Interiors 204-795-7053 Spacial Expressions 204-801-4389 Wildflower Creations 204-475-0465 Milne Well Dressed Homes 204-416-5159 Masterpiece Interior Decor 204-663-8978 Transforming Spaces (204) 781-7009 Interior Rose Decorating 204-981-7673 Interior Elements 204-792-6035 CindyMarie Small 204-479-1548 Tara Spencer-Nairn 204-257-0043 R-Home Decorator 204-654-2130 Carol Standil Colour & Design 204-226-1533 Lifestyle Decorating 204-453-2712 Designing Spaces Mb. 204-990-1135


6 Contributors The great friends and talents we have met along the way, that have given of themselves to make Covet possible.

7 Editor's Page

Out and About - Local businesses we would love you to know about.

8 Assiniboine park zoo Go and meet Hudson, the city's newest citizen this spring.

10 Narcisse snake dens Dare to observe thousands of snakes in one place.

Style defined - A design lesson. A period, style, or piece explained.

No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow. ~Proverb

9 bunk beds Who gets the top bunk?

12 We Love Items we have spotted here or there that we think you will love too.

Abode

A peek inside Manitoba homes and cottages, completed by local design talent or design-savvy homeowners.

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on the bright side City mice turn country mice in this new rural build.

Lily's Pad A mid century bedroom gets a bright update with a bespoke renovation.

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peyton's palace A spacious place for an adorable 3.5 year old to call her own.

Caelum's cool crib A teen gets a new room in while you were out fashion.

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Black, White and something in-between Covet's creative director and her husband prepare for the arrival of a bouncing baby.

small space - Big idea A 56 square foot room really can accomodate all the needs of cool 7 year old.

Get Crafty - We can get into good craft projects, and love the satisfaction creating something brings.

16 Birthday bonanza Make your own colourful party decorations.

Collections - Admittedly, we like stuff. Here we showcase people and their stuff, and their knowledge of their stuff.

11 something old, something new...

PROfile - Allow us to introduce you to the great, local design talent available in Winnipeg for you to tap into.

18 susan kuz of Spacial expressions

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INTERIOR/EXTERIOR DESIGN | PROJECT MANAGEMENT ACCESSORIES | PAINT, WALLPAPER, AND SUPPLIES southwest


ta b l e o f co n t e n ts

SPRING 2013 Bahia Taylor Editor in Chief Co-founder Leigh McKenzie Creative Director Co-founder Darren Grunerud Managing Editor Graphic Design Hinge Design www.hingedesign.ca Styling Envy Paint and Design www.benjaminmoore-mb.ca Owned and Published by: Covet Magazine For inquiries, please contact us at info@covetmagazine.ca 1811 Assiniboine Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0A5 www.covetmagazine.ca info@covetmagazine.ca Cover Photography Rachael King Johnson LuckyGirl Photography luckygirlca While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, Covet Magazine cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damaged caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for informational purposes only. The views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editor. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Typeset in Chronicle Roman and Whitney Printed in Canada

22 Tools Great gadgets, tools, and task-busting items we thought you should know about.

Tips O' the Trades - Expert advice. You didn't solicit it but we're giving it to you anyway.

20 french accent! Andrew Downward, teacher, painter and colour expert stopped in Winnipeg. Here's what he had to say

64 DIY IKEA hack to make your own platform bed with ample storage.

26 26 Merton road and‌ Travel with photographer Pauline Boldt throughout the city and province, and take in the glorious sites through her camera lens. This issue, Parlour Coffee.

Chow - Food, glorious food and everything to go with it.

66 fresh flavours of spring Celebrate exciting new ways to eat your greens.

Living Well - Reviews, ideas, a little form and a little function.

77 2 x 4 Life Follow radio personality Dez Daniels and her family as she blogs her way through the start-to-finish journey of a new home build.

78 gaga for green See how local designers embrace Pantone's colour of the year.

80 oh baby Three fail safe plans for bouncing baby boys or girls.

Dig - Get outside and get gardening.

84 spring greening; reduce, reuse recycle; is something seedy going on here?

91 Hot Blogs Be sure to check these out - we do!

92 Design Dilemma - Your chance to have an expert solve your design dilemmas.

Prairie Pallette A glimpse into the Winnipeg art community or profile of a great local artist

76 Karen Robb

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contributors

FLATLANDERS FLOORING .COM 110B LOWSON CRES, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, R3P 2H8 PH. 204.487.3767 FAX 204.487.3717

pauline boldt 26mertonroad.com TOM BIMA ticoswinehouse.com KATHLEEN BLACK blackglass@mymts.net SHAUNA BOYCHUK forspacesake.com Samantha braun ecotones@mts.net marisa curatolo www.marisacuratolo.com Andrew Downward www.andrewdownward.com Esther Eisbrenner benjaminmoore-mb.ca darren grunerud Man-about-town IKEA ikea.ca SUSAN KUZ spacialexpressions.com Rachael King Johnson luckygirl.ca brian johnson gooddogphotography.ca ARTHUR LIFFMANN benjaminmoore-mb.ca stephanie middagh artfulowl.ca MANITOBA HYDRO hydro.mb.ca petals west www.peatalswest.com KAREN ROBB birchwoodartgallery.com jim taylor Go-to Guy DEZ WENGROWICH twobyfourlife.com KASSIA WOLOSHYN benjaminmoore-mb.ca


e d i to r ' s pag e

covet turns one! They say time flies when you’re having fun. Combine fun with

design and décor with you, and enjoyed some really amazing

hard work and long hours, and this past year seems to have

experiences along the way. This year, we hope to get into the

flashed by at warp speed. From the excitement of the first issue

hands and hearts of many more Manitobans. Like all yearlings,

coming off the presses, to the satisfaction of wrapping up our

growth is around the corner for us, and we plan to gain in girth

holiday issue, we feel so lucky to have been able to share our

this year … so watch for more pages chock full of inspiration and

journey with you. We are very proud of reaching our one-year

ideas, beautiful things, and great finds, all available within city

milestone. We have met so many fantastic and brilliant people

limits. As we close our eyes and blow out the candles, we wish

– Manitobans might be even more talented (and friendly!)

all of you a year full of happiness and discovery. We hope you

than we thought! We set out to share the wonders of Winnipeg

continue to find inspiration within Covet.

Covet is free, and if you'd like to receive a copy visit covetmagazine.ca to subscribe. You can view a digital version of this issue there, too. See you soon! upcoming events • F riends of Gardens Manitoba presents Gardening Saturday on March 23rd, 500 Shaftesbury Blvd. www.gardensmanitoba.com • 1st Annual Chocoholics' Buffet benefiting United Way of Winnipeg, The Gates on Roblin Saturday, April 20th, 6:45pm to 10:00pm www.ChocoholicsBuffet.com

• B  enjamin Moore Colour Spokesperson Sharon Grech speaks in Winnipeg, March 24th • The Floor Show showroom grand re-opening, March 24th. www.thefloorshow.ca For more information about these events like us on Facebook!

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out and about

assiniboine park zoo text COVET MAGAZINE | photography ASSINIBOINE PARK ZOO

Imagine a place...

experienced in books.

Find It: 2595 Roblin Blvd, Winnipeg, Open Daily, 9am-4pm 204.927.6001 www.assiniboineparkzoo.ca

Menu: Diversity abounds at the Assiniboine Park Zoo. Whether you're looking to meet indigenous animals from the prairies or exotic creatures from far away, the zoo is home to over 200 animals and more than 2000 specimens. It recently welcomed Hudson, a 16-month-old Polar Bear cub, to its International Polar Bear Conservation Centre and is excited to be the temporary home to a group of African penguins throughout the summer. The Journey to Churchill exhibition, set to be fully open next year, will be a hub for academic research on the Arctic Environment, polar bear conservation, rescue and relocation.

History: The Assiniboine Park Zoo, located in beautiful Assiniboine Park, has a history spanning over 100 years; it opened in 1904 when the city of Winnipeg purchased 283 acres of woodland and prairie along the Assiniboine River. The Zoo is currently going through a dramatic facility transformation, including the addition of the Journey to Churchill exhibit. The Space: From tropical Toucan Ridge to the Journey to Churchill (opening in 2014), the Assiniboine Park Zoo encompasses over 90 acres of wonderment, animal education and inspiration to all its visitors. A trip to the zoo offers children and adults alike a chance to see animals that are often only

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Winnipeg: Assiniboine Park Zoo is Winnipeg's home of highquality animal-based education programs, children’s workshops and promoting awareness of endangered species – creating a lasting appreciation of the natural world, and inspiring people of all ages to get out and be active in our city in the sunshine of summer as well as the snow!


st y l e d e f i n e d

i get the top bunk! text ARTHUR LIFFMANN

It's the ultimate struggle of childhood; the epic battle fought by generations of siblings. It's the battle cry heard ‘round the neighbourhood: “I get the top bunk!� Modern historians date the original bunk beds back to ancient Egyptian times, when bundles of branches and palm fronds were piled on several levels in the corners of living spaces, providing comfortable sleeping areas for upwardly mobile Egyptians. The bunk bed has since outgrown its humble beginnings, and today offers smart sleeping solutions for both childhood sleepovers and compact urban living spaces.

Modern bunk beds are available in a wide variety of styles and finishes, suitable for any living space. The original two-stacked-single-beds version has been joined by single-overdouble mattress styles, offering greater comfort and sleeping options. Along with lustrous wood finishes in maple and ash, modern materials like iron and tubular steel can provide excellent options at various price points, and provide great design flexibility. Today, that flexibility is seen in inspirational designs, of which the ancient Egyptians could never have

dreamed. Large dormitory bedrooms, featuring built-in bunks reminiscent of ocean liner berths, are a new trend in multi-generational family vacation homes, while tri-level stacked beds free up floor space in vertically-blessed period houses. Modern loft beds put everyone in the top bunk while creating seating or work space below, and hidden floor-level mattresses effortlessly slide out from under trundle beds for staggered sleepovers. When it comes to bunk beds, the sky is the only limit - but don't hit your head on the ceiling, or we'll tell mom.

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out and about

narcisse snake dens Find It: Highway #17, 6KM North of Narcisse, MB Late April to Early May and Early September 204.945.6784 or 1.800.214.6497 History: The Manitoba Interlake area offers a unique opportunity to see more snakes at a glance than anywhere else in the world. For two brief periods each year, tens of thousands of garter snakes congregate at the surface of their winter dens before making their way to the nearby marshes and summer homes. viewing: The best time to view the Narcisse Snake Dens is late April to early May, which is mating season. This spectacular ritual lasts for one to three weeks, depending on weather conditions.

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area:Their winter dens are caverns formed by the area's waterworn limestone bedrock. The deep limestone crevasses are also a bit of a zoological oddity in that their northern latitude makes the garter snake the only reptile known to survive happily in such a cold climate. There are four active snake dens at Narcisse. The dens are connected by a 3.0 kilometre self-guiding interpretive trail. Winnipeg: Scientists and tourists alike travel from all over the world to catch a glimpse of this spectacle. Located in the rural municipality of Armstrong, the trip takes about an hour and a half from Winnipeg. Considered one of the seven wonders of Canada, Narcisse is a part of the natural heritage that we must treasure. http://gov.mb.ca/conservation/wildlife/spmon/narsnakes/index.html


co l l ect i o n s

Something old, something new… Don’t hide your grandmother’s china, her linens, her stemware or her silverware in a box in the basement … layering the heirlooms with modern pieces give them a new lease on life, and create lovely texture at your table. Over the years, we all seem to acquire and amass bits and pieces of old and new tableware. The trick to these pieces is keeping them active and fresh by using them. Vintage and antique glass, plates, linens and silverware add a real personal touch to any table. Here are some tips to using them, caring for them and mixing them with modern pieces. Glassware Vintage glasses and stemware can be very different in size from modern ones but repurposing them at the table is a perfect plan. Vintage sherry glasses are great for ice wine. Vintage water goblets are just meant to be mixed with modern glasses. Worried about the safety of lead crystal? Keep calm, it is totally safe. Chipped pieces should not be used, and decanters are fine for decor but don’t store and consume liquids from them. Other than those caveats, go ahead and use the good crystal!

Caring for crystal is pretty straightforward. Hand-wash in warm water with mild detergent and store upright. The fluctuation of heat in dishwashers can cause fogging unless you have a crystal setting on your dishwasher. Linens Vintage linens never go out of style. To balance out the formality, set the table with new tablecloths, mixed with a fantastic set of monogrammed napkins. Old textiles are pretty robust and can withstand a lot of washing and use, unlike their modern counterparts. Wash them in the machine with warm water. Avoid using any kind of bleach on them – it will weaken their fibers. Should vintage napkins become yellowed, boil them with powder detergent and iron them. China When mixing vintage or antique china being aware of colours and textures is key. Layer them with a neutral modern setting or a charger plate, playing on individual colours. The more ornate, the better; you can pick a few key colours and make them the focus. Caring for old china doesn’t have to be

difficult. Scrape with a rubber spatula, not a knife, when removing detritus. Wash it in the dishwasher, using a liquid detergent. Exception should be made for porcelain, which is very delicate, and can crack in extreme heat. Store with china pads between and be sure to rotate – don’t use the same four plates every time. Silverware Old silverware goes with everything. Never fear the age-old rule of mixing gold and silver metals together. When it comes to place settings mixing patterns and styles makes for a much more interesting table. No rules! Silverware is high maintenance. Solid sterling silverware can be washed in the dishwasher, but it will get a powdery finish. This can easily be polished off, but don’t mix sterling with stainless. Plated silver is trickier, and really should be handwashed in warm, soapy water. Storing them properly will add years to their lives. Those who believe that silver is too fussy for a modern table are simply wrong! Our collections specialist, Stephanie Middagh has spent the past 12 years being inspired by museum collections while working as a curator for various museums and galleries. Concurrent to her curatorial work, she took this inspiration to her sessional positions at the University of Manitoba where she continues to teach Introduction to Art and the History of Textiles.

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w e lov e

2. 1.

6.

5.

7. 3. Looking for some funky accessories to add interest to your child's room? Check out these creative solutions. From woodpecker hooks to a thought bubble clock that is fully customizable, these fun and unexpected designs will add delight to the decor. Can't part with that concert t-shirt? Retire and admire it in one of these shirt-shaped frames. Keep the nursery comfortable witn an owl humidifier and light with a lucite crib and organic mattress. Custom design any name or word in Scrabble tiles. Items 1-4 available at InDecor, Dream on Futons, and Envy Paint and Design. 5 at Envy Paint and Design, and 6, 7, through e-children.

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3

4.


Make a few improvements and you’ll save money By upgrading your insulation, you can save approximately $150 annually on your energy bill, and you may qualify for rebates through Manitoba Hydro. Your contractor or retailer can help you complete the rebate paperwork, choose the proper insulation material, and determine which installation technique to use. Caulking and weather stripping gaps around your windows and doors is a great place to start to draft proof your home and is also one of the most cost effective methods of reducing heat loss. Adding insulation to areas of your home with poor insulation levels can help to eliminate drafts and cold spots, and reduce your energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, which is beneficial for you and the environment. Approximately 25 per cent of a home’s heat loss occurs through a basement that isn’t insulated. Additionally, topping-up a poorly insulated attic can reduce energy costs by 10 per cent or more. With your insulation upgraded, you’ll make your home more

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comfortable. It will be warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Here are few reasons to draft proof your home: • 30 to 50 per cent of air leakage gets in underneath the baseboards, through wall outlets, windows, and doors. • 20 per cent of air leakage gets in through holes where plumbing pipes and telephone wires enter the house and other gaps. • If your attic is much warmer than the outside air, your home may be leaking heat. Seal gaps and air leaks around light fixtures, pipes, ducts and exhaust fans in ceilings to save up to $20 a year on your energy bill. • If your bedroom faces north, keep your blinds shut when convenient during the cooler winter months. Visit hydro.mb.ca to learn more about the benefits of home insulation and get advice on installation techniques.


Birthday Bonanza Never ones to shy away from a party, Covet crafted up some paper-party-perfection to celebrate our first birthday. Using scrapbook, wrapping and craft papers these creative solutions let us customize a look that goes beyond what you can find on the shelves at your local party supply store.

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get crafty

paper pennants Supplies: colourful paper, glue gun, scissors, and string. Cut a selection of triangles out of various sheets of paper - various sizes can add a fun detail. Assemble them good side face down in a row. Lay a length of string about 1 inch from the edge of the triangles, and adhere it to the paper using hot glue.

Party Pinwheels Supplies: Pins, straws or skewer sticks, paper, and scissors. Cut a square of paper any size. Draw an "X" from corner to corner on the back of the piece of paper. Pierce a hole in the center of the "X" with a pin. Mark 1 inch from the center of the "X" in each direction. Cut from the marks to the corners. At approximately 1/2 inch from the corner cut a 1/4 inch notch in the paper. Fold each corner point into center, hooking notch into end of cut. Secure in place with a sticker or tape. Push a pushpin through hole in front of pinwheel and attach it to a straw or skewer stick. For the multicoloured effect we put two sheets of paper back to back.

festive flowers Supplies: Paper, glue gun, scissors and skewer sticks. Our biggest tip before you start is to choose papers that are easy to fold! This is a quick list of tips to make one of the larger flowers; once you've mastered that vary your design to make flowers of different sizes! Cut paper to equal a total size of 6"x50" - we typically cut three smaller pieces that would be attached together. Start by folding the paper along the shortest edge into an accordian. Once folded glue the short ends together to form an accordian ring. The next step may take an assistant, but the goal here is to flatten the ring into the finished floral shape - pretty side facing down. Cut a square out of scrap 2"x2" and using a lot of glue on the small square attach it to the middle of the back of the flattend flower; hold until it has cooled enough that it sticks. Flip the entire piece over (gently) and then add glue to the middle on the good side securing the accordian to the small square.

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p ro f i l e

SPACIAL EXPRESSIONS Susan Kuz is a consultant and designer with Spacial Expressions. She loves working with people to help them take their lives to the next level. She believes that our physical spaces have a strong impact on us, and can be a positive or negative contributor to our lives. Over time, Susan has combined her multiple talents and passions as an interior decorator, colour consultant, life coach and social science researcher to develop programs that guide individuals and professionals to create spaces that reflect passion-based lives and businesses.

PROfiles is a chance to meet and get to know a local Winnipeg talent.

Covet has partnered with CDECA (Canadian Decorator’s Association) to bring you the inside scoop on one of their members from the Central Prairie Chapter. To learn more about CDECA or for a list of CDECA decorators in your area, visit them at www.cdeca.com.

Susan trained with colour expert Frank Mahnke, President of the IACC, in the areas of colour psychology, biological effects of colour and light, neuropsychological aspects of colour, and colour theory. She is also a student of “Place Sciences” where she continues to develop her expertise in how our physical spaces can be best utilized for optimal work and life experiences. She is a current member of the Canadian Decorator’s Association (CDECA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and an Associate member of the International Association of Color Consultants and Designers – North America (IACC-NA). She is a life-long learner, who enjoys writing and teaching about her areas of passion. She lives with her family in Winnipeg, Canada. Q. Spring is here! What projects are you most excited to tackle now that the snow is melting? A. So many to choose from! Finishing off our basement renos, re-decorating my teenaged daughter’s bedroom, painting my office, redoing our window coverings and giving our front yard a much-needed facelift!

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Q. Where do you draw your inspiration? A. Everywhere: travels, magazines of all types, online photos and websites, art, books, décor and fashion stores. There are so many places for great inspiration. Q. This issue is all about spaces for kids. Do you have go-to design advice for people decorating those spaces? A. Plan with flexibility in mind, as kids needs change quickly as they grow up. If your kids are old enough, involve them in the process. They can be wonderfully creative, and come up with some great ideas. In bedroom spaces, use colour to create something dynamic and personal – but remember that it’s a relaxing space as well, so avoid colour schemes that are too loud, especially if your child is more introverted. Q. Are there any design trends you want to try this year? A. I’m always watching for new materials and ways to use them. Right now I’m especially interested in the variety of wall coverings (full spectrum paints, textured wall papers, wall decals) and the many vertical panels (sculptured MDF, recycled leather, acrylic resins). There are endless ways to play with colour and texture to create something unique. Q. How do you keep the look fresh in your own home? A. By constantly updating and changing it. As our family grows I find our needs continue to evolve. We are all creative, so there are always new projects going on. We love to keep things fresh with new colours, and by moving things around for a new look and feel. Change, within reason, is good for the heart and soul. Q. Where do you splurge and where do you save? A. I tend to splurge on things I will have for a long time, like the dining table I just bought. Or on items I absolutely love that make me smile. I save on basics


and things less important to me, like the feather toss cushion inserts I just bought at IKEA. I’ll splurge on the fabric for the covers to get the right colour and texture. I believe it is better to spend a little more and get quality piece that is flexible and that meets my needs, than to spend additional time and money replacing something a short while later. Q. What best describes your design philosophy? A. The décor in your living and working spaces should be an expression of your authentic self. Every aspect of your environment should support you in living your best life. This is done by aligning all aspects (colour, light, room layout, textures, air quality, location, etc.) to work for you in the best possible way. Q. Do you collect anything? A. The things I seem to collect are books and scarves. I’m am avid reader in areas that interest me, and I like to dive deep into a subject and learn everything about it. I also can’t seem to resist the colour and texture of scarves. They’re so versatile and fun to wear! Q. Whose personal style do you admire? I admire people who are authentic and unafraid in their expression of themselves, so that could be a lot of people. I’ve been long-time fan of Tricia Guild’s colour style. I love that she’s not afraid to go big with her colour choices. The pairings she uses are often bold and intense, yet have a soft quality about them. Q. If you were not working as a designer what would you be? A. That’s a tough one because I have many interests. I am curious by nature and love problem solving so I’d see myself working in research, in life or career coaching, or as an architect. www.SpacialExpressions.com susan@spacialexpressions.com

JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT OUTDOOR FURNITURE COULDN’T LOOK ANYMORE…INDOOR The Carlisle Collection From EBEL, Completely Waterproof, Completly Outdoor, and Completly Relaxing, Our Entire 2013 Spring/Summer Patio Collections Now On Display.

24,000sq.ft. showroom | open 7 days a week

this is not your grandma’s wicker. 120 McPhillips Street | Winnipeg, MB Canada (204) 779-2900 | wickerworld.ca


tips o' the trades

Covet Magazine sat in with Andrew Downward's paint and prep tips seminar at the Kitchen and Bath show in February. We got to chatting and he graciously offered to contribute his expertise to our Covet crew. Here's his advice!

French Accent! By Andrew Downward I have always been amazed by how a colour can completely transform a space. Colour can inspire, effect mood and even emotion. Over the last twenty five years I have been extremely fortunate to have worked with some of the most creative artists and designers in the world. I have seen first hand how the strategic use of colour and its proper application can harmoniously bring a space together. A beautiful violet vase set against a soft yellow, a burning red accent wall that makes even a ‘builders beige’ pop and a splash of tangerine orange against a sky blue can make the difference between painting a room or creating a dynamic space. The influence of colour however is not limited to the fashion and decorating world. There are also many national and cultural influences associated with colour, the French and their love affair with blue for instance. Like the French, I have always been drawn to the deep blues, especially ultramarine. The French discovered an inexpensive way to manufacture this blue pigment in the early 1800’s and ever since the colour has been a staple in French design and the foundation of the French colour palette. So when an old client recently called me up looking for a way to add some drama to a new home I had French on the brain! Luc had just moved into a new home and was looking for an economical way to transform his space. Although his home had been freshly painted he found the colour a little drab and a little depressing. Also, he had recently spent a ton of money updating his furniture, and you guessed it, chose predominately beige and neutral tones! Stung by some unexpected closing costs, a complete repaint was not an option. When I first looked at the space I was struck by how everything seemed to melt into each other. The couches and area rug were lost against the neutral canvas and the art work

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seemed out of place and unappealing. Another problem was the lighting. The room had a southern exposure so there was lots of light entering the space but this made the neutral walls and furniture even more well…boring. Something drastic had to be done, but what? Taking my cue from the reds in the throw cushions my knee jerk was to choose a complementary red and use it as an accent wall. Knowing Luc to be an outgoing chap and wanting his house to be a reflection of him, I felt that although red would be a great option it would draw too much attention to the wall instead of the interesting antiques in the space. Not to mention, it wasn’t about me, it was his house and what colours he likes! After a quick colour consultation, I finally settled on a rich deep blue and painted two accent walls, framing the room in the new colour. The other two I left in the beige. I also used an ultra matt finish so that the colour would not reflect light, rather absorb it. The furniture and even the art work are now striking and the room is warm and inviting! My client was pleasantly surprised at the feel of the new space! Luc’s response, “Manifique”! Tips for an A+ from Andrew: • An accent wall is an economical way to change the look and feel of a space. Generally an accent wall is the first wall you see when you enter a room. • Remember, your house is a reflection of you, your sense of style and taste, be true to yourself when choosing colour. Andrew Downward is a teacher, painter and colour expert. He played a leading role on the extremely successful Divine by Design with Candace Olson on the W Network/HGTV.


to o l s

1042 Waverley Street At Seel • 204-956-9720 • www.thefloorshow.ca


to o l s

Handy Apps, Take two! We've set out to add to our list of smart phone apps that will help get the job done this Spring! roomscan by Locometric Download this app for $0.99, and you'll have the quickest way to measure a room. Just touch each wall with your phone and you're done. The app will then produce a floor plan with correct shape.

HOUZZ INTERIOR DESIGN IDEAS Want to be inspired? Houzz interior Design Ideas catalogues a collection of more than 120,000 interior design photos. You can save shots you like to a virtual idea book to refer to later. Best of all, it's free!

HOUZZ KIDS ROOMS Covet thought this was the perfect app for this issue. Browse thousands of kids spaces. Filter by age group, tap through guides from nurseries to shared spaces. It has products, furniture and accessories: amazing resources to put the perfect space together.

jot not scanner pro Keep records without a paper trail. If you're famous for losing receipts, this app will be a life saver. Simply take a picture of the document - this app will turn it into a PDF, and you can save it in your library. It is also fantastic if you need to sign a document and get it back to someone: sign it, snap a photo and send back the PDF. All these app and more can be found on itunes.

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APRIL 24th, 2013 You've seen her on CityLine now see her live in person

Sharon Grech Benjamin Moore's Colour Expert She's packing her bags and colour chips and headed to Winnipeg to talk about colour.

Fort Gibraltar 866 Rue Saint Joseph www.fortgibraltar.com Doors Open at 7:00 Presentation at 7:30 $50.00 Tickets available at ENVY Paint and Design 130-1600 Kenaston Blvd | 204. 487.3666 Brought to you by CDECA, Envy Paint and Design, Covet Magazine, and Benjamin Moore


s p ec i a l f e at u r e

Covet Magazine caught up with Michael Penney at Winnipeg's Kitchen and Bath Show in February. We had the opportunity to pick his brain about decorating, design and DIY. Michael has a huge passion for design and decorating, and a rich history working with some of our country's biggest names in the business, including House and Home Magazine, and designer Sarah Richardson. He is a regular on the Marilyn Dennis show, sharing his expertise on decor and DIY. He is a blogger, a new dad and owns a fabulous boutique in Whitby, Ontario. Check out his blog at www. michaelpenneystyle.com. We're sure you'll be inspired. We sure were. Your career has given you the opportunity to experience design in many different media. How have those experiences influenced the designer you are today? I would say the nice thing about working at a magazine is that your goal is to push the envelope and push design forward. It is not necessarily about what your seeing in homes at the moment, so you can have a little more free reign – inspiring people in what's new. It gave me a lot of practice in thinking outside the box and not following what I see around me, but going beyond that. And also before I worked in magazines I worked in a shop, and when you're working in a shop you're trying to make it more theatrical and interesting. So both of those things combined have helped me be a little more bold. What has been the greatest motivating factor in your success?

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I think it is just the love of design; I didn't get into this with any particular goal. I didn't know I'd work on a magazine. I didn't know I'd work on TV. I just knew I loved all this stuff, and sort of thought about it all the time and practiced it all the time. By putting myself out there and seeing what opportunities were there these things came too. To some people, it may seem like a step back to move away from a magazine or something. It isn't about the prestige of having a certain position; it is about the work and the shop is just as fulfilling to me, because that is what I care about. Being surrounded by inspiring design daily, how do you decide the design direction for your own home? That's difficult. I have that conversation with customers all the time because if you're shopping in my shop or hiring a decorator, you're probably already design

savvy ‌ and so by nature that means you know that you'll always be in love with the next great thing that comes along, and you're not just satisfied to do it once and leave it for 10 years. So then, that makes making choices hard because, A, you don't want to commit; you're afraid the next thing is going to come along and you're going to hate what you picked and B, if you go with something classic (as designers always tell you), you're afraid of being boring; it doesn't represent your style and panache. So, what I decided to do when designing our own home was to forget about all that I knew at the moment, and think about what I have always loved and been inspired by; what is the common thread with that? If I loved it for the last 10 years, maybe I'll love it for the next 10. Maybe I'll want to inject some new current things that are low commitment, but the bones of it are what I've always loved. It isn't the most classic or boring, because I still love colour, but it has a more traditional bend.


I also try to keep in mind what the house warranted and suited. Balancing your media commitments and your shop, what is your typical day like? Before heading over to the store I'm usually blogging in the morning and following up on orders. I work at the store all day, which is a combination of working with customers helping them with tips, inspiration and design ideas – if there is some quiet time painting a piece of furniture, refinishing a lamp. Other days I'll have to pop out to do a rehearsal for the MD show, which usually takes a couple of days: rehearsal on one and the live show the day of. Often when the store is closed, I'm heading home and going to my local vintage shop to find something. So I'm all over, but it's fun. When do you splurge and when/ where do you save? I don't know whether I splurge very often, it's more like volume! I find it hard to splurge because I think I'm going to want to change it. And because I am a DIYer, I'm not going to paint something I spent a tonne of money on. I try to keep the prices pretty low. It's easier for me to do that because I'm always out and about and have time to shop finding the cheaper cool thing. But other people have a busy schedule and can't spend their whole lives searching around. I would recommend splurging on larger pieces like upholstery, because it is going to be the most expensive, and even though it is semi-affordable, it is still an investment. Whereas pieces of furniture, even if they're large, you really can save by going to thrift shops and looking on craigslist, finding good quality for a savings. They're also the things you can change yourself in a DIY kind of way. And accessories: don't spend a lot on those. What is some great design advice you've been given? I think that it wasn't one particular big talk, but working over the years with other

designers and creative people. I learned to pull back a little on the eclecticism that I was first inspired by. I was really influenced by Domino magazine and empowering people to be fearless with design, mixing and matching. So I have been learning some restraint. What advice can you give other aspiring designers? My big tip is to look, look, look, and expose yourself to what is going on. You're going to learn the most by opening your eyes to magazines, TV shows, books other pals work. If you're realizing it or not, you're filling your mind with a catalogue of images that you can draw on, and will combine to create your own work. You don't want to copy people, but it is like being well read; having all these resources to draw on to create your own work. Learn from what has happened before and experiment to create your own point of view. If you could only afford to do two things to your space this year, and bring in the trends, what would you do? I would alter colours through paint and fabrics. A lot of the pieces are timeless, but pillows and fabrics and paint change it easily. What are some styling tricks you use on a regular basis? My styling tricks have to do with loosening spaces up, and layering them; those are the two sides. With traditional spaces, if you have a vintage coffee table or dresser that has a more formal tone, add organic elements or something found or that is unexpected and has a bit more of a casual feel. Layering - a lot of people don't get to that finishing stage. Even the most fancy houses that you see in magazines hardly ever look like what you see in a magazine, because designers go in and add the little things. The homeowners always love it when you're done, and want to buy it. Those layers, like a rug, cushions, a throw; interesting

things on your side table – not just a lamp – those layers are styling tricks that people should employ. What trends do you predict for 2013? Trends are tough to pinpoint when they're here, or on their way; it is organic, evolves everywhere, and it’s over. For 2013, what I see is strong and tasteful. The industrial thing, raw boards and metal; mixing it in to loosen up spaces. Utilitarian things, things that are inspired by commercial spaces from 100 years ago. Like the kitchen in Downton Abby is really popular, or an old hospital with subway tile, with a contrasting grout. Something utilitarian with a romantic vibe. The global influence; everyone loves mixing textiles from all over the world. Not just IKAT, but other block printed things. Bringing easy elegance and colour. Pastel colours are huge: minty green, blush pearl but mix it with black or navy blue. Leather furniture that is clean lined, but bolder colours. What are you tired of seeing? I've never really been into the glam look. I think it has gone too far - too much damask and mirror. I like them in moderation, but I don't like it as a whole look. I never have liked red and black together in a room; [it] seems vampire-y and bordello-y to me. I also think those statement tubs are going to be a mistake, because it is the kind of thing where everyone is going whole hog, and in ten years you'll look back and think, “oh, that was so 2012.” What DIY projects are you most excited about tackling this year? We are DIYing a nursery, and I'm trying to think of some creative ideas to make it look special and different. Right now it is pretty neutral, but once we know we'll be adding some cool stuff. I love animals cut out of old wallpaper or old sweaters cut into shapes layered in a shadow box. Making a mobile.

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26 m e rto n roa d a n d … pa r lo u r co f f e e

t h e p e r f ect c u p text COVET MAGAZINE photography PAULINE BOLDT

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Parlour Coffee is an unexpected gem on Main Street in Winnipeg. Its minimalist interior, with rich wood and white walls offers a gallery like backdrop to the art of brewing coffee. Owner, Nils Vik was working in a rewarding design position when he left that to open Parlour. Prior to then he wasn't a fan of coffee, but that all changed with the experience of a steaming cup in Montreal. He searched high and low for a shop that could brew a cup of equal quality in Winnipeg, and was left unsatisfied. After amassing quite a collection of home espresso equipment and beans from both near and faraway places and still not reaching the bar set by that perfect cuppa in Montreal it was time For Nils to take matters into his own hands. Three years later Parlour Coffee was born. Coffee is ritualistic. At least one cup is often enjoyed at the same time each day or surrounding the same activities. The shop is conducive to conversation and interaction. It’s both informal and intimate and much like that perfect cup of coffee a welcome and enjoyable break in any day. The preparation of the coffee is an art craft. Precisely measured, monitored and taste tested. Milk is foamed in superior fashion and placed artistically atop your latte. Only the finest freshly roasted organic beans, carefully sourced and selected have the honour of becoming Parlour House fare. The coffee you sip at Parlour will never be past two weeks from roasting. You can find out exactly when your beans were roasted and rest assured they will be fresh. New shipments arrive weekly on Wednesdays,

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26 m e rto n roa d a n d ‌ pa r lo u r co f f e e

Thursdays, and Fridays. Beans past their prime are donated to shelters and never sold or served to customers. Should you need to nosh they also offer scrumptious baked goods from Tall Grass Prairie Bread Co. and Jonnies Sticky Buns, delivered fresh daily. In addition to ground to order coffee you can also purchase beans by 49th Parellel, Bows & Arrows, Detour and Phil and Sebastian Coffee Roasters. Retail offerings include items from Hario, Chemex, Stanley, Keep Cup, Baratza, Aeropress, Able Brewing, Porlex, Camellia, Sinensis Tea, iconic Finnish Iittala ceramics and some other fabulous things. The relaxed atmosphere has a craftsman like feel mixed with a little touch of laboratory. Reclaimed wood counters, and an iron chandelier feel old world and European influenced. Industrial metal Tolix stools, stark white walls, and clear glass beakers give you the sense that a mad scientist just may be toiling away on site. Attention to

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detail, whether it stems from Nils' design background, or just his obsession for the best espresso means a new standard has been set for coffee shops in Winnipeg. Recently, as sometimes happens in retail establishments, the shop found themselves unable to accept payments other than cash due to technological difficulties. They didn’t miss a beat and kept business going – if patrons didn’t have cash they were still served. Nils put faith in humanity and allowed those without cash to get their morning fix on the honour system. Asking customers to come clean next time they came around. Now isn’t that the type of bloke you want behind your coffee bar? www.parlourcoffee.ca

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on the bright side Organic style meets industrial edge with many a silver lining. photography Rachael King Johnson

With a desire for something unique, and to the dismay of her stone mason and window expert, Lisa angled the chimney face and windows to create this stunning focal point.

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In


nto The second story common area shows off the high contrast light and dark signature of the home.

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For a lot of people the notion of moving out to the country and setting down stakes on an acreage with room to breathe and play and wild-life just outside your back door is an aspiration. For Lisa and Sam and their two young boys the suggestion, which came from a friend, actually made them laugh out loud. They indeed wanted more space but an extensive house search followed by an extensive city lot search yielded nothing but disappointment with cookie cutter neighbourhoods and building restrictions. After searching long and hard and far and wide they realized the open country lot deserved more serious consideration. It was 5 acres, minutes to the city, and surrounded by breath taking classic prairie landscape. On the bright side it was still available so they immediately snapped it up. On the down side they had to admit their wise friend was right all along. With the help of a general contractor and Michelle Wiebe, of W Design Group, Lisa implemented her ideas and vast collection of images — inspirations she had been collecting in anticipation of the build for over two years. Ground was Above: Beautiful organic wood bowls are perfect accents either full or empty. Left: White walls and light wood make dark and colourful elements pop. Opposite top to bottom: The living room windows and chimney soar to the home’s second level; A happy fellow; Busy Mom and career woman, Lisa, breezes through the crisp white kitchen adjacent to the industrial, glass enclosed staircase that runs between all three levels.

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“I wanted the perfect family photo and there they were fully clothed in the sprinkler. The photographer just went with it and it turned out to be my favourite picture.�

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broken in March of 2009 and the family moved into their new digs in October of 2010. The house is brimming with light thanks to plenty of massive windows, most of which get to remain free of blinds or curtains at all hours as there is no need for privacy. Lisa’s mandate was to bring the outdoors in and keep the balance between the outdoor view afforded by the windows and the interior details of the home in check. Elements like driftwood, hardwoods and brick pay homage to the prairie landscape but the home has a modern sensibility delivered in spades by industrial elements like glass, steel, and sleek gloss finishes. The combination is impressive. Lisa didn’t want the house to feel locked into a design period a la 2009 so she went intentionally light with her finishes at a Opposite: The boys making their own photo history on a hot and sunny day. Clockwise from top left: Oversized furniture and plush carpets make the living room family friendly for down time and play time; An outdoor railing company was called upon to assist with the staircase and enhance the industrial quality of the home; Custom shelves display pieces collected over time.

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abode time when the trend was toward dark selections. She experimented with watered down paint on boards to create the perfect wood stain and sent her results off to Montreal where they custom matched and manufactured the wood floors. Rather than hanging a canvas or framed art on the landing between main and second levels Lisa, who works in graphic design and print media, enlarged a photograph, and had it printed on vinyl adhesive sign medium and installed like wallpaper. The stunning black and white photograph of Lisa and Sam’s two boys came to be quite by accident. Lisa had the boys in their Sunday best for an outdoor family photo shoot. Mid shoot Lisa and photographer, Rachael King-Johnson of Luckygirl Photography, were rolling through some images when squeals of delight prompted them to turn around and find the boys, fully clothed, running through the sprinkler. Lisa was mortified and thought the shoot was ruined but quick thinking Rachael captured the, now laughable, event beautifully. On the bright side the image turned out to be the best shot of the day, Lisa’s favourite and a fabulous art installation. Country life has been a real learning experience for the family. They are now fully versed in flax bales, frozen septic issues, keeping field mice at bay, bobcats and snow fences. They know when to haul water in before the cisterns run dry, that deer are attracted to certain potted herbs, and that extra land means you get to scoot around on Quads. On the downside requiring a genie to change the light bulbs in your soaring double-height ceilings doesn’t mean enlisting a fella who resides in a lamp and grants three wishes...but when you live in a home with bright sides all around who could wish for anything more? The asymmetry of the window installation is further emphasized by the dividing mullions which are not equidistant as would be the norm.

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get this lo o k

1.

2. 3.

4.

5.

ENHANCING LIFE AND SPIRIT THROUGH DESIGN 6. Concept development Space planning Kitchen design Custom furniture Lighting plans and fixtures Colour consultation Materials and finishes selections Trades consultations and coordination

7.

8.

1. Ceasarstone Pure White 1141 available at Carrara Tile 2. Nagouchi Table available at Design Manitoba 3. Preverco flooring available at Flatlanders f; 4. Grey Brick available at Olympus Masonary 5. Ceasarstone 4120 Raven available at Carrara Tile 6. Driftwood accessories available at Home Sense 7. Oxford White CC-30 Benjamin Moore 8. Smiling Buddha available at Urban Barn

TAMARA ECKSTEIN, B.ENV.D Interior Designer

204.894.5636 | ecksteindesigngroup.com

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What do you get when you mix a provincial-style room with just the right amount of darling...?

Payton’s Place design by envy paint and design photography Rachael King Johnson

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Rustic features like rough wood paneling, tongue and groove ceilings and exposed beams don’t exactly bring to mind a pretty bedroom for a little girl, but there’s no mistaking that this room belongs to an adorable three-and-a-half-year-old sweetheart named Payton. Payton’s mom, Erin, tackled the project with the aim to lighten up the room and make it youthful, while still keeping the inherent qualities of the family’s log home. With the help of handy-dad Randy, who enjoys working around the home, and some advice from the team at Envy Paint and Design Ltd., the room is now a bucolic haven for a young lady. The colour palette is a fresh and light blue, with lots of soft white and a punch of coral pink. The coral keeps the room from feeling saccharine, as a true pink may have done, and the baby blue is an unexpected choice for a little girl’s room. Erin sketched out the vision for the built-in book shelves, which showcase books, artwork, photos, and knickknacks. Baskets and drawers keep toys tucked out of site and organized. A friend built the bookcases, as well as the window seat that anchors the large room and offers a perfect perch to curl up with a good book or enjoy the outdoor view. For a change of scenery, Payton can climb up into the ladder-accessible loft above her closet, which will be a A charming surf van is one of many collectibles on display on the custom shelves; Payton’s grandfather’s chair got a fresh lick of paint and beautiful trellis fabric; Playful patterns on the custom finished bed from Faveri’s.


Payton now loves to play in her room. It’s such a haven that she feels comfortable playing upstairs by herself. There’s lots of storage space for her stuff, and we have her thinking that cleaning and putting things away is fun!!! ~Mom, Erin Fitzpatrick The custom closet was designed and built by For Space Sake, and adjusts to grow with Payton.

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Clockwise from top right: A soft and comfortable window seat is bursting with juicy fabrics and patterns; The combination of the rough-cut walls and delicate pastel accents is sublime; Custom built-in bookcases will meet storage needs from now to adulthood.

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fantastic hangout in years to come. It was important to Erin to ensure the room would have longevity, and not need to be redecorated for a long time. Pieces and plans were carefully considered to last for years. The custom finished bed and her grandfather’s refinished chair are both of generous size, and the rods in her custom closet are adjustable to allow for larger items as she grows. A bold mix of patterns keeps the room feeling playful and interesting. In addition to the already chock-full-of-pattern bedding, eight more different fabrics were used on the custom pillows, bench, chair and poufs. Erin says of the process, “Envy helped a lot with fabric selection. It was a bit overwhelming. I knew generally what I wanted but I needed to narrow it down. (They) helped with coordinating colours and bringing in patterns.” The oversized area rug offers a lovely place for Payton to play. It brings softness and warmth to the room which is washed in light that streams in through the sheer window shades. So what do you get when you mix rough-hewn woods and handcrafted bone structure with just the right amount of sugar and spice? Wood tones and playful pattern with a splash of delicate? A timeless and perfectly pretty place for Payton of course!


g e t t h i s lo o k 3.

5.

7.

1.

6. 4. 2.

1. Kravet 31700 Torbali #13 2. Kravet 31700 Torbali #17 3. Kravet 31708 Ogee Knot #13 4. Kravet 31734 Nestled #101 White 5. Bow wow #2 Taupe/Duck Egg 6. Pier #3 Duck Egg 7 Pindler & Pindler P1200 Meadow

8. Cloud White CC-40 Benjamin Moore 9. Rose Quartz 2002 -30 Benjamin Moore 10. Woodlawn Blue HC-147 Benjamin Moore 8.

9.

10.

We sell wine from all over the world. Cottage cases, private seminars, exclusive wines! We provide excellent customer service. Come visit us. We love wine.

110 -1600 Columbia Drive (Kenaston Commons) 204 275 6660 | www.thewinehousewinnipeg.com Mondays 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays from 12 noon to 6 p.m.

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design by covet magazine photography Rachael King Johnson

Even if you don’t have a coffee table that’s this perfect for Halloween, you can employ the same principles on it. Spray some artificial apples black; place deep, fall-coloured blooms in a heavy vessel; add some Halloween novels and a couple of skulls for good measure. Flowers by Petals West.

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design by ENVY PAINT AND DESIGN photography COVET MAGAZINE

Opposite: texture and pattern in the cow-hide rug and striped blanket contrast the bold, green up-cycled crib; From a driftwood whale to a box of bath accessories these shelves hold adventures just waiting to happen.

Not long after we found out we were expecting, I started a mood board with nursery decorating ideas. My husband and I are not finding out the baby’s gender, so traditional colour palettes were out. Even though pastels are on trend, I knew I wanted something bolder than that. We went back and forth with the options, considering the possibility of a single black accent wall to the half-painted walls. We ultimately decided to paint half the walls in flat black. Make no mistake, when we told family and friends that black was the jumping-off point for our nursery, we were often met with some awkward silence. Still, I was confident that this bold statement would be the perfect balance to the colourful furniture and accessories I had envisioned complimenting the space. The major furniture pieces – crib, dresser, chair and bookcase – have all been re-purposed and in some cases

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I like that when I look around the nursery there are things that I will find as eye-catching as the baby will. ~Darren Grunerud, Dad-to-be

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up-cycled from other settings. The chair evolved from a rose-coloured club chair to its new life as a light green swivelrocker. A hand-me-down crib received a bold face-lift, transforming from traditional honey oak to show-stopping green. The dresser is my husband's from childhood, and the barrister bookcase got shuffled from my office. Accent colours started out as mostly lime and green and evolved to include the entire citrus palette. I love the hits of colour, and how they appear in the most unusual way: an orange elephant, a yellow globe.

With a day job as a graphic designer, pattern and texture are always on my mind as great ways to add some subtle variation to a composition. In this case, the bedding, cowhide and sheepskin bring interest to the room. We love this space, the statement the colours make. Perhaps it was a bit risky to break the rules with our decorating approach, and maybe our little one will share that same attitude in life. We will find out shortly! Here's hoping that our nights aren't too long and our days are filled with laughter and adventure.


get th i s lo o k

D E S I G N YO U R OW N OUTDOOR KITCHEN

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. LYKTA Lamp IKEA 2. RĂ…SKOG Kitchen Cart IKEA 3. Hide Rug Flatlanders Flooring 4. Jet Black 2120-10 Benjamin Moore 5. Oxford White CC-30 Benjamin Moore

5.

Classic Fireplaces "Hearth & Patio" 649 Archibald St. | Winnipeg, Mb. Ph. 204.237.4509 | www.classicfireplaces.ca

Opposite: clockwise from top left: an antique dresser contrasts the industrial, modern caddy from IKEA; Books to grow with fill the shelves of this barristers bookcase; Owls from Indigo make for the perfect book-ends. Above: Hits of colour pop off the black walls and bring life to this bold space.

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Lily's Pad A mid century bedroom gets a fresh vibe with a bespoke renovation

design by shauna boychuk of for space sake photography Rachael King Johnson

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There's a special feeling that comes with having something made exactly to your tastes. It doesn’t matter whether it's a business suit, a piece of jewelry or a wood-fired pizza; it's simply the joy of something that's created just for you. That feeling can extend to the ways we customize our living spaces; the benefits of customization reach far beyond convenient storage and unique finishes. Homeowners Treena Hastings and Don White are familiar with the impact of quality custom touches. When the time came to rethink their daughter's bedroom, they knew whom to call: designer Shauna Boychuk and the team at For Space Sake. Lady in Blue: Lily and Aowie bask in the glow of their new room.

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All Dolled Up And Places to Grow: Shelves in the large built-in unit provide great display space for Lily's doll collection; they can be adjusted to suit her needs as she and her collection grow.

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Having previously collaborated with the couple on projects including a kids’ office/study, Shauna immediately understood that the revamp of 10-yearold Lily's bedroom would need to address the tastes of both parents and child. Treena and Don's mid-century home has a modern feel with many natural elements; there's a definite desire to bring the feeling of the outdoors in, notes Boychuk. The home's understated neutral scheme lets the abundant natural light and park-like setting take centre stage. A sense of effortless style and relaxed confidence runs through the whole house. Carrying that feeling through dictated much of the direction for Lily's room. Another factor was the need for an organized home for Lily's extensive family of dolls collected from around the world. Boychuk began by creating a light and bright, customized wall unit that provides both the much-needed display space for Lily's dolls and other treasures, and closed storage for clothing and toys. The shape of the asymmetrical unit acknowledges the existing built-ins created for the kids' study space, and considers the existing placement of HVAC and power sources. The layout serves to balance the large windows and nook on the other side of the room, while adjustable shelving and a back-painted glass magnetic whiteboard allow Lily opportunities to adjust her displays, or add her own notes & artwork. Clockwise from top left: Mexican La Calvera Catrina dolls from Lily’s collection find their place in the new wall unit; Diverse patterns are unified by a continuous colour thread; The designer’s favourite pillow provided the perfect shades for the room and speaks to Lily’s love of animals; No Tiffany blue room is complete without a diamond; Varying scales and textures give depth to the simple colour scheme

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abode Boychuk and the homeowners agreed on a cool, modern colour scheme for the space that incorporates shades of grey and white with Lily's favourite colour. “Feminine and Blue? It works when the shade is inspired by a Tiffany ring box,” laughs Boychuk. A young and playful edge is introduced with the playful lines in the bedside tables and lamp and dramatic chevron feature wall; a luxurious custom bed, upholstered in blue velvet and layered with graphic bedding, anchors the space. As excited as Lily is about her own bed, she's equally thrilled with the custom digs created for her pet bunny, Aowie. While the deep nook located between the windows and closet would have made a natural desk area, the kids’ office made such a space redundant. Boychuk created a platform for Aowie's cage; built-ins above and below provide storage for bunny supplies. The space can be easily converted to a cozy and private reading area, with the simple addition of a seat cushion and some toss pillows. That kind of planning and foresight may just be why this space is truly a room that any little girl would love. While there are many reasons to covet this space - the tailored finishes, the timeless appeal - the fact that it'll grow right along with its occupant is possibly more valuable than anything you'd find at Tiffany. Above right: The soft curves of the cylindrical table and bedside lamp provide a pleasing counterpoint to the strong geometric patterns throughout the room. Right: The large wall unit provides enough open and closed storage to keep all of Lily’s treasures well organized

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get this lo o k 5. 4.

1. 3.

2.

6. 7.

1. Decorators White CC-20 Benjamin Moore 2. Stonington Gray HC-170 Benjamin Moore 3. Avant Garde Elegant 100 4. Maxwell Valet 16 5. Avant Garde Habitat 100 6 and 7 Pillows from Urban Barn

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Caelum's

Cool Crib Family, friends and IKEA conspire to revamp a teenage bedroom on a shoestring budget design by designstation73 photography Rachael King Johnson

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The Problem: Builder beige walls, poor lighting and a dearth of architectural details left a below-grade bedroom feeling downright delinquent – definitely not suitable for a young teenager. The Inspiration: A Christmas wish list that included IKEA gift cards. The Plan: A shopping trip, ostensibly to purchase a new bedside table, allowed his family to observe the teen's current style likes and dislikes... all in preparation for a secret weekend room makeover. Like many guys his age, Caelum is passionate about sports, spending time at the lake, and Lego. While he approaches each with energy to spare, it's his detailed Lego creations that first displayed his budding design eye. He comes by it naturally - his family is full of designers and stylists, so designer DNA is in his blood. And so it was no surprise that when Winnipeg's IKEA opened, Caelum began thinking about making some changes to his room. Enter family friend and design associate Arthur Liffmann of Envy Paint and Design, who collaborated with designstation73 to surprise Caelum with a total room redo. Armed with little more than an IKEA catalogue, a shoestring budget and a handful of Allen keys, they set to work transforming the space over one three-day weekend. This is their story. Day 0: (Thursday evening): Caelum's departing words as he left for a hockey tournament in Fargo: “Feel free to put it together for me”. Someone drinking pop suggested he meant the nightstand; someone else, possibly the guy drinking a nice Merlot blend, thought Caelum meant the entire room. Between sips, a plan was born – new wall colours and fresh bedding, improved lighting and furniture placement, and increased storage and organization in both the bedroom and walk-in closet. Day 1: Friday Painting begins. Working with new SMÖRBOLL bedding, the designers chose Forest Moss (2146-20) and a mid-tone grey (AF-700) from Benjamin Moore. To provide architectural interest, and to allow a neutral background directly behind the headboard, the green feature wall was offset and wrapped around an inside corner onto the desk wall.

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abode Caelum's bedroom is located in the home's lower level; consequently, it doesn't receive the same quantity or quality of natural daylight as the upstairs bedrooms. The bedroom and closet were originally lit by standard builder-grade ceiling fixtures; the designers replaced them with halogen spotlights that provide a warm glow throughout the space. Additional task and accent lights were added to the new desk and beside table; together, the improved lighting and colour scheme created a bright and warm backdrop for new accessories. Day 2: Saturday Allen keys in hand and surrounded by stacks of flat-packed boxes, the crew settled in for what one deemed 'Grownup Lego Day'. In retrospect, Caelum's expertise would have come in handy and likely qualified him as team foreman. Missing from Caelum's previous room setup was a study area; a small but wellfunctioning work zone was created with a compact MICKE desk. LACK shelving added space for books and display. The shelving reaches in two directions from the corner to both sides of the feature wall, allowing it to play up the wrap effect while not overwhelming the room. A customized four-cube EXPeDIT bookshelf provides additional organizational space at the foot of the bed. Day 3: Sunday Decorators, start your engines. With the backdrop complete, Caelum's favourite Lego and Winnipeg Jets treasures were layered in with new storage boxes and fun accessories. Modern graphic artwork and a vintage robot collection play off each other; two pieces of art Caelum created were framed and take pride of place alongside photos of his dogs and his waterfront fort in Lake of the Woods. The Surprise Reveal: His extended family were all on hand when Caelum arrived home and opened the door into his transformed space. The verdict? “I love my room... and I KNEW you guys were gonna do this – you like building stuff from small pieces, too!” And it's true – with a little effort, a bunch of little pieces can be built up into something pretty cool. Now, pass the Merlot.

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Opposite top left: Dream Something Up: A sliver of wall space between the closet and bedroom doors is a perfect space for hanging your hat and checking the time. Opposite middle: Mini-Maximize Small Spaces: The clamshell light and desk organizer work with the small scale of the workstation and keep things feeling light and clutter-free. Opposite bottom left: Custom Needn't be Expensive: A back for the bookcase was created using simple pegboard painted the same green as the walls; it echoes the dots found in the bedding. Puck lights brighten the dark cubbies.

get this look 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

1. IKEA 365+ LUNTA 2. Forest Moss 2146-20 Benjamin Moore 3. Storm AF-700 Benjamin Moore 4. IKEA MICKE Desk 5. IKEA SMĂ–RBOLL Bedding

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abode

S m a l l Space 

B ig Idea Re-imagining a Small Bedroom Yields Dramatic Results design by covet magazine photography Rachael King Johnson

Mom, I don't like my room... I LOVE my room! ~Nigel Taylor

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In a society where huge SUVs and massive McMansions are the norm, one might think that bigger is better – but only 25 years ago, we lived in spaces that were less than half the size of modern homes. Given the propensity for larger, grander spaces today, it’s easy to overlook the opportunities that exist within a smaller space. At only 7’x 8’, this young dude’s room is ittybitty in size, but big with innovative ideas. The wall-to-wall bed/display-unit offers a place for everything, and keeps everything in its place. It’s composed of well-known Ikea Expedit units, combined with some handy carpentry and tricked out with the Expedit high gloss drawers. The drawers tuck items away neat and tidy, and the open cubbies are perfect for things like books, photos and collectibles. Inside the closet, matching units and a closet rod are customized to accommodate clothing, television viewing and gaming. With comfy pillows piled at both head and foot, the bed assumes the role of sofa when

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abode Clockwise from far right: The ceiling really is the fifth wall in this room. The mini art gallery has prime real estate, with a perfect view from the bed. The gallery and room is lit with under-cabinet lighting, affixed to the ceiling around the room’s perimeter; Ten drawers offer maximum storage by simply tipping this Ikea Expedit unit on its side; Keeping all clothing in plain sight makes mornings a breeze … and why not throw in the TV for good measure?; Playtime reaches new heights with a Lego wall, magnetic primer and chalkboard paint.

not used for slumber. The dual purpose of key components is critical to making such a tiny room feel grand. The walls were treated to bold stripes to make the room feel taller and some stripes even serve a purpose; white stripes are magnetic, navy stripes are chalkboard and one gray stripe is actually made of Lego platforms screwed to the wall – all taking playtime onto a

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vertical plane. The ceiling above the bed is utilized to display art and posters, and framed old t-shirts that couldn’t be parted with, making the ceiling a mini gallery. The small space packs a big punch with comfortable sleeping, playing, entertainment and storage areas all efficiently packed into the modest 56 square foot room. It just goes to show that sometimes less really is more!


get this lo o k 1.

2.

SPRING TE, 20R13M nd April 8th - June 22

Ages 2 to 6 Preschool Art for 6 school Age Art 6-1

3.

nching point Using art histor y as our lau ful Owl for a studio practice the Art making fun. inspires creativity and art ar t Ho ot hoot, love artfulowl.ca t: 204.487.2012 create@artfulowl.ca

4.

16-1700 corydon Winnipeg, Manitoba r3N 0K5

LICENSED, QUALIFIED ELECTRICIANS 5.

Hiring a qualified, licensed electrician to inspect your home, make repairs, and conduct installations is a smart way to protect your home’s value and safety. • Electical Wiring • House Rewiring • Troubleshooting • Service Upgrades • Renovations

6.

1. IKEA EXPEDIT Bookcase 2. Cement Gray 2112-60 Benjamin Moore 3. Hale Navy HC-154 Benjamin Moore 4. Decorators White CC-20 Benjamin Moore 5. LEGO Baseplate available at Kite and Kaboodle 6. IKEA EXPEDIT Drawer Insert 7. IKEA EXPEDIT Bookcase

• Outdoor Lighting

hardwired@live.ca

7.

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diy

Make your own bookcase headboard The storage platform is a white Expedit turned on its side and tricked out with the line’s optional storage drawers in high-gloss gray. The high-gloss gray finish is repeated on the Expedit units used on the back. A platform at the same height of the unit was built off the back of it, at the precise width of the mattress so the mattress straddles both the horizontal unit and the platform. A higher platform, the depth of the high-gloss gray Expedit units, was built between the mattress and the wall for the gray units to sit on. This raises the bottom cubbies above the mattress.

OUR IKEA SHOPPING LIST: EXPEDIT Drawer Insert EXPEDIT Bookcases

+

+ Lay this guy flat.

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A change in the weather is sufficient to recreate the world and ourselves. -Marcel Proust

habitat in harmony with design | samantha braun | 204.223.6157 | ecotones@mts.net

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c h ow

recipes and food styling Marisa curatolo photography BRIAN JOHNSON

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FRENCH ONION TART recipe page 88

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c h ow

Quiona roasted red pepper & cucumber salad ¾ cup quinoa 1 ½ cups chicken stock or water 1 roasted red pepper, cleaned and diced ½ cup chopped English cucumbers 8 grape tomatoes, sliced ¼ cup pitted and chopped black olives ½ cup sliced green onions ¼ cup chopped fresh mint leaves 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill 2 tablespoon chopped parsley 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice ½ cup extra virgin olive oil Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste Rinse quiona under cold water. In medium saucepan, combine quiona with chicken stock or water. Bring to boil; turn heat to low. Cover with lid and cook 15 to 17 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with fork and let cool.

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Add red peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, green onions, mint, dill and parsley. Stir in lemon juice and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Toss well to coat. Serves 6.

Sugar snap peas with Dill 1 lb fresh sugar snaps peas 1 cup frozen baby peas ¼ cup unsalted butter 1 tablespoons minced shallot ½ cup sliced green onions 2 tablespoons minced fresh dill Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to season In large saucepan of boiling salted water, blanch sugar snap peas for 4 minutes. Drain and refresh under cold water. Pat dry. In medium skillet, melt butter over medium heat, Add shallot, peas, and cooked sugar snaps, cook 2 to 3 minutes or until sugar snaps are warmed. Add green onions and dill. Season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat. Serves 6.


Spring is in the air, and what better way to celebrate the end of winter than to rejoice and be inspired in all things green? I used my collection of green jadite plates mixed with ordinary striped plates. An un-ironed linen napkin makes a perfect placemat. Vintage water glasses found at your local thrift store hold white wine. Tulips are an easy tabletop flower as they look great in any container, from ceramic pitchers to mason jars or old metal buckets.

About the menu Not only is this menu pretty to look at but it’s also healthy: lightly blanched sugar snap peas with fresh dill, protein packed quinoa loaded with vegetables and a delicious maple roasted salmon with fresh herb-topped parsley sauce. To finish the meal, French madelines with lemon curd, and some vanilla tea packaged in a lovely mint-green tin. This spring, remember what your mother said – eat your greens – and give her a big hug. Marisa Curatolo is a Paris-trained chef, food stylist and culinary instructor. She inspires cooks with her simple, easy recipes that are beautifully presented.

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Brush the salmon with any of the glaze that has spilled onto the baking sheet. Broiling the fish the last few minutes gives the sauce a deep golden color. Just make sure to watch that you don’t over cook the fish. Err on the side of under done. Trust me it will be perfect.

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<< Flowers by Academy Florist modern living with a pr airie t wist

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c h ow Roasted Salmon with Parsley Pesto Sauce 1 (3 pound) center-cut piece salmon, sliced into 6 pieces Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to season 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil ½ cup maple syrup sliced green onions, for garnish

Parsley Pesto Sauce Makes 1½ cups 2 cups fresh parsley leaves 2 cloves garlic 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest ½ cup extra virgin olive oil 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt For Sauce, place parsley, garlic and lemon zest in bowl of food processor; pulse until chunky. add olive oil and pulse 5 seconds. Season with salt. Chill until ready to use. Sauce will keep up to one week or frozen up to three months. Preheat oven to 350°F. For Salmon, place salmon, skin side down on parchment lined baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper. In small bowl, combine olive oil and maple syrup. Brush mixture over fish. Bake in oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until fish flakes when tested with fork. Cook under broiler setting for the last 4 minutes of cooking. Spoon sauce over fish and garnish with sliced onions. Serves 6.

Blueberry Madeleine with Lemon curd 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 4 eggs, room temperature 2/3 cup sugar grated zest of 1 lemon ½ cup butter, melted and cooled slightly 1/3 cup frozen wild blueberries, not thawed icing sugar, to dust Butter Madeleine mold; set aside. In medium bowl, sift flour and baking powder. In another bowl, whisk together eggs with sugar until light and fluffy about 4 minutes; stir in lemon zest. Fold flour mixture into egg mixture and drizzle melted butter over batter; stir gently. Cover and chill batter in refrigerator for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 375°F. Spoon batter into mold shapes, ¾ quarter full, do not spread. Divide blue berries evenly between two batches. Bake cakes for 10 minutes, or until edges are lightly golden. Invert pan and tap out cakes; cool on wire rack. Repeat with remaining batter. Dust with icing sugar to serve. Makes 24.

lemon curd 6 egg yolks, room temperature 2 eggs, room temperature 1 cup sugar ½ cup fresh lemon juice ¼ cup unsalted butter, cubed and chilled (continued on p. 88)

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pa i r i n g s French onion tart

sugar snap peas with dill

Chateau Ste. Michelle Riesling from Washington. Riesling has an earthy â&#x20AC;&#x153;petrolâ&#x20AC;? nose that will work well with the savoury onion smell.

Pair this light dish with an aromatic wine like a Torrontes from Argentina. Something like the Cuma Torrontes, and organic wine, should work well.

roasted salmon with fresh herb sauce

blueberry madelines with lemon curd

Cycles Gladiator Pinot Noir, California. This is a smoky but fruity Pinot Noir. Light enough to compliment the Salmon, but robust enough to match with the herbs.

Arrogant Frog Sticky White, France. This is a late harvest wine that keeps a good amount of residual sweetness,

The Winehouse, located in Kenaston Common puts together Covet's pairings. Their attention to detal and genuine interest will exceed your expectations. Pop in to try something special.

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prairie pa l e t t e

Manitoba has a plethora of both emerging and established artists. In each issue, Prairie Palette will introduce you to some of the talented locals who share Manitoba with us, and demystify some of the intricacies of art and the art scene in Manitoba. This issue we are excited to introduce Karen Robb to you. While others might describe her as a Contemporary Abstract Expressionist, she sees herself as an artist whose influences span many different movements; Abstract, Modern, Fauvist, Post-modern and Pop Art. She is perhaps 10% conceptualist but a formalist at heart. She is a Colorist who has undeniably been seduced by the Fauvist ideals and forms. Presently, she is studying the relationship between architectural design, art and the female form. Her work can often take an interesting twist, be it through hidden imagery,

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wild color or humorâ&#x20AC;Ś she likes to create canvases that can remain a conversation piece. She often finds herself exploring the interplay between shape, line, form and space; following the path that her paintbrush takes her. When the dance between these elements converge to complete the final image, the end result often surprises her. Nature, everyday objects, daily events and personal stories are all metaphors that converge in her creative mind. Sorting through these thoughts and images, with many a path of heavy

paint on a canvas, is a fascinating and rewarding process. Her hope is that her art takes people on an unexpected journey, where one can look at the everyday situations in an unexpected way; where perceived space is filled with shapes, color and interest.

You can find Karen's work on display at the Birchwood Gallery. www.birchwoodartgallery.com 204.888.5840


living well

Two-by-Four Life text DEZ DANIELS The week of June 12, 2012 started with a giant hole in the ground in my backyard. It ended with a trip to the city of my dreams. Two bucket list items crossed off within the span of seven days! How I expected it to go UP from there seems pretty preposterous today. Doing something you have really, REALLY dreamed of is an amazing feeling. The accomplishment becomes even more important if that dream scares you just a little. If it includes buying wine at a convenience store at 10pm on a Friday night to go with the “lapin” that’s waiting at the French restaurant around the corner, all the better. But that’s for another sweet reminiscence. But between those two events last summer - a solo trip to Montreal, and breaking ground on a new home – I was bursting with positive energy. Both experiences also came with varying degrees of “holy crap.” But doing stuff that scares you is important. And when it comes to putting finishing touches on your home build, I’ve discovered that a sense of play and adventure can make the experience less like a root canal, and more like the jolly adventure one envisions at the start. Building and renovating often becomes hellish when you’re faced with that inevitable glut of finishing choices. Panic sets in when making decisions related to: paint colors (“What if I pick the wrong one!!!”), flooring (“What if it looks ridiculous!”), or even bathroom hardware (“Will the pressure from this faucet REALLY strip the hide off an elephant?”) Every choice has the potential to create anxiety, and they are moments I am intimately familiar with. I had a few firm preferences, which helped. And having decent professional help did too. But for me, freedom from this ridiculousness was deciding that when I couldn’t decide, I would go with the wickedly impractical choice … the choice that excited me, but scared me at the same time. It’s hard to say yes to “cream” when you know “skim milk” would be way smarter. But between all of life’s have-to’s and should-not’s, sometimes one feels they are drowning in skim milk … and a little cream can go a long way.

February 12 marked eight months since the start of our build. Some days, it feels like it was yesterday. On most others, it feels like forever. And the quest to finish up has taken on new urgency. The house we’re living in now has been sold to another family. The spring thaw is almost here, and if the road restrictions go up before we’re ready to move it, we’ll miss our window, and that house won’t be going anywhere for a while. As inconvenient as that would be for us, it would be even more so for the folks that bought it. So, there are never enough hours in the day. My husband and I pass each other in the hallway, arguing about who is more tired, grunting our hellos and goodbyes to one another. Our special time together is about 3:30 am, as I am preparing to start my workday, and he is just finishing his. Occasionally, the whole thing feels like a really, really bad idea. But as the days get longer, and the sky dawns lighter earlier every day, prairie dwellers can’t help but get excited at the promise of things to come. We are beginning to make those delightful summer preparations that, if they did not exist, would make this time of year almost unbearable. For our family, these plans are also ‘beyond the build.’ They hold the promise of family time, down time, alone time. It feels like an adventure. It feels like something unexpected and wonderful could, and will, happen. Perhaps in the spirit of this, we’ve chosen black wood trim to run throughout the house instead of natural wood trim. I’m imagining it will be to our home what dark eyeliner is to a beautiful face. The kitchen counters were almost caesarstone, but I love marble, porous and unforgiving as it is. Despite all the message boards online telling me how impractical it is … it’s what made my heart race. So I’ve put a bit of my money on the thrill of the unknown. Occasionally making the “fun” choice in our build has been such a freeing experience. It also proves that you don’t need wine from a convenience store to make your head spin. Although it sure couldn’t hurt.

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living well

g ag a fo r g r e e n Spring is the perfect time to infuse a little Emerald into your life, Pantone’s colour of the year for 2013. text by SUSAN KUZ Every year Pantone (www.pantone.com), considered an authority on colour for more than 40 years, chooses a Colour of the Year that represents the many influences of our times including technology, socio-economic influences, trends in the entertainment industry and a host of other international influences. This beautiful jeweled colour is associated with growth, renewal, and rejuvenation making spring the ideal time to incorporate Emerald into your home décor. Add Emerald coloured plants or spring bulbs to bring the outdoors in rejuvenating your home’s energies and adding visual relaxation. Associated with prosperity, Emerald is a great addition to your office spaces. Why not add a little touch of abundance with splashes of Emerald in unexpected places; perhaps an Emerald paperweight, pen or picture frame. Or go with bolder statement walls in one of the newer wallpapers or paint colours. As a jewel tone, Emerald symbolizes sophistication and luxury, making it great for entryways or entertainment spaces.

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Create a dynamic first impression through artwork or wall coverings near your front door. Or use in entertainment areas such as the living room or dining area by adding accessories in this wonderful colour. Because Emerald is a vibrant colour, use it sparingly in areas where you want to relax. Pair it with soft neutrals or other cool colours such as blue or blue-violets. If you are using it in a more active or creative space, combine it with vibrant, warm colours such as fuchsia or bright yellow, or complementary colours such as last year’s colour of the year, Tangerine Tango. However you decide to incorporate this dynamic colour you won’t be disappointed with a little splash of luxury in Emerald. Susan Kuz, a specialist in colour and healthy living spaces, is an associate member of the International Association of Color Consultants/Designers – North America (IACC-NA). She can be contacted at www.SpacialExpressions.com


ask a designer:

We asked Designers: “What are the opportunities and challenges of using Emerald, Pantone’s 2013 Colour of the Year?”

S3

interior design inc. Tracy Dyck Emerald Green is an intense hue. The challenge is to ensure that such a colour doesn’t overwhelm a space, but this is also the fun of it!  Additions of Emerald Green in small amounts such as accessories add interest. In a large application, such as an entire painted room, creates a BOLD statement.  (Way more fun than beige!) Ph. 204.415.7600 www.s3interiordesign.com tracy@s3interiordesign.com

t i f fa n y s h e l d o n d e s i g n Tiffany Sheldon There are quite a few ways to bring Emerald into your home. Nature or rustic inspired decorating can use emerald as an accent colour – think plaids, a classic HBC blanket combined with warm toned woods. Those who have grey as a neutral have a great canvas to incorporate Emerald in fabrics, art and accessories; they can also incorporate black or white for a dramatic effect – be it through furniture, fabric or painting the trim and mouldings.  This shade of green also gives us the opportunity to work navy blue - my favorite colour!  Emerald can be challenging to use in interiors that have a very dominant brown/beige colour scheme as bright jewel tones don’t easily lend themselves to those neutrals. Ph. 204.997.2637 info@tiffanysheldon.com www.tiffanysheldon.com

d e s i g n i n g s pac e s m b Wanda G. Vuignier If you have always been a lover of Emerald Green or just love, love, love that jolt of colour in your decor this is a definite opportunity as this is the colour of the year! However, I can also feel the rest of you cringing at the thought of such a loud colour. I believe most designers would agree that using Emerald Green does not have to be in its purest form but could also be a greytoned version or even paler or darker versions. This is great news for those of you who would like to stay on trend but feel this colour is just too much for you to handle. Ph. 204.990.1135 wanda@designingspacesmb.com www.designingspacesmb.com

s pac i a l e x p r e ss i o n s Susan Kuz For years I’ve been a fan of jewel tones and am thrilled to see Emerald re-emerge as Colour of the Year. I love its depth and richness, and the opportunity it brings of using other jewel tones as companions. It’s a colour that can liven up a space even when used in small doses and because of its intensity it can quickly overwhelm a room if not kept in balance. It is definitely a colour I look forward to working with this year. Ph. 204.801.4389 susan@spacialexpressions.com www. spacialexpressions.com

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living well

Oh Baby! At a time when true surprises are few and far between it seems more and more expectant parents are choosing to keep the gender of their off-spring under wraps. While this brews anticipation and excitement for everyone it makes decorating a challenge. Check out these three fail safe nursery schemes that give you a good foundation to tackle while that bun is cooking in the oven and a few details to finish when the bundle of joy arrives...

Baby Glam

Use a palette of grey, white, and yellow as an exciting new way to think outside the box. Turn up the glam factor in the girl's room by including items with sparkle, glass and bling. For a boys room, substitute the sparkle and include elements of steel, pewter, and brushed nickel. Add texture and softness to the room by including yellow wall art and stuffed animals. We all know that babies don't stay that way forever, so this neutral palette of grey can easily transition into a toddler or teen bedroom. Remember to include patterns, and textures that you love, and most of all have fun!

If you would like to find any or all of these fantastic decor ideas zip over to www.covetmagazine.ca and check out our digital issue. Hover over any image for more information.

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Modern Rustic

Warm woods and antiqued finishes make for a serene and sophisticated nursery scheme. Try a wood grain wallpaper in pink or pale pink walls and accents for little miss. For the little mister use warm greys and hits of black via wrought iron accents. Add elements of aged brass, antiqued mirror, burlap and wool for texture, and don't be afraid to layer, layer, layer patterns and prints. When working with a muted scheme and calm furnishings more can be more.

Bold & Beautiful Baby You're only young once - combine bright colours, fun patterns and graphic shapes for an exciting, exuberant scheme! For a more traditional girl's space, punch up the pink by upholstering the chair with a fun pink-based woven fabric and a bold fushia feature wall. For a boy's room, switch to a blue jersey knit on the rocker and paint the feature wall bright green. Remember to choose pieces that will grow with your baby - the dresser, mirror, rocker, side table - even the elephant - all will work in adult bedrooms or other areas of your home. Soft indirect light sources, and layered fabrics will amp up the luxe feeling, and balance the boldness of your nursery!

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dig

spring greening text SAMANTHA BRAUN

Sometime around when the snow melts and the twigs at the cabin start growing fluffy bits… Mother Nature will be getting her green-on (we’re not talking the kind that involves stout and leprechauns). She’s doing her part, here are some great ways for you to do yours. So dust off those Birkenstocks and pull out the patchouli… we’re about to get real earth-friendly with these babies. If you’re already recoiling at the thought of giving up bug spray, and hiding your roundup as you read, take a deep breath (preferably away from the aforementioned) we’ll start you gently… Just like your mamma said, every little bit counts. Composting One of the basic green-gardening practices to get started with. You’ve seen the bins, you’ve thought about it, maybe you even bought one of those black ones from the city. So composting can be as simple or as complicated as you’d like to make it (isn’t everything?)… if you build it (at least half-decently), they will come. By “they”, we’re referring to the decomposing critters: microbes (fungi and bacteria), insects, worms. And when given the right conditions, “they” will

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work tirelessly to turn all those banana peels, slimy baby salad greens, crushed egg shells, coffee grounds and dryer lint into black gold. “The right conditions” are the ones that make the microbes happy. Happy microbes make for a happy compost pile (and happy owners of compost piles). To keep a compost composting, place your bin in a warm spot directly in contact with soil, layer wet stuff (eg. banana peels) with dry stuff (fall leaves), and keep it moist (but not sopping wet). You want fresh dirt

smelling microbes, not the ones that live in the mud under the cattails in the ditch (or in the Ziplock you forgot in the back of the fridge). The huge difference is air versus no air. So basically, to keep the whole thing acting like a dirt-factory instead of a stinky mess, keep it aerated. Ultimately, composting not only diverts piles of garbage from the landfill, but will give you a supply of compost to put the “magic” back in your garden, so you no-longer need a “miracle”.


Don’t spare a drop Another really easy spring greening tactic (no bugs required) is to set up a rain barrel or two. Barrels are available almost anywhere—the easiest to use being those designed for the job with taps and down spout diverters built right in. One quick tip is to make sure the height of the tap is far enough off the ground to get a watering can underneath. It’s an annoying “oops” to discover once the barrel’s full! Putting a rain barrel in close proximity to your veggie patch, pots or planters is always nice since they are the places you’ll be watering at some point unless you’re growing cactus. Again, planning “where” before you’ve re-routed and cut downspouts, is a good idea for saving both your back and water bill. Barrel taps can even be fitted with hose systems and timers if they are higher than the garden being watered; so you catch the rain and redistribute it where, and when, it’s needed. Even a row of 10 gal buckets along the drip line of a shed can be an effective rain water collection device—with no wait and fill required—just grab a bucket and go. As a design aside, either use very pretty buckets, or tuck them on the “ugly side” where you’re not stuck staring at them out of the kitchen window! To keep mosquitoes out of the equation, cover the top of your barrel with mesh, and use your bucketwater weekly. Rain barrels and buckets are lovely earth-friendly examples of waste not, want not. Drop the drugs So now for the hard part (not really, just adding a little drama!). For the mother of all spring greenings, how about breaking your garden’s drug dependency. I know, we all have weeds, mildews and aphids… and nobody wants to see their blood, sweat and tears undone by an onslaught of little green sucking demons (yep, aphids)! But just like people-health, garden health is based on good habits, and a whole lot of prevention and early detection. We’re not talking tireless scouring of the garden with a magnifying glass either (still advocating working smarter, not harder) who has time for that? If plants are healthy with good light conditions, well suited soil moisture, and good friends and neighbours, then a few nibbles here and there, the odd brush with mildew, or a few “sucking things” will be fought off by the plant and by your garden's whole ecological community. For every lousy bug or at least the ones we don’t particularly like, there are a myriad of critters that are ready to eat them, lay their larvae in them, and generally do some very sadistic bug-on-bug nastiness! When we use insecticides in a garden, they can’t select for the “bad guys” any more than a stray blast of Killex from a lawn crew next door can avoid your petunias. Using green pesticide techniques can stave-off many basic problems, leaving the bad bugs less resistant if you do ever need to use something with a skull and cross bones on it, and leaving the good guys to fight your battles for you. Using a gadget like “The Bug Blaster”

sprays water up under the leaves to catch aphids in late spring and early in their nymph stage when they’re young, helpless and squishy. It leaves the hard-bodies (like ladybugs) and flying predators (like lace wings) to escape. You can also use a thumb over the end of your hose to bump up the “blast factor” but it’s a bit harder to get the water up under the leaves where they’re hiding, and you will more than likely get very wet. The “gadget” takes the win on this one. Another issue that plagues gardens is mildew. Some good housekeeping and a little prevention goes a long way in mitigating mildew problems. Removing diseased leaves ASAP is great, but you can also build up the not-mildew plant microbes by spaying susceptible plants with a preventative coating of 10% milk in water solution throughout the growing season. Not much different than that dose of yogurt and chia every morning. The bacillus out compete mildew when at healthy levels, so “there’s no room in the Inn”. Watering well and less frequently, gives leaves time to dry, hence less moisture-loving mildew issues. And making sure your sun lovers are not in too much shade will also keep them higher and drier. When all else fails, garden Sulfur is the tried and true solution to knock out a bad fungal infection. “Resistant varieties” are often claimed on the plant tag, but your best bet is keeping the plants healthy, and not splashing or brushing the mildew from one plant to the next. Weed killer!!! Ok, so not really weed killing, more accurately weed preventing. If you get to them early (like first thing in the spring when our many European-import weeds are poking their nasty little tips out of the ground), you’re not only making it easier to spot the offending plants, but you are also removing the first round of seed-bearing parents. Dandelions, quack grass, stray lawn, thistles and creeping jenny are all far easier to spot and destroy with a flick of the garden knife or a little tug in the moist spring soil before everything else is up and roots are established. The other hands-down best strategy for weed suppression is mulching. Most plants we think of as weeds don’t germinate well on organic material (think breaking down plant bits), so once you put a nice layer of mulch down, they can’t get their seed root in deep enough to hit mineral soil, pull water and survive. The few that do (or shade adapted trees), are really easy to pull out of the humus (that stuff on a forest floor). Often a light “ruffling” in the surface does the trick and they dry out quickly. No weed killer needed, no accidentally nailed ornamentals, no resistance in the weeds, and no residue or contaminants in the ground or on you. Most importantly, you’re doing the one thing that sorts out either heavy clay or very sandy soils… you’re adding organic matter. Organic matter either through composting of your veggies, or from decomposition of mulch acts as the sponge, and nutrient keeper of the soil profile.

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Reduce, Reuse, Recycle… You can’t get much greener than the 3 Rs.

One easy way to do a little planet saving, and a little budget saving is to get creative with your garden. That old birdcage in Grandma’s attic… pop a lovely terracotta pot inside. Peek under grandma’s porch, if she still had a birdcage stash, she’ll have a planter stash or something cool to put dirt in. Vining, flowing ivy would be an instant classic hanging by the bird feeders on your favourite tree. Or perhaps a showy scarlet trumpet vine with some million bells to lure humming birds to have a drink.

One of the cutest, all be it eclectic, projects for growing families is to plant up a collection of those adorable little wellies that the little people out grow every year. Even our grown-up wellies are funky enough to use with the teeny pink ones, and blue ones with shark fins. For a family tradition they can be lined along the top of a fence, or clustered near the veggie patch for a hit of colour and just plain fun. Pop a few holes in the soles for drainage, and some gravel to keep them bottom heavy and the holes clear. (You might want to consider it as a mother’s day gift for grandma since you stole her bird cage!).

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Old wooden ladders make great quirky, country trellises. Beautiful wash basins double as bird baths when tacked onto a log or stone pedestal or even sunk into the garden with some marbles for butterflies and critters to rest on. Bicycle wheels can be welded together to make a climbing dome for a school gardenâ&#x20AC;Ś the only limit to the 3Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the garden is the imagination (and possibly some zoning restrictions in extreme cases!).

Junk yard finds can make very head-turning conversation starters. But less is definitely more when adding quirky pieces to the landscape unless you want to push the envelope, rather than nudge it a bit. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used old auger blades from a prairie clean-up to form a weird and wonderful frame for melons. And the best part about reclaimed or recycled additions, is that you can enjoy them and then pass them along when you want to change things around a bit. You will have diverted more junk from the landfill and be the proud owner of a one of kind creation.

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Is something seedy going on here? You’re probably thinking you should be doing something new this time of year—there are stacks of little brown pots and plastic things in the way of your French bread at the supermarket. Before you worry about missing out on a peat pellet frenzy, or feel guilty for not starting your own plants, have a look at our guide and decide if growing from scratch should be added to your list of talents or it it might be best to let the pros do the seed-starting for you.

Selection Pro. There are far more unique varieties available from seed (especially rare herbs and exotic or heirloom veggies) than available in most nurseries. Variety and colour choices are almost limitless when you consider the www-dot-something factor and a UPS guy. Con. You need to buy a whole pack of seeds for one white heirloom squash plant. *Remember some loose viability with storage and not all varieties and colours are created equal. Suspect germination is not a quality listed on packaging—but your local grower probably wishes it was.

Price Pro. You can’t get much cheaper than a pack of seeds and some dirt! Especially true if you recycle some cartons or old pots to start them in. Con. If you only need a couple of plants, the young pre-grown version may actually end up the same price as a package of 20 seeds (like the white patty pan squash). Minus your window-ledge real estate. For some, the going rate for love, care and attention (especially the time and effort for acclimatizing young seedlings to go

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outside, sturdy-up and harden off ) is worth more than the cost difference.

Per unit effort Pro. If you have the space, time and ambition, seed starting can be very rewarding; much like making your own pizza dough or partaking in homemade soap production. Con. If those last two activities elicited fear and annoyance instead of joy and pride save your window ledge from water stains and peatmoss splash-back. Just ask a friend to start an extra white patty pan squash plant for you. Try the friend who just announced on Facebook that she’s simultaneously “perfected her parmesan flat-bread recipe and finished Christmas shopping”. She would love to share her heirloom squash because she has about 19 plants to spare.

Time Pro. Seeds all take time to go from seed to plant and some longer than others. Even a 6 year old has the patience and growing season time to start varieties with a short growth cycle from scratch. These include radishes, lettuce, and wheat grass for the heath fiends. Quick growing varieties are a great place to start successfully; and

learn the ropes without a lot of fancy lights and equipment. Cons. Some varieties like tropicals or sub-tropicals, take a very long time in Zone 3 to get to the point where they are useful for your intended goal, ornamental or otherwise. Check the germination time on the package (and for veggies the time till harvest) and the suggested start time for annual flowers. Those petunias that cost far more than the seed in the nursery were started sometime shortly after Santa made his rounds.

Quantity Pro. If you need multiples of the same colour (think flats and flats of blue violets for the niece’s back yard wedding photos) then seeding may be a great option. Con. If you don’t need tonnes of a particular colour, you’re stuck with all of them. Although you can always share extra plants or seeds with friends and neighbours. Samantha Braun is a landscape ecologist and designer with over 15 years experience in the horticultural industry. Her company, Ecotones, specializes in creating Habitat in Harmony with Design.


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w h e r e to f i n d If you liked what you saw, check out our digital version at www.covetmagazine.ca for links to the product and talent featured in this issue. In addition, we are happy to help you source one of your “gotta haves” from within our pages. Simply visit us on Facebook at Covet Mag where you can post your query, and one of our team will reach out with the information... while you’re there, be sure to “like” us too! Designers in this issue: Peyton's Place Envy Paint and Design Ltd. Designer: Bahia Taylor 204.487.3666 130-1600 Kenaston Boulevard Winnipeg, MB R3P 0Y4 Black, White and Something in-between Covet Magazine 204.487.3666 covetmagazine.ca

Caellum's Crib Designer: Billy Crossman designstation73 204.487.3666 419 Graham Ave. Unit D Winnipeg, MB 204.297.9057 Small Space - Big Ideas Covet Magazine 204.487.3666 covetmagazine.ca

Lily's Pad For Space Sake Designer: Shauna Boychuk 807.468.7843 1824 Grant Ave Winnipeg, MB R3N 0N3

lemon curd, continued from p.70 For lemon curd, in small bowl whisk together eggs, sugar and lemon juice. Pour into small sauce pan. Cook over low heat, stirring with wooden spoon until thickened, about 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and mix in butter, piece by piece. Transfer to bowl. Cover and chill 1 hour or up to 2 days. Makes 1½ cups

French Onion Tart Dough 2 cups all purpose flour 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt ½ cup unsalted butter, cubed ½ cup ice water

Filling 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 medium white onions peeled and sliced thinly 1 egg ½ cup heavy cream ½ tsp salt

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Thank you for taking the time to get this far! If you enjoyed our Spring 2013 issue of Covet perhaps you might give your patronage to our advertisers. Their support has allowed us to create what you have enjoyed. Artful Owl Benjamin Moore & Co. Ltd. Birchwood Art Gallery CDECA Classic Fireplaces Ecotones Eckstein Design Group Envy Paint and Design Ltd. Expedia Travel Flatlanders Flooring For Space Sake Hard Wired Electric Hinge Design Hunter Douglas Gallagher Group J and M Window and Door Co. Linden Ridge Eye Care Linden Ridge Orthodontics MPD Glass Manitoba Hydro Over and Above Custom Homes The Floor Show The Wine House Wicker World 1/8 freshly ground pepper pinch freshly grated nutmeg

For dough, place flour and salt in food processor and pulse to combine. Add butter and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add ice water with machine running, drop by drop until dough slightly comes together. Wrap and chill for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 375°F. On lightly floured surface roll out dough to fit 10 –inch tart pan. Cover and let rest in refrigerator 15 minutes. Line tart shell with foil and then dried beans (this will prevent crust from lifting up). Bake for 20 minutes or until bottom is lightly brown. Remove from oven and cool. In medium skillet, melt butter with olive oil over medium high heat. Add onions and cook until soft and tender, about 15 minutes. Let cool. Whisk egg with cream in medium bowl; season with salt, pepper, and vnutmeg. Add onions and toss; place mixture in tart shell and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until filling is set. Let cool slightly; gently remove tart from pan.


Local Artists World Wide Appeal

hot blogs http://mocoloco.com MOCO LOCO is a slick site with a hardcore focus on all forms of contemporary design. If modern is your thing, it's worth a click to check out their reviews and recommendations on everything you'd hope to find in a state-of-the-art space, from furniture and lighting to websites and audio-video components.

Upcoming Art Show

City

paintings by Michel Saint Hilaire Opening April 18th and on display until May 18th

http://thenester.com The NESTING PLACE is part DIY blog, and part decorating blog; it’s a blog about how to think about your home, and focus more on our own personal style. See how your current home can be the home you love with quick and easy ideas and fresh takes on old tricks. http://www.thecoolhunter.net Check out what’s cool in architecture, design, style, music, fashion and entertainment according to THE COOL HUNTER. A truly global hub for what's cool, thoughtful, innovative and original, this blog celebrates creativity in all of its modern manifestations. The blog keeps relevant by staying ahead of and outside of trends and fads — the fickle shifts in taste and style. The Cool Hunter digs deeper, finding tomorrow's icons and classic phenomena. http://www.younghouselove.com Sherry and John Petersik, self-proclaimed DIY dorks, like to learn as they go and share their adventures and misadventures with the world on YOUNG HOUSE LOVE. They spend their days doing projects, photographing them, writing posts, answering reader questions, coordinating giveaways, managing sponsors – and raising a two year old daughter. They recently published the Young House Love book, which became a New York Times Bestseller.

"Climb" acrylic on canvas by Michel St. Hilaire

v "Keep it Clean" acrylic on canvas by Michel St. Hilaire 6-1170 Taylor Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba 204.888.5840 800.822.5840 www.birchwoodartgallery.com main level gallery, ample parking Find us on Facebook

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design dilemma Hi Covet Magazine! Too big for one room - too small for two rooms ... not sure what to do!? We've lived in this house for four years, and for the first three years it was an adultfriendly living / television room, and then we had our son. It soon became a living / television / play room (with lots of toys). We just finished our basement and the television has already been moved downstairs and the toys are soon to follow (thank goodness) but that leaves us unsure of what do do with the space ... it seems too big for only one room (living room) yet too small to be two rooms (living-dining room). It is 17x14 feet with a beautiful coved ceiling (it sold me on the house) and a large window centred in the room. The room is open to the eat-in kitchen and I'm probably the only person not a fan of the open-concept, but I'm not a big fan of having the couch positioned where you are looking directly into the kitchen (i.e., a constant reminder of the dishes to be done). It is an awkward size with some permanent design features (ceiling & window) that seem to limit our options, and we're stuck on where to go - please help! Deanna

t h e s o lu t i o n Dear Deanna, A great first step in making two rooms from one is to delineate the floor space with area rugs. This will help to clearly define the areas. In the seating area, we suggest you add an additional green polka-dotted chair and remove the existing couch. There is simply not enough room for a couch and a dining area while still maintaining your preference to not have the sofa in front of the window. The addition of a wallmounted fireplace will add warmth to the room and create a focal point for the seating to be arranged around. Banquette style seating will allow for a dining table to be tucked into the corner and you can make use of some fun fabrics for the bench and dining chairs. Invest in a smaller dining table that can extend when needed for maximum versatility. A buffet will store dishes and serving ware for the dining area. The installation of a light fixture above the dining table will add much needed lighting and anchor

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the table in the room. Adding two floor lamps for the seating area, and two table lamps for the top of the buffet will give you more lighting options without the danger of running cords across the floor. Finally, wallpaper the whole room, paint the inside of the coved ceiling with some colour, add gorgeous drapery and accessorize the room with bright blues and greens...and voila a knock out entertaining space thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party ready!

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1. Ceiling Colour: Dill Pickle 2147-40 Benjamin Moore; 2. Trim Colour: Chantilly Lacy OC-65 Benjamin Moore; 3. Wall Paper: Joanne Fabrics Pattern #: 5038 Colour #: 37W6191; 5. Banquette Fabric: Joanne Fabrics Pattern: Spain Colour #: 67J6041; 4. Dining Chair Fabric: Joanne Fabrics Pattern: Posh Colour #: 68J6041; 6. Curtain Fabric: Joanne Fabrics Pattern: Whisper Colour #: 66J6041; Dining Area Rug: Surya Aros; Living Area Rug: Surya Forum; Fire Place: PurFlame Orinda Ethanol Biofuel UL/ULC Listed Fireplace; Side Tables: Sun Pan Imports Rocco End Table - Green; Pendant Light: Torre & Tagus Sphere Mesh Pendant Lamp - Turquoise; Table Lamps: Uttermost Meena; Floor Lamps: Uttermost Civita; Dining Accessories: Torre & Tagus Swirl Salad Bowl & Swirl Fruit Bowl - Green; Coffee Table Accessories: Torre & Tagus Swirl Oval Platter - Green; Buffet Accessories: Torre & Tagus Mini Lustre Turquoise Vases; Pillows: Torre & Tagus Tessa Pleated Pillow Square - Green

Design by Bahia Taylor and Kassia Woloshyn of Envy Paint and Design Ltd.

Do you have a design dilemma? Send us your questions and some photographs to info@covetmagazine.ca for your opportunity to receive free design advice from the talented design team at Covet!

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Covet Spring 2013  

Modern Living with a Prairie Twist

Covet Spring 2013  

Modern Living with a Prairie Twist

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