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Courtney Richeson 2016

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courtney richeson Undergraduate Portfolio North Carolina State University 2016

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education North Carolina State University B.Arch, Bachelors of Architecture Fall 2015- Spring 2016 North Carolina State University BEDA, Bachelors of Environmental Design + Architecture Honors, Summa Cum Laude Fall 2011- Spring 2015 Prague Institute Study Abroad Fall 2014

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Honors + activities AIA Triangle Scholarship

Shawcroft Drawing Prize

First Place, Merit based

Second place

Fall 2015

Fall 2013 Nominee

Elizabeth B. Lee Scholarship

Fall 2013, 2014, & 2015

Merit based Fall 2015- Spring 2016

North Carolina Concrete Masonry Unit Competition Second place Spring 2014

Award for Design Achievement in the BED-A Program Graduation award Spring 2015

Summa Cum Laude North Carolina State University Graduating Class of 2015

Westmoreland Scholarship Merit based Fall 2014- Spring 2015

Experience Smith Sinnett Architecture Raleigh, NC Summer 2014, Spring 2015 Hord, Coplan, Macht Baltimore, MD Summer 2015

Louis Sullivan Masonry Competition First place Spring 2014

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Contents

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RICA

Bridge to the Sound

Lofted

The Raleigh Bicycle Station

p. 6

p. 20

p. 30

p. 46


The Common Bond

Compromised Context

p. 54

p. 66

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raleigh institute of contemporary art

ARC 500 Professor Matt Griffith Fall 2015 Objective Design an art institute for the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh (CAM Raleigh). Important features include a sculpture garden, assembly hall, display plane, and library.

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM, RALEIGH

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A Parti

B Program

Learning

Making

Train Site

Final Product

Concept Connecting Art and Process to the Urban Context The scheme for this project is primarily

panels and provides a glimpse into the

The library, which is the primary

driven by the unique features of the site

process of creating art.

learning space, is located at the top

and attempts to establish a connection

floor. This is followed by three floors of

between the activity of the interior

The Institute is comprised of two

production spaces, housing the studios

and the urban context. A railway runs

volumes; the large skeletal volume

and critique spaces. The gallery is

along the western edge of the site and

contains the library, studio spaces,

located on the first floor where the veil

begins to bridge over north street as the

and gallery. The smaller more opaque

of the screen has been lifted to reveal

topography drops approximately 14 feet

volume contains the lecture hall, admin

the train, but also the final products.

from south to north. This is reflected in

spaces, and the classrooms. The two

These parts of program are connected

the facade which consists of corrugated

volumes have been arranged to appear

by a grand stair that is positioned

perforated metal panel that has been

as if they slid past one another, creating

between the screenwall and the sliding

raised from the gallery floor such that

a fore court at the main entrance and a

display panels. This movement through

a pedestrian on the street would be

larger sculpture garden. The process of

process spaces further establishes

able to see through the building to the

making begins with learning, is followed

the connection between the building’s

train beyond. A large void in the screen

by making, and ends with the final

occupants, their art, and the street

creates a display plane which allows

product. The program is arranged in

experience.

pedestrians to view art on movable

section to reflect this process.

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Learning

Making

Final Product


C Reciprocity of Site Monumental Stair + Display Plane

D Reciprocity of Site Display Plane + Gallery

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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10


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avenue

glenwood

glenwood avenue

W

W

north

Main Entrance into Gallery

Main Entrance into Studios, Gallery Library Gallery,

Gallery, Studios, Library

north

street street

Exit from Lecture Hall to Sculpture Courtyard

Lecture Hall, Administration, Classrooms

Exit from Lecture Hall to Sculpture Courtyard

Lecture Hall, Administration, Classrooms

N

N

Street

Street West

West

harrington street

harrington street


w

n o r t h

S t r e e t

A A

B B

N

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

W e s t

Plan in Context

S t r e e t


RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Site Section

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

First Floor + Fifth Floor


B Structure Diagram

A

C Perspective of Gallery

B

C

D

B E

F

G

E H

1

2

3

4 5

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Section AA

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


Perspective of the Sculpture Courtyard

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Section BB

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


Perspective of the Monumental Stair

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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bridge to the sound

ARC 402 Professor David Hill Spring 2015 Objective Design a boathouse for the UNC Coastal Studies Institute. Partners Adam Dunn

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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Concept This proposal is focused on creating a boathouse that is incorporated with an educational boardwalk, allowing the community to become more connected with the Croatan Sound and its surrounding seascape. It is located on a small canal with access to the Croatan Sound and other smaller canals, which facilitates an explorative kayaking

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experience.

1

The boathouse is elevated so that it can be read from a distance, appearing as a line on the landscape. It also acts as a covered bridge, spanning over the canal. The path passes through

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the boathouse, making it become a part of the path as opposed to a destination.

6 4

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A Exploded Axonometric 1. Oar Storage 2. Slotted Membrane 3. Structure 4. Kayaks

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5. Lifejacket Storage 6. Boardwalk 7. Kayak Launch

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


c on n e ctin g t o h amm ock ar e a

r e s e ar ch f acility

p r opos e d e ducation al b oar dwalk + f ootpath

croatan sound

p r opos e d boath ous e f or e ducat i o nal kayak exc ursi o ns

Site Plan

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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Bridge to the Sound Connecting the community to the Croatan Sound through experiencing the seascape.

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A Storage

B Slotted membrane for ventilation

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

C View to sound


ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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Lofted: housing for csi

ARC 402 Professor David Hill Spring 2015 Objective Design housing for the UNC Coastal Studies Institute that would accommodate students and professors Partners Adam Dunn

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


ABANDONED BEACH HOUSE

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The Horizontal Axis Our initial response to this site, in a boathouse proposal, was to express the horizontality of the landscape. We proposed a line on the landscape in the form of a bridge.

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


The Vertical Axis With this project we realized that the landscape is more nuanced. Vertical elements that break the horizon are few and scattered, but they are special moments and means of shelter against a harsh landscape. We sought to achieve this essence by building not in the plain, but in the forest.

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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Experiencing the Site

Harnessing the Site

Fostering Community

The CSI campus exists now as a

Placing the residential complex in the

The atmosphere of the Coastal Studies

research building and a boathouse.

woods offers many advantages. The

Institute is heavily influenced by both

These are linked by a series of

northern trees provide protection from

the community created within the

landscaped retention ponds through

cooler northerly winds in the winters,

campus bounds and the surrounding

which people can meander along

and intense beam light from the south

community of Roanoke Island. Staff

small footpaths from one to the other.

and west during the summers. The land

congregates in the boathouse for oyster

The experience is one of openness,

elevation minimizes the height each

roasts, researchers collaborate at local

magnified by the immense scale of

building must be elevated by as a flood

cafes, some bike to work, some even

the flat, surrounding landscape. We

prevention strategy.

kayak. Our proposed bike path, along

sought to both preserve this experience

which the residences are organized,

and create a new one by creating a

Leaving the main campus open allows

is an opportunity to incorporate the

residential complex not on the existing

for an unobstructed wind pattern

broader community into the CSI

site, but in a very different one: a

through the site, and therefore an

campus.

wooded area adjacent to the main

opportunity to harness wind power

campus.

to offset the electrical needs of our proposed residences. Our two

This presents an entirely new and

proposed wind turbines are placed

unexpected experience of the site:

prominently along the bike path

from a lofted perspective amidst the

as objects to be celebrated and

trees. Each building is oriented to

meandered through.

take advantage of views to the north (woods) and south (Croatan Sound).

Additionally, this site plan creates

These north-south views are more

distance between living and

advantageous from a solar perspective

working facilities, which is not

than the east-west views offered on the

only psychologically beneficial, but

main campus.

physiologically beneficial through creating opportunities to commute by

This land is owned by the state of

foot or bicycle along the proposed path.

North Carolina and could feasibly be purchased for use as CSI residences.

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


Site Plan

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Wind Protection

B Views

C Summer Solstice

This diagram shows how the

This diagram show how each

This diagram shows the shadows

surrounding forest protects the

building is oriented to take

cast across the site at summer

residences from cooler northerly

advantage of views to the north

solstice.

winds during the winter.

(woods) and south (Croatan Sound).

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

Site Concept Diagrams


D Winter Solstice

E Circulation

F Renewable Energies

This diagram shows the shadows

This diagram shows the proposed

This diagram shows where

cast across the site at winter

bike path that leads from the

renewable energy is generated.

solstice.

broader community through the

Two wind turbines along the bike

residences and into the main CSI

path act in conjunction with a

campus

photovoltaic array atop the existing CSI building, which is already equipped to support such an array.

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


Ground Floor Plan

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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Lofted Rendering from Across the Sound

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ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

Rendering of the Ground Floor


Rendering of the Reading Nook

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Foundation

B First Floor Structure

C Upper Floors Structure

D Lateral Reinforcement

Concrete piles with pile caps

Steel Frame with Moment Connections,

Steel Frame with Pin Connections,

Steel Beams with Pin Connections

Concrete Floor Slab

Concrete Floor Slabs

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA


Sustainable Strategies Diagram 1. Standing Seam Aluminum The east and west faces of each building are clad with lightgray standing seam aluminum for both durability in wind and water events and reflectivity against the summer sun. 2. Fiber Cement Board Rainscreen The southern face is clad with a higher ratio of opaque 1

material to reduce solar gain during the summer. The cladding here is a light tone of fiber cement board, finished to resemble wood, for both durability and wind and water events and reflectivity against the summer sun. 3. Double-Insulated Glass Double-insulated glass saves energy on conditioning.

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4. Opaque Door An opaque door controls solar gains. 5. Louvers Horizontal louvers protect the glazing on the south face from solar gains. 2 3

6. Cross Ventilation Cross ventilation naturally cools and circulates air throughout each building, both in plan and section. 7. Continuous Insulation Continuous insulation wraps around the entire building

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beneath the standing seam aluminum cladding. 6 8. Rock Infiltration Pit Rock infiltration pits slow the runoff from the building roofs,

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preventing erosion in addition to capturing debris. 9. Stack Effect 4

A window in the loft allows hot air from the rest of the building to escape on days when the humidity level permits. 10. Porous Pavers (Not Shown) Porous pavers reduce the surface area of pavement and therefore prevent erosion.

ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA

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The Raleigh Bike Station

ARC 302 Professor Jamey Glueck Spring 2014 Objective Design a bike station, positioned in front of the proposed Raleigh Union Train Station designed by Clearscapes Architects. Use the plaza as the site, also include a cafe, bike shop, and visitors center, in addition to the plaza.

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


WAREHOUSE DISTRICT, RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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S WEST STREET NEW UNION STATION

W MARTIN STREET

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

Site Map


Concept The goal for this project was to create a building that was interwoven with the ground to create a non-building building that would maximize the plaza space, allowing it to become a catalyst for movement and circulation. A Program

B Parti

C Embed

This was accomplished by embedding parts of the program, the visitors center and bike storage, to meet the same grade as the train entrance, while leaving the shops at grade

in

with the street. This allows

Tra

the plaza to be draped on top, enabling visitors to experience the city and the trains from different perspectives. Slices of circulation were inserted o

sh

between the two volumes to

in pp g

storage, and visitors center. The

in

plaza features a roof garden

n io at st

s

r Ca

a tr

es

k bi

allow access to the shops, bike

with paths that weave up and down, providing a space for

D Circulation

E Plaza

bikers to perform tricks, and test bikes from the bike shop, while also providing a space for people to meander and enjoy Raleigh’s skyline.

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


BB

A Ground Plan

AA

B Sections AA + BB

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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S West STreet

train station

w martin street

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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The common Bond

ARC 302 Professor Jamey Glueck Spring 2014 Objective Design an education facility that provides science teaching classrooms and labs, faculty offices, and common spaces to promote positive interactions among faculty, students, and staff, and to sustain evolving technologies. The project will be located on NCSU University Plaza, known as the “Brickyard”, and will be replacing an existing building, Harrelson Hall, while linking to and creating a new “front” to Cox and Dabney Halls. The proposed building should acknowledge the pedestrian nature of the Brickyard and provide an inviting transition from the building into the open space. It is required that masonry be used, and it is encouraged that it is used in an innovative way.

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


SAS HALL, NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

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Concept

hillsborough street

The Common bond is a proposal for North Carolina State University’s science commons building. The driving principle of this scheme is based on the idea of “bond,” which is present in masonry construction, the sciences, and social interaction. The bridges and courtyards become like the mortar between bricks, bonding not only the two proposed buildings, but also the existing Dabney and Cox hall, and therefor creating an interconnected science

Brickyard

complex. These spaces become catalysts for formal and informal social interaction among students and professors, prompting the exchange of ideas, an essential component for an education and research facility. The skin of the building is made of metal that has been perforated to resemble a running bond pattern, which highlights the importance of the bond in masonry construction and allows

stinson

light to filter into the spaces. This light material is juxtaposed with the stereotomic quality of a brick interior. The interior pattern resembles a running bond where bricks have removed

Dabney

to create a pattern of shadows along the main corridors. Together these materials celebrate the importance of brick on NC State’s campus.

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

Site Plan

Cox

drive


A Program

B Split

C Embed

D Rotate for better daylighting

E Resize to resemble brick types

F Creating bond

G Extending bond

H Bond becomes social component within science complex

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


7 5

6 2

5

9

9

9

9

Ground Floor Plan Key

7 10

1. Visualization Lab 2. Utility Room 3. 99 Person Scale Up Classroom 4. 45 Person Scale Up Classroom 5. Bathrooms 6. 75 Person Classroom 7. 40 Person Classroom 8. Labs

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9. Tutorial Center + Conference 2 3

5 5

Rooms

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10. Lobby 11. Faculty Offices

4

12. Dean’s Suite Offices 13. Dean’s Office 14. Break Room 15. Faculty Collaboration Rooms

Ground Floor Plan

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Elevations

B Circulation Diagram

C Aerial View

Interior Circulation Exterior Circulation

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


C Three Dimensional Detail

Screen Wall

D Structural Diagram

Spacer

Running Bond with Bricks Removed Revealing Second Layer of Brick

Second Layer of Brick Steel Frame Steel Stud

Channel

Rigid Core

Composite Metal Decking Outrigger

Wide Flange Insulated Metal Panel Double Glazing Mullion

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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The Common Bond Creating an interconnected science complex for social interaction & the exchange of ideas

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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A Juxtaposition of Materials: Exterior Metal Skin vs. Interior Brick Core The metal skin with perforations emphasizes the mortar allows light to filter to interior. The brick core features the void of bricks, and emphasizes the stereotomic quality of bricks.

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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA


B Section Perspective

Faculty Offices

Dean’s Suite

Scale-Up Classroom

Laboratory

Scale-Up Classroom

Laboratory

Visualization Lab

Tutorial Center

C Material Concept Diagram Metal Skin Brick Core

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

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Compromised Context

ARC 490 Professor Adam Gebrian Fall 2014 Objective Create a proposal for a site located within Prague 10.

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC


VIEW FROM Most legií, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

Site Plan of Prague


The Problem Informal Urban Greenspaces are vacant lots or voids of greenspace that have become a part of the urban fabric. The site is beautiful as it is. Ideally, nothing would be built on it. However, Prague’s city planning team have recently discussed the need to increase Prague’s density. Overtime, sites like this will be seen as opportunities for formal development. A The Site The Question The question: Is the site worth conserving? The answer: Yes, but why? It is a major perimeter of a frequently used corridor in the community and offers ecosystem variety. It has become integrated with the urban fabric and shows the accumulation of time through the ephemeral quality of nature. The Approach The approach to conserving the site is to implement an informal and minimal development in phases on a needs base system. The two greenspaces read as one but the southern, more heavily vegetated greenspace is not accessible.

B Making Prague more dense

B

Phase One A walkway based on the existing paths would be extended into the site, providing the community with views of the vineyard and the ability to experience the site in a new way. A small student housing tower would become a node along the path. The tower would also provide a shared exit onto the side stairs. Phase Two, Three, & Four Overtime more housing towers would be added based on the current needs. The goal of the proposal is to find a way to add to the site without destroying its integrity. The end result is a compromise of building and site.

C Formal Development

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

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The Approach The approach to conserving the site is to implement an informal and minimal development in phases on a needs base system.

A The Site

B Phase One

C Phase One Continued

D Phase Two

E Phase Three

F Phase Four

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC


G Site Plan

H Floor Plan

I Site Section

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC


PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC


A Section

Housing Unit (Bedroom, Bathroom)

Common Space (Kitchen, Laundry)

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

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Fin

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Courtney Richeson Portfolio 2016