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JUNE & JULY 2013

future so bright a hot jolt of summer’s best colors

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culture clubbing how one man is bringing the party to boston’s art scene


CONTENTS & DEPARTMENTS

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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CURATED // YELLOW FEVER

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SOCIETY // THE FRONT ROW Who wore what, when, and why. And more importantly, how they made the party better for it.

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VANITY // BEAUTY BLITZ A step-by-step action plan to get you ready—and fast—for a summer of looking utterly amazing.

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ABODE // LIVING ON EASY STREET The balance between elegance and ease is never an easy one to strike.

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ARMOIRE // CHROMOPHILIA Local color starts here, in the best and brightest of this season's hot-hued clothing collections.

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ARMOIRE // PRISM BREAK From daring to demure, there’s no better time than summer to add vibrant accessories to your color wheelhouse.

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COUP D'ÉTAT // oeuvre achiever How one libretto-singing former chemist has made galvanizing Boston’s artists community his new forte.

ON THE COVER photograph by JOEL BENJAMIN art direction & styling by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD Hair by KAI LOPES, AVANTI SALON Makeup by JEREMY STONE featuring ESTELLA, for MAGGIE INC.

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Yigal Azrouël Stella McCartney Michael Kors Balenciaga Proenza Schouler A.L.C. Barbara Bui Helmut Lang Chloé Veronica Beard Chris Benz Edun Camilla James

Yigal Azrouël Resort 2013 printed moto jacket with leather sleeves.


Alexandra Hall Editor-in-Chief Joseph Gordon Cleveland Creative Director Austyn Ellese Mayfield Managing Editor Michael Blanding Editor-at-Large MICHAEL TrOTMAN Copy Editor CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Katherine Bowers Amanda Hark Robin Hauck Jolyon Helterman Bernard Leed Erin Byers Murray Lisa Pierpont STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Marie Wu CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Joel Benjamin Sadie Dayton Conor Doherty Tristan Govignon Christopher Huang Eric Levin Russ Mezikofsky Bob Packert Cory Stierley Matt Thoman Jessica Weiser ART & DESIGN INTERNS Caitlin Coyne Alexa Robertiello EDITORIAL INTERNS Diana Burmistrovich Basia Gordon Valeria Navarro Kelsey Prisby Heidi Rose CHERYL KAUFMAN Senior Client Manager TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT salut@coupboston.com COUPBOSTON.COM 20 Park Plaza, Suite 1105 Boston, MA 02116


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR / COUP BOSTON / JUNE & JULY 2013

fast forward Rivers of ink have already been spilled about the Marathon Monday bombings since they happened, and I won’t be adding to their still-rising tide here. This magazine was created to celebrate how Boston as a city is changing— to encourage the spirit that spurs that evolution, and to help nudge it forward toward a more complex and spirited version of itself. And that’s precisely what the city has done—change, evolve, move forward—since that April day. Just look at the lifestyle and hospitality industries alone: In record time, 100-plus chefs from every corner of the city and beyond had jumped on board to volunteer for Boston Bites Back, joining Ken Oringer and Ming Tsai to raise funds for The One Fund last month (page 18). The event took over the entirety of Fenway Park and packed it with food lovers by the thousands. I was proud to be on that event committee, but I was also proud of plenty of so many other Boston businesses, media, and people who don’t ordinarily work together, who teamed up to donate their time and resources. In a similar show of unity, the local fashion community is right now pooling its resources and planning a major fashion fundraiser—you heard it here first—with local designers and shows at The W Hotel. Keep an ear out for details in the next few weeks: Proceeds will be some of the first to go beyond The One Fund, directly toward a citywide memorial. The shows promise to be not only something to keep us all moving forward, but also something to look forward to. And now here we are on the cusp of summer, faced with another inspiring, albeit more material, phenomenon:

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>>> The editor, trying to decide which of summer’s hyper-colorful fashion collections to wear first.

namely, a deluge of clothes befitting our sunniest season. Brighter than ever, in kaleidoscopic prints, trippy swirls, and with accessories that stun with their bravado, it’s all but impossible to behold without feeling a jolt of adrenaline. Consider it just one more thing to look forward to right now. Happy summer.

Alexandra Hall Editor-in-Chief alex@coupboston.com


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Thursday June 27 th 2013 6:00pm-10:00pm

Pier 4, Courageous Sailing Center Charlestown Navy Yard One First Avenue, Boston MA $125.00 per ticket Lobster Bake, Live Band, Complimentary Beer & Wine, Lawn Games Purchase Tickets: http://online.ccfa.org/piermadness2013


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JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / CURATED

CURATED

What the finicky editorial COUP crew is donning, devouring, hoarding, imbibing, inhaling, and generally lusting after right now. by JOSEPH GOrDON CLEVELAND, ALEXANDrA hall and Austyn ellese mayfield 1. A SUITE AT THE CANARY HOTEL, SANTA BARBARA Recommending the Canary Hotel is really just a thinly veiled excuse for me to make a break for some bliss in my hometown. But it’s also a damn good hotel, with easy access to incredible restaurants and shops, historic sites, and the beaches that earned Santa Barbara the title “California’s Riviera.” From $525 per night at canarysantabarbara.com —JOSEPH GORDON CLEVELAND, CREATIVE DIRECTOR 2. MISTRAL’S PINEAPPLE CARPACCIO It’s not on the brunch menu all the time. But when it is, go after it—with two hands. Sliced to an astounding thinness, dripping with fresh juice and olive oil, and cut with dollops of smooth sea salt and tart lime sorbet, it’s a study in brilliant simplicity. $5 at mistralbistro.com —ALEXANDRA HALL, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 3. AMBER PENDANT LAMP Los Angeles–based, ethically- and environmentally-minded Cisco Brothers has created an industrial-chic fixture capable of lending an artisanal quality to even the most high-minded of rooms. $465 at mohr-mcpherson.com —JGC 4. TIEKS COMPACT FLAT Walking around shoeless in a beach town is all fun and games until somebody gets glass in her foot. Pack a chic pair of portable flats like these, and you’ll embody la vie boheme yet still get around your destination unscathed. $165 at tieks.com —AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD, MANAGING EDITOR

5. ROUVALIS LEMON ZEST FLORAL ARRANGEMENT Yellow, but still mellow: The ranunculi chosen for this bouquet jump, but don’t overwhelm their foils— sweet-smelling hydrangeas, stock, and Asclepias. Starting at $60.95 at rouvalisflowers.com —AH 6. NICOLE PORTER MODERN SALAD SETTING Summer dinner parties: When you gather your dearest friends for food, quality time, and to show them that your dinnerware is way cooler than the crap they had last year. Nicole Porter’s creations all seem to say, “Eat your heart out, then be a doll and pass the vinaigrette.” $100 per set at nicoleporter.com —AEM 7. FLUX CHAIR Finally, my eighth-grade obsession with origami has found a place in my adult life—and my perennial urge to redecorate my patio. $198 at room68online.com —AEM 8. SOLEY ORGANICS MJUK It may not get particularly warm in Iceland, but the folks there still know how to groom right for the solstice—with an herbal exfoliator perfect for rejuvenating beach-battered skin. $52 at soleyorganics.com —AEM 9. ETRO CLUTCH It’s the sharpest architectural shape on the shelves. It’s snakeskin. It perfectly balances cut-through-the-neutrals canary and make-nice-with-the-neighbors cream. In short, it’s perfect. $1,735 at luisaviaroma.com —JGC

10. BOMBAY COCKTAIL RING On cloudy summer days, my vitamin D supplement of choice comes in the form of jewelry like this eight-stone citrine number. Warning: Onlookers will have a hard time not staring directly into it. $265 at sikarajewelry.com —AEM LEMON LUST TART Perhaps the most aptly titled dessert in Boston, this pastry from Flour Bakery is just that: lustworthy. Take it home with you and see for yourself. $35 at flourbakery.com —JGC PRETTYOLOGY OPENING After teaching Boston the value of perfect brows and lashes more than a decade ago, makeup maestro Julie Michaud has just rendered our fair city even fairer by opening Julie Michaud Prettyology—the Newbury Street “beauty lab” that’s home to her micropigmentation, specialized facials, and a slew of other innovations. prettyology.com —AH CHANEL BIJOU SHADES Ibiza, West Palm, or Edgartown: It doesn’t matter where your sunny spot of choice is, so long as these lenses accompany you. They’re fronted by dark tortoise and flanked by intricate, opulent pale gold filigree that’s been polished to a shine nearly as bright as the rays they protect you from. $1,050 at lunetteoptic.com —AH

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JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / SOCIETY

THE FRONT ROW Between the food, fashion, and fundraising throwdowns lately, the city’s been abuzz with impressive shindigs. Foremost was Boston Bites Back, the momentous benefit for The One Fund organized by chefs Ming Tsai and Ken Oringer—a night that took over Fenway Park with thousands of Bostonians who gathered to dine on food from more than 100 of Boston’s top chefs. Then there was Create, chef Louis DiBicarri’s newest brainchild, which brought together six chefs with six artists, and paired them up to produce collaborative installations. At Pivot Boston’s event, held in partnership with One Medical, 120 women met up to swap ideas and inspiration for endeavors both personal and professional, all to benefit Dress For Success, Boston. And at the annual luncheon, Party in the Park, champagne flowed under the tents as ladies wearing some of the most lavish hats around schmoozed and dined to raise money to support the Emerald Necklace Conservancy. photographed by MARIE WU


SOCIETY / COUP BOSTON / JUNE & JULY 2013

the venue PARTY IN THE PARK Kelleher rose garden May 15, 2013

This page, top to bottom: ASHLEY BERNON, LAURA BALDINI, AISTE FEINBERG, AND JAIME EISENBERG; MAGGIE AHEARN AND JOSHUA JANSON. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Krista Ference AND COURTNEY FORRESTER; JULIETTE BUNCH AND KATE MCCUSKER; ALLI ACHTMEYER AND HER MOTHER.

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SOCIETY / COUP BOSTON / JUNE & JULY 2013

the venue BOSTON BITES BACK Fenway Park May 15, 2013

This page, top to bottom: MORE THAN 100 OF BOSTON'S TOP CHEFS; KEN ORINGER AND MING TSAI; KELLY EARLY, CAITLIN AHEARN, AND LOUIS DIBICCARI.

the venue CREATE BOSTON CENTER FOR ADULT EDUCATION June 2, 2013

Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Alex crabb; brian young and mike hammaker; kevin stanton.

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SOCIETY / COUP BOSTON / JUNE & JULY 2013

the venue PIVOT BOSTON Space with a soul May 10, 2013

clockwise, from top left: Roxanna Sarmiento, Morra Aarons-Mele, Christine Koh and Whitney Johnson; Treats by Sweet Cupcakes; Honey Jo Hersey; Mingling and style stations; Sue Thirwall; Kim Todd.

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BEAUTY BLITZ Status update: It’s June. Half the year is gone. You’ve made pretty much zero headway on any of your 2013 resolutions, and you’re staring down the barrel of a summer’s worth of events for which you’re woefully unprepared, appearance-wise. Sure, it would be great to escape for a month of no-holds-barred beautification to get back on track, but we all know that’s not going to happen. So what now? Cue up an action plan. Or a miracle. Or maybe just a miraculously effective action plan that takes the guesswork out of the equation. The following quick, high-impact products and services all have serious ROI, and can get you to the best version of yourself ASAP, without throwing your schedule out of whack. by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD

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JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / VANITY

Goldwell Colorance Hair Gloss

Because // It’s too early in the season to try to pass off what’s happening on your head as “beach hair” Start to Finish // 40 minutes ROI Score // 4 out of 5 stars

Early summertime weather in New England can be crazier than a Real Housewives star who’s off her meds, and all of those dramatic humidity swings can be torture for our hair. The result: dull, sad-looking locks in desperate need of attention, and resignation to perfunctory ponytails. While a new set of highlights and a deep condition are probably somewhere in your near future, full processes aren’t the only way to perk up your mane. Demicolor treatments like the impressive Goldwell Colorance line offer a time-efficient and costeffective way to boost your beauty quotient (and your morale) between coloring. Using the innovative new IntraLipid delivery system, Colorance gently opens the hair cuticle, penetrating the strand’s surface to refresh existing color, condition and improve the structure of the hair, and leave a high-impact shine that can last from four to six weeks. The lower levels of ammonia make the gloss process easier on the hair, and the no-foil application makes for a shorter stint at the salon. —Starting at $40. The Parlor Salon & Apothecary 398 Washington St., Wellesley P // 781-237-2121 theparlorsalonandapothecary.com 25


The Bar Method Boston

Because // You need daytime bar to offset all the calories from your favorite nighttime bar Start to Finish // 60 minutes on the dot ROI Score // 4 out of 5 stars Midday workouts often boil down to choosing between the lesser of two evils: either you phone it in to preserve some vestige of a professional appearance for your afternoon meetings, or you sweat it up like a champ and skulk back into the office hoping someone burns popcorn in the break room to throw off your scent. So for an actual workout that won’t sabotage your actual work, there’s The Bar Method. By fusing fat-burning interval training and controlled, precise muscle contractions called isometrics, the surprisingly aerobic workout creates high caloric burn as it increases muscle tone. The almost micromovements are intuitive but challenging, so there’s no time to daydream and no lag between sequences—meaning every second in the studio is being put to good use. Perhaps the most incredible thing about The Bar Method (other than the amazing bodies of the folks who’ve made this a staple of their fitness regimen) is that no one in the room is sweating. The temperature-controlled room is kept at a constant 72ºF, so you can get your workout on without worrying about your makeup running off. —$125 for a new-client unlimited monthly pass. The Bar Method Boston 234 Clarendon St., Boston P // 617-236-4455 boston.barmethod.com


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / VANITY

Kate Somerville DermalQuench Oxygen Treatment

Because // Your face is beginning to bear a striking resemblance to your python-skin clutch Start to Finish // 20 minutes ROI Score // 5 out of 5 stars There aren’t many products that give the term “instant” a good name. Instant coffee? Gag. Instant credit report? Wasted a half hour. Instant lotto? Haven’t won a dime. And with the beauty industry dropping the “i-word” more often than Amanda Bynes posts selfies, we’ve become justifiably skeptical of facial treatments that are quick to play on our cravings for immediate gratification. But when America’s reigning dermis diva, Kate Somerville, promises “age-defying results instantly” with her DermalQuench service, she’s actually not blowing smoke. What she is blowing is oxygen. Using a compression machine that looks like a mini R2-D2 and an airbrush applicator, a special hyaluronic (read: supermoisturizing) serum is combined with O2 to penetrate skin, help remove bacteria, stimulate cell regeneration, and add immediate luminosity— leaving the face firm but not taut, and dewy without feeling greasy. While the treatment originated in Somerville’s posh L.A. medi-clinic, the same exact pampering is offered as a complimentary service at the Kate Somerville retail counter at Neiman Marcus. Which means you can come back from lunch looking noticeably younger without being considerably poorer. NEIMAN MARCUS 100 Copley Place, Boston P // 617-536-3660, ext. 2080 neimanmarcus.com

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Mother Juice

Because // You’re going to regret eating another burrito Start to Finish // 10 minutes or less ROI Score // 3.5 out of 5 stars If we truly are what we eat, then on any given lunch hour, most of us are often gross, weird, or completely boring. Lodged precariously somewhere between the most important meal of the day (“Don’t forget to eat breakfast!”) and the most celebrated meal of the day (“Let’s make dinner plans!”), lunch can become a veritable no-man’s-land of fast but unremarkable and/or unhealthy options. So bring on Mother Juice. With a rotating queue of cold-pressed, pulp-free elixirs and smoothies made from fresh, locally sourced produce, Boston’s first juice truck is foolproof healthiness. The full benefits of juicing are still being explored; certain juices may prevent cancers, increase energy, lower cholesterol, or promote weight loss. But one thing’s unquestionable: The beet/carrot/apple/orange/jalapeño blend at Mother Juice is better for you than anything out of the lobby vending machine, and so delish you’ll curse the memories of downing pub fries in your cubicle. —Starting at $6.50. Visit facebook.com/motherjuice for daily truck location.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / VANITY

GLO Brilliant Personal TeethWhitening Device

Because // It’s time to stop doing closelipped smiles in all of your photos Start to Finish // 35 minutes ROI Score // 5 out of 5 stars The reported $383 million teeth-whitening industry numbers support what we already know: We’re all a little obsessed with getting a brighter smile. But between awkward drugstore products and expensive (and time-consuming) visits to the dentist, the quest for pristine pearly whites doesn’t give us much to smile about. That is, until renowned dentist and prosthodontist Dr. Jonathan B. Levine had a stroke of genius and introduced GLO Brilliant. The awardwinning GLO (short for “Guided Light Optic”) technology delivers the two things essential to successful whitening efforts: convenience and visible results. A specially formulated hydrogen peroxide gel applied directly to the upper and lower teeth is activated by a mouthpiece connected to a portable control box worn about the neck (it looks a little like a mouth guard attached to an iPod). Using four preset eight-minute intervals, the system whitens without pain or increasing tooth sensitivity. The design of the mouthpiece prevents the whitening oxygen from escaping from the tooth’s surface, making the treatment time effective and efficient. Best of all, the system’s hands-free mobile design is a major score for multitaskers. —$199 at gloscience.com

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Between fine and fashion jewelry, you'll find...

180 Linden Street, Wellesley, MA 02482 | 781.416.1800 | www.trustyourimpulse.com


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ABODE

living on easy street by JOSEPH GORDON CLEVELAND photographed by MATT THOMAN

The balance between elegance and ease is never an easy to one to strike. That’s especially true in Boston’s Beacon Hill, where the charms of its brownstones and row homes are protected not only by the neighborhood’s diligent architectural review but also by some of the most decidedly engaged residents in the city. Above all else, historic preservation prevails, and for that reason accommodating the needs of a modern family hoping to both entertain and relax comfortably can be a formidable challenge. But just off Mount Vernon, on a cobbled, tree-lined street, stands a renovated single-family brownstone that not only meets that challenge, it exceeds it. The late-19th-century home is a monument to the artistry of architect Juan Guillermo Uribe Rubio, of Pauli & Uribe Architects, and designer Kate McCusker of Theodore & Company, whose partnership began with this very project some years ago. The home brims with the tasteful appointments of its heritage—custom rugs, an artful mix of Continental furnishings, period-specific architectural details—but is also markedly modern in its use of light, scale, and readiness for entertaining, whether formal or casual. And while the home’s four floors each articulate a different plane of the homeowners’ needs, unlike so many of its neighbors, it isn’t simply a set of disconnected rooms and rambling narrow hallways. Instead, Uribe Rubio and McCusker have created a flow—from the tastefully relaxed ground-floor family room through the secondfloor master’s suite and up to the third-floor guest bedrooms and den—that’s elegant, of course, but above all else, easy.


An artful mix of Continental furnishings in muted hues forms the perfect frame for the homeowners’ growing collection of fine art, including the arresting cityscape immediately above the dramatic carved-stone fireplace. Above the sofa hangs a gold-leaf Federalist-inspired clock, a historic motif that’s repeated throughout the home’s first-floor entertaining spaces. Resting on the cocktail table is an arrangement of anemones from Marc Hall Design.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ABODE

VINE FESTIVAL A collection of classical objets punctuates this exquisitely overgrown garden on Pinckney Street. Photograph by Peter Vanderwarker.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ABODE

Hand-painted walls and traditional silk draperies serve as the perfect counterpoint to a suite of traditional English furnishings with intricate marquetry and sweeping curves. Period candlesticks and a dramatic gilded mirror are offset by an arrangement of viburnum, ferns, symphoricarpos, and parrot tulips from Marc Hall Design.


Uribe Rubio and McCusker reoriented the existing smaller-scale spaces on the third floor, resulting in a large, inviting den—which serves as both a comfortable screening room and an office—and two guest rooms that take full advantage of the home’s different exposures. Here, the homeowners’ oversized leather club chairs are accented by a Turkish rug and an antique mahogany armchair with carved lion’s head details. The bookcases and workstation, on which an arrangement of narcissus and tulips from Marc Hall Design rests, were designed by Pauli & Uribe.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ABODE

VINE FESTIVAL A collection of classical objets punctuates this exquisitely overgrown garden on Pinckney Street. Photograph by Peter Vanderwarker.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ABODE

To create a truly comfortable family room, Uribe Rubio and McCusker completely redesigned the garden-level space, shifting the room’s orientation to exploit its long, narrow dimensions and to maximize the space’s limited light. The result is a warm-but-easy entertaining space, punctuated by exposed beams—which the design team discovered during renovations and replicated with reclaimed wood to continue the motif—and a suite of nooks to suit the room’s various purposes. On the left, the brick arch, revealed during renovation, was transformed into a focal point with the addition of a sleek cabinet, inset with copper panels repurposed from an antique pot.


The sweeping arch was preserved to create a cozy nook, outfitted with a suite of sumptuous linens in a calming palette of neutrals punctuated by rich reds. The walls are upholstered in suede, lending a subtle textural element to the entire space. On the traditional chairside table rests an arrangement of narcissus and tulips from Marc Hall Design.


Jeff Lahens, Men’s Fashion Director

Men’s

Style

Retail

Strategy

Connect brands to their audience in today’s social media and digitally driving world.

www.DressCodeBoston.com

@DressCodeBoston


84 LEONARD STREET Belmont, MA 02478 (617) 484-4777 leonandco.com


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE

C

hro路ma路phil路ia noun [kroh-muh-fil-ee-uh] origin: Greek/Latin

1:

a. an unabashed obsession with color b. an intense attraction to or stimulation by hue and saturation

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pigment fixation

3. the compulsive indulgence in prismatic dressing that coincides with the onset of summer. photographed by JOEL BENJAMIN art directed & styled by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD

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THIS PAGE PRINTED TOP, $56, AT PRETTY SNAKE. LEGGINGS, $225, AT DANIELA CORTE. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN SHOES, $1,075 AT NEIMAN MARCUS. OPPOSITE PAGE CHANEL SUNGLASSES, $340, AND PANACEA EARRINGS, $45. BOTH AT NEIMAN MARCUS. BIKINI TOP AND PANTS, PRICE UPON REQUEST, AT SINESIA KAROL. DOLCE VITA SHOES, $158, AT CRUSH BOUTIQUE.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE

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DRESS, $175, at Jonathan joseph peters. ALEXIS BITTAR NECKLACE, $295, AT NEIMAN MARCUS. 50


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE

this page SCARF, STYLIST’S OWN. RAG & BONE SWEATER, $195, AT THE TANNERY. ALEXIS BITTAR NECKLACE, $225, AT NEIMAN MARCUS. BIKINI BOTTOM, $88, AT DANIELA CORTE. opposite page SHOW ME YOUR MUMU DRESS, $164, AT CRUSH BOUTIQUE. BELT, STYLIST’S OWN. BADGLEY MISCHKA BRACELETS, $28-$64, AND CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN SHOES, $1,295. BOTH AT NEIMAN MARCUS. 53


PARKER TOP, $198, PANACEA CUFF, $40, AND SAINT LAURENT SHOES, $875. ALL AT NEIMAN MARCUS. EARRINGS, STYLIST’S OWN. SKIRT, $52, AT PRETTY SNAKE. RAFE CLUTCH, $495, AT MOXIE. 54


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE


THIS PAGE JOIE BLOUSE, $248, REBECCA MINKOFF HANDBAG, $495, AND MANOLO BLAhNIK SHOES, $685. ALL AT NEIMAN MARCUS. BIKINI TOP, $88, AT DANIELA CORTE. HELMUT LANG JEANS, $230, AT THE TANNERY. OPPOSITE PAGE JACKET, $250, at NEPANTLA. SWIMSUIT, $140, at HALEY BAUMER.

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Photographed by JOEL BENJAMIN Art Directed & Styled by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD Hair by KAI LOPES, AVANTI SALON Makeup by JEREMY STONE Art Director’s Assistant DIANA BURMISTROVICH Featuring ESTELLA, MAGGIE INC. Photographed on location at the 45 PROVINCE >>> WHERE TO SHOP CRUSH BOUTIQUE 264 Newbury Street, #2 (617) 424-0010 DANIELA CORTE 211 Newbury Street (617) 262-2100 HALEY BAUMER hebaumer@gmail.com JONATHAN JOSEPH PETERS jonathan@jonathanjosephpeters.com MOXIE 51 charles Street, Boston (617) 557-9991 NEIMAN MARCUS COPLEY PLACE 5 Copley Place, Boston (617) 536-3660 NEPANTLA BY HILLARY ROBERTS hillary.roberts27@gmail.com PRETTY SNAKE BY JOSEPH AARON SEGAL prettysnake.com SCOOP NYC 177 Newbury Street, Boston (617) 874-4400 SIKARA & CO. 250 Newbury Street, Boston (617) 236-7770 SINESIA KAROL sinesiakarol.com STIL STUDIO 740 Legacy Place, Dedham (781) 407-9642 THE TANNERY 711 Boylston Street, Boston (617) 267-5500

SINESIA KAROL BIKINI, PRICE UPON REQUEST. COVERUP, $295, AT DANIELA CORTE. NECKLACE, $60, AT STIL STUDIO. RING, $350, AND BANGLES, $325. BOTH AT SIKARA & CO.


Prism Break

From daring to demure, there’s no better time than summer to add vibrant accessories to your color wheelhouse. photographed by JOEL BENJAMIN art directed & styled by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE

SINESIA KAROL BIKINI, PRICE UPON REQUEST. RAY-BAN SUNGLASSES, $150, AT NEIMAN MARCUS. 63


this PAGE GUCCI SHOES, $640, AT THE TANNERY. opposite PAGE MARC BY MARC JACOBS HANDBAG, $598, AT NEIMAN MARCUS. 64


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / ARMOIRE


Photographed by JOEL BENJAMIN Art Directed & Styled by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD Hair by KAI LOPES, AVANTI SALON Makeup by JEREMY STONE Art Director’s Assistant DIANA BURMISTROVICH Featuring ESTELLA, MAGGIE INC. Photographed on location at the 45 PROVINCE >>> WHERE TO SHOP NEIMAN MARCUS COPLEY PLACE 5 Copley Place, Boston (617) 536-3660 SINESIA KAROL sinesiakarol.com THE TANNERY 711 Boylston Street, Boston (617) 267-5500

GUCCI SHOES, $495, AT THE TANNERY. 66


TIMELESS TUESDAYS

WEEKLY RUNWAY SHOW & BOUTIQUE FEATURING CAPTIVATING LOOKS FROM TOP LOCAL & NATIONAL DESIGNERS

FA SH I ON TO BA N K ON STARTING 6.18.13 | 7:30 P.M. 250 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, THE LANGHAM, BOSTON BONDBOSTON.COM | 617.956.8765 /BOND.BOSTON

@BONDBOSTON1


nirva.com


DOCTOR'S ORDERS Dental maverick Dr. Steven Spitz's mission: To give his patients—and the culture of dentistry—a makeover.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / SPONSORED FEATURE

PARTNER SPOTLIGHT //

something to smile about

With a mix of high-tech know-how and ultra-personal patient care, Smileboston (Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry) is remaking the dentist’s office into a place that’s far more welcoming than worrying. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT THOMAN

“Nobody ever wakes up and says, ‘Oh good. I'm going to the dentist today,’” laughs Dr. Steven Spitz, leaning back into the chair at his desk in his Brookline office. “But our job is to perform dentistry at the highest level while creating a comfortable positive experience for each of our patients.” As he’s sitting, all around Spitz (Yes, he was born with that name. And no, he didn’t become a dentist just to fulfill the destiny it implies.) are the kinds of things—animate and inanimate—that substantiate that mission. There is the progressive dental equipment, lasers, and tools that precious few of his colleagues have onsite; there’s the framed Red Sox Jersey emblazing signatures placed throughout the years, symbolizing Spitz’s role a team dentist (Spitz has joined the boys of summer in Ft. Myers for pre-season dental screenings for the last two years); the gigantic salt water tank that his office team bought him as a holiday gift a few years back; his own personal wildlife photography, and of course, then there’s the Smileboston team. “Almost everyone here has been hired through word of mouth from friends, patients and past work associates due to the wonderful relationships we have,” he says, noting that Smileboston tends to attract people with customer service backgrounds rather than the usual clerical ones. “And they

stay with us for years and years and years,” he says proudly. “Our team is more like our family, and because they are happy here, they treat our patients the same way. You can teach anyone about dentistry, but you can't teach how to be good to people.” Most dental offices are sterile, silent places. Places where few people laugh very much, let alone banter back and forth, or seem genuinely relaxed. Walking into Smileboston’s Brookline space, you encounter precisely the opposite: hygienists joke with the front desk staff over ‘80s tunes while patients grab themselves cups of steaming joe from the Keurig, seemingly unfazed by anything that awaits them in the dentist’s chair. What pervades the office, you can’t help but notice, is a distinct lack of fear—almost as if it’s been painlessly extracted from the stereotype like a bothersome molar. But how do you do that in an industry so stuck in the mode of making people anxious, and for so long? “You've got to make people comfortable by finding out what their fears are,” says Spitz, playing every bit the therapist as much as dentist. “Find out what drives them to make the decisions they do about how they treat their mouths everyday. So, the first step is


SOMETHING TO CHEW ON The trappings of Smileboston’s Boston office are anything but typical. CLOCKWISE, LEFT TO RIGHT: One of the many wildlife photos taken by Dr. Spitz; the giant fish tank given to Spitz by his staff; a framed Red Sox jersey remind the doctor of his services to the team; one of many pieces of cutting-edge tech equipment; a petrified hippopotamus tooth, a gift from one of Dr. Spitz’s clients.

sitting down and really listening. You can’t get anyone to a better place until you know where they’re coming from, and understanding what needs to be done in the short- and longterm.” And then, when it comes time to treating patients, there are the dentist’s toys. The machines that fill every free inch around the office are the newest, the safest, the fastest, and the most pain-free pieces of technology in the industry. Spitz admits to being a little obsessed with finding them. “I’m always, always researching and traveling to find new machines that will cut down on patients’ time in the office,” says the Tufts and Harvard Dental Universities alum, “and make them the most comfortable”. In 2002, Spitz was the first Prosthodontist in the country to use a dental laser (which was then in the beta phase) in placing tooth implants. He started using them to prepare a tooth for the procedure, rather than using traditional equipment. “Lasers make it possible to do many procedures faster, in a less invasive manner, with less discomfort, and more aesthetic healing. Because the laser works on such a small area of tissue, there is no damage to the tissue and therefore the area heals faster. That means we ultimately create less trauma and therefore, less inflammation. Many patients tell me after the fact that they didn’t feel anything at all.” The lasers Dr. Spitz uses can be used on all the tissues of the mouth -- gum tissue, tooth structure, and bone, and are now in their third generation. “Lasers are a big draw for people who are fearful of needles. I still recommend anesthetic, but it is a great advance to have the ability to not use needles if we don’t want to. Another example: An in-house CT scan that allows Spitz and his team to see the jaw in 3D, to gauge the height, width, and density of a tooth, and all its vital structures. That means when planning an implant, he can do it at a much higher level of accuracy and precision. “I would never place an implant again without having a CT scan,” he says. Most dentists don’t have their own scanner, so they to outsource the process to a third party, and the patient must make multiple trips before completing the process. Even the process of replacing teeth has advanced: Spitz’s Cad/Cam digital impression machine allows him to create a new crown in the office right then and there. “I have one patient who's on the road 360 days a year,” he says. “She doesn't have the time with her schedule to come back again and again. So we were able to clean up and prepare her tooth, use the laser to clean up the gums, take a digital impression to create a 3D image and design the crown on a computer. Then

we used a milling machine we have here in the lab to create the crown, and fire it in a porcelain oven and that finishes it.” The entire process was done in one day. Armed with those and other painless (literally and convenience-wise) processes, Spitz has converted so many people that his patient base has outpaced his square footage. Which was why, six months ago, Smileboston expanded, creating Smileboston Pembroke, and taking his clinical team to five doctors. In Pembroke, they immediately created the ‘Smileboston’ culture to match the welcoming and comfortable vibe of the Brookline original, by placing two of their Brookline team to that location. “We worked to make sure, from the very first phone call a patient has with us, through the completion of treatment, to aftercare, and routine maintenance, that every visit is a positive experience. And it all boils down to the personalities in the office,” he says. “Everyone here understands that people have fears about dentistry; the treatment, cost, and end results.” It also all boils down to a certain underlying philosophy that everyone espouses. “The Latin root for the word doctor means teacher,” says Spitz. “We take that to heart.” They do that by taking the time to walk each individual through the process—taking photos, showing patients what their teeth look like via X-rays, explaining everything about clinical exams and oral cancer screenings. “Going through that process allows people to understand more and fear less,” says Spitz. And once that fear is quelled, once the work has been done, suddenly patients don’t feel self-conscious anymore about how they look and feel. “That's the most rewarding thing for me personally,” says Spitz. “Helping people figure out what makes them smile. And that,” he adds with a smile of his own, “…is why we do what we do.”


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / SPONSORED FEATURE


SOCIAL CHAIR With Opus Affair, opera singer Wright is putting the “art” in party.


JUNE & JULY 2013 / COUP BOSTON / COUP D'ÉTAT

Oeuvre Achiever

How one libretto-singing former chemist has made galvanizing Boston’s artists community his new forte. by AUSTYN ELLESE MAYFIELD photographed by JOEL BENJAMIN On a particularly muggy Monday evening, The Hawthorne in Kenmore Square is packed shoulder to shoulder. Smartly dressed folks are drinking classic cocktails without irony. Conversation topics drift from music to real estate deals and recent lectures, lingering on playoff games and vacation plans along the way. At first glance, this group could pass for the finance crowd, except there’s an exuberance that keeps the room from feeling like a corporate happy hour. It’s hard to put your finger on just who these people are, and what it is that’s brought such an eclectic mix of people together. Then, from the center of the room, a loud, hearty laugh rumbles from a man with a ginger-colored beard and piercing blue eyes. And in that moment, the energy in the room seems to find its axis. That man is Graham Wright. And this is an Opus Affair event. Five years ago, Wright (an M.I.T. chemist-turned-opera-singer who came to Boston almost a decade prior) noticed that people were having a hard time finding an entree into the city’s performing arts scene. “People complain that there’s not enough happening in Boston, but there’s a lot going on,” he states. “It can just be difficult to get connected to it. Things are just so fragmented. We needed a way to help turn people into ‘insiders’ so they could see what’s out there.” Thus, in an effort to demystify and de-clique Boston’s functionally covert fine arts landscape, Opus Affair was born. Now, with an active list of over 5,000 members, the self-titled “community of artists and friends” aims to support young professionals interested in the arts by hosting monthly social events. At them, artists and nonartists alike connect in casual settings, and embrace a more personal approach to exploring the city’s cultural offerings. It’s that personal approach that Wright sees as the

linchpin of the operation. Instead of relying on e-mail blasts or message boards to coax audiences into seats, would-be patrons get their appetite for the arts whetted firsthand. “You can read a great review about the Boston Symphony season to choose what you’re interested in seeing, or you can have a drink with the cellist and hear which performance they’re really excited about,” he explains. “That’s part of the appeal of the group. It’s just a really human way to access culture.” In addition to hosting their own events, Wright and his deputized crew of Opus Affair co-hosts also recommend and rally membership support for other established area arts events and organizations—the Boston Ballet, New England Conservatory, and WordSong, among others. Using the meet-up culture of Opus Affair, their joint efforts with institutions can quickly generate buzz that the traditional committee model can’t create. “Big institutions have a lot of bureaucracy, and they have it for a reason,” Wright remarks, matter-of-factly. “They need it because they have a lot to manage. So if there’s an event we can create as an Opus Affair project that they’re supporting, [building an audience] happens a lot faster. And the staff of the big places are often very excited to have the support to make things happen quickly, especially when it comes to young professional programs. And we need more and more of that.” For Wright, the endeavor has been a journey that combines his own passion for the arts with his interest in how a catalyst can affect its environment. “Opus Affair has been the most fascinating experiment for me: Maybe that’s the chemist in me talking,’ he admits, smiling. “But if you want to do something creative, it takes risk. It’s an experiment with lots of unanticipated results. This is bigger now than anything I could have ever hoped. It’s truly become its own community.”

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COUP Boston June & July 2013