Page 1

See Page 16, and 17 for CouPon SPeCialS!

www.somd com

Thursday, January 21, 2010

JuMPiNG FOR JOy St. Michael’s School Will Remain

Page 16

Open for 2010-2011 School Year

County Officials Not Worried About O’Malley Budget Story Page 4

Photo by Frank Marquart

Charlotte Hall Prospering During Recession Story Page 8

Great Mills High Hosting Jeopardy Tournament

Story Page 14


The County Times

Weekend Dinner Specials Fully Prepared In Our Kitchen Price Effective Friday, January 22 - Sunday, January 24

Whole Rotisserie Chicken

• 1 lb. Mashed Potatoes • 1 lb. Store Made Creamy Cole Slaw • ½ doz. Fresh Dinner Rolls • 2 ltr. Coke or Pepsi

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99

Thursday, January 21, 2010

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Your Paper... Your Thoughts How do you think the housing market is doing in St. Mary’s County? “Being in a military town, we didn’t drop down as far as other counties did,” said Danny Paolucci, 66, a realtor who has lived in Hollywood since 1987. “It just depends on what you want the market to do for you. If you’re looking to buy, inventory is at an all-time high, and prices are at a 10-year low, and we all know loans are as cheap as the devil right now. If you’re looking to sell, you may not find the market as cooperative, and we have a lot of people selling here because this area is so transient.” Leonardtown resident Jan Barnes, who has been selling houses in the area for 33 years, said that the market was still good for people looking to buy. “The market down here has been very good. You just have to work it … we’ve had some foreclosures and short sales, but that’s to be expected … it’s been a buyer’s market, but that might be changing this year … because how long is the government going to give us stimulus funds?”

“It’s going to be very slow for a while,” said Sean Dunn, 43, a real estate agent from Hughesville. “I’m doing a lot of foreclosures right now … and there’s an enormous amount of inventory that’s not on the market yet … but I think [the banks] need to get it out there as soon as possible so we can get through this. The longer they hold it, the longer this will go on.”


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The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Johann Jones of St. Mary’s College looks for an open teammate during the Seahawk men’s basketball team’s 83-52 win Saturday afternoon. SEE PAGE 30

Weather

Watch

“It’s very unfortunate, the O’Malley spending plan shifts money around, uses one time fund transfers and relies on about $400 million in federal stimulus funds … It’s a horrible way to manage the state’s purse strings and it doesn’t make the tough decisions that need to be made.”

On T he Covers

ON THE FRONT

Students at St. Michael’s School in Ridge, Moira Cooper, Connor Eagan, Alyssa Gray and Kyle McKay jump for joy because the school is staying open at least one more year due to successful fundraising.

ON THE BACK Anna Sparr looks to make a move with the ball while her sister Sam defends.

defense

The hospital ship USNS Comfort arrived in Haiti. SEE PAGE 9

- Delegate Tony O’Donnell, on the governor’s budget request

community William Yoast, the high school stock market football coach portrayed in the

For Weekly Stock Market cloSing reSultS, check Page 8 in Money

film “Remember the Titans,” poses with the choir at the sixth annual MLK Prayer Breakfast. SEE PAGE 20

4 7 8 9 10 12 14 16 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 30 31

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The County Times

ews

Thursday, January 21, 2010 The music for "The Star Spangled Banner" comes from a British drinking song named "Anacreon."

O’Malley Budget Proposes $2 Billion In Cuts By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Gov. Martin O’Malley’s proposed fiscal 2011 budget cuts $2 billion in spending by state government but proposes increases for key items like education and calls for level funding of programs and agencies to the local government jurisdictions. County Administrator John Savich said that from the county’s perspective the initial budget preview was positive. “All in all it looks like local government has been hit as much as it’s going to be hit,” Savich said. Savich continued by saying that the county had already made adjustments to its own budget outlook for this year based on projected revenue cuts from the state. “Income tax revenues are the most uncertain,” Savich said, with the expectation that they would be closer to what the county received in 2009. As for highway user fees, Savich said the county government wasn’t holding their breath. “We’ve zeroed them out,” Savich said. The county administrator said that the school system would not really see any increases this year, but according to the latest budget proposal they would not see any more reductions either. “So far what I’m understanding is that the board won’t have to expect any more cuts,” Savich said. “But we’ll be hard pressed to do anything more than maintenance of effort for the board of education. The governor’s budget adds $99 million to kindergarten through 12th grade education to a level of $5.7 billion statewide, but Savich said it remains to be seen what categories that funding will be placed in and how it would affect schools locally. The governor’s budget, while making cuts, bucks the common thinking that no program would be immune from cuts for this budget cycle. Del. John Wood (D-Dist. 29A) said that the increases to education proposed showed O’Malley’s break from some attitudes in the state legislature.

“That’s what some legislators are saying [about cutting programs] but the governor’s not saying that,” Wood said. “I’m sure we’re going to be making some additional cuts.” Reductions highlighted in the O’Malley proposal include $78 million worth of employee furloughs, and $58 million in salary increments. Local aid was also cut by $330 million statewide and general downsizing of government came to $25 million. More than 3,500 jobs were cut by the administration during its tenure, according to budget proposals, that would have cost the state $150 million. The budget also pins hopes on $20 million for a tax credit to prod businesses to hire employees and doubles the amount of money going to the Chesapeake Bay 2010 fund to $20 million as well. In-state college tuition, which has been held steady for the past four years in a freeze, will increase by 3 percent if O’Malley’s proposal remains intact. The governor’s budget shifts just under $1 billion from other sources including the capital budget to close the $2 billion budget shortfall. Revenue forecasts also show that the state will receive $12.7 billion in its coffers this year, far below revenues of $16.4 billion it received in 2007, budget documents stated. Del. Anthony O’Donnell (D-Dist.29C) slammed the governor’s proposed budget, saying that it avoided dealing with the fiscal reality of the state’s condition. “It’s very unfortunate, the O’Malley spending plan shifts money around, uses one time fund transfers and relies on about $400 million in federal stimulus funds that have not been approved,” O’Donnell said. “It’s a horrible way to manage the state’s purse strings and it doesn’t make the tough decisions that need to be made.” O’Donnell said that the budget proposal was “smoke and mirrors” to get O’Malley through the 2010 elections and if re-elected to the post, allow him to increase taxes on Maryland citizens. guyleonard@countytimes.net

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un Fact

Local Red Cross Still Seeking Donations For Haiti By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Officials with the Southern Maryland chapter of the American Red Cross say that they are still collecting monetary donations for relief efforts in Haiti, where tens of thousands of people are feared dead after a massive earthquake wrecked much of the country and destroyed its capital of Port-Au-Prince last week. Debora Storey, Health and Safety director for the regional office, said that they have only collected $3,000 so far locally for the relief effort and have had to turn away people who want to make donations of clothing or other supplies. “We provide them with the items which they [the Haitian people] want” using the monetary donations, Storey said. She explained that the money is transferred by wire to bank accounts used by International Red Cross workers on the ground in Haiti who can use the money to buy medicine and other supplies from surrounding islands. “A bank transfer is much more economical,” Storey said. Storey said that 91 percent of all money donated to the Red Cross goes directly to the disaster relief efforts. She said the local Red Cross would continue to raise funds for the disaster efforts as long as needed. “They’re still finding and rescuing live bodies,” Storey said. “This relief effort will be going on for a couple of years.” Anyone who wishes to make a donation can send a check to the local Red Cross at P.O. Box 507 La Plata, MD 20646 or callers to the office can give their credit card number over the phone for a fixed donation amount. Those writing checks are reminded to make a note that the money is to be used specifically for the Haiti disaster relief effort. guyleonard@countytimes.net


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Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times

ews Today’s Newsmakers In Brief Congressman Steny Hoyer said he understood why voters in Democratic Massachusetts are “angry, roiled and looking to get out of this economic ditch we inherited” from President Bush.

Vowing to move health-care legislation through Congress despite the Scott Brown election Hoyer said: “the Senate bill is clearly better than nothing.”

A Community on the Edge – Eroding Cliff Face Threatens Homes

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

In Lusby the Chesapeake Ranch Estates development is among the largest in the region, with about 4,000 homes and 67 miles of roadways all maintained as part of the private community. But part of that community is in danger of falling off the shoreline cliffs and right into the Chesapeake Bay. About 90 homes are at the frontline of the erosion problem along Calvert County’s shore-

as proposed in this application would adversely impact the Puritan tiger beetle by destroying the cliff habitat that is essential for larvae… therefore the project would appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival or recovery for this species and it would not meet criteria noted above,’ states an Oct. 9, 2009, letter from Maryland Department of Natural Resources rejecting an application for stone revetment construction along Taos Trail. But that’s not the only problem the community is facing. They are also embroiled in a lawsuit with Calvert County and the Calvert

Submitted Photo A home owned by Bill Carmichael saw its Jacuzzi platform fall off the cliff face after a 15-foot landslide on Thanksgiving. The platform is shown halfway down the cliff.

line, say officials of POACRE, the ranch club’s property management board, but federal and state mandates prevent those homeowners from finding ways to harden the shoreline and slow the erosion, which has been happening for thousands of years, because of a tiny inhabitant in the cliffs known as the Puritan tiger beetle. Named in the federal and state endangered species laws the beetle has been singled out for protection — it needs the eroding cliff habitat to continue its life cycle, but that means that property owners at the ranch estates may see their homes fall over the cliff edge eventually, says the organization’s president. “We are prevented any means from bracing this shoreline,” John Eney, president of POACRE said, adding that numerous meetings with officials to try and ameliorate the problem have met with resistance. “All I’ve seen is their dedication to preserving the beetles and not one ounce of sympathy for the property owners,” Eney said, who added that residents are considering suing the federal government for impeding them from taking action to reinforce the cliff face. “Grading and stabilization of the cliff face

Marine Museum, one of the biggest attractions for the area, over a whale skeleton scientists dug out of the cliff face back in 2008 after consulting one of the property owners at the ranch club. When other members of the ranch club found out they tried to get the scientists to stop the excavation for numerous reasons, including that it disturbed the beetles’ habitat and created more danger of erosion. But perhaps their biggest claim, according to court filings, was that the landowner the museum consulted was not in actual possession of the land at the cliff face, the property belonged to the ranch estates as a whole. The lawyer defending both the county and the marine museum in the suit, Daniel Karp, said that the suit has dragged on and will be making its rounds in court again. According to association newsletters written by Eney, the ranch club is suing for compensation of attorney’s fees and they also want “relief from prohibitions against construction of stabilization systems needed to stop the cliff erosion.” Karp said that the court case could reveal

that the marine museum mistakenly took the skeleton without the property board’s permission and may have technically committed trespass, but not maliciously. “It’s probable POACRE does own that land,” Karp said without conceding the point. “But this is the tail wagging the dog. They believe the county and state have the obligation to fix it [the cliff erosion problem] or let them fix it themselves. “Eventually things are going to erode and fall on the beach.” The relief they need can be found in the legislature and even the ballot box, Karp said, and not in the courtroom. “This lawsuit is not the way to do it, it’s a waste of time,” Karp said. House Minority Leader Tony O’Donnell (R-Dist. 29C) would not speak on the impact

of the whale skeleton case, but he did say that the erosion problem goes far beyond the Chesapeake Ranch Estates and extends all along the western shore of Maryland where the cliffs are prominent. He said that legislation he offered in 2005 that was passed that would have allowed residents to take action, but so far the state has resisted any measures to slow the problem, except wave breaks off shore that O’Donnell believed to be ineffective at stopping the erosion. “The bureaucratic intransigence is incredible,” O’Donnell said, adding that it would take more residents from outside the ranch club to come together around the problem to get any action from government. “We’ve got to help these people save their homes.” guyleonard@countytimes.net


The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

6

ews Grants Available for Southern Maryland Farmers

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Farmers in St. Mary’s County and other Southern Maryland jurisdictions have until Feb. 20 to apply for grant money from the region’s agricultural development agency to ensure that their farms remain profitable. Christine Bergmark, director of the Southern Maryland Agricultural Development Commission, said that prior restrictions on the program have been removed and now farmers with

any size plot of land can apply for up to $40,000 in grant money. Bergmark said, however, that farmers with 50 acres or greater would be assigned more points during the grant application process. The grant program for farm sustainability has about $200,000 available to farmers across the region and since 2002 about four to eight farmers from St. Mary’s County apply every year. Farmers who agree to take on the grant commitment once approved must also agree to

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ensure that they will not sell a portion of their land off for development and otherwise keep it available for agricultural operations. The agreement can last for 5 to 10 years, Bergmark said, depending on the size of the grant awarded. “Farmers can use them for many different purposes,” Bergmark said. “Not everyone goes and buys new equipment, some agricultural tourism farms have used it to build retail shops.” But the application process is just the beginning, Bergmark said, since farmers then have to meet with a business planner contracted by the commission to work out a vision of how the grant money might be used. That process has taken up to six months in the past, Bergmark said. “It’s not for everyone,” Bergmark said of the program. Farmers could find the new grant

money helpful, since the first round of tobacco buyout money from the state is set to dry up this year. Farmers who are nearing retirement age, as well as their younger family members who do not want to carry on the business, have asked the county and tried to find ways to get agricultural preservation money to forestall the possible sale of farmland since the subsidy is no longer available. Donna Sasscer, agriculture preservation specialist with the county, said that farmers had balked at the lengthy business planning process before but that might change with the tougher economic climate. “It’s not something farmers are used to doing,” Sasscer said. “I’m hoping people will realize this is the last year for the buyout… that they would consider this opportunity.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Jarboe: Tabloid Publisher No Longer Part of ‘Town Hall Alliance’

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Commissioner Lawrence D. Jarboe, head of the four-candidate Town Hall Alliance slate seeking election this year said that the Web administrator for their on-line site has resigned following a row over comments posted about MetCom executive director Jacquelyn Meiser. “[Kenneth Rossignol] has washed his hands of it,” Jarboe said of the publisher of St. Mary’s Today who was running the slate’s Web site. “He’s resigned from any volunteer duties with the Town Hall Alliance.” Last Friday media reports circulated that a statement attributed to 2nd Commissioner District candidate Dan Morris on the slate Web site, claimed that the only experience Meiser had was “in using the ladies room.” Morris said that the comment attributed to him that criticized Meiser’s so-called lack of experience was actually made by Rossignol. “It’s not true, it’s not my statement,” Morris told The County Times Monday. “I don’t make remarks like that.” In that comment attributed to Morris it was also stated that the result of Meiser’s ascension as the head of MetCom last year has lead to higher rates for customers. Meiser also continues to act as general counsel for the agency as well as run her own law practice. Morris said that the derogatory comment hurt both his candidacy and those in the slate, which includes Jarboe, Randy Guy and Richard Johnson.

Jarboe said that Rossignol had had a volunteer position with the slate and he also sat in on discussions about issues that were of interest to the slate. Jarboe said, though, that Rossignol did not make any decisions regarding which issues the slate would take up. “He won’t be attending any [slate] meetings,” Jarboe said, of Rossignol’s status with the group. “There’s been a separation.” Commissioner Thomas A. Mattingly (D-Leonardtown) who is term limited, said that he believed that the comment about Meiser was “insulting to not just Jackie Meiser but to all women” and that no matter who wrote it, Jarboe was responsible for what went on the site. “He [Jarboe] ought to be reviewing whatever goes on that site,” Mattingly said. “Evidently he [Rossignol] had a pretty solid position that gave him the authority to write what he wrote.” Rossignol, when asked about whether he wrote the comment and attributed it to Morris, said: “I don’t think I want to comment about it at all. I’m not a candidate and you need to talk to candidates.” When The County Times called him again to talk about his past, present and future relationships with the Town Hall Alliance slate he said: “You should talk to candidates, if you want to know what I think you should read my paper.” Mattingly said that he still believed that Jarboe and Rossignol would still have a relationship despite this recent incident. “You wont’ see Jarboe’s political articles stop in [Rossignol’s] paper,” Mattingly said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Beware of Haiti Disaster Relief Scammers

Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is advising Marylanders to be cautious about the relief organizations that they choose to give donations for the victims of the recent Haitian earthquake. “Unfortunately, there are unscrupulous folks that will view this time as a way to capitalize on the generosity and compassion intended for Haitians affected during this disaster,” Gansler said in a press release. “Be on the lookout for possible scams to

verify that a relief organization is legitimate before donating.” Consumers wishing to make donations to victims of the Haitian earthquake should confirm before making their donations that the charity allows donations to be earmarked for this disaster. For more information regarding charitable giving, consumers can visit the Attorney General’s website at www.oag.state. md.us/consumer/tip42.htm.


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Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times

Legal Notice: CIRCUIT COURT FOR ST. MARY’S COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO.: 18-C-09 001205DA JOSEPH XAVIER BOWMAN, PLANTIFF VS. BERNADINE WRIGHT BOWMAN, DEFENDANT To: Bernadine Wright Bowman “You are hereby notified that Joseph Xavier Bowman has filed for an Absolute Divorce from you. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the clerk’s office at 41605 Courthouse Drive, Leonardtown, Maryland telephone 301-475-7844 extension 4130 or from the Plaintiff’s attorney, Margaret Johnston Abraham at 42001 White Point Beach Road, Leonardtown, Maryland 20650. If you do not file a written answer within 30 days after the third publication of this Notice, you will have agreed to have an Absolute Divorce granted to Joseph Xavier Bowman”. Clerk of the Circuit Court Joan Williams 01-07-10

Santa Didn’t Give Us All We Need

The Southern Maryland Chapter American Red Cross thanks you Southern Maryland community members, who gave their time, money, and blood to our cause. It has helped provide lodging for more than a 100 families of men, women, and children that would otherwise have nowhere to go after their home became unlivable due to fires. It also helped us serve meals and provide clothes to these innocent victims. It provided lifesaving training through our Health & Safety programs. It saved countless lives with the blood we collected. It provided emergency communication to our men and woman around the world in our Armed Services. And, the list goes on! To continue to provide vital services, programs and training, the Southern Maryland Chapter needs your continued support. Below you’ll find our wish list that Santa did not fill and we need for the New Year: • Volunteers to help with the design, planning, capital campaign, and construction of a new Chapter House. •Someone to paint our donated vehicles with the standard Red Cross Red & White colors. • A serviceable cargo van for disaster and Health & Safety programs. • Corporate/ organizational sponsors to underwrite the purchase of cold weather outerwear for our volunteers who brave the elements responding to disasters around the clock. • Volunteers to be trained to respond to disasters and teach first aid and CPR. • A serviceable, towable trailer (like a garden trailer) to be used by the Red Cross communicators to build a portable antenna tower transport that would be used to establish critical emergency communications in remote locations in the event

of a major disasters. • Digital trunking public service scanners for the disaster operations center and each of the Southern Maryland RC regional offices. • Volunteers to support our life saving mission in Southern Maryland. To man our Emergency call center, teach community disaster education programs in our community, to drive our emergency vehicles, and many other opportunities. • Cash donations to supplement the Local Operations & Emergency Response Fund. These funds maintains our ability to help victims of disaster, whether it is food, clothing, or shelter and keep our local offices open The Southern Maryland Chapter American Red Cross strives to be there when you need us. It is in our mission as: “... a community organization led by volunteers and guided by its congressional charter and the fundamental principles of the international Red Cross Movement, will provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies.” On behalf of the thousands of people we’ve touched locally, the employees, volunteers, and volunteer Board of Directors of the Southern Maryland Chapter, we wish you the best New Year ever. If you would like more information on volunteering or to address any of our wish list items needs, please contact the chapter at 888 276 2767. Mike Zabko, Chief Executive Officer Serving all of Southern Maryland SO. Md. Chapter American Red Cross

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Needs Serious Attention

With the recent declaration by the Environmental Protection Agency that greenhouse gases are dangerous pollutants, municipalities and businesses throughout the country are faced with the challenge of reducing the emissions and fuel consumption of their fleet vehicles. There is no simple solution when it comes to improving fuel economy and reducing emissions of fleet and transit vehicles. This is especially true today when there are limited resources available to address a multitude of complex issues. It makes economic and environmental

sense to investigate the benefits of retrofitting before spending hundreds of millions of dollars on new hybrid vehicles. The realized reduction in fuel consumption and added years of useful life provide economic advantages, while reducing harmful emissions from a renewable source of energy is environmentally sound. Conducting a thorough vehicle asset analysis and having a comprehensive, executable plan in place are the best ways to conserve energy and maximize return on investment. Sam Jones, President Recaptured Energy Technologies

To The Editor:

Guest Editorial: State Teachers Union Will Bust Budgets if Legislation Passes By Marta Mossburg

You have to give the Maryland teachers union credit for its chutzpah. It is like a teenager who tells her parents she needs their credit card to buy school supplies and then drives to Neiman Marcus. The only problem: The credit card the union wants to abuse is the one paid for by every state taxpayer. Last year the Maryland State Education Association supported legislation called the Fairness in Negotiations Act (SB 673), which would have added millions to local budgets in the form of higher teacher salaries and hundreds of millions to the pension obligations state taxpayers can already not afford to pay. Look no further than this year’s budget, where teacher retirement spending jumped 22.1 percent to $759.1 million, largely the result of a bump in benefits passed in 2006. Sen. Jamin Raskin, D-Montgomery County, who sponsored the bill last year, has not reintroduced it, but it is top on the agenda of the MSEA and a hearing is planned for it. Basically, the legislation upends 40 years of precedent, having outside arbitrators instead of local boards of education make the final decision on teacher and employee contracts. The Maryland Association of Boards of Education opposes the bill. Members urged legislators last year to deliberate “the magnitude of the shift of decision-making authority away from local boards, accountable to local policy priorities and fiscal realities, to outside arbitrators accountable to no one.” Andres Alonso, chief executive officer of Baltimore City Public Schools who deserves credit for transforming city schools into places of learning under his short tenure, also opposes the legislation. He says it “is not about outcomes for kids. The bill exclusively focuses on outcomes for adults, regardless of effects on student achievement. ... Additionally, the bill’s usurping of local and state board review authority may further create increased barriers for input and collaboration by key educational stakeholders.” In other words, children, community members and taxpayers would lose under the legislation. At a time when counties face huge deficits and are laying off employees, and the state is $2 billion in the hole, why would legislation that exacerbates both problems be considered? The union describes the legislation as having “no fiscal impact on the state.” Technically that could prove true if legislators succeed in pushing teachers’ pension burden from state taxpayers to local ones. But according to the fiscal impact statement from last year’s legislation, “general fund expenditures increase significantly to pay increased retirement costs.” And “local school system expenditures may increase significantly” from higher school employee salaries, fringe benefits, and the cost of outside mediators and arbitrators. So there you have it. Contrary to its title, the legislation is not about “fairness.” It is about the union’s desire to win higher salaries and benefits for teachers regardless of student performance or of community satisfaction with their work. The manipulative wording and veiled intent of the legislation should make residents wonder whether the union represents those with a higher calling or those who would rather ask only what taxpayers can do for them. Examiner Columnist Marta Mossburg is a senior fellow with the Maryland Public Policy Institute and lives in Baltimore.

Do you have something to say? Would like your voice to be heard? Send us a letter telling us what’s on your mind! E-mail letters to: opinion@countytimes.net

Send to:

The County Times P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, MD 20636 Make sure you include your name, phone # and the city you live in. We will not publish your phone #, only your name and city


for the love of

Money Company

WalMart Harley Davidson Best Buy Lockheed Martin BAE Systems Computer Science Corp. Dyncorp International Inc. General Dynamics Corp. Mantech International Corp. Northrop Grunman Corp.

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The County Times

Mona Lisa has no eyebrows in Leonardo da Vinci's painting. During that time, a woman was considered more beautiful if she shaved her eyebrows.

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1/20/2010

12/31/2008

$53.86 $25.84 $38.77 $78.08 $5.95 $56.55 $12.83 $69.35 $50.26 $58.28

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Miller Wants Slots in PG

The Maryland Senate president said he’s interested in bringing slots to Prince George’s County, but Gov. Martin O’Malley and county leaders did not sound enthusiastic about the idea. Getting slots in the county east of Washington, D.C., would first require passage of a bill in the legislature and then approval of another constitutional amendment by voters. Currently, slots are allowed in five other locations approved

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Change

by voters in a 2008 constitutional amendment. “I’ve got an interest in Prince George’s county, quite frankly,’’ said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller (D), who represents part of the county, adding that Rosecroft Raceway could be a “prime site.” Miller also mentioned the National Harbor and an equestrian center in Upper Marlboro as possible locations.

un Fact

Charlotte Hall Square Filling Up, Despite Economy By Sean Rice Staff Writer

-3.92% 52.27% 37.92% -7.14% 9.98% 60.93% -15.43% 20.42% -7.25% 29.40%

8

New retail operations are continuing to pop up in the Charlotte Hall Square shopping plaza off Route 235 despite the downturn in the overall economy. Since opening up the new section of the plaza in early 2009, six new stores opened up in the development, which was built by CMI General Contractors Inc. “Things are going pretty well,” reports CMI President John Parlett. A new Auto Zone opened in November, the last in a string of stores to open, including Old Beijing Café, B.B. Nails and Spa, April’s Pool and Spa, True Value and Verizon dealer Z Com Wireless. “We also have two other tenants that we’re finalizing now. One is for Charlotte Hall Liquors, a fine wine and spirits kind of a place,” Parlett told The County Times. “And we have the Hair Cuttery coming.” Charlotte Hall Liquors will soon be appearing before the Alcohol Beverage Board of St. Mary’s County for an operating license. “We have more spaces available, and we have some more folks were talking to, which I’m not at liberty to talk about, that we’re hoping to get,” Parlett said. In addition to locations in the connected section of the shopping center, the Square also has three stand-alone pad sites left; one on the Route 235 road frontage,

one on Triangle Drive and one next to Food Lion, which is the decade-old anchor for the Square. “We’ve got opportunities for other uses there, maybe a restaurant or an automotive facility,” Parlett said. “Everybody seems to be doing really good business there. The Old Beijing café is doing a brisk business, the Verizon store is pleased with their numbers … the nail salon always has folks coming through,’ he said. “Even True Value hardware, given the economy, is quite pleased with how they’re doing.” April Parlett, owner of April’s Pool and Spa, said her first-time business venture is “moving right along.” “It’s surprising with the economy as bad as it is, the hot tubs have been moving really well, I cannot complain,” April Parlett said. She attributes some of her success to the success of the other stores in the area, as well has her highly visible location, adding that the lunchtime crowd at Old Beijing Café is “ridicilious.” John Parlett said one reason the plaza is doing well is a demand for services in the northern end of the county. “I think there’s been a reasonable amount of pent up demand in northern St. Mary’s County and southern Charles,’ he said. seanrice@countytimes.net

Smartronix Donation To Help Patuxent Habitat

Local defense contractor, Smartronix, has made a significant contribution to Patuxent Habitat for Humanity (PHH) to help provide affordable homes for working families in the St Mary’s and Calvert counties. PHH President Dan Doherty said the donation would help bring the dream of homeownership for another Habitat partner family a bit closer to reality. “We truly appreciate the generous support shown by community leaders and businesses during these tough economic times,” Doherty Photo by Diane Daly said. “Their commitment to assist hardworking members of the com- Smartronix presents a check for $5,000 to PHH representatives. From left: Alan Parris, Smartronix Vice President and co-founder; munity is to be commended.” Melonie Dalson, PHH Fund Development As a result of this contribution, Coordinator, Dan Doherty, PHH President; Laurell Aiton, Smartronix Smartronix is eligible for a tax de- Director of HR and Corporate Communications; and Arshed Jaduction through the Community vaid, Smartronix President and co-founder. Investment Tax Credit program prothat welcomes to its work all people dedicated vided by the Maryland State Department of to the cause of eliminating poverty housing. Community Development. Since its founding in 1976, Habitat has built Arshed Javaid, President and co-founder more than 300,000 houses worldwide, providof Smartronix stated, “Organizations such as ing simple, decent and affordable shelter for Habitat for Humanity are directly in line with more than 1.5 million people. For more inforour company sponsorship goals. We are fortu- mation, visit www.habitat.org. nate to be in a position to help organizations Patuxent Habitat for Humanity (PHH) is that offer so much directly back to the com- an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity Internamunity. Patuxent Habitat for Humanity part- tional (HFHI), which works to create decent ners with families to build and finance quality affordable housing in partnership with those homes. Increased homeownership rates im- in need in the St. Mary’s and Calvert counties. prove our community. I challenge fellow busi- For more information about donating, volunnesses to follow our lead.” teering or applying for a home, log on to www. Habitat for Humanity International patuxenthabitat.org or call 301- 863-6227. (HFHI) is an ecumenical Christian ministry


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Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times

USNS Comfort Receives First Patients in Haiti

Navy medical professionals aboard Vinson took this same level of care in proUSNS Comfort received their first patients viding initial treatment to the young boy, Jan. 20, delivered by an MH60S “Knight- which helped extend the child’s ability to hawk” helicopter from USS Carl Vinson fight for his life. in the middle of the night. “A surgeon aboard Vinson performed Comfort’s medical staff sprung into the initial surgery on the young boy, who action following a message over the hos- sustained blunt trauma to his pelvic repital ship’s general announcing system in- gion during the earthquake or subsequent forming shipboard personnel that a flight aftershocks,” said Sharpe. “That kind of carrying patients was imminent. trauma is unusual for such a young child, “The team did an outstanding job with but upon his arrival to Comfort he was rethe two patients who arrived tonight,” sponsive and doing well.” Cmdr. Timothy F. Donahue, director of Comfort plans to receive many more surgical services, said in a press release. patients during their indefinite stay in “Just the way a good trauma resuscitation the region in addition to landing medical should be conducted.” teams and providing supplies, including The two patients, a 6-year-old boy water. and a 20-year old man injured in the The disaster relief and humanitarian earthquake that devastated Haiti Jan. 12, operation capabilities of the ship were exarrived aboard the 1,000-bed hospital ship panded from the initial total of 600 medishortly after 10 p.m. An initial examina- cal personnel to man a 250-bed hospital to tion confirmed that both of the patients 1,000 hospital beds and more than 1,000 suffered from serious injuries. Sailors to meet the needs of the approxi“The first two patients arrived and mately three million Haitians affected by were taken straight to casualty receiving,” the earthquake. said Capt. Richard Sharpe, a trauma surIn addition to Comfort, U.S. response geon aboard. “The first was a Haitian boy assets participating in Operation Unified who suffered a blunt injury to his pelvis. Response include Carl Vinson, USS NorHe is stable and doing well. mandy, USS Bunker Hill, USS Higgins, “The second patient was a male who USS Underwood, USNS Grasp, USNS suffered some blunt injury to his head and Big Horn and the USS Bataan Amphibiarm. He won’t need surgery for either in- ous Ready Group. Bataan ARG consists of jury, so that is good news. the embarked 22nd Marine Expeditionary “However,” said Sharpe, “we discov- Unit aboard Bataan, USS Fort McHenry, ered spinal cord fluid leaking out of his USS Carter Hall and USS Gunston Hall. ear, which is concerning. But based on his For more news from USNS Comfort, computerized axial tomography (CAT) visit www.navy.mil/local/tah20/. scan, his brain looks normal and is functioning properly.” Following initial assessments, both patients were moved to the intensive care unit for further observation. Prior to arriving on station just a few hours away from the Caribbean nation of Haiti, Comfort Sailors spent much of their three-day transit from their home port of Baltimore, preparing for patients by conducting drills, reviewing procedures and conducting frequent exercises concentrating on the variety of afflictions they felt they were likely to encounter during their disaster relief efforts during Operation Unified Response. “We have anticipated treating for extreme dehydration, infections from open wounds, orthopedic injuries and crush injuries,” said Lt. Cmdr. Daniel D’Auora, division officer for the casualty receiving department aboard Comfort. “We have two cases of injuries at this moment, but we are also focused on the basic U.S. Navy Photo medical problems that may be exacerbated by U.S. Navy Sailors await the arrival of the hospital ship USNS Comfort at the lack of medical care.” Naval Station Mayport, Fla, in 2005, when the floating hospital was in Doctors aboard the route to help victims of Hurricane Katrina.

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The County Times

Patricia Abramowicz, 65

Pensacola, FL. Pat graduated from Elba High School, AL “Class of 1962.” She moved to St. Mary’s County in 1983 from Kansas. and was employed as a bookkeeper. The family will receive friends on Thursday, January 21, 2010 from 5– 8 p.m. in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, Leonardtown, MD where prayers will be said at 7 p.m. A Funeral services will be held on Friday, January 22, 2010 at 10 a.m. in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Chapel, Leonardtown, MD with Pastor Dan Moore officiating. Interment will be held on January 25, 2010 at 11 a.m. in Maryland’s Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD. Pallbearers will be Ricky Hawkins, Shane Hawkins, Wesley Hawkins, Mike Workman, Cory Hawkins and Terry Hawkins. Condolences may be left to the family at www.mgfh.com. Arrangements provided by Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Marie Dean Lawton, the mother of his children. Harvey is survived by his children Lorena Terry Mull of Downey, CA and Janette Huseman of La Plata, MD, his stepdaughter; Kay Sowards of Huntinton, WV, four grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. Harvey is also survived by his sister Edna Thompson of Hollywood, MD. Harvey was a life time resident of St. Mary’s County where he was employed as a carpenter for the Federal Government until he retired in 1965. He also

Ronald Behnke, 77 Patricia Ann “Pat” Abramowicz, 65, of Lexington Park, MD and formerly of Alabama died on January 15, 2010 at Washington Hospital Center. Born December 22, 1944 in Andalusia, AL, she was the daughter of the late Rex and Hazel Brooks Brown. She was the loving wife of Walter Joseph Abramowicz whom she married in Meridian, MS on September 25, 1970. Pat is survived by her children; Mike, Ricky and his wife Sherry all of Lexington Park, MD, Terry and his wife Debbie of Bristol, VA, her seven grandchildren and her two great grandchildren. She is also survived by her siblings Rex Brown and his wife Rhena and Martha Brown all from Huston, TX and Fred Brown and his significant other Joe Sadlowe of

Roland Frederick Behnke, 77, of St. Inigoes, MD died January 16, 2010 at his residence. For arrangements please call the Brinsfield Funeral Home at (301) 475-5588. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com.

William Dean, 91 William “Harvey” Dean, 91, of Hollywood, MD died January 17, 2010 in the La Plata Genesis Center. Born February 20, 1918 in Baltimore, MD he was the son of the late Bernard Simpson and Ethelle Elizabeth Gatton Dean. He was the loving husband of the late Vivian Lucille Dean. He is also preceded in death by

To Place A Memorial Please Call: 301-373-4125

worked at the Powder Factory in Indian Head, MD during WWII. Following his retirement in 1965 he enjoyed hunting and fishing usually in the company of his nephew Rodney Thompson. Harvey was a lifelong member of the Hollywood Church or the Nazarene and he was a charter member of the Hollywood Masonic Lodge. A graveside service was held on January 20th, 2010, at the Hollywood Church of the Nazarene Cemetery with Rev. Verne Haskell officiating. Pallbearers were Joe Huseman, Scott Huseman, Mark Huseman, Rodney Thompson, Timothy Thompson and Jerry Thompson. Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association of Southern Maryland, 511 Charles Street, La Plata, MD 20646. To leave a condolence to the family please visit our website at www. mgfh.com. Arrangements provided by the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Florence Meyers, 84 Florence Hill Meyers, 84 of Lexington Park, MD passed away on Thursday, January 14, 1010 at Mandrin Hospice House, Harwood, MD. Born November 7, 1925 in Ringgold, PA she was the daughter of the late Oscar and Mamie Miller Hill. Florence was the Commanding Officers Secretary at the Patuxent Naval Air Station retiring in 1986. She was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church and the Altar Guild. In addition to her parents Mrs. Meyers was preceded in death by her husband Edward P. Meyers. Mrs. Meyers is survived by her son David Meyers of Davidsonville, MD, grandsons; Ian and Ethan Meyers of Davidsonville, MD, sisters; Louise Diaviao and Rosalie Kerschner both of Ringgold, PA. A Memorial Service was conducted on Monday, January 18, 2010 in Trinity Lutheran Church with Reverend Stephen Updegrave officiating. Interment will take place Monday, January 25, 2010 at 2 p.m. in the Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD Memorial contributions may be made to BAC-BSA (Boy Scouts of America) 701 Wyman Park Dr., Baltimore, MD 21211 Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com

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Arrangements provided by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD

Ida Via, 95 Ida Virginia Via, 95, of Leonardtown, MD formerly of Island Creek, Calvert County, passed from this life on January 14, 2010 at St. Mary’s Nursing Center after a long battle with Alzheimer’s Disease. She was born in Brunswick, MD on August 16, 1914 the daughter of Jesse Lee Woods and Mae Barker Woods. She grew up in Brunswick, Martinsburg, WV, and Washington, DC. She married the late Robert M. Via on September 3, 1932. They had two children. They lived in Washington, DC and in the late 1940s moved to a small farm on Burch’s Hill near Clinton, Prince George’s County. In 1956, they moved to their farm near Island Creek where Mr. Via was engaged in tobacco and hog farming. Mrs. Via was a wife and homemaker and also worked at various department stores in Washington, DC and the surrounding area. She was employed at various times by Lansburghs, The Hecht Co., and finally by Woodward & Lothrop (Woodies) where she worked as a desk girl in the beauty salon in their flagship store on F. Street in Washington, DC. She was promoted to assistant manager and then manager at Woodies locations in Seven

Corners and Chevy Chase. She was employed for a time by the United States Postal Service in Capital Heights. Mrs. Via retired from Woodies in 1973 and helped her husband on the farm until his death in 1983. She moved from her home in Calvert County in 1993. From 1992 until 2000, she spent over ninety weeks participating in numerous studies dealing with Alzheimer’s Disease at the National Institutes of Health. She was profiled in the September 1997 issue of Washingtonian Magazine. She enjoyed gardening and crocheting, having crocheted over fifty Afghans in the last years of her life. She was a homebound member of St. Thomas’ Episcopal Parish, Croom and Brandywine, Prince George’s County. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She is survived by a half-sister Patricia M. Albright, one son, Robert D. Via of Benson, AZ, her son-in-law, Franklin A. Robinson of Serenity Farm, Benedict, MD; five grandchildren; Franklin A. Robinson, Jr., R. David Robinson, Adina T. Robinson, all of Serenity Farm: Robert M. Via of Benson and Mrs. Rene Kirstin Via Ellsworth of Tucson, AZ, four great-grandchildren; Ashlee, Virginia Larae, and Austin Robinson and Sydney Ellsworth, one great-great grandson, Jordan Bunner, and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, and


11

Thursday, January 21, 2010

daughter, Adina Mae Via Robinson. A funeral service was held at the Chapel of the Incarnation, 14070 Brandywine Road, Brandywine, MD 20613 on January 20, 2010 with the Rev. Ms. Debra Brewin-Wilson officiating. Interment followed at Trinity Memorial Gardens, Waldorf, MD. Serving as pallbearers were Perry Bowen, Graydon Lamb, Franklin Robinson Jr., David and Austin Robinson, and Robert Via. Honorary pallbearers will be Franklin Robinson, Sr. and Vincent Via. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Thomas’ Episcopal Parish for the restoration program at the Chapel of the Incarnation, 14300 St. Thomas’ Church Road, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

The County Times

17, 2010 at St. Mary’s Nursing Center. Born April 11, 1959 in Leonardtown, MD, he was the son of Ralph Watson of Piney

Michael Watson, 50 Michael Wayne Watson, better known to family and friends as “Little Mike” 50, of Leonardtown, MD passed away on January

Point, MD and Mary Rose Watson of Leonardtown, MD. Mike has lived in St. Mary’s County

all of his life. He grew up on St. George Island and was his happiest when on the water. Mike’s passion and love for the water made him an avid fisherman, crabber and oysterman. He also enjoyed carpentry and home improvement. In addition to his parents, Mike is survived by his siblings, Sueanne Burroughs of Piney Point, MD, Bonnie Lynn Loy (Richard) of Leonardtown, MD, Danny Ralph Watson (Carolyn) of Rehoboth Beach, DE, Kathy Lee Watson of Silver Spring, MD, Tammy Marie Watson of Leonardtown, MD and Jimmy Allen Watson of Piney Point, MD. He is also survived by nephews and nieces, Bruce Burroughs, Richie Loy, Kevin Loy, Stanley Watson, Kimmy Watson, Lizzy Watson, Sarah Watson, Crystal Adams, Chanel Adams and great-nephews and nieces, stepdaughter Melissa and lifelong best friend, Tony Evans. Mike truly had a great heart. He was a very kind and thoughtful person, and had a great compassion and deep love for his family and friends. He took care of his sick mother for many years. Whenever someone was in need, Mike would do his best to step up and help out the best he could. Mike also had

Continued

many joyous and fun times fishing, crabbing and hanging out with his friends and family. He was a special friend to many. Mike will truly be missed and our hearts are left empty with his passing. Mike will always be remembered by his family and friends for his beautiful blue eyes and smile, caring spirit, and his willingness to help out when needed. Family will receive friends for Mike’s Life Celebration on Thursday, January 21, 2010 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD with prayers recited at 7 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Friday, January 22, 2010 at 10 a.m. in Our Lady’s Catholic Church, Medleys Neck with Father Lawrence Young officiating. Interment will follow in Charles Memorial Gardens, Leonardtown, MD. Memorial contributions may be made to the National Brain Tumor Society, 121 Watertown Rd., #2D, Watertown, MA 02472 Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com

Stages of Bereavement, Mourning, and Grief

By the National Cancer Institute

People cope with the loss of a loved one in many ways. For some, the experience may lead to personal growth, even though it is a difficult and trying time. There is no right way of coping with death. The way a person grieves depends on the personality of that person and the relationship with the person who has died. How a person copes with grief is affected by their experience with cancer, the way the disease progressed, the person’s cultural and religious background, coping skills, mental history, support systems, and the person’s social and financial status. The terms grief, bereavement, and mourning are often used in place of each other, but they have different meanings. Grief is the normal process of reacting to the loss. Grief reactions may be felt in response to physical losses (for example, a death) or in response to symbolic or social losses (for example, divorce or loss of a job). Each type of loss means the person has had something taken away. As a family goes through a cancer illness, many losses are experienced, and each triggers its own grief reaction. Grief may be experienced as a mental, physical, social, or emotional reaction. Mental reactions can include anger, guilt, anxiety, sadness, and despair. Physical reactions can include sleeping problems, changes in appetite, physical problems, or illness. Social reactions can include feelings about taking care of others in the family, seeing family or friends, or returning to work. As with bereavement, grief processes depend on the relationship with the person who died, the situation surrounding the death, and the person’s attachment to the person who died. Grief may be described as the presence of physical problems, constant thoughts of the person who died, guilt, hostility, and a change in the way one normally acts. Bereavement is the period after a loss during which grief is experienced and mourning occurs. The time spent in a period of bereavement depends on how attached the person was to the person who died, and how much time was spent anticipating the loss. Mourning is the process by which people adapt to a loss. Mourning is also influenced by cultural customs, rituals, and society’s rules for coping with loss. Grief work includes the processes that a mourner needs to complete before resuming daily

life. These processes include separating from the person who died, readjusting to a world without him or her, and forming new relationships. To separate from the person who died, a person must find another way to redirect the emotional energy that was given to the loved one. This does not mean the person was not loved or should be forgotten, but that the mourner needs to turn to others for emotional satisfaction. The mourner’s roles, identity, and skills may need to change to readjust to living in a world without the person who died. The mourner must give other people or activities the emotional energy that was once given to the person who died in order to redirect emotional energy. People who are grieving often feel extremely tired because the process of grieving usually requires physical and emotional energy. The grief they are feeling is not just for the person who died, but also for the unfulfilled wishes and plans for the relationship with the person. Death often reminds people of past losses or separations. Mourning may be described as having the following 3 phases: died.

* The urge to bring back the person who * Disorganization and sadness. * Reorganization.

The Pathway to Death People who are dying may move towards death over longer or shorter periods of time and in different ways. Different causes of death result in different paths toward death. The pathway to death may be long and slow, sometimes lasting years, or it may be a rapid fall towards death (for example, after a car accident) when the chronic phase of the illness, if it exists at all, is short. The peaks and valleys pathway describes the patient who repeatedly gets better and then worse again (for example, a patient with AIDS or leukemia). Another pathway to death may be described as a long, slow period of failing health and then a period of stable health (for example, patients whose health gets worse and then stabilizes at a new, more limiting level). Patients on this pathway must readjust to losses in functioning ability. Deaths from cancer often occur over a long period of time, and may involve long-term pain and suffering, and/or loss of control over one’s body or mind. Deaths caused by cancer are likely to drain patients and families physically and emotionally because they occur over a long pe-

riod of time.

Anticipatory Grief Anticipatory grief is the normal mourning that occurs when a patient or family is expecting a death. Anticipatory grief has many of the same symptoms as those experienced after a death has occurred. It includes all of the thinking, feeling, cultural, and social reactions to an expected death

that are felt by the patient and family. Anticipatory grief includes depression, extreme concern for the dying person, preparing for the death, and adjusting to changes caused by the death. Anticipatory grief gives the family more time to slowly get used to the reality of the loss. People are able to complete unfinished business with the dying person (for example, saying “goodbye,” “I love you,” or “I forgive you”).

Caring for the Past Planning for the Future

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The County Times

Briefs Woman Charged With Violating Protective Order

On November 17, 2009 April Renee Carter, 27 of Hollywood was served with a Protective Order ordering no contact between her and the petitioner of the order. On January 15, 2010 Carter allegedly attempted to contact the petitioner via text message and cell telephone in violation of the active protective order. Carter was arrested and charged with violating a protective order.

Traffic Stops Leads To Drug Charges

On January 16, 2010 Deputy Jean Vezzosi stopped a Ford Thunderbird because the front passenger was not secured with a seatbelt which is a violation of Maryland motor vehicle law. The driver, Amber Lee Timms-Faulkner, 19 of Culpeper, Virginia had a suspended license. Timms-Faulkner was arrested for driving while suspended. Search of the Timms-Faulkner’s purse revealed a small clear bag of green leafy material - suspected marijuana. Timms-Faulkner was charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance – marijuana. On January 17, 2010 Dfc. M. George assisted the Charles County Sheriff’s Office with a traffic stop in the area of Three Notch Road and Old Village Road in Mechanicsville. The driver was identified as Joan Manuel Cordova-Torres, 23, of Leesburg, Virginia. As George was speaking with Cordova-Torres, he (George) noticed green leafy material, suspected marijuana, on the center console of the vehicle. Cordova-Torres was administered the standardized field sobriety test and was arrested for driving while under the influence of alcohol. Search of the vehicle revealed a plastic baggie containing suspected marijuana. Cordova-Torres was also charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance – suspected marijuana.

Store Employee Charged With Theft

On January 15, 2010 Deputy H. Allen responded to the J.C. Penny department store in California for a report of a theft. Investigation revealed between January 7, 2010 and January 10, 2010 Lity Gean Thompson, 36, of Lexington Parkan employee of J.C. Penney, used various techniques to allegedly steal clothing from J.C. Penney. Thompson was charged with three counts of theft under $1,000 and one count of theft scheme.

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

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Separate Trials In Land Fraud Indictments Could Take Months

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Both sides of a brewing legal battle over theft and land fraud indictments against Leonardtown attorney John A. Mattingly and his real estate partner Daniel Jason Brown said in court Tuesday that each trial could take six weeks if held separately. Both defendants have also expressed either on their own or through counsel that there could be motions filed in the case to have Circuit Court Judge C. Clarke Raley recuse himself from the case and have the trials moved to another jurisdiction. Mattingly was indicted recently by the Grand Jury on 140 counts alleging theft, conspiracy and land fraud over a five-year period. Brown was indicted on more than 80 counts stemming from the same investigation in November. Both made their appearances separately in court Tuesday. Mattingly said that he had commissioned an attorney to represent him in the case but that he had not yet entered his appearance in the case. Mattingly told Judge Marvin Kaminetz that he planned to move ahead with both the recusal and change of venue motions.

“I fully expect that,” Mattingly said at the scheduling conference. Assistant State’s Attorney Daniel J. White, lead prosecutor on the case, said that he was not sure if he would oppose those motions; he said he would wait until he had seen them to make a decision. White said that more developments would likely come from the investigation. “I anticipate additional indictments on these defendants and additional defendants,” White told The County Times. Mattingly has denied any wrongdoing regarding the allegations against him and has said that the case is motivated by political retaliation from State’s Attorney Richard Fritz because he has challenged the GOP incumbent as a Democrat in the upcoming election. Fritz has denied Mattingly’s claims. In all the indictments and court filings go on to state that Mattingly conspired on numerous occasions to defraud the rightful owners of various parcels of property by buying their land at only a fraction of the value listed by the state Department of Assessments and Taxation, bilked money from an ailing widow and tried to pay off witnesses not to testify against a man accused in a 2008 shooting. guyleonard@countytimes.net

County Sheriff Investigating Mass Property Destruction By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Investigators with the county sheriff’s office are looking for suspects in 35 incidents of property destruction that they say occurred between Jan. 9 and Jan. 10 and than again on Jan. 15 through Jan. 17 during a 12-hour span from 3p.m. to 3a.m. They say that unknown perpetrators used objects to smash in vehicle windshields and mailboxes in the California, Lexington Park and St. Inigoes areas of the county. Most of the incidents took place in

Town Creek, Chancellors Run and St. Inigoes, according to police information. Police say they believe the crimes to be related. Police are asking anyone with information related to these crimes to call Lt. Eric Sweeney at 301-475-4200 ext. 1915 or CrimeSolvers at 301-475-3333. Callers can remain anonymous and if their information leads to the arrest and conviction of suspects they might be eligible for a $1,000 reward guyleonard@countytimes.net

Two From Montgomery Indicted On Southern Maryland Theft Charges

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Two defendants have been indicted by grand juries in both St. Mary’s and Charles counties recently on charges that they bilked money from people who believed one of the defendants would use the funds to make investments for them. Daniel Dwight Manoff, 46, of Poolesville and his estranged wife, Theresa Elizabeth Thorne, 30 have been charged with counts of felony theft and conspiracy for allegedly stealing money form Marcia Wilkinson of St. Mary’s and Carl Steinhauser and Paula Kennedy of Charles County. According to information from State Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler’s office the investigation results alleged that Manoff

told the victims he would invest funds for them but instead pocketed the money and used it for his own ends, including paying off some of Thorne’s personal expenses. The defendants are set to go to trial in April in Charles County, according to an attorney general’s office press release. On-line court records show that Manoff faces five counts of felony theft and two counts of conspiracy in Charles County, while Thorne faces five counts of theft or theft scheme there. Thorne also faces seven counts of felony theft in St. Mary’s county as well as one count of conspiracy to commit theft. Each count of felony theft carries a possible 15 years in jail and $25,000 fine. guyleonard@countytimes.net


13

Thursday, January 21, 2010

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In The

Know Education

The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010 Marie Curie, the Nobel prize winning scientist who discovered radium, died of radiation poisoning.

Ryken Math Team Scores in Top 10 Percent Three St. Mary’s Ryken students earned high scores and finished in the top 10% of the 31st Annual University of Maryland High School Mathematics Competition. The math competition, open to all students enrolled in high school in Maryland and the District of Columbia, had 2,343 participants this year. St. Mary’s Ryken senior Jingtao Wang ranked 54 out of 2,343, senior Erin Krumenacker ranked 189 and junior Dong Ha Park ranked 211. All three students have AP Calculus this year and each actively participates in extra-curricular activities and clubs. Jingtao is a member of the SMR Math Team and Robotics club and is looking forward to studying computer science or robotics at college next year. Erin is the president of the school’s National Honor Society chapter and in the ensemble for the school’s upcoming production of the musical, Grease. She will study chemical engineering at college next year. Dong Ha is a member of the SMR Math Team, FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America) and the Key Club. The High School Mathematics Competition is meant to provide students with stimulation, feedback and the opportunity for achievement. The test is divided into two parts. Students needed high scores on Part I to move on to participate in Part II of the competition. The three SMR students were among only 251 test-takers to qualify for Part II. They had two hours to From the left) St. Mary’s Ryken seniors Erin Krumenacker and Jingtao Wang and junior Dong Ha Park were top-performing students in the University of Maryland’s Annual High School complete five problems. According to the competition’s Web site, while both exams Mathematics Competition. Each finished in the top 10% of all test-takers. require a sound knowledge of high school mathematics, Part II only ability, but also a fair amount of insight and ingenuity to solve the is a “considerably more challenging exam.” All problems needed not questions.

Report Highlights Stimulus Spending for Schools By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer A report presented to the Board of Education at their Jan. 13 meeting included an outline of how last year’s stimulus money was spent, and highlighted concerns over the cuts in stimulus funding which may impact the school system in the next year. By way of State of Maryland allocations, the school system received federal funding from three sources as part of the American

Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, which provided funding to school systems via the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) Program and through grants which included both Interagency Disability Educational Awareness (IDEA) funding and Title I funding, as well as assistance from the National School Lunch Equipment Assistance grant. The school system used a Title 1 grant of $1,352,959 for SMART technology at George Washington Carver Elementary, Lexington Park Elementary, Green Holly Elementary and Park Hall Elementary schools, as well as amplification systems for classrooms. $3,872,302 was allocated for IDEA funding, with a heavy emphasis on technology, interventions and professional development, according to school officials. The report also included details on State Fiscal Stabilization (SFSF) funds totaling $3,165,068, and how they were spent, with more than a third going for instructional materials and supplies. “We made a conscious effort not to purchase staff,” commented Superintendent Michael Martirano during the meeting, explaining that new hires would require recurring funds that were not likely to become available in the next year. “I feel very confident in how the funds were allocated in this process,” he added. “What I am most concerned about is our budget stabilization funds.” Indeed, the Board’s recap of ARRA spending revealed a fiscally conservative allocation in the last year, but comments from school officials and board members seemed colored with uncertainty. “The funding cliff is real,” said Dudderar, referring to a phrase coined by the federal government to describe the limited availability of funding for an extended period, and emphasizing that the school system would need to use future grant and stimulus money again for non-recurring expenditures. She added that SFSF funding would most likely not be coming this year, and they did not expect any more federal stimulus money for the school system. Board of Education Vice Chair Cathy Allen commented later that, with the loss of budget stabilization dollars and other cutbacks, she expected that the school system might face as much as a $7 million shortfall in the next year. “It’s going to cost us more to do business the same way next year, so we may be looking at a $7 million shortfall … It’s horrendous,” she said, “so I appreciate the nightmares you’ve provided for me today.”

14

un Fact

Award-winning Author to Give Reading Jan. 28

Author Debra Marquart, English professor at Iowa State University, will read from her works as part of the St. Mary’s College of Maryland VOICES Reading Series at 8:15 p.m. Thursday, January 28, 2010, at the Daugherty-Palmer Commons. Marquart, who received the 2007 PEN USA Creative Nonfiction Award, is currently working on a novel set in Greece. The event is free and open to the public. Marquart has written two poetry collections, Everything’s a Verb and From Sweetness; a short story collection which draws on her experiences as a road musician, The Hunger Bone: Rock & Roll Stories; and a memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing Up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere, which received the PEN USA award. PEN Center USA’s annual awards program, established in 1982, recognizes literary excellence. Past award winners include Barbara Kingsolver, Maxine Hong Kingston, T.C. Boyle and Paul Thomas Anderson. Marquart’s work has also received a Pushcart Prize, the Shelby Foote Nonfiction Prize from the Faulkner Society, the Elle Lettres Award from Elle magazine, and a National Endowment for the Arts Prose Fellowship. She also is a member of The Bone People, a jazz-poetry, rhythm & blue project, with whom she has released two CDs: Orange Parade and A Regular Dervish. 

GMHS Hosting Jeopardy Tournament

Great Mills High School will be hosting the Southern Maryland Jeopardy Tournament on Friday, January 29, 2010, 6:30 p.m., in the Great Mills High School Auditorium, located at 21130 Great Mills Road, Great Mills, MD. The tournament will consist of two preliminary rounds and one championship round. Every registrant will participate in one of two preliminary rounds. The two winners and two highest score non-winners of the preliminary rounds will advance to the championship round. The champion will be awarded a trophy and prizes. Admission is $5.00 per person. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Great Mills High School STEM-10 and Engineering Club. For sponsorship information or details on registering as a contestant, visit http://schools. smcps.org/gmhs/stem-10 or contact Mr. Allen Skinner at caskinner@smcps.org.

Delegate Bohanan Calls for Scholarship Applicants for District 29-B

Delegate John L. Bohanan, Jr. is seeking applicants for Maryland Delegate Scholarship awards for the 2010-2011 school year. Successful applicants must be pursuing an academic program beyond high school and either attend or plan to enter a Maryland college in the fall. Applicants also must be a resident of District 29-B, and should contact the Board of Elections if unsure of the district in which they reside (301-475-8644, ext. 1610). Full or part-time students may qualify for the awards. To request an application, send home and mailing addresses to Delegate Bohanan’s district office at 46940 South Shangri-La Drive, Lexington Park, MD 20653, or e-mail john.bohanan. district@house.state.md.us.


15

Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times


The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

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“changing the rules” about how funds are allocated. “They eliminated subsidizing schools. The only way you’ll get assistance is through the tuition assistance program,” she said, adding that parents have been cooperative in applying for the program, and the school has received $66,000 in tuition assistance, “but we haven’t received it yet. We’ll get it at the end of the year.” Upcoming events for this year are set to include a golf tournament, which is tentatively scheduled for May 7 at Breton Bay Golf Course, though Lowe said the date has not been confirmed yet. “We’ll be doing another ‘Increase Your Egg Nest’ picnic, and that was at Mary’s Hope last year … the Raley’s organized that for us, but we’ll be taking it over this year, and that’s a fun outdoor picnic, and all of it benefits the school,” he said. St. Michael’s is also planning a car rally for the summer. “We do have a Jaguar, and we’re not sure how we’re going to auction that yet,” said Lowe, explaining that the school is currently auctioning off a Honda Civic, which has drawn a great deal of interest. “People are donating stuff all the time,” including fur coats, jewelry, cars, clothes, and various other items, said Lowe. The next fundraising event will be the school’s winter gala, which will feature a catered dinner and dance at Mary’s Hope in St. Inigoes on Feb. 27. Tickets and information can be found at www.saint-michaels-school.org. In the meantime though, Hofmeister said the school is continuing to take calls from people interested in enrolling. “We just enrolled a new student today, and we Photo By Frank Marquart enrolled a new one last week, so that’s two students St. Michael’s Principal Lila Hofmeister in the last seven days, and we had two phone calls about children moving into the area and wanting to enroll next year,” she said, explaining that their curPhoto By rent enrollment is up to 154 students, but the school Frank Marquart has the capacity to handle as many as 225 students, Below: St. Michael’s though the school is aiming at an enrollment of student Alyssa Gray around 200. “If we have 200 … that would be heaven,” she said, laughing.

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Students, parents and parishioners in the community around St. Michael’s School in Ridge are heaving a sigh of relief this year, as fundraising efforts to keep the school open for another year have proved successful. Such is great news for a community that consistently rallies behind the school, which also serves as an historical landmark, said St. Michael’s Principal Lila Hofmeister in an interview with The County Times, explaining that the parish’s pastor, Lee Fangmeyer, called a meeting on Oct. 15 to request help raising $575,000 by January to keep the school open. Many of the concerns voiced at the October meeting echoed those raised by parents the previous year, when the school was put on a list by the Archdiocese of Washington to determine the school’s fiscal sustainability. Though the community was able to raise the $300,000 needed in 2008 to keep the school running, the money that was needed to cover their most recent shortfall seemed a great deal steeper, covering a pre-existing debt of $154,639 and a projected deficit of $143,320 this year, in addition to part of the school’s operating costs. Help was already on the way though, said Hofmeister. “Before that, we had a meeting with the staff, and that was when true miracles started occurring,” she said, explaining that staff members had already come together “and initiated the first bit of fundraising, raising $100,000 amongst themselves.” The rest of the effort to solicit donations from the community took a little more work, said David Lowe, whose two stepdaughters attend the school. He has been credited with spearheading many of the school’s fundraising efforts this year, and confirmed Fangmeyer’s request for $575,000, saying, “what we have raised since then is $340,000 in cash, and another $260,000 or so in pledges, so it’s just over $600,000 in pledges. But what he did in November

was he put out another letter saying he wanted to raise $150,000 by the end of November, and then he would like to see progress on all the normal fundraising we do throughout the year, and then the rest of that towards that 575.” The school’s specific campaigns have included the “Thanks-A-Million” donation website, the reprisal of the school’s Fall Festival, and several other events aimed at increasing revenues. “The big thing that we started was more a message than anything else, and that was the ‘Thanks-AMillion’ campaign,” said Lowe, explaining that the idea for the campaign was even echoed by a parent who offered suggestions on soliciting pledges at the Oct. 15 meeting. “It gave people the ability to donate online, which a lot of people have done, but also it was just a way to get the word out,” he said, “and it just seemed like when people saw how much was being given, the more people gave.” Another “big thing” for St. Michael’s was the reprisal of their Fall Festival, which Lowe said raised more than $10,000 for the school. “The biggest value of doing that was that it brought the community back together,” said Lowe, adding that the dinner festival had been downgraded to a “Fall Breakfast” for the last several years, but that this year’s event had drawn a lot of former participants back to the community from other parts of the state. “Over 700 meals were served, so it was a very big day,” he said. And it was the tight-knit community that made it possible to pull St. Michael’s out of the red this year. “This community is the most amazing community ever in their support,” said Hofmeister. “You don’t raise that kind of money in that short time without a tremendous community effort. And from every area people have come forward.” Hofmeister added that media exposure has also helped spur interest in the school, and enrollment has increased. “Enrollment went up 18%, and in the past year it went up 9%,” said Hofmeister, explaining that part of the challenge this year has been the Archdiocese stopping school subsidies, in effect

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times

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By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer Leonardtown native C. Aloysius Bowman is a busy man, though he would never describe that as a problem, especially now that his brainchild, The Elijah International Foundation, is getting off the ground to establish itself in St. Mary’s County. “It’s been a destiny of mine, I guess, since the time I was born, but I got the first glimpse of the vision back in ’87,” he said. “My dream is always to help everybody, and that’s all I want to do in life, and I was told growing up, ‘you can’t do that, you have to take care of yourself’ … but that’s all I wanted to do. I grew up here in Leonardtown, right on Macintosh Road … and it always seemed like I was in a position to help the community in some capacity.” Nowadays, Bowman’s drive to help the community has translated itself to a multipronged approach to education and community outreach, centering on what he calls “the global fundamental principles of faith, environmental conservation, economics and education.” As such, these core principles have had Bowman and his colleagues presenting ideas to local dignitaries on how to expand recycling services to St. Mary’s, ideas on how to help local businesses expand their offerings, and pitching educational programs that would focus on teaching the history of St. Mary’s County. But one of Bowman’s latest efforts may even expand these principles to fostering more entertainment in the county, which he says would help the community in more ways than one, and foster a spiritual principle of its own. “The Bible says that God created us for his pleasure,” he said, “so it’s reasonable, I think, to say that man, being made in his image, needs to be entertained as well … and entertainers are the only ones left in our society that are paid for their gifts, and these are gifts that the great ones just give away … some of us on the fringes think it’s just all about money, but that’s not what it’s about, because the greats don’t do it for money.” The idea of expanding entertainment offerings in St Mary’s County to help support local businesses may be seen as the whole impetus of his latest project, a fourday Memorial Day Weekend music festival, an idea that he pitched to local dignitaries on Friday night at a meeting at the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center. “What I’m trying to do is get to the entertainment industries, those moguls … and capture that energy and fund major extravaganzas in rural areas … I have an event that I’m envisioning that I’m trying to put together for Memorial Day weekend,” he said, explaining that it would be a four-day festival including national re-

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cording acts like Bruce Springstein, Nelly, Alicia Keys and others, with all proceeds staying in the community to fund the project and local community and economic development efforts, a systemic approach that Bowman thinks may spur the interest needed to bring “the greats” to this corner of the state. “I actually gave it to Bohanan this weekend and he’s taking it up to Annapolis,” he said, “but it’s something that would actually kick-start this whole restoration process in Southern Maryland.” The proposed festival would take place in Historic St. Mary’s City, using some of the grounds at St. Mary’s College. All of this fits into a major piece of the foundation’s corporate fundraising, “David’s Call,” an entertainment project that Bowman hopes will help fund everything from major extravaganzas to small social outings. Right now Bowman said that his ideas have met with excitement and interest from Del. John Bohanan and members of the Board of County Commissioners. But that his plans are still “visions” and not yet realities, but he defines it as an idea that could spread across the country if done correctly. “I just want to have it that first time, because what I want it to be is a template of what we could do throughout the country,” he said. “We could do the same thing in the next state. Have an event, something of the same magnitude, which would generate money for their community. And this could be a flame that got started, that just goes.”

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St. Mary’s College was a hub of spiritual activity as hundreds assembled for the sixth annual MLK Prayer Breakfast, which was set up to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and county residents who have lived and served in the spirit of racial equality and community service. Among the highlights of this year’s program was Del. John Bohanan’s presentation of the first annual “Realizing the Dream” awards, honoring four people from St. Mary’s County whose character was exemplary of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Each winner received a plaque and a check for $100. Aamon Smith of Great Mills, an eighth grade student at Leonardtown Middle School, was nominated for her participation in leadership activities both in and out of the classroom. “Aamon was elected to attend the National Young Leaders Conference in D.C., and was also selected to attend the Maryland Leadership Workshop this past summer,” said Bohanan, adding that she has also worked at the Go Green forum in St. Mary’s County, and is an active member of the local NAACP. Evelyn Holland, from Hollywood, was recognized for serving more than 50 years as a local civil rights activist. “Evelyn has had a major impact on the community, both in her profession as a nurse and as a civil rights leader,” said Bohanan. “She has chaired the local NAACP education committee for more than 30 years. Evelyn was a charter member of the St. Mary’s County Commission for Women, served on the St. Mary’s County Social Services Board, served on the St. Mary’s County Nursing Center Board, worked on the public action committee, and serves on the St. Mary’s County library board. I know that because Evelyn’s giving me a hard time right now about funding for the new library in Leonardtown,” he added. Theodore Newkirk, from Lexington Park, was recognized for his fight against segregation at Patuxent River Naval Air Station. The fourth honoree, Donald Anthony Shubrooks, a sophomore at Great Mills High School

William Yoast, the high school football coach portrayed in the film “Remember the Titans,” posed with the St. Peter Claver Catholic Church Gospel Choir and the First Missionary Baptist Church of Lexington Park Youth Choir at the sixth annual MLK Prayer Breakfast, which was held at St. Mary’s College on Monday.

from California, was honored for his participation in the Young Leaders of St. Mary’s County, and his work with youth counseling and community outreach. As he was unable to attend, his mother, Jacqueline Shubrooks, accepted the award on his behalf. The keynote speaker this year was William Yoast, the high school football coach portrayed in the film “Remember the Titans.” Yoast spoke about his experience as assistant coach to head coach Herman Boone, who is black, in the early 1970s when T.C. Williams High School, in Alexandria, Virginia, was first integrated. “We realized we were there to correct a mistake made by society. A mistake called segregation,” he said. John W. Franklin talked of the birth of the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History, which he described as “the dream of black World War I veterans who wanted to tell their story.” The museum will be built on 5 ½ acres of land that he said would be located at the base of the Washington Monument. The museum is currently expected to open in 2015. Also featured were musical performances by the St. Peter Claver Catholic Church Gospel Choir and the First Missionary Baptist Church of Lexington Park Youth Choir, both of which performed together at the end of the program.

Annual Conference Will Focus on Learning Disability Research The Learning Disabilities Association of St. Mary’s County is pleased to announce that the 47th LDA International Annual Conference will be held in Baltimore, MD this year from February 17th to 20th. This conference will focus on the latest research and teachings regarding learning disabilities, including specific workshops on medical, mental health, teacher preparation, public policy, adults with LD, assessment, advocacy, and more. Keynote speakers will include Dr. Martha Denckla, Director of Developmental Cognitive Neurology at Kennedy Krieger Institute and professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Michelle Rhee, Chancellor of Washington DC Public Schools; Lisa Dieker, professor at the University of Central Florida and director of the Lockheed Martin Mathematics and Science Academy; Dr. Larry Silver, psychiatry professor at Georgetown University Medical Center and former director

of the National Institute of Mental Health; and Debbie Phelps, educator, principal, and mother of Michael Phelps, Olympic gold medalist. Special event speakers will include Rick Lavoie, administrator of residential programs for children with special needs and renowned speaker and author about LD; Neil Sturomski, former director of the National Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities Center; and Ellen Callegary, Esq., attorney that focuses on special education, disability and family law issues. More information about the conference can be found on the LDA of America website at www. ldaamerica.org. A limited number of stipends ($250 each) are being provided by LDA of St. Mary’s County to individuals who wish to attend this conference. For more information about these stipends, please contact LDA of St. Mary’s County at ldasmc@gmail.com or Barbara Mielcarek at 301-863-5658. Deadline for submission of stipend requests is February 1st.


21

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Thursday, January 21 • Business Networking Meeting Coffee Quarter (California) – 9 a.m. BNI is a business and professional networking organization that offers members the opportunity to share ideas, contacts and, most importantly, qualified referrals. Our ongoing education programs help members build their business through “word of mouth.” Visit our weekly meeting to find out more about our BNI California Breakfast Chapter. For questions please contact our secretary, Shari Mesh @ 703-587-5659. • Cheesesteaks Night VFW Post 2632 (California) – 5 p.m. • Captain Cinvent Camalier Camp 1359 SCV Meeting Garvey Senior Center (Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m. The camp will be celebrating the birthdays of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson during their monthly business meeting. Anyone with southern ancestors who are interested in preserving local history, and studying the war between the states, is welcome to attend. • St. Mary’s County Republican Club Meeting Southern Maryland Higher Education Canter (California) – 6:30 p.m. The purpose of the Club is to provide a social and charitable forum for people who support and promote the ideals, philosophy and candidates of the Republican Party. They will meet in Building 2 at the Higher Ed Center. Call 204-2986089 for details. • HomeSpun Folk Concert Christ Church Parish Hall (Chaptico) – 7:30 p.m. Bill Gurley will be performing a Folk Concert at the Homespun Coffee House on Friday, January 22, 2010. Making music for decades, Bill has performed on guitar, fiddle, mandolin and 5-string banjo with many of the legends of Bluegrass and Folk Music. Bill is joined on vocals for this concert by his daughter Macon and by Jimmy Masters on bass. The concert is sponsored by the Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance association, and will be held at the Christ Church Parish Hall, 37501 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico, MD. Doors open at 7:00 and the concert will begin at 7:30. The cost is $10 for SMTMD members, $12 for non-members. Light refreshments will also be served. • $50 Free Roll Hold’Em Donovan’s Pub (California) – 7:30 p.m.

Friday, January 22 • Texas Hold’Em Poker Mechanicsville Fire ouse (28165 Club Rd, Mechanicsville) – 7 p.m.

• Newtowne Players: “Over the River and Through the Woods” Three Notch Theater (Lexington Park) – 8 p.m. The comedy by Joe DiPietro will show Thursdays through Sundays, Jan. 22 through Feb. 7, 2010. Reservations are recommended. Please make reservations for the show by calling 301-737-5447 or visiting www.newtowneplayers.org.

Saturday, January 23 • Used Book Sale Lexington Park United Methodist Church – 9 a.m. • Animal Training Class Charlotte Hall Library – 9:30 a.m. Golden Retriever Rescue of Southern Maryland is hosting a training for animal lovers who are interested in volunteering with the rescue on Saturday, January 23rd from 930 a.m. until noon at the Charlotte Hall Library. The first hour of the training includes an introduction and brief history of the rescue, followed by training for Home Visit Volunteers. Home Visitors go to the homes of people who are interested in adopting a golden retriever to ensure the family has a safe environment for a golden retriever and to educate prospective adopters about the breed and the rescue. If you have a golden this is a great volunteer activity as you can take your dog with you! The second half of the training focuses on all aspects of providing a temporary (foster) home to a golden retriever in need. Topics include introducing your temporary golden to your family, providing medical care, getting to know your dog and helping your dog make the transition to their furever family. There is no cost for the training, and while an RSVP is nice to ensure adequate training materials and refreshments, it is not necessary. For more information about the training or Golden Retriever Rescue of Southern Maryland go to www.goldenretrieverrescueofsouthernmaryland.org or call 301.994.0132. • Appraiser Fair St. Clement’s Island Museum (Colton’s Point) – 10 a.m. Appraisers for jewelry, furniture, glassware, pottery, artwork, music boxes, dolls and coins will be available at the St. Clement’s Island Museum to evaluate your antiques and collectibles. A fee for dolls, coins and jewelry will be $5 for the first two items and $10 per additional item. Fees for fine arts items are $5 per item with a two item limit. Only bring items that can be hand-carried. There will also be a free soup tasting sponsored by the Chincoteague Seafood Co. Call 301-769-2222 or go to www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/museums for more information. • Second Hope Rescue Pet Adoptions Petco (California) – 11 a.m. For more information or to find out which dogs/cats will be at this event, please call 240-925-0628.

The County Times

• Huge “Stuffed” Basket Bingo Valley Lee Fire Department – 5 p.m. • Legends and Lore Tours Sotterley Plantation (Hollywood) – 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. An eerie after-hours Mansion tour with spirit sighting stories of the past and present! Hear the legends and unexplained occurrences of Sotterley Plantation and ask the questions to which you have always wanted answers. Perhaps you will have an unexplained experience. Reservations required. Admission. 301-373-2280. www. sotterley.org. • Longaberger/Vera Bradley Basket Bingo Father Andrew White School (Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:00 pm and bingo begins at 7:00 pm. For questions or reservations please call Denise at 301-475-3192. • Newtowne Players: “Over the River and Through the Woods” Three Notch Theater (Lexington Park) – 8 p.m.

Sunday, January 24 • Texas Hold’Em Tournament – The Big Game Park Hall Bingo Hall (Claifornia) – 2:30 p.m. • Newtowne Players: “Over the River and Through the Woods” Three Notch Theater (Lexington Park) – 3:30 p.m. • Deep Stack Texas Hold’Em Bennett Building, 4930 Old Three Notch Rd. (Hollywood) – 4:30 p.m.

Monday, January 25 • Geneological Society Meeting Leonardtown Libaray – 7 p.m. The public is invited and admission is free. Topic for this night will be “Navigating the Finda-Grave Website” The speakers will be Bill Mitchell & David Roberts. Refreshments served. Contact Loranna Gray at 301 373-8458 or Peg Richardson at 410 326-4435 for directions or information.

Tuesday, January 26 • Meeting: Republican Women of St. Mary’s County Tea Room Antique Restaurant (Leonardtown) – 11 a.m. Monthly meeting. For information call 301-863-1977. • Special Olympics Texas Hold’Em Bennett Building, 4930 Old Three Notch Rd. (Hollywood) – 7 p.m.

Wednesday, January 27 • Special Olympics Texas Hold’Em Bennett Building, 4930 Old Three Notch Rd. (Hollywood) – 7 p.m.

Casper

“Hi, my name is Casper and I’m a darling four year old pure bred male Maltese. I’m a real sweetheart! I get along great with children and other dogs of all sizes but I’d be happier in a home without cats. I’m looking for love from someone wonderful just like YOU! I’m up to date on vaccinations, neutered, house trained and identification micro chipped. For more information, please call SECOND HOPE RESCUE at 240925-0628 or email katmc@secondhoperescue.org. Please Adopt, Don’t Shop!”

L ibrary

Items

• Library joins Facebook and Flickr The library recently launched a Facebook page, which the public can view by clicking on the Facebook icon on the homepage. Registered Facebook users can become “fans” and add comments to the page. The library also has a presence on Flickr where the public can view photos taken at library programs. To access the public can click on the Flickr icon on the homepage. • Discover how to pay for college Tim Wolfe, Director of Financial Aid at St. Mary’s College, along with a local high school career counselor, will discuss the options available to help pay college expenses. The FAFSA form will be discussed. Lexington Park will host the free program Jan. 27 and Charlotte Hall on Feb. 3. All three programs begin at 7 p.m. No registration is required. High school seniors and their parents/guardians can get assistance in filling out and filing the FAFSA form online from experts from the Financial Aid Office of St. Mary’s College and the St. Mary’s County Public Schools’ College Access Program on Jan. 31 at Lexington Park Library. Those interested must pre-register with their high school career center or by emailing mgsmith@smcps.org. • Family fun planned Families can enjoy an afternoon of gaming or a free movie on Jan. 25. Gaming fun will begin at 1:30 p.m. at Charlotte Hall. Leonardtown will show a 2009 PG movie at 2 p.m. This animated adventure follows a scientist who tries to solve world hunger only to see food fall from the sky in abundance. Snacks will be provided at each event. • “The Birds” to be discussed Alfred Hitchcock’s movie, “The Birds,” will be discussed at the Charlotte Hall branch on Jan. 25 at 7 p.m. The movie is to be viewed prior to the discussion. • County kicks off Big Read Once again Southern Maryland is having a Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts, with residents in all three counties reading Ray Bradbury’s novel, “Fahrenheit 451”, during the month of February. Leonardtown Library will host St. Mary’s County’s Big Read Kick-off on Jan. 30 at 2 p.m. Six students from St. Mary’s Ryken will read excerpts from Bradbury’s novel. Copies of the book will be given away and light refreshments will be served. Various events and discussions are planned throughout the month of February.


The County Times

A Journey Through Time The

By Linda Reno Contributing Writer Alexander Somervell was born in Aquasco, Prince George’s County on June 11, 1796 and was the son of James and Elizabeth Hawkins (Magruder) Somervell. In 1817, at the age of 21, Alexander left Southern Maryland moving first to Louisiana then to Missouri, and finally in 1833 he moved to Texas where he was granted land in Stephen Austin’s second colony. He established a mercantile business at San Felipe. In October 1835 Somervell joined the volunteers marching from Gonzales to Bexar and was elected major. He participated in the siege of Bexar. In 1836 he joined the Texas Army. On March 12, 1836 he was elected Major of the First Regiment of Texas Volunteers and less

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Chronicle

than a month later was elected Lieutenant Colonel of the same Regiment. On April 21 he would fight in the Battle of San Jacinto where the Texans, led by Gen. Sam Houston, defeated Santa Anna’s Mexican forces and secured the independence of Texas from Mexico. On June 7, he resigned from the army to accept the post of Secretary of War for Texas. From 1836-1838, Somervell served as a member of the Texas Republic Senate. In November 1839, he was elected Brigadier General of the First Brigade; January 1840 appointed commissioner to inspect land offices west of the Brazos; 1841 named county clerk in Austin County; and in December 1842 appointed Collector of Customs for the Port of Calhoun. General Somervell died under mysterious circumstances. Initially it was reported that he had left home with a great deal of money in his possession and his body was later found lashed to the timbers of a capsized boat. “The Indianola Bulletin (TX) of the 25th inst. has the following account of the death of Gen. Alexander Somervell, late collector of the port of Saluria. It becomes our painful duty to announce the unexpected death of Gen. Alexander Somervell of this city. He left here for Saluria, on a sail boat, in company with the master and Charles Haley, free man of color, on the evening of the 20th

inst. About 10 o’clock P.M. a very severe blow came on from the north-northwest. The boat endeavored to land at Saluria wharf, but failed, and in casting anchor in but three feet of water, was capsized, by which Gen. Somervell and Charles Haley were drowned, and probably drifted to sea, as their bodies have not yet been found. Mr. Collins, the boatman, got ashore. P.S. From Capt. James Cummings, up from the Pass, we learn that the body of Gen. Somervell has been found. It appears that the boat in dropping anchor, filled and sunk in four feet of water, within a few feet of a row of wharf posts. Mr. Collins says that as he jumped over, the General appeared to be seeking his carpet bag, and he saw him no more; that Haley leaped into the water simultaneously with himself, and seizing hold of a post, was struck by a heavy sea, causing him to scream. It was very dark, and from the noise of the bay, he could neither see nor hear them more; but getting out himself, he supposed they had done likewise, and reaching his house almost perished, he was unable to give notice to others till morning. It seems the General lashed himself to a post under the lee of the boat and was rode down by the latter. In this situation he was found. The other body has not been found.” (Times Picayune, New Orleans, LA, March 1, 1854). Somervell County, Texas was named in honor of Alexander Somervell.

Fort Detrick to Inherit Medical Museum

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) – Fort Detrick will bring a renowned medical museum under its control, as the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington prepares to close and scatters its resources to local military installations. The National Museum of Health and Medicine will move to Fort Detrick’s Forest Glen Annex in Silver Spring in 2011. The museum has a dozen exhibits with artifacts ranging from the bullet that killed President Abraham Lincoln to the actual tent and floor of an Air Force tent hospital from Iraq in which thousands of American lives were saved. The museum will remain under Army command and parallels much of Fort Detrick researchers’ work to study diseases and create medical technology. “We get another outstanding nationally known entity,” said Mike Jewett, Fort Detrick’s executive officer for Forest Glen, about the acquisition. “We’re excited.” The Forest Glen post is particularly happy to host the museum because it is working on expanding its tissue repository for military researchers to study. The repository includes samples dating back to the 1970s. The museum, on the other hand, boasts the largest collection of brains and brain slices in the world, as well as odds and ends such as the amputated leg of Civil War Gen. Daniel Sickles – he donated his limb to the fledgling museum in 1863 after he was hit by a cannon ball. Fort Detrick has a good relationship with the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in downtown Frederick , and Jewett said “I would expect and hope that once the museum is up and running at (Forest Glen Annex) that we would have some kind of joint and complementary relation with the two museums.” The Army museum’s new building is expected to be completed by April 1, 2011. Officials recently awarded a $10.5 million contract for the museum’s design and construction, and Jewett said workers should break ground by March 1. The project is expected to cost a total of $12.2 million, he said. Construction details for the new building have not been set, but the contract calls for a 20,000-square-foot building, Jewett said. That’s about a third of the size of the current museum at Walter Reed, but the current space also contains a warehouse area that the new building won’t have. Jewett thinks the new display will not be much smaller than the current one. Building a new museum from scratch is a great opportunity

for the curators to help decide how to display their 25 million artifacts, said Tim Clarke Jr., spokesman for the National Museum of Health and Medicine. The museum’s displays include the world’s largest collection of microscopes, with some dating back to the 1660s; medical tools and technologies from the Civil War through Vietnam; and bones and organs. Two exhibits relate to modern military medicine. The museum preserved the tent and floor from the U.S. Air Force’s hospital tent in Balad, Iraq. That is where soldiers with some of the most serious injuries of Operation Iraqi Freedom came to be treated or to be cared for until they could be flown to the United States. Despite being in a tent, doctors achieved a 98 percent survival rate for wounded American soldiers. A delegation of Congressman visited Balad in 2007, when the military planned to tear down the tent hospital to build a more permanent facility. The lawmakers insisted Trauma Bay II be spared. “The scuff marks and antiseptic stains on the floor tell a story of heroic efforts to give our wounded the best emergency medical care in the history of warfare. The lives saved, and lost, likely make the slab of concrete the most hallowed of ground in the entire country of Iraq,” they wrote in a letter to the Secretary of the Army’s office. Another exhibit shows the history of identifying the war dead, which now relies on modern genetic and forensic methods. Near the exhibit<s entrance sit dental tools used by Paul Revere, along with an implant he fashioned for Maj. Gen. Joseph Warren before the Revolutionary War. Warren was killed in the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, and Revere identified his body for Warren’s family by recognizing the implant _ one of the earliest examples of forensic identification. Clarke said he loves seeing the Revolutionary War tools on display “and just on the other side of the room having one of the most modern technologies.” For the school groups that come through, the museum has plastinated organs _ real human organs whose liquids have been replaced with plastics for preservation – for tourists to hold and examine. “In this day when resources are drawing down, we can offer opportunities that may not be available in the classroom,” Clarke said.

22

Smithsonian Exhibit Shows Nuns’ Impact on History WASHINGTON (AP) – The Smithsonian’s International Gallery is opening a new exhibit on the impact of Catholic nuns in shaping the nation’s culture and social services over 300 years. The exhibit opened Friday on the National Mall. It includes stories of 12 Catholic sisters who arrived in New Orleans in 1727. One section includes a letter from President Thomas Jefferson assuring the women that their work could continue following the Louisiana Purchase. Other sections are devoted to the role of sisters in treating soldiers on the front lines in the Civil War, the founding of the Mayo Clinic and other notable moments. The exhibit, ``Women & Spirit: Catholic Sisters in America,’’ is on a three-year tour. It will be on view in Washington through April 25.

Catering Hall to Become Maryland Naturalist Center

OVERLEA, Md. (AP) – A former town hall is on its way to becoming the new home of the preserved snakes, fossils, skeletons and other items in the collection of the Natural History Society of Maryland. The collection has been housed away from public view in a Baltimore town house since losing its home at the Maryland Zoo in the 1970s. The society purchased the 9,000-square-foot former Overlea town hall, also later used as a catering hall, three years ago. Members plan to turn the two-story structure into the Maryland Naturalist Center, where “kids can get unplugged and connected with nature,” said Carl “Bud” Herb, society treasurer. “We want a hands-on facility with handson programs, many of them designed so children can learn,” Herb said. “We want visitors to hold a thousand-years-old shark tooth and feel the sharp edges. People can examine birds from the 1800s and see how they have changed over the years.” The society treasurer says the project will revive the society, established in 1929, and the neighborhood. Ginger Mihalik, executive director of the society, said residents were concerned about what would happen to the building and feared it might become a gas station or liquor store. “Those were the last things we wanted to see on this corner,” said Mihalik. “People were so excited about the possibility of this museum they were doing cartwheels.” Artifacts in the collection show evidence of the whales and sharks that inhabited Maryland’s coastal waters thousands of years ago and also of the Native Americans who hunted, fished and camped along the state’s rivers. One glass display case contains mounted birds indigenous to the state. “It’s all so Victorian,” Mihalik said. “They look so natural, exactly the way you would see them in nature.” Exhibit space, classrooms and conference areas, and possibly a tower for bird-watching are planned. A whale skeleton now on loan to a North Carolina museum will hang from the rafters in the great hall above a display of rocks, minerals and fossils that includes a mastodon tooth unearthed in Towson. Several clubs focused on natural history currently meet at the building, but a grand opening is about $150,000 and a year away, Mihalik said. “We are still in the birthing phase and working on grant applications,” Mihalik said. “Our main focus now is to get this building open so we can run programs and protect our collection. We have had no place to archivally preserve history, but hopefully, this building will change all that.”


23

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Book Review

The County Times

c.2010, Crown Books $25.00 / $29.95 Canada 307 pages, includes index

By Terri Schlichenmeyer Contributing Writer The organ starts to play and you’re nervous. You shouldn’t be, though. You’re in love and this quickly-assembled Las Vegas wedding proves it. You’ve got the minister who barely knows you and you’re standing in a chapel you’ve never seen before. If that’s not love, what is? You’ve even got Elvis holding the wedding ring. No, not someone who looks like Elvis. The real Elvis, and he paid for the wedding, just as he paid for your nose. His generosity didn’t surprise you, though. It’s something a guy gets used to, as you’ll see in the new book “Elvis: My Best Man” by George Klein with Chuck Crisafulli. When George Klein was young, he was fascinated with music and the radio DJs that played it. Moreover, he was fascinated by an emerging “fad” called rock and roll. Klein knew he wanted to be part of that, and it set the course of his life. Though he’d gone to school with Elvis Presley, it was through radio that he got to know Presley well. And when Klein lost that coveted radio job, Elvis spontaneously stepped in and hired him as a “traveling companion”. Elvis’ mother didn’t want her son in an airplane, so Elvis and Klein traveled by car and train to concerts (the rest of the entourage often caught flights). Because they shared rooms as well as time, the two became close. Klein supported the singer, counseled him, and brought girls to hotel parties held with chaste kisses and no alcohol. But the support went both ways. Whenever Klein felt the pull of radio, Elvis always urged him to return to that career, but with an open-door invitation: Klein could return to the fold any time. And he did. Who could give up the life of a King? Elvis Presley, says Klein, was the kind of guy who gave people cars and posed for nervous fans’ cameras. He was a gentlemanly ladies’ man who respected his date’s privacy. But Elvis was easily angered, quickly jealous, and his mood could go dark in a

“Elvis: My Best Man” by George Klein with Chuck Crisafulli

blink. He was a star and demanded treatment as such but Klein stuck by him, as friends do. Then, in a quirk-of-fate, circleof-life way, Klein learned from a radio DJ that his friend was dead. I find it amazing that, thirty-plus years after Presley’s death, people are still writing books about him. In the case of “Elvis: My Best Man”, I’m glad.

Not just another my-friend-Elvis memoir, this book is really only half dedicated to Presley. In addition to anecdotes and little-known insider tidbits about Elvis, authors George Klein and Chuck Crisafulli also tell the story of rock & roll and the birth of a kind of radio we can’t imagine living without. What makes this story wonderful is that it’s lively, gentlytold, and not one bit pandering. If “Long Live the King” is your mantra and you can’t help falling in love with books about him, you’ll definitely want this one. Missing this “Elvis: My Best Man” might make you all shook up.

An iguana can stay under water for 28 minutes.

un Fact

Wanderings of an

Aimless

d

Min To rip means I love you By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer I don’t like to cause my husband pain, not really. But when he told the nurse to not worry about taking off his electrical leads from numerous EKG’s and an echocardiogram, that I would actually enjoy it, I was happy. It meant he was still in good spirits. Nurses try to be so gentle and sweet and don’t always take the leads off quickly. My husband has a good amount of chest hair. Some nurses shave little patches of hair before they adhere the leads and some don’t. In the last three weeks he has spent two overnights in hospitals with heart issues; one at St. Mary’s Hospital and one at Washington Hospital Center - he has had his share of pain and anxiety. I must say, I think SMH and WHC have some of the kindest and most attentive doctors and nurses we have had contact with. So, when he was being discharged from Washington Hospital Center last Wednesday, it was time to take off the leads. The nurse came in, looked at his chest with nine leads and said, “I hate to do this, I know it’s going to hurt”. “No problem,” he said, “My wife enjoys it.” He did ask me if we could remove them in the room’s bathroom though. That way less people would hear him scream. I think everyone on the hall could hear him preparing himself before we even got to the bathroom. He was saying” Oh, No!” loudly. Bless his furry soul. And, I was saying, ”God, please don’t let him have a heart attack while I’m pulling these off”. He said, ”At least we’re in the right place.” I was ready to start ripping, but my husband was covering his chest with his hands tell-

ing me, to wait, that he wasn’t ready. I told him the quicker we did this the quicker he could go home. He took a few deep breaths, and I counted, ”One, two, RIP, three” and watched him take a sudden intake of air. I said, “O.k., eight more to go – let’s git ‘er done.” “Wait, wait!” was all he was able to say, then after a bit, “all right”. This process continued a few more times. Angry red patches appeared on his skin. We were both caught between hysterical laughter and tears. He commented that his were the tears of pain and mine were tears of joy. No, I hurt for him too. But, when we looked down at each patch covered in fur, we had to laugh some more. I had to trick him once or twice and act like I was using one hand to steady him and the other to rip. Really I was grabbing for two at a time to get it over with. He really lost his breath on those. I finally removed them all, and I believe he was grateful when they came with the obligatory exit wheelchair to take him downstairs. This had taken a lot out of him. I also have to be careful myself, I had the “05 biting incident” to remember. During the stay after his heart attack, he asked me to detangle all the lead wires that were running over his chest under his gown. Well, there wasn’t much room to maneuver, and I slipped my hand in with the back of my left hand facing his chest hair. As I started to pull my hand out, my wedding ring got caught in his hair and yanked sharply. He bent his head and bit my forearm. I yelled, then cried. He wouldn’t let go, and I was still stuck in his chest hair. We stayed that way for a while, laughing, crying and both in pain. He drew blood. I had a bite mark bruise for a long time. He says I’m still paying him back for that one. “No, never”, I said. … I just finished paying him back. When he wakes up and looks in the mirror, he will see lots of X’s and O’s on his bare chest patches. Funny thing, I won every game. This is the game of Love. To each new day’s adventure, Shelby Please send comments or ideas to: shelbys.wanderings@yahoo.com.

Call 301-373-4125 to Subscribe Today!


The County Times

Thursday, January 21 • Fair Warning Irish Pub Band CJ’s Back Room (Lusby) – 5 p.m.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or entertainment announcements, or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail andreashiell@countytimes.net.

• Gretchen Richie (Jazz After Hours) Café des Artistes (Leonardtown) – 8 p.m. •

• David Norris DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m.*

• Karaoke Applebee’s (California) – 9 p.m. • Slow Rush Martini’s Lounge (White Plains) – 9 p.m.

Nuttin’ Fancy CJ’s Back Room (Lusby) – 8 p.m.

• Smith-Tucker Drift Away Bar & Grill (Cobb Island) – 9 p.m.

Friday, January 22

• The Wanderers Cryer’s Back Road Inn (Leonardtown) – 9 p.m.

• Fair Warning Irish Pub Band Donovan’s Pub (California) – 5 p.m. • Benjamin Connelly Ruddy Duck Brewery (Solomons) – 6 p.m. • David Norris DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m.* • DJ Donna Hotel Charles (Hughesville) – 7:30 p.m. • Slow Rush Martini’s Lounge (White Plains) – 9 p.m. • Too Many Mikes Apehanger’s Bar (Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

• Southbound Anderson’s Bar (Avenue) – 8:30 p.m. • Country Memories Band VFW Post 10081 (Bel Alton) – 8:45 p.m.

Partygoers had their hands full on New Year’s Eve, with dozens of venues to choose from offering live music, dancing and drinks galore to ring in 2010. And nestled along a stretch of country road near Leonardtown, locals and visitors were enjoying the early fruits

• California Ramblers Bluegrass Band Scott’s Bar II (Port Tobacco) – 2 p.m.

• Bad Horse Hotel Charles (Hughesville) – 9 p.m. • Bone Big Dogs Paradise (Mechanicsville) – 9 p.m.

• Fair Warning Irish Pub Band DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m. • California Bob Ruddy Duck Brewery (Solomons) – 7 p.m.

Wednesday, January 27 • Captain John DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m.*

• Full Effect Hotel Charles (Hughesville) – 9 p.m. • Full Steam Apehanger’s Bar (Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

• Fair Warning Irish Pub Band DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m. • Wolf’s Hot Rods & Old Gas Open Blues Jam Beach Cove Restaurant (Chesapeake Beach) – 8 p.m.

• DJ Mango Lexington Lounge (Lexington Park) – 7 p.m. • Billy Breslin Ruddy Duck Brewery (Solomons) – 8 p.m.

*Call to confirm • Funny Money Hula’s Bungalow (California) – 9 p.m.

Email events to andreashiell@ countytimes.net. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 5 p.m.

n O g n i Go

For family and community events, see our calendar in the community section on page 21.

What’s

By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer

Tuesday, January 26

• Alive-N-Kickin’ Memories (Waldorf) – 9 p.m.

• Eclipse Blue Dog Saloon (Port Tobacco) – 9 p.m.

• Captain Woody Beach Cove Restaurant (Chesapeake Beach) – 8 p.m.

Local Rockers Get Good and Wild

Sunday, January 24

• Dave & Kevin Catamaran’s (Solomons) – 9 p.m.

Saturday, January 23

24

In Entertainment

Photo from www.wildgoodrocks.com

of a long evening at Cryer’s Back Road Inn, where local rockers WildGood were preparing to play. Suzanne Warner, lead singer, described the band’s roots as a family affair, nodding to her husband, lead guitarist Mark Warner, and smiling as she spoke. “Basically we were another version of the band with some different players … I actually met the drummer [Dave Butler] through my brother, who’s in another band [Too Many Mikes] … and then the keyboardist [Dave Husted] through my brother as well, and they came over and we all clicked.” And together with bassist Jay Black, they have clicked, she said, for more than a year now, offering a high-energy blend of any number of rock and roll variants from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. Boasting no formal training, and working by day with an engineering contractor, Suzanne said she didn’t get the performing bug until later in life, and it has taken her a while to get comfortable in front of a crowd. “I wasn’t very good at all when I started out,” she said, “but now I have a little more confidence, so it’s great.” Taking the stage with her husband, Mark, has probably also helped Suzanne develop as a singer, though Mark admitted he had stalled his own musical career at one point, first picking up guitar at the age of 12 only to put it down, not picking it back up until he was in his 20s. Though nobody in the band will discuss their ages, a look at their set list proves they’re children of the 80s. “We do anything from AC/DC and Aerosmith, to Led Zeppelin and Heart … so we kind of cover the gamut. We tend to do a lot of 80s stuff, just because that’s what we’re familiar with,” said Suzanne, explaining that her own tastes in music also covered the gamut, particularly with 80s bands. “I love Depeche Mode and New Order and that stuff, and Bauhaus,” she said, later admitting there might not be a market for that genre in Southern Maryland. But judging by the New Year’s crowd and their enthusiasm for the music, such omissions don’t seem to matter. And Suzanne, however modest she claims to be, still seems comfortable enough onstage, lending her voice to Courtney Love covers (during the band’s nods to the 90s, which are also ample), and screaming like Joan Jett or mimicking Lita Ford’s lilt. So this reviewer can echo, (in the words of the 80s metal diva herself) “it aint no big thing.”


25

The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Business

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Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

2 BR APARTMENT: Newly remodeled 2 BR apartment within walking distance of Leonardtown Center. A/C, W/D in unit. All utilities incl. except electric, cable. Off street parking. $850/month. Call 301-475-8384. 3 bedroom, 1 bath brick front rambler on cul-de-sac, nice quiet neighborhood, 1 acre, large backyard, shed with electric, recently updated kitchen and bathroom. No smokers, no cats. Dogs will be considered on caseby-case basis. $300 non-refundable pet deposit. Move in date is negotiable. Contact June with any questions june.gray.ctr@navy.mil, 240-682-6457. Rent: $1500. Newly remodeled to include newly painted walls, carpet, washer/dryer, updated bathroom and an 8’ x 10’ shed. Please call (vs e-mailing) Jimmy at (240) 538-8772 for an immediate response. A one year lease a must. Please no pets and no section 8s. Rent: $850.

Computer & Network Service/Sales Security Camera Service/Sales Serving Southern Maryland

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Beautiful 1 story spacious home, 3 bedrooms, 2 Baths, Kitchen (microwave, stove, dishwasher, refrigerator and washer & dryer), living room, family room, dinning room and large yard with front & rear deck. This home is located in Park Pines and is minutes from Pax River NAS Please call Kim Guy @ (301)475-6752 to preview. Rent: $1,200.

Help Wanted Triton Metals Inc. a precision manufacturer located in Hollywood Maryland has an immediate opening for Tig Welder. This position requires an experienced individual with 5-year min experience in Tig welding with the ability to read blue prints and assemble projects. We offer competitive pay and benefits. We require Drug testing and background check. Please go to our company website www.tritonmetals.com, complete application and email it to kmorgan@tritonmetals. com. No phone calls please.

Vehicles 1989 Nissan 240sx. Automatic, $1800 or best offer. If interested, please call 240-925-9717.

Important The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.


The County Times

26

Thursday, January 21, 2010

ner

Kiddie Ko r

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CLUES ACROSS

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Last Week’s Puzzles Solutions

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5

1. Father 4. Young women’s assoc. 7. Humbug 10. Breezed through 12. Not generally occurring 14. Baseball scoring term 15. Discharge from army (Br.) 17. Morally reprehensible 18. Leuciscus fish 19. Thin gruel or mush 20. Sulawesi 22. Take a seat 23. ___s - Nam’s neighbor 25. Popular cracker 28. _____ B. de Mille, filmmaker 30. Stories 31. Smaller quantity 33. A stone lined grave 34. Sales reciept 40. Popular BBQ meat 41. Rabbit 42. Days long past 44. Italian commune Lona-___ 47. Grooves on a column 50. Adjoined

45

50 54

59

51 55

46 52

56

60

62

63 65

51. Swiss river 53. Set free 55. Former $10 US gold coin 57. N. Central African country 59. Mountain range 60. Storage towers 61. Take in solid food 62. Large S. Am. burrowing rodent 63. Sandy piece of seashore (Br.) 64. A lyric poem 65. Owns 66. Very fast airplane

CLUES DOWN

1. Opposite of mamas 2. Vinegary 3. Assign to a lower position 4. El _____, painter 5. Rescue from harm 6. Plant parts 7. Capital of Brazil 8. Easy as 1 2 3 9. Go quickly 11. Pain unit

66

13. R____se - let go 16. Cognitive content held as true 18. In a way, separates 21. Bacon-lettuce-tomato sandwich 24. In addition 26. Crime fighter Eliot 27. This (Spanish) 29. A state of secrecy 32. Left heart there 34. College teacher 35. A small stream 36. Unrepentant 37. Expression of uncertainty 38. Abnormal breathing 39. Shipping containers 43. Goose egg 45. Am. birds of prey 46. Hairdressers shops 48. A less than average tide 49. Cockatoo 50. Plateaus 52. Readjust 54. Prevents harm to creatures 56.An assistant 57. Top business operator 58. Possessed


27

The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Fr

The m o

1/15-20/09 Thurs., Jan. 21 Wrestling Chopticon at Patuxent, 5 p.m. Bishop McNamara at St. Mary’s Ryken, 6 p.m. Great Mills at Lackey, 7 p.m.

Fri., Jan. 22 Boys’ Basketball Chopticon at Calvert, 7 p.m. Great Mills at Patuxent, 7 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken at Good Counsel, 7:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Calvert at Chopticon, 6:30 p.m. Patuxent at Great Mills, 6:30 p.m. Good Counsel at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m. Ice Hockey Leonardtown vs. La Plata at Capital Clubhouse, 5 p.m. Swimming Leonardtown vs. Calvert at Lackey, 7:30 p.m.

Mon., Jan. 25

Tues., Jan. 26 Boys’ Basketball McDonough at Great Mills, 7 p.m. Bishop McNamara at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Great Mills at McDonough, 6:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken at Bishop McNamara, 7 p.m. Wrestling La Plata at Chopticon, 7 p.m. Great Mills at Thomas Stone, 7 p.m.

Wed., Jan. 27 Boys’ Basketball La Plata at Chopticon, 7 p.m. Leonardtown at Thomas Stone, 7 p.m. Girls’ Basketball St. Mary’s Ryken at Washington Christian Academy, 5:30 p.m. Chopticon at La Plata, 6:30 p.m. Thomas Stone at Leonardtown, 6:30 p.m.

Boys’ Basketball Leonardtown at Westlake, 7 p.m.

Ice Hockey Leonardtown vs. Huntingtown at Capital Clubhouse, 6:45 p.m.

Girls’ Basketball Huntingtown at Great Mills, 6:30 p.m. Westlake at Leonardtown, 6:30 p.m.

Swimming Leonardtown at Great Mills, 5 p.m.

Wed., Jan 13 Boys’ Basketball Lackey 50, Chopticon 36 La Plata 64, Great Mills 62 North Point 78, Leonardtown 67 (overtime) Girls’ Basketball Lackey 61, Chopticon 52 (double overtime) Great Mills 48, La Plata 35 North Point 60, Leonardtown 43 St. Mary’s Ryken 79, Paul VI 76 Boys’ Swimming Great Mills 164, Calvert 107 Girls’ Swimming Great Mills 140, Calvert 138

Thurs., Jan. 14 Boys’ Basketball Gonzaga 69, St. Mary’s Ryken 56

SPORTS DESK

You had me at “Pants on the Ground” By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

The Minnesota Vikings are making their eighth NFC championship game appearance in team history, their first trip since the 2000 season and the fourth-most since the NFL/AFL merger took full effect in 1970. Brett Favre was a wee lad of one year old when the merger took place, but the Vikings are riding his aging but fiery shoulders into New Orleans to battle the equally explosive Saints this Sunday. As a person who has criticized Favre for his ability to just walk on to a team and do whatever he pleases these past two seasons, even I have had fun watching him this season. What sealed it for me was a post-game look in the Vikes’ locker room after their convincing 34-3 victory over the Dallas Cowboys in the division match-up Sunday afternoon. To set up the story, anyone who watches American Idol knows of the comedy that comes with the tryout episodes, as Fox cameras follow the judges and Ryan Seacrest from city to city trying to find fresh young talent, but end up finding people who really have been lied to about having any singing ability whatsoever. Last Wednesday evening, Atlanta was on the map, and 63-year old Larry “The General” Platt took center stage. Platt, a longtime Civil Rights champion, stepped into the audition room with an original song called “Pants on the

Fri., Jan. 15 Boys’ Basketball Great Mills 71, Chopticon 37 Leonardtown 54, Patxuent 28 Girls’ Basketball Great Mills 37, Chopticon 33 Patuxent 42, Leonardtown 39 Holy Cross 55, St. Mary’s Ryken 35 Boys’ Swimming Leonardtown 156, North Point 123 Leonardtown 184, Chopticon 95 North Point 176, Chopticon 103 Girls’ Swimming Leonardtown 181, North Point 98 Leonardtown 172, Chopticon 108 North Point 148, Chopticon 132

Sunday, Jan. 17 St. Mary’s Ryken 51, Paul VI 49

ground,” a hilarious call for young men to wear their pants properly on their person. I personally was in tears laughing as this man even got Idol judge Randy Jackson to join him in a dance while performing the song. Since the episode aired, pop culture has pounced on this phenomenon with Mr. Platt making several talk show appearances and is meeting with music producers and recording labels to release a full-scale version of “Pants.” Back to Sunday afternoon. Favre had just finished off a Cowboy beat down (Skins fans, feel free to take a few minutes to laugh/smile/dance if need be) and Fox took us inside the Vikings’ locker room and there was Favre, leading his teammates in a 53-deep choral rendition of “Pants on the ground.” The convulsing laughter that began Wednesday night extended into Sunday. I even updated my Facebook status to say “Brett Favre singing ‘Pants on the ground?’ CLASSIC.” I see why the everyday person, the typical football fan is in love with Favre.

While I can question his habits and the people who enable him, one thing that has never been up for debate is his passion for the game of football. It’s clichéd and on some levels insincere for athletes to say that they’re grown men playing a child’s game, especially with the grown-up money that they make (just an observation). In Favre’s case, you do get the sense that him running around the field like a kid on Christmas morning after his offense just scored another touchdown as Favre as a kid, doing the same thing playing sandlot football during the Mississippi summers in which he came of age. Now Favre is one step away from taking the Vikings to a place they haven’t been since 1976 – The Super Bowl. The Saints should be advised to watch out or a Vikings remix of Pants on the ground will be done with the NFC championship trophy. Comments, questions, complaints? Send ‘em all to Chris at chrisstevens@ countytimes.net.


The County Times

Thursday, January 21, 2010

28

Colts Beat Ravens 20-3, Advance to AFC Title Game The
Twelfth
Annual
Trossbach
Family

 The
Twelfth
Annual
Trossbach
Family

 The
Twelfth
Annual
Trossbach
Family

 Memorial
Co‐Ed
Softball
Tournament
 Memorial
Co‐Ed
Softball
Tournament
 Memorial
Co‐Ed
Softball
Tournament
 Committee
Members
and
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
 Committee
Members
and
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
 Committee
Members
and
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
 Would
like
to
recognize
thesponsors
and
managers
of
the
teams
in
 Would
like
to
recognize
thesponsors
and
managers
of
the
teams
in
 Would
like
to
recognize
thesponsors
and
managers
of
the
teams
in
 the
2009
tournament,
as
well
as
say
THANK
YOU
to
all
of
our
 the
2009
tournament,
as
well
as
say
THANK
YOU
to
all
of
our
 the
2009
tournament,
as
well
as
say
THANK
YOU
to
all
of
our
 fabulous
volunteers
who
help
us
each
year.
 fabulous
volunteers
who
help
us
each
year.
 fabulous
volunteers
who
help
us
each
year.
 

 


2009
Recreational
Bracket
 2009
Recreational
Bracket
 2009
Recreational
Bracket
 

 
 Team
Names:
 Team
Names:
 Team
Names:
 Big
Dog’s
Paradise
 Big
Dog’s
Paradise
 Big
Dog’s
Paradise
 Carroll’s
Equipment
 Carroll’s
Equipment
 Carroll’s
Equipment
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Dew
Drop
Inn
 Dew
Drop
Inn
 Dew
Drop
Inn
 Here
for
Beer
 Here
for
Beer
 Here
for
Beer
 Hits
&
Lips
 Hits
&
Lips
 Hits
&
Lips
 Seabreeze
 Seabreeze
 Seabreeze
 Swampy’s
 Swampy’s
 Swampy’s
 “Triple
K’s”/C.A.
Bean
Excavating
 “Triple
K’s”/C.A.
Bean
Excavating
 “Triple
K’s”/C.A.
Bean
Excavating


Manager(s)
Name(s)
 Manager(s)
Name(s)
 Manager(s)
Name(s)
 Ray
Copsey,
Jr.
&
Josh
Helmick
 Ray
Copsey,
Jr.
&
Josh
Helmick
 Ray
Copsey,
Jr.
&
Josh
Helmick
 Janice
Wood
 Janice
Wood
 Janice
Wood
 Mike
Digulimio
 Mike
Digulimio
 Mike
Digulimio
 Dale
Farrell
 Dale
Farrell
 Dale
Farrell
 Gerry
Johnson
 Gerry
Johnson
 Gerry
Johnson
 Brad
Combs
 Brad
Combs
 Brad
Combs
 Ricky
Ryce
 Ricky
Ryce
 Ricky
Ryce
 Jeff
Quade
 Jeff
Quade
 Jeff
Quade
 Stephen
Rice
 Stephen
Rice
 Stephen
Rice
 

 
 

 


Other
Tournament
Sponsors
 Other
Tournament
Sponsors
 Other
Tournament
Sponsors
 

 
 Armitage
&
Armitage,
P.A.
 Armitage
&
Armitage,
P.A.
 Armitage
&
Armitage,
P.A.
 Brass
Rail
Sports
Bar
 Brass
Rail
Sports
Bar
 Brass
Rail
Sports
Bar
 Chesapeake
Custom
Embroidery
 Chesapeake
Custom
Embroidery
 Chesapeake
Custom
Embroidery
 Chesapeake
Trophy
 Chesapeake
Trophy
 Chesapeake
Trophy
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Cryer’s
Back
Road
Inn
 Dale
Nelson
&
Micie
Guy
(In
memoriam)
 Dale
Nelson
&
Micie
Guy
(In
memoriam)
 Dale
Nelson
&
Micie
Guy
(In
memoriam)
 Dameron
Contracting
 Dameron
Contracting
 Dameron
Contracting
 Guy
Distributing
Company
 Guy
Distributing
Company
 Guy
Distributing
Company
 Hoppy
Langley
Ridgell
(In
Memoriam)
 Hoppy
Langley
Ridgell
(In
Memoriam)
 Hoppy
Langley
Ridgell
(In
Memoriam)
 Jody
Dement
(In
Memoriam)
 Jody
Dement
(In
Memoriam)
 Jody
Dement
(In
Memoriam)
 Joey
Titus
(In
Memorium)
 Joey
Titus
(In
Memorium)
 Joey
Titus
(In
Memorium)
 Kmart
(California
Store)
 Kmart
(California
Store)
 Kmart
(California
Store)
 Leroy
Dyson
&
Marie
Dyson
(In
 Leroy
Dyson
&
Marie
Dyson
(In
 Leroy
Dyson
&
Marie
Dyson
(In
 Memoriam)
 Memoriam)
 Memoriam)
 Lots
Flowers
 Lots
Flowers
 Lots
Flowers
 Mary
Lee’s
Financial
Services
 Mary
Lee’s
Financial
Services
 Mary
Lee’s
Financial
Services
 McBride
Enterprises
 McBride
Enterprises
 McBride
Enterprises
 Sandra
Forrest
Knott
(In
Memoriam)
 Sandra
Forrest
Knott
(In
Memoriam)
 Sandra
Forrest
Knott
(In
Memoriam)
 The
Simms
Insurance
Agency,
Inc.
 The
Simms
Insurance
Agency,
Inc.
 The
Simms
Insurance
Agency,
Inc.
 T.R.
C.
(Tom
Raley
Contracting)
 T.R.
C.
(Tom
Raley
Contracting)
 T.R.
C.
(Tom
Raley
Contracting)
 Wal‐Mart
(California
Store)
 Wal‐Mart
(California
Store)
 Wal‐Mart
(California
Store)
 

 


Daniel
&
Sue
Ann
Armitage
 Daniel
&
Sue
Ann
Armitage
 Daniel
&
Sue
Ann
Armitage
 Dickie
&
Hilda
Mae
Gatton
 Dickie
&
Hilda
Mae
Gatton
 Dickie
&
Hilda
Mae
Gatton
 Paul
&
Dianne
Manchak
 Paul
&
Dianne
Manchak
 Paul
&
Dianne
Manchak
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Jim
Cryer
 Jim
Cryer
 Jim
Cryer
 David
&
Dotty
Nelson
 David
&
Dotty
Nelson
 David
&
Dotty
Nelson
 John
Keister
 John
Keister
 John
Keister
 George
Guy
&
Family
 George
Guy
&
Family
 George
Guy
&
Family
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Tim
&
Bonnie
Ridgell
 Anonymous
Donor
 Anonymous
Donor
 Anonymous
Donor
 Anonymous
Donor
 Anonymous
Donor
 Anonymous
Donor
 Kmart
 Kmart
 Kmart
 Dyson
Building
Center
 Dyson
Building
Center
 Dyson
Building
Center
 Susan
Carter
 Susan
Carter
 Susan
Carter
 Mary
Lee
Raley
 Mary
Lee
Raley
 Mary
Lee
Raley
 Addie
McBride
 Addie
McBride
 Addie
McBride
 Alfred
Knott
&
Family
 Alfred
Knott
&
Family
 Alfred
Knott
&
Family
 Sheila
Simms
 Sheila
Simms
 Sheila
Simms
 Tom
Raley
 Tom
Raley
 Tom
Raley
 Wal‐Mart
 Wal‐Mart
 Wal‐Mart


Thanks
to
all
your
generous
support,
we
made
a
donation
of

 Thanks
to
all
your
generous
support,
we
made
a
donation
of

 Thanks
to
all
your
generous
support,
we
made
a
donation
of

 $2,250.00
to
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
in
2009!
 $2,250.00
to
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
in
2009!
 $2,250.00
to
Hospice
of
St.
Mary’s
in
2009!


By BARRY WILNER AP Football Writer INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Peyton Manning beat the Ravens and buried a myth. Say goodbye to the bye-week blues. In his first game since winning an unprecedented fourth NFL MVP award, Manning threw for two touchdowns Saturday night in the Indianapolis Colts’ 20-3 victory over the Baltimore Ravens. The decisive win came after a playoff bye, something that had been a plague, not a respite, for Manning and his teammates. “I don’t think it matters if you’ve had a bye or you’re playing home or away, “ Manning said when asked about Indy’s previous 0-3 record after sitting out the wild-card round. “This myth that you can’t win after a bye week, I haven’t believed in it.” By halftime, the scoreboard told it all: Indianapolis 17, Baltimore 3. It didn’t get any tighter, even though Ed Reed got his fourth career interception of Manning in the third quarter. Reed was stripped of the ball by a sprinting Pierre Garcon, the intended receiver, at the end of a 38-yard return. Dallas Clark recovered, and Reed was robbed of another pick five plays later because of a pass interference call on Corey Ivy. The Ravens’ vaunted defense was self-destructing, and Manning gave it another push toward the offseason with a 14-play drive to Matt Stover’s 33-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter. Indy’s 18th-ranked defense gave Manning lots of help, shutting down a running game that romped for 234 yards against the Patriots. Even when Ray Rice, who had 159 yards rushing a week ago, burst through for a 20-yard gain, Raheem Brock forced a fumble and the Colts recovered. It was Indy’s third of four takeaways. “Our defense did a tremendous job,” Colts head coach Jim Caldwell said. “Anytime you hold that offense the way they run the ball, and Ray Rice, under 100 yards, our defense did indeed play hard and well, tackled well, and they were opportunistic. It was a heck of a performance.” Baltimore, with rookie Joe Flacco at quarterback, won two road games last January to get to the AFC championship game,

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where it lost to Pittsburgh. Flacco struggled in this postseason and was intercepted twice Saturday night. Stover, the career scoring leader for Baltimore who joined Indianapolis in October, also had a 44-yard field goal. Billy Cundiff had a 25-yarder for the Ravens’ only points. “The better team won today,” Rice admitted. “You shouldn’t be afraid to say that.”

Ravens Safety Reed Contemplating Retirement INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed is considering retirement after an injury-filled season. The 31-year-old Reed missed four December games because of a variety of injuries, including problems with his neck, hip and groin. “I’ve been thinking about it, and it kind of hit me on the sidelines,” he said Saturday after a 20-3 playoff loss to the Colts. “It’s going to be a long offseason. It hurts. I am just thinking about it. “I’m 50-50. I am going to re-evaluate things and see how it goes in the next couple of days.” The six-time Pro Bowler was the 2004 Defensive Player of the Year. He had one interception of Peyton Manning on Saturday night, but fumbled on his runback, handing the ball back to the Colts. He also had an interception and long return erased by a pass interference penalty on teammate Corey Ivy. Reed has a franchise-record 46 interceptions and 13 career touchdowns. He is the only player in NFL history to score TDs by blocking a punt and returning a punt, an interception and a fumble. But Reed has been hindered over the past two seasons by a damaged nerve in his neck, among the other injuries. He made only three interceptions this year, yet made the Pro Bowl. “It wasn’t a weird nomination. I played the majority of the season,” he said.

Janzen, Jeremy Owens Join Hobson’s Coaching Staff Southern Maryland Blue Crabs Manager Butch Hobson has announced his coaching staff for the 2010 Atlantic League season. Former Toronto Blue Jays hurler Marty Janzen is the team’s new pitching coach, while outfielder Jeremy Owens returns to the Blue Crabs for a third season as an active player and will also assume the hitting coach duties. The player-coach arrangement for Owens is a first for the Blue Crabs, and comes on the heels of Owens being named team captain during the 2009 season, to the unanimous approval of the Blue Crabs clubhouse. Janzen, a veteran of 13 professional seasons as a starter and reliever, wrapped up his playing career in 2005, reaching the Majors with Toronto during the 1996 and ’97 seasons. His travels also included stops in the New York Yankees, Cincinnati Reds, Arizona Diamondbacks and Anaheim Angels organizations. Janzen also has considerable Atlantic League experience, having played for Hobson with the now defunct Nashua Pride in 2000, 2001, 2004 and 2005, winning the Atlantic League Championship in 2000. “Marty is a guy who pitched well for me over the years, and he always wanted me to keep him in mind if a chance to coach came up,” said Hobson. “Well now we have an opening, and I think with all of his experience he’ll fit right in and be very good for us.” Janzen replaces Andre Rabouin, who had served as pitching coach the last two seasons. Rabouin will continue as the pitching coach for Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. Rabouin guided the Blue Crabs staff to either the best or second best team ERA in the Atlantic League during his time with the Crabs. “I loved playing for Butch because he’s a hard-nosed, intense guy and I approach the

game the same way. This is always something I wanted to do, and when Butch asked me to be his p i t c h i n g coach I was literally at a loss for words,” said Janzen. I’m honored, and won’t take one moment of it for granted.” Jeremy Owens, considered by many in baseball circles to be a prime candidate for a coaching or managing position once his playing career ends, will be starting his coaching career a little early while remaining as the Blue Crabs starting centerfielder. Owens will take on coaching duties in the spot vacated by former Orioles great Andy Etchebarren, who departed the Blue Crabs mid-season last year to become manager of the York Revolution, also of the Atlantic League. Greg Blosser, who assumed the hitting coach duties in the interim for the Crabs through the end of last season, will not be returning to the staff. For Owens, who is the Blue Crabs alltime leader in home runs (43), and walks (125) through two seasons, the move to playercoach is a logical one after being awarded the team’s captaincy in ’09. The durable Owens also set a franchise record for games played this past season, appearing in 137 of the team’s 140 regular season outings while winning the Atlantic League home run title with 28. He is also in the top four of the Blue Crabs all-time leaders in games played, runs scored, hits, extra-base hits and RBI. Owens will be entering his 13th professional season, which includes time in the San Diego Padres, Boston Red Sox and Tampa Bay Rays organizations.


29

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Sp rts

The County Times

Indoor Lacrosse Leagues Help High School Kids By Chris Stevens Staff Writer LEONARDTOWN – With lacrosse growing by leaps and bounds in St. Mary’s County, the high school-aged athletes that play the sport are afforded an opportunity to improve their skills in the off-season – even when the temperatures are below freezing. Leonard Hall hosts an indoor lacrosse league for high school players (as well as an eighth grade travel team) that has been going on for weeks now. Parks and Rec sports coordinator Kenny Sothoron believes the boys and girls leagues are helpful in terms improving actual lacrosse skills, especially on the girls’ side. “It’s more of a passing game, you can’t just find a fast kid, give them the ball and let them go to the net with it,” Sothoron says, noting that each team must make two clean passes in the offensive end before they can take a shot. “You can get away with that in outdoor lacrosse, not indoor.” Right now, there are currently 100 players spread among eight teams in the girls’ league and 120 players on 10 teams in the boys’ league. For anyone interested in fielding a team in the future, the cost with shirts supplied St. Mary’s County Rec and Parks is 600 dollars per team. Without shirts, the cost is 550 dollars per team. Play-

10 games from early December to late February, providing players with opportunities to play right up until spring practice, which starts March 1. “I definitely think the kids are getting an extra opportunity to pass and catch,” Sothoron said. “It’s only going to help them.” For Great Mills sophomore Sydney Schaeffer, the league has provided a chance for

Photo By Frank Marquart

Katie McGovern of Great Mills (right) and St. Mary’s Ryken’s Sharlene Dhemeri keep their eyes on the ball.

her to work on her skills as Spring practice begins in just about six weeks. “It’s really fast-paced,” says Schaeffer, who plays high defense for the Hornets during the regular season. “It helps with stick skills, gives us a chance to pick our sticks before the season starts.”

Schaeffer also echoed Sothoron’s sentiment about the league helping players improve as time goes on. “It’s just about getting out there and practicing. Every little bit helps,” she said. chrisstevens@countytimes.net

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Sam Sparr of the Hornets indoor lacrosse team is defended by St. Mary’s Ryken’s Angela Sperbeck during Friday’s games at Leonard Hall.

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Sydney Schaeffer of Great Mills says the indoor lacrosse league helps with practicing and perfecting skills for the outdoor season.

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ers from each of the county’s public high schools as well as St. Mary’s Ryken are playing in the league, as well as a Charles County team, which Sothoron expects to grow as that county prepares for varsity action this coming season. All teams will play at least

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The County Times

Seahawk Men Showcase Depth in Rout of Gallaudet

By Chris Stevens Staff Writer ST. MARY’S CITY – Any other college basketball team would be concerned missing their leading rebounder and shot blocker as well as their top three-point shooting threat. Not the St. Mary’s College men’s basketball team. 12 Seahawks scored at least point, led by senior guard

ing junior center Sam Burum, who scored 12 points and grabbed six rebounds Saturday. “It’s hard to live up to what Bowden can do,” Burum admits, “So I just play hard every minute I’m out there.” Head coach Chris Harney likes Burum and sophomore Brian Grashof (six points, six rebounds and two blocked shots in Saturday’s game) in the paint because they bring diversity to the Seahawks’ offense and defensive game plans. “Sam has been tremendous for us because he’s so athletic that he can guard guards if he has too,” Harney says. “Being 6-foot-8 and being able to run with guards in Division III is rare.” Grashof, a bruiser at 6-foot-7 and 230 pounds, has learned to control his body and his emotions, a development Harney says has been key. “Brian has done a great job learning to use his body to his advantage instead of bowling over guys,” he said. “They’ve done great, they’ve definitely exceeded expectations,” Griffin said of Burum and Grashof. “Mike’s a big body and his production was going to be hard to follow, but they’ve done a great job of doing what the coaches ask them to do – block shots, rebound and score when the opportunity’s there.” Harney credits the Seahawks’ never-ending supply of talent to his assistant coaches Mike Smelkinson, Nick Wilson, Brian Cosgrove, Yony Kifle and Kyle Harmon, who according to Harney do the hard work of getting the players to commit to SMC (132 overall, 6-1 in CAC play). “These guys put in a lot of hours and lot of work, much more than what I pay them,” he says. “It’s been a great benefit for me to have these guys on staff.”

Photo By Chris Stevens

Johann Jones of St. Mary’s College looks for an open teammate during the Seahawk men’s basketball team’s 83-52 win Saturday afternoon.

Camontae Griffin’s 21 points in their 83-52 victory over Gallaudet Saturday afternoon, their seventh win in a row. “It’s great, the depth helps us out a lot,” said Griffin, the Capital Athletic Conference’s leading scorer at 22.1 points per contest. “The starting five, we play the bulk of the minutes, but it’s good when guys can come in and give us relief without any drop-off.” With sharpshooter Mike Fitzpatrick on the sidelines with a broken hand and junior center Mike Bowden redshirting this season because of a knee injury, SMC, ranked number 16 in all of NCAA Division III, have gotten significant contributions from everybody, includ-

chrisstevens@countytimes.net

Photo By Chris Stevens

The Seahawks’ Kyle Jarczinski defenders Danny Kelly of Gallaudet.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

30

Saint-Aubin’s 20 Points Help SMC Women Snap Losing Streak By Chris Stevens Staff Writer ST. MARY’S CITY – Stephanie Saint-Aubin had an ice pack wrapped around her left ankle, a sign of the times for the St. Mary’s College women’s basketball team. Just a few minutes earlier, Saint-Aubin ignored her sprained ankle and scored 20 points to lift the Seahawks to a 74-59 win over Gallaudet University, snapping a six-game losing streak in the process. “We’re trying to fight through various injuries,” Saint-Aubin said while rattling off a list of maladies the team is suffering from that includes everything from groin pulls to shin splints. The youthful and thin Seahawks (3-11 overall, 2-4 in Capital Athletic Conference play) didn’t seem to be a MASH unit as they led from start to finish, jumping out to a 15-0 lead and leadPhoto By Chris Stevens ing by as many as 21 points Jamie Roberts drives during the Seahawks’ in the second half. 74-59 win Saturday. The win was their first since a 64-53 win over Stevenson, also at home, on December 5. The key to the Seahawks snapping their losing streak was contributions coming from each of the eight players on the team, including the team’s four freshmen. 5-foot-10 forward Taylor Petrisko scored a season-high 12 points while point guard Jasmine Jones, ranked in the top five in the conference in assists per game, handed out a season-high 10 Saturday afternoon. All eight players hit at least one field goal for St. Mary’s, with four (SaintAubin, Megan Seeman with 19 points, Jamie Roberts with 13 and Petrisko) scoring in double figures. “In order to win, we have to have contributions from everybody,” Saint-Aubin said. “You can’t just have two or three players contributing.” Head coach Barb Bausch agreed. “It’s the only way we’re going to win games,” Bausch said. “We’ve got to have balance.” Bausch has been waiting for the Photo By Chris Stevens freshmen to catch St. Mary’s College’s Megan Seeman defends Nukeiup to the speed of tra Hayes of Gallaudet on a drive to the basket Satthe college game, and she believes urday afternoon. that they’ve done just that. “The college game is a lot quicker, you don’t have time to think, so it took them a while to get used to it,” Bausch said. “Now that they have, they just have to use their knowledge in game situations.” As for Saint-Aubin, the biggest challenge for the senior guard thus far is getting back into game shape after taking the 2008-09 season off to focus on academics. “It’s been hard, going from basketball player to student, back to basketball player,” she says. “I have to work my butt off to keep up with the other girls so they don’t have to wait for me.” Bausch believes she’s doing fine. “She’s doing tremendously, she’s confident in driving against the defense, she’s definitely got her stride back,” Bausch said. chrisstevens@countytimes.net


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Thursday, January 21, 2010

The County Times

Raiders Start Fast, End Slow Against Patuxent By Chris Stevens Staff Writer LUSBY – Starting a game with a 10-1 looks pretty good for any basketball team. One could understand Leonardtown girls’ basketball coach Christie Doerrer’s frustration as the Raiders squandered that lead in dropping a 42-39 decision to host Patux-

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Co-ed Recreational League Serves You Right 32-4 Team Dumpy 27-9 Dick’s Diggers 26-10 St.Mary’s Auto 25-11 Center for Cosmetic Surgery 24-12 Dig This 22-14 Chesapeake Custom 22-14 Spence Electrical 16-20 Dirty Half Dozen 13-23 Geezer World 12-24 Block Party 12-24 CBL 8-28 Well Pet 8-28 Grid Iron Grill 5-31

Gretton Goalkeeping Indoor Futsal Clinic Series

Gretton Goalkeeping will conduct weekly indoor futsal training sessions for all ages and skill levels Monday and Wednesday each week at Park Hall Elementary School from 7:30-8:30pm. Field player training is also available. Reservations are required. For more information or to reserve your spot please email grettongoalkeeping@gmail.com or call 301-643-8992.

Sabres Spread Wealth, Stay Undefeated

Photo By Frank Marquart

Dani McLoughlin of Leonardtown looks for an open teammate as Patuxent’s Courtney Hill defends. Photo By Frank Marquart ent High School Friday night. “I don’t know if they got comfortable with the lead,” Leonardtown’s Ashley Lytle goes up for a shot. Doerrer said of her players. “But we let them back in it.” The Raiders jumped out to the big lead with their easier, we have one game next week and then pressure defense creating turnovers and easy baskets for three the next. It’s going to be tough to snap Kate Finkleston and Sara Oevers, who scored six and four this streak we’re on if we don’t play like we’re points respectively to start the game off for Leonardtown capable of playing.” on a positive note. Oevers lead Leonardtown (1-10) on the evening with 10 points while Finkleston scored eight chrisstevens@countytimes.net before fouling out. Panthers head coach Chris Turlington was impressed with the Raiders’ ability to make his team work. “My hat’s off to Coach Doerrer because boy, are those girls scrappy,” he said. “It’s very tough to handle their pressure defense.” Somehow, the Panthers found a way around it and took their first lead at 15-14 on a Kaitlyn Lloyd free throw with 5:28 to go in the second quarter. Doerrer felt that Leonardtown still had a chance to win the game with their aggressive defense. “There’s always adjustments that can be made, but I wanted to stick with it a little while longer,” she said. We forced some turnovers, but they were able to take us out of the type of game we wanted to play.” The Raiders kept battling and when junior guard Erin Mallory drove down the lane and rolled a shot off of the front of the rim and in, LHS reclaimed the lead (26-25) at the 4:18 mark of the third period. Junior guard Megan Sears would put the Panthers ahead to stay on the next possession, and Patuxent eventually opened up a 41-33 lead in the final minutes. Three-point shots by senior guard Dani McLoughlin and junior Tess Roper were too little-too late Photo By Frank Marquart as the Raiders lost their eighth straight game. “We have to come back to practice on Monday ready The Raiders’ Kate Finkleston and Dani McLoughlin surround Tito roll,” Doerrer said. “Our schedule does not get any ana Forbes of Patuxent during Friday’s girls’ basketball game.

Six players on the Southern Maryland Sabres Pee Wee rec team, coached by Jaime Cantlon, scored goals again the Howard Huskies 1 Pee Wee Rec team on Saturday, Jan. 10 at the Capital Clubhouse in Waldorf. Forwards Eric Brawner, Jake O’Hara, Hunter Stempin and Alex Parnes scored, as did defenders Eric JohnJohn ston and Walter Burlack. Goalie Katelyn Bucior allowed just one goal of 14 shots for a final score of 6-1. The Sabres Pee Wee rec team remains undefeated this season with an 8-0 record. The Southern Maryland Sabres’ Eric Brawner takes a shot during the Sabres’ 6-1 over Howard.

Sabres’ Hunter Stempin takes the puck away from the Howard Huskies.


THURSDAY January 21, 2010

Taking the Game Indoors

Page 29

Homes In Danger of Cliff Erosion

Story Page 5

Realizing the Dream: Locals Awarded at Prayer Breakfast

Story Page 20

SMC Men, Women Sweep Doubleheader

Story Page 30

Photo By Frank Marquart

The County Times -- January 21, 2010  

The County Times -- January 21, 2010

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