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Thursday, december 3, 2009

AnnmArie GArden HArvestinG Culture

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Man Dies After Falling Overboard Story Page 6

Presidential Helicopter May Get Revived Story Page 9

Man Arrested In Hit-AndRun Of Four-Year-Old Story Page 12

Photo by Frank Marquart


The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

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Your Paper... Your Thoughts Do you think the existing library in Leonardtown is adequate to meet the needs of the community? “I have to admit I used to love the Leonardtown library until I went to the Lexington Park library. The light the space is so nice,” said Dianna Diatz from Leonardtown (who described herself as ageless), adding that she felt there should be a new library. “What would be great is if they could still use the building as a language library or for literacy programs, or other types of things that would relate to books, because it’s still very cozy … if you can combine resources, then maybe you could save [the building] for something it’s better suited for.” Paul Unkle, 33, a construction worker from Hollywood said he did not think the library was adequate. “I think there ought to be a new one. I was just there this morning and it should be bigger, like the Charlotte Hall library.”

County Wide Poll

80 70 60 50 40 30

Yes

No

Not Sure

14

76

10

20 10 0

While The County Times makes efforts to make our polls random and representative of the county’s diverse population, the poll results listed here should in no way be considered scientific results.


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The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

On T he Covers “We adopt loca l fa milies ON THE FRONT Stacey Hann-Ruff, director of Annmarie Garden Sculpa nd we get a ture Park and Arts center, puts the finishing touches on a display showcasing this month’s exhibits – Garden in list of t hings Lights and Glow. t hat t hey wa nt ON THE BACK From left, Basil Moye, Moe Queen, Kamaron Barker and a nd need, a nd Michael Harris, are ready for battle this season for the Great Mills High School boys basketball team. we go to Ta rcounty get a nd shop Also Inside A 58-year-old man from Springfield, Va., died after 4 County News for a ll of t hose being rescued from the Chesapeake Bay after falling overboard Tuesday SEE PAGE 6 7 Editorial/Opinion t hings.” 8 Money Greg Callaway, right, owner of the Gridiron Grill, and his executive chef, Rick Toth, at the bar in the new Callaway restaurant. PAGE 8

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5th graders Seth Barker and Randy Putnam, and 2nd grader Matthew Green help build gingerbread houses for Lettie Marshall Dent’s annual gingerbread auction. SEE PAGE 14

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The County Times

ews

Thursday, December 3, 2009 India used to be the richest country in the world until the British invasion in the early 17th Century.

4

un Fact

Environment Commission Wants County To Take McIntosh Run Land

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

The county’s Commission on the Environment says that the commissioner board should reconsider their decision to not take over an 80-

acre piece of property in the McIntosh Run watershed as the parcel, if preserved as a heavily forested area, would be another piece needed to improve the water quality of Breton Bay. In late October the commissioners did not approve a motion to take a proposal to acquire

County environmental commission head John Wheeler claims that preserving 80 acres of forested land near the McIntosh Run, shown, would help protect the Breton Bay watershed.

the property to an executive session. One commissioner had hopes to preserve the property for hunting and outdoor activities but another commissioner said that they had little interest in maintaining the property. Commission on the Environment chair John Wheeler wrote that the 80-acre property was key to the health of nearby watersheds. “Maintaining and having any hope of improving the water quality of Breton Bay in the future requires that every effort be made to preserve forest buffer and wetlands in their natural state,” Wheeler wrote. “The Department of Natural Resources has ranked this property as among the most important to preserve in the state of Maryland.” The property was to be purchased using state and federal land preservapreserva tion funds, officials said, and would have gone to the county free of charge initially. “We were afraid the funding would disappear if action weren’t taken,” Wheeler said of the letter he wrote dated Nov. 20. The county location here is one of three in the entire state that supports the habitat of an endangered mussel, according to information from the state Department of Natural Resources.

Leonardtown Christmas tree lighting took place on a blustery Nov. 27 evening with a huge crowd in attendance.

Commissioner Thomas A. Mattingly (D-Leonardtown) said that he did not intend to bring the matter back up to the board for consideration, though he said that the land had value environmentally. “It probably has some importance but the state can buy it and manage it themselves,” Mattingly said. “There’s no need for us to manage it.” guyleonard@countytimes.net


5

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

ews

Outlook Bleak For Extra County Adkins Takes Over As Elections Board Director Bonding Authority

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

The majority of the Board of County Commissioners wants the power to take on more debt — to the tune of $25 million — to pay for public construction projects already in the development pipeline but with growing skepticism from state elected officials who must approve the authority, county officials aren’t holding out much hope. “It’s unlikely we’ll get an increase in debt authority,” said County Administrator John Savich at a joint meeting between the commissioners and the Board of Education Tuesday. “Instead of trying to play chicken… the only responsible thing to do will be to reprioritize the CIP (capital improvement program).” If the county does not get the extra bonding authority through the upcoming legislative session in Annapolis it would affect projects like the expansion of the county jail’s minimum security wing and a much anticipated new library slated for the Hayden Farm property just outside the town limits of Leonardtown. Other projects that could be affected would be communications towers as well as renovations to Leonardtown Middle School. The jail and library projects would cost about $30 million and $13 million each, with some of the financial burden to be born by the state. Savich said the county would have to “reprioritize to essential projects only,” though he said that the county remains in good financial shape — it just attained a triple-A bond rating from Wall Street — and that the wary nature of state officials reflected the deep economic troubles of the state and a cautious approach to debt. He also told schools officials that there would likely not be any increase in their budget allocation from the county this budget cycle. The amount the school system gets would likely

closely mirror what they are operating on now. “That waiver process [for maintenance of effort funding] has to be a realistic safety valve because if the money isn’t there it isn’t there,” Savich said. But the local delegation has not made any firm commitment on the bonding authority question yet. Several weeks ago they held a meeting on legislative proposals where concerns came out over the county’s intentions to go deeper in debt; some of the delegation wanted the county to review their request. “If they can take some out [of their initial request] we’d like for them to do that,” said Del. John Wood (DDist. 29A). “Just having the authority sitting there right now might not be the best time.” Del. Anthony O’Donnell (R-Dist. 29C) and the House Minority Leader, said that the risks of increasing the county’s ability to borrow money far outweighed the advantages given the continuing cuts the state had to make in the face of dwindling revenue collections. “Revenues are way down and the state’s budget obviously needs to be cut,” O’Donnell told The County Times. “Discretionary spending needs to be put on hold. O’Donnell said that greater indebtedness meant the county’s operating budget would be put upon by heavier debt service payments on the bonds. He did not say outright that he would vote against the bonding authority issue but he seemed to offer little hope of it either. “I think they need to make a better case than they’ve made,” O’Donnell said. Whatever decision state officials make, Commissioner Daniel H. Raley wanted them to make it soon. “If they’re not going to do it they should tell us earlier rather than have us wait in suspense to the last day of the session,” Raley (D) said.

Mayor J. Harry Norris has asked the St. Mary’s County Library Board to consider other sites for the new library slated for Leonardtown since funding for the project seems to be in question. Originally planned for construction on the Hayden Farm property on the outskirts of town on Hollywood Leonardtown Road, Norris has said that he wants to see the library much closer in to the downtown area. But the head of the library board, Alan Dillingham, said his latest request was not likely up for consideration. “He’s a day late and a dollar short,” Dillingham told The County Times, adding that the process of positioning the library was too far along to change now. “At no time in all this process did anyone from the town council or Mayor Norris participate in any discussion of finding new sites.” “As things stand now we’ll go forward with our current plans,” Dillingham said, adding that there appeared to be no other available, committed sites to take the new facility. But Norris offered a potential site during a Tuesday interview that he said would place the new library on part of the Tudor Hall development that has not progressed recently because of financial difficulties. The idea included placing the new library near the corner of Lawrence Avenue and Fen-

After working for the county’s Board of Elections for the past eight years, Wendy Adkins, 37, has been appointed to head the agency after the retirement of Brenda Burch. With the 2010 elections coming up in September, Adkins already sees challenges ahead that her predecessor warned about. “That’s early voting and new equipment; they’re both new to the county so they’ll be a challenge to figure out when it happens and where it’s supposed to happen.” The state is also supposed to purchase a new paper ballot system for use in all counties, but that has not happened yet, Adkins said, so the county will also be using the current electronic touch screen to the tune of two units in each precinct. Training the election day workers on the new system as well as getting the public used to it will be one of the board’s biggest challenges, she said. “We don’t know what equipment we’ll be using and that’s a little scary,” Adkins said. She’s also looking to fill two positions at the board office, the

election i n fo r m a tion specialist position she vacated and an election administ ration assistant. Once filled, the staff will up to full Wendy Adkins strength to deal with the 2010 elections, which will decide the fate of commissioners seats, the state’s attorney’s office and the local congressional seat. But it’s a challenge she said the agency is up to. When she first came on board she was trained on paper ballots and then on touch screens; going back to papers just means she’s come full circle. “I’m looking forward to it, I love to stay busy and I love a challenge,” Adkins said. “I have no fears just a few timeline worries.” Adkins lives in Welcome in Charles County. guyleonard@countytimes.net

guyleonard@countytimes.net

Leonardtown Mayor Wants Board To Look At Other Library Sites By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

wick Street though he has only had preliminary talks with the developer to secure such a site, he said. The town owns part of the land slated for development, he said, which sits on the waterfront and could be part of a land swap to secure a site for the library. “If they’re not going to move ahead in the near future with the library then I asked that they reconsider the location,” Norris told The County Times. “The library is like the post office or the court house. It’s a community center for the town.” Norris has said that moving the library to a location farther away from the town would hinder the town’s efforts at economic revitalization by taking away a significant amount of traffic that might also frequent shops and restaurants with much needed dollars. “If you’re planning a library I think you should consider the opportunities for economic development,” said Norris, who believes that a library at the Hayden Farm site would encourage unwanted commercial growth on Hollywood Leonardtown Road. Library board member and town councilman Dan Burris said he supported Norris’ request to look for new sites. “I’ve been asking them to keep their options open all along,” Burris said. “That’s all I’m asking them.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

When the

Weather Outside is Frightful... And contrary to the lyrics, we do have places to go! When our county is covered in a blanket of snow, the people of our community never fail to come through for St. Mary’s Hospital. Each winter, we compile a list of volunteers with four-wheel drive vehicles who would be willing to drive essential hospital employees to and from Leonardtown during severe weather. If you can help, please call 301-475-6453.

25500 Point Lookout Road

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Leonardtown, MD 20650

www.smhwecare.com


The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

6

ewsToday’s Newsmakers In Brief On the possible consequences of not graduating with a high school diploma. “It’s almost a direct ticket to jail.” Schools Superintendent Michael J. Martirano

On the county’s November tax distribution from the state. “Ours doesn’t look that bad but it’s not positive.” County Administrator John Savich

Developer Wants Industrial Zoning For Former Munitions Site

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

A La Plata based developer has asked the Board of County Commissioners to rezone a piece of property that was once the site for a Thiokol Corporation munitions operation in the 1950s to a zone approved for light industrial applications. The 619-acre property has also been eyed by Tatton Park LLC and developer Crispin Etherington for use as a new racing track for European style sports cars. Past proposals for residential growth have failed there and the developer stated in a letter to the commissioners that an industrial application was likely the only use the property would be suitable for. The land is currently listed as being in the Rural Preservation District, where development is among the most restricted in the county. “Industrial uses will allow for the ability to use the site as opposed to it sitting idle as it is currently zoned,” wrote Paul Facchina of Facchina Development LLC. “One could also argue that due to the past manufacturing history that there is precedence for the industrial use on this property.” Bob Schaller, director of the county’s Department of Economic and Community Development, said that putting the site to an industrial use would be a positive step for diversifying the county’s economy. “We need industrial property to attract industrial businesses,” Schaller told The County Times. “There’s [currently] very little capacity to expand.”

Schaller said that current light industrial operations like Triton Metals based in Hollywood came here to supply needs at Patuxent River Naval Air Station but have also branched out to other commercial applications for their projects outside the U.S. Navy. Others who come might have to have the same demand anchor, Schaller said, but could expand much like Triton Metals. Diversifying the local economy, which is virtually dependant on the U.S. Navy’s presence, is one of the key efforts of economic development officials. Tourism has also played a part in those efforts and elected leaders here have expressed an interest in having Tatton Park filling a role to bring in out-of-town racers to boost the local cash flow. “If we had room to expand [industrial uses] I know we could attract people here,” Schaller said. Commissioner Daniel H. Raley (D-Great Mills) said that the commissioner board still had to get through finalizing the county’s long awaited comprehensive plan before they could consider rezoning individual pieces of property. “It’s really early in the process, we’re not at that stage yet,” Raley said. The owner of superfund clean up site in Hollywood, CapFinancialProperties, LLC has also petitioned the commissioners to keep a wood treatment facility property zoned industrial; the property would be down zoned to the rural preservation district according to the latest revision of the county’s comprehensive zoning plan. In a letter from Bill McKissick, the attorney for the property owner, he said that both state and federal environmental officials have declared the land suitable for industrial use and that would be

a way for taxpayers to recoup funds spent to clean up the site years ago. “Finally keep in mind that the taxpayers have already paid over $60 million to remediate the property and place it back into productive economic use,” McKissick wrote. “To downzone the property to RPD would ensure that the taxpayers would not ever be able to recoup the monies spent to clean up this property.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Man Dies After Falling Overboard

By Sean Rice Staff Writer Shortly after 2:30 p.m. Tuesday an emergency call went out for a boat in distress in the Chesapeake Bay off Point Lookout. The operator of a 28-foot boat called 911 on a cell phone and reported that his passenger hit his head and fell into the water. The boat operator, identified as Craig Matthew Powell, 47 of Scotland, Md., told officials that his passenger was faced down in the water and he could not get him back on board. Before a rescue

boat arrived, he said he believed his passenger had drowned. Rescue personnel rushed to the scene, including a Ridge Volunteer Fire Department boat, the U.S. Coast Guard, Maryland Natural Resources Police and a Maryland State Police helicopter. Emergency personnel were staging at the Point Lookout State Park boat ramp. The Ridge fire boat was the first to reach the scene of the accident at approximately 3:05 p.m., and pulled the man from the water and began CPR while rushing back to the state park boat ramp for a waiting helicopter. At 3:43 p.m., Maryland State Police helicopter Trooper 2 took the victim to St. Mary’s Hospital, where officials say he died from his injuries. Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) Special Operation Division, which is continuing an investigation into the incident, identified the victim Wednesday as Gary Berthold Pappe, 58, from Springfield, Va. Sgt. Art Windemuth, Public Information Officer for the NRP told The County Times there was no alcohol involved on behalf of the boat operator, and exact details on the cause of death will not be available until an autopsy and toxicology report is completed. The victim was not wearing a life jacket.


7

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Housing Plan Needs Action

The following is an excerpt of a letter submitted to the Board of County Commissioners as public comment on the Draft Comprehensive Plan.

As members of the Justice and Advocacy Council of St. Mary’s County, Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, we continue to have concerns about the housing component of the draft Comprehensive Plan currently under review. Section 8 of this draft incorporates many changes recommended by the Community Workforce Housing Task Force and the new Section 12 on Human Services also includes housing recommendations. With these inclusions, the current version is significantly better than the earlier draft. Three policies included in the draft are essential to addressing the issue of adequate housing. These policies are, in brief, determine the need, monitor the housing stock, and regularly assess progress. The policies require three elements that are neither part of current operations nor included in the Comprehensive Plan: 1. The policies require current and projected data on the amount and percentage of housing needed to support low and moderate income families based on the anticipated population growth and the existing trends in family income. Such data are part of several other Maryland counties’ Comprehensive Plans, including Frederick, Charles, and Garrett Counties. (We supplied the Planning Commission with a summary and copies of these plans during their hearings.) Since the current draft of the plan doesn’t include such data, even after it was requested, we assume a study is needed to develop the information. Such a study was

recently turned down by the BOCC. 2. The policies require a detailed Housing Plan to bridge the gap between supply and need of affordable and workforce housing. For example, Frederick County has an “Affordable Housing Action Plan” and Charles County has a “Community Development Housing Plan.” The policies stated in the Comprehensive Plan need to be translated into specific actions with time schedules and numerical goals in a detailed plan. 3. These policies require that a specific agency or position be assigned the responsibility to develop the Housing Plan and implement it, coordinating among various agencies involved in housing and reporting regularly to the BOCC on progress toward goals. Without such assigned responsibility, the three policies listed above will not be carried out, and the other affordable and workforce housing policies in the Comprehensive Plan will be only intermittently applied. The Comprehensive Plan must be more than a statement of good intentions. In summary, putting the Plan’s words into action requires current and projected data on housing needs; a Housing Plan with time schedules and numerical goals; and accountability thru assigned responsibility. Even in a time of reduced resources, every effort must be made to implement policies that reflect the concerns and needs of St. Mary’s County citizens, including the poor and vulnerable among us. Barbara Thompson, Chairwoman St. Mary’s County Justice and Advocacy Council, Archdiocese of Washington

Citizens Deserve a New Library

I am writing to show my support for the new Leonardtown Library on the Hayden property. As a Mom and avid library user, I have spent many hours in the Leonardtown Library. As I have stated in a previous letter to the editor, the libraries in this county have so much to offer the residents of St. Mary’s County and those who visit here. The Leonardtown Library is housed in a former National Guard Armory building that was built in 1954. The building is no longer able to meet the needs of many of its users. To encourage our youngest residents to make the library a place for them, they need to have an area they can explore in without “disturbing” other library patrons. More room for children and their parents is a necessity. Currently the library offers awesome summer programs for families, but these events must be held off-site due to a lack of space in the current library. A larger space for community gatherings and library programs is a must.

The shelves and all available space are being used to hold as much as the library possibly can, but with the narrow book aisles and small bathrooms, patrons with disabilities cannot fully utilize all the library has to offer them. Because the building was originally designed to be an armory, there are many technological issues that arise with trying to update computers, networking, cabling, etc. These issues can only be addressed in a new building that has enough space for everyone. The County Commissioners purchased the Hayden Farm to build an elementary school, middle school, recreation areas and a library. What a great match! New schools with a new library to encourage our children to be the best citizens they can be. Give the residents of St. Mary’s County what they have asked for and deserve - a new library that meets the needs of everyone. Michelle Vandergrift Great Mills, Md.

Slavery Did Not Start Civil War A letter from a reader in the November 19 edition of your paper states that The American Civil War was started to end States rights and slavery. True, the war had to do with States’ rights, but slavery was not an issue at the start of the war. The first shots of the Civil War were fired on April 12, 1861 and Lincoln did not propose

the Emancipation Proclamation until September 22, 1862, 16 months after the start of the war. Lincoln’s edict did not go into effect until January of 1863. When I went to school 1861 came before 1863. Michael Marcus Mechanicsville, Md.

Editorial:

To The Editor:

Smart Growth on a “Not So Smart Path” The last thing smart about smart growth

is to turn more and more jurisdiction over local land-use planning and public land-use policy to the state of Maryland and Maryland’s Department of Planning. Since the inception of land-use planning by government, a relatively young process (formally instituted for our community only some 40 years ago), it has generally been reserved for local governments. True at its inception and still true today is the fact that people know best what is best for the communities in which they live. The most difficult job for local government elected officials is not budget decisions, not education decisions, not public safety decisions. The absolute most difficult decisions, most controversial decisions, most important economic decisions, most important protection of individual rights decisions, most important decisions over time are land use decisions. If local elected officials could pass all land use policy and enforcement responsibility on to state elected officials, their jobs would be long on good natured responsibilities and short on explosive actions. They could spend their time on improving education, improving public safety, improving recreational opportunities, building better infrastructure for citizens to enjoy, only challenged by the manageable need to balance the communities ability to afford the improvements. Almost all things they would focus on would have a high potential upside, ultimately we all rejoice over improving quality of life so long as it’s affordable. And the best part for local elected officials would be the immediate reversal of public outrage away from them and towards the state elected officials. Just the opposite of how it is today, commissioners and council people would be easily re-elected while senators and delegates would routinely be “thrown out”. Senators and delegates can have “careers” in office, more or less a “cradle to grave” job because they don’t have to swallow the land-use decision “poison pill”. When our neighbor is allowed to do what they want with their property, we believe it infringes on us and we blame the local government officials for not having protections in place. When we are not allowed to do what we want with our property, we blame the local elected officials for having bad laws in place. And that is exactly why local government must have and must keep the responsibility. The most important part about land-use policy is that it directly affects us and our neighbors. The decisions need to be made in Leonardtown, not Annapolis. Elected officials from Baltimore should not have jurisdiction over

land-use decision in St. Mary’s County. Remember, Baltimore, Prince Georges County, and Montgomery County control state government, the county commissioners control St. Mary’s County Government. But bureaucracies inside Maryland State government act to constantly form a more centralized government. Unfortunately, the same continues to happen on the federal level. Federal government continues to seek power from state governments and state governments continue to seek power from local governments. Maryland Department of Planning is one of those power hungry bureaucracies that each year seeks more and more control over local land-use policy. Beginning with Governor Glendenning and moving faster than ever under current Governor O’Malley, “Smart Growth” has been the phrase coined brilliantly to open the door for centralized government control over local land-use under feel good terminology that things are being done the “smart” way. Land planning in St. Mary’s County is and should be influenced by two overriding concerns, a good place for the Navy to do business, and the protection of our rural character. Whether or not this is unique to St. Mary’s County is not the issue, the issue is that these somewhat competing overriding concerns are best understood here and should be balanced here against other statewide initiatives. It simply isn’t acceptable policy to look at counties like St. Mary’s and Somerset (with no major employer similar to the Navy) as two similar rural counties that should have the same land-use laws. It is easy for the Maryland Department of Planning to illustrate the ultraistic advantages of doing things their way, the smart way, while constantly creating a more centralized government. It is not that they are bad people who have nothing to offer, quite the contrary. The problem is they operate with very little elected official oversight and almost no local citizen input. State elected officials do not understand the intricacies of land-use law unless they have previously served at the local government level which very few have. And since land-use laws are enforced at the local level, state officials have very limited knowledge of the real life impact of policy changes. Nor do they want to understand it, it is the most technical and complicated part of local and state government. State elected officials leave the technical stuff almost entirely to the bureaucracy and they should leave local land-use law almost entirely to local government.

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In the world, the Netherlands has the highest concentration of museums in the world. Just in Amsterdam alone there are 42 museums.

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un Fact

Gridiron Grill Serves Up Fresh Local Food

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Constellation Energy Buys Wind Power Project

BALTIMORE (AP) – Constellation Energy says it has agreed to buy a wind power project under development in western Maryland. Constellation announced Monday that it has signed an agreement with Clipper Windpower Inc. to acquire the Criterion wind project in Garrett County. Constellation Energy says it plans to build and operate the $140 million, 70-megawatt wind

Thursday, December 3, 2009

energy project. The turbines at the site are expected to provide enough electricity to power 23,000 households. Baltimore-based Constellation says the project was the first to win approval under a 2007 state law promoting wind development in Maryland. The company says the sale is expected to close in the first quarter of 2010 and begin producing electricity next fall.

By Sean Rice Staff Writer Sports fans in St. Mary’s County have a new hot spot to catch all the big games while enjoying fresh local cuisine. The Gridiron Grill, owned by Greg Callaway, opened in the Callaway Village center, in October, and prides itself on fresh local produce and seafood served in a family-orientated atmosphere. Word about the restaurant so far has spread only through wordof-mouth. The place packs them in on Sundays for football games on six flat-screen televisions, and they soon are adding a 72-inch projector screen. “Unfortunately we had two business that failed in this spot, so we decided to do something totally different with it,’ Callaway said. “I think we do have a winning combination. It’s three-fold, with the ambiance of the place, plus the food, plus the service.” “All our food is fresh. We buy Photo by Sean Rice all of our produce local. We buy Greg Callaway, right, owner of the Gridiron Grill, and his executive all of our seafood local,” said Rick chef, Rick Toth, at the bar in the new Callaway restaurant. Toth, executive chef at the Gridwhat’s missing in the county.” iron Grill. “Everything is made from scratch,” Cal“This fish that I’m serving today was swimming yesterday. We don’t freeze any- laway said. thing,” Toth said. “These little things are

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CAN THE SKINS GIVE THE SAINTS 1ST LOSS?

By: Martin Warczynski This is the time of year when small business owners look over their budget and consider investing with funds they have saved throughout the year. The “downturn” economy has prompted more business owners to save creating some residual leeway for investment spending. Hopefully these tips will spark your interest where to spend those “hard-saved” dollars. 1. Secure Intellectual Property – Consider a server-based network. A data server will allow you to capitalize on efficiencies by keeping intellectual property in-house. Access can be granted to users who are given permission to read or modify important documents. Server-based networks allow for the continuous backup of this data. For more info, go to http:// techchampion.net/NetworkingBasics.aspx 2. Domain Name Registration – Secure a domain name (web address), if you have not already done so, now is the time. Ensure you partner with a reputable and innovative web design team such as Maryland’s eastern shorebased D3 Corp. They not only design and develop great websites but provide E-Commerce and E-Marketing services. D3 Corp has built their self-dubbed “mac-daddy” site for hundreds of clients. http://www.d3corp.com/

<http://www.d3corp.com/> 3. Website Content – Basics should include your business contact information, i.e. business address, phone, email etc. Your core product line with detailed delivery options is important to include on your site. Services offered and community involvement would top it off as a well-rounded site. 4. Manage your Network – Consider outsourcing the monitoring and management of your IT network. At a reasonable cost per server/workstation most administrative tasks can be performed remotely allowing business-owners to focus on their core business. Managed services allow you to proactively monitor your systems before problems occur at a significant cost savings. TechChampion – Managed Service Provider assisting small and midsized businesses make smarter technology decisions. Post technology-related questions to TechChampion’s Tech blog at http://techchampion.wordpress.com <http://techchampion.wordpress.com/> or email Martin@techchampion. net <mailto:Martin@techchampion.net> Send comments to The County Times, PO Box 250, 43251 Rescue Lane, Hollywood, MD 20636.


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The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Presidential Helicopter Program May Get Resurrected

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

After being cancelled last spring, the presidential helicopter program may be on its way back, according to some comments made by the top acquisition official for the nation’s military. The helicopter program was one of the most touted of projects to come to Patuxent River Naval Air Station but several jobs were lost when the program was scrubbed. According to statements made by Ashton B. Carter, assistant Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, at a Nov. 23 media roundtable recorded in a transcript the program may come back in a pared down, less complicated form. The transcript was compiled by Federal News Service, Inc. Carter told reporters that the program’s death knell, it was opposed by both President

Barack Obama (D) and his former chief campaign rival Arizona Senator John McCain as wasteful, and it was a helicopter that was trying to do too many missions. “We can’t let that happen this time. We need to shape the requirements so the program becomes doable,” Carter stated in the transcript found on his Web site. “And the White House is very intent on doing that, so that’s going well.” Carter stated in the transcript that the initial project’s main problem “was the piling on of requirements to such a degree that no helicopter could satisfy all of them simultaneously.” Carter went on to state that the project would likely seek to follow a current helicopter design instead of a reboot of a completely new aircraft. While the VH-71 Marine One project was terminated it is believed that any presidential helicopter would still come back to Patuxent River Naval Air Station for testing and evaluation. Tom Greer, a spokesman for defense contractor Lockheed Martin who participated in the original Marine One program, said that they had no expectations of the program coming back yet. “We’ve been following the customer’s [the Obama administration] direction under termination [of the program] to close out the VH-71 program,” Greer said.

Lockheed Martin photo

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Navigational Radio System To Be Terminated By Sean Rice and Guy Leonard Staff Writer A land-based navigational radio system, Loran-C, which has been used for 65 years to help seafaring vessel captains locate their position, is slated to be shut down in favor of satellite-based global positioning systems (GPS) as soon as Jan. 2010. James Moore, a public information officer with the Solomons Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla 23-2, stated that a defense budget signed by President Barack Obama in late October had effectively ended the use of coastal radio stations to fix latitude and longitude for vessels in favor of GPS technology. The Loran-C system had been in use since the World War II era, Moore said, and had at one time been the gold standard for maintaining navigation of vessels in the event of an emergency. The latest decision means that vessels will likely be solely dependent on GPS navigational aids, which many believe is a more vulnerable system than land-based radios. “ T h e decision to shut it down has been going on for about a decade,” Moore s a i d . “There’s gonot go ing to be a backup

for GPS, we’re going to be relying on satellite information. There will not be any Loran-C ground based information.” Moore said that the system could have been phased out several years ago with the advent and acceptance of GPS technology but many commercial as well as private boaters had invested in the older system of radio fixing navigational coordinates. The 2010 Homeland Security Appropriations Act signed by President Obama states the Loran-C system will be dismantled after the Coast Guard Commandant and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sign off that the termination of the system will not adversely impact the safety of maritime navigation and it is not needed as a backup to the GPS system. In a recent letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security from the Senate Committee on Homeland Security, Chairman Joseph I. Lieberman stressed that the Loran-C system is needed as a backup for the GPS system. “The LORAN-C infrastructure would, in fact, serve as a cost-effective backbone for a much-needed backup to GPS; therefore, we urge you to refrain from making such a certification,” Lieberman wrote, adding that China already has the capability to destroy GPS satellites with missiles or lasers. “Given the vulnerabilities of GPS, LORAN must be maintained and enhanced as a vital backup to GPS for various critical infrastructure users. It therefore would not be wise to certify the decommissioning of LORAN infrastructure,” the letter states. seanrice@countytimes.net

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MEMBERSHIP ELIGIBILITY: Employees, students, as well as their parents and immediate family members, of Prince George’s, Charles, Calvert and St. Mary’s County Public Schools, Prince George’s Community College and the College of Southern Maryland are eligible to become members. Employees of Talbot County Public Schools, individuals who live or work in St. Mary’s County and their immediate family members may also join Educational Systems FCU. Please check our website at www.esfcu.org for a list of eligible immediate family members, other schools, employers and groups. naCT1109

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The County Times

Shirley Birdine, 61

Shirley Ann Birdine, 61, of St. Inigoes, MD died November 11, 2009 at St. Mary’s Hospital. Shirley was born December 12, 1947 to Mary Louise (Ball) Birdine and Arthur Raymond Birdine. She attended Jarboesville/Carver High School in Lexington Park, MD. She enjoyed being around family and friends. Shirley leaves to cherish her memory one son, Terry Lee Milburn of St. Inigoes, MD, her mother Mary Louise Birdine of St. Inigoes, MD, one brother, William Charles Barnes (Louise), Lexington Park, MD, her special friend Joseph ‘Little Joe” Milburn, and a host of nieces, nephews and friends. She was pre-deceased by her father, Arthur Birdine, and three brothers, Henry, Richard and Stanley Barnes. Family will receive friends for Shirley’s Life Celebration on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. in Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, St. Inigoes, MD. A Funeral Service will be conducted at 11:00 a.m. with Reverend Alfred Statesman officiating. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. Serving as pallbearers will be: Eddie Banks, Ricco Barnes, Wayne Barnes, William Barnes, Julian Bryan, and Gilbert Green. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

Robert Carleton Burns, 83 Robert Carleton Burns, 83, of Lusby, MD and formerly of Temple Hills, MD, passed away, peacefully, on November 14, 2009 at his residence. He was born on February 10, 1926 in Washington, D.C. to the late Thomas Burns and Gertrude Shoup Burns. He was

the beloved husband of Jean M. Burns, whom he married on December 19, 1947 in Washington, D. C. Robert attended Eastern High School in Washington, D. C. and left high school to join the United States Marine Corps in 1943. Mr. Burns took part in the World War II Pacific Campaign, as a gunner and mechanic on PBJ’s with VMB-433. He also served on active duty during the Korean Conf lict. Robert retired from the Marine Corps Reserve in 1965 as a Master Sergeant. He worked for PEPCO for thirty six years, and retired in 1986 as Roving Maintenance General Foreman. In 1983, Robert and his wife moved from Temple Hills, MD to Lusby, MD, where he built a waterfront home. Robert was a member of Marine Bombing Squadron VMB-433, Marine Air Group 61, Marine Corps Aviation Association and the VFW. Mr. Burns loved wood working and was well known

for both his extensive wood shop and his abilities while in it. He was also an avid gardener. He leaves three children, Robert C. Burns, Jr. of Leonardtown, MD and San Diego, CA, Karen Keysar of La Plata, MD and Steven T. Burns, Sr. of Lusby, MD. Grandfather of Julie M. and Steven T. Burns, Jr., Paul and Greg Keysar and Shea Riniker. He was preceded in death by his sister Mary K. Burns and his grandson Robert C. Burns, III. The family received friends at the Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 20 American Lane, Lusby, MD on Wednesday, November 18th, from 2-4 PM and at 6:00 PM until the time of the service at 7:30 PM, with Pastor Bruce Wietzke officiating. Interment will be held at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA on Thursday, December 10th, 2009 at 10:00 AM. The family requests in lieu of f lowers memorial contributions to be made in memory of Robert to Calvert Hospice, P.O. Box 838, Prince Frederick, MD 20678. Donations are encour-

age on-line at www.calverthospice.org.

Darrell Canter, 48 Darrell Dean Canter, 48 of Valley Lee, MD died November 21, 2009 in Lake City, FL. Born August 22, 1961 in St. Louis, Mo he was the son of Charles Canter and Juleann Bein. Darrell is survived by his son Ryan R. Canter of Abingdon, VA, his mother, father, stepparents and his siblings. Darrell D. Canter, USN retired, Chief Canter, a Gulf War veteran, succumbed to injuries incurred in a motorcycle accident. After retiring in 1998 from the Fleet Maintenance Squadron, Patuxent Naval Air Station, Darrell stayed on as a valuable resident of Southern Maryland. He immediately went to work for VSE Corporation supporting the F-18 program. At the time of his death Darrell was surrounded by his friends doing one of the activities he loved most, riding his motorcycle. A long time member of the Nam Knights Motorcycle Club, he was supporting a Nam Knights ride in Lake City, FL. Nam Knights is an organization which provides support to the families of veterans and law enforcement officers. Darrell was an active member. One of his best friends was at his side. He ended his last email to fellow club members with; I was looking where I was going!!!!!!!!!!!! I was looking into the future! Darrell rides on in our hearts and mind. Family received friends on Friday, November 27, 2009 in the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A. A Funeral Liturgy was held on Saturday, November 28, 2009 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, Lexington Park, MD with Father Jack Kennealy officiating. Interment was private. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com Arrangements provided by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD

Thursday, December 3, 2009

by her son William and his wife Derly Miller of Great Mills, MD; her stepson Thomas Cwynar of Newmarket, NH; grandsons Brett and Lance Miller of Great Mills, MD, and Daniel Cwynar of Newmarket, NH; her sister Lesalotta Bolte and her sister-in-law Eisella Vogel both of Berlin, Germany. She was preceded in death by her brother Walter Vogel. Her marriage to William Miller ended in divorce. Christel attended high school in Berlin, Germany and worked at various jobs after coming to the United States in 1958. Her last place of employment was Dyncorp, where she worked as a technical librarian. Prior to a major stroke in 2003, she enjoyed sewing, cooking and playing computer games with her grandchildren. While a resident of St. Mary’s Nursing Center, she enjoyed reading, watching television (especially the SciFi channel) and participating in the center’s various activities. She continued to be as independent as possible and always retained her sense of humor. Visitation will be held on Saturday, December 5th, 2009, from 9-11 a.m. at Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, where a memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. with Rev. Dale Skurla officiating. Following the service, burial will take place at Charles Memorial Gardens, Leonardtown, MD. In lieu of f lowers, memorial contributions may be sent to St. Mary’s Nursing Center’s Activities Department, 21585 Peabody Street, Leonardtown, MD 20650. To send a condolence to the family please visit our website at www.mgf h.com. Arrangements provided by the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Jeffery “Jeff” Dinges, 52

Christel Cwynar, 73 Christel Maria Cwynar, 73 of Lexington Park, MD formerly of Berlin, Germany, died November 27, 2009 at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, due to complications related to a stroke. Born September 13, 1936 in Berlin, Germany, she was the daughter of the late Erich and Charlotte Ball Vogel. Christel is survived by loving husband Stanley Cwynar of Lexington Park, MD. She is also survived

Jeffery “ Jeff ” Neal Dinges, 52 of Charlotte Hall, MD formerly of Waldorf, MD, died November 22, 2009 at his residence. Born July 13, 1957 in Jackson County, MO he was the son of Leila King of MO and Harold Dinges and his stepmother Peggy Dinges of KS. He is also survived by

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his children Heather Dinges of Bryanstown, MD, and Marcus Robertson of MD as well as his siblings Rene Randall of Camp Springs, MD, James Dinges of TX, Carla Hayes and Harold Dinges, Jr. both of MO. Jeff was a graduate of Lackey High School. He worked in Pepco/ Mirant Energy Services Store Department for 29 years. All Services are private. To send a condolence to the family please visit our website at www.mgf h. com. Arrangements provided by the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Thomas Edelen, 57 Thomas “Tommy” Arthur Edelen, “Colonel Sanders”, 57 of Brandywine, MD, died on November 29, 2009 at St. Mary’s Hospital, Leonardtown, MD. Born on October 26, 1952 in Lexington Park, MD. He was a lifelong resident of the Baden area and lived on his family farm where he raised tobacco. Tommy was an Engineer for Charlotte Hall Veterans Home for 5 years and previously worked for the town of La Plata. He also enjoyed cutting hair for his local friends. His enjoyments included dancing, water skiing, crabbing, blue grass and blues music. He is survived by his mother, Julia Doremus McPherson Edelen and the late Clinton Reynelda Edelen. He is also survived by his wife, Karen Ann Kolbe Edelen, children, Thomas Arthur Edelen, Jr., his partner, John Barrack, Christopher Adam Edelen and wife, Jennifer, Matthew Joseph Edelen and wife, Jaclyn, Kenny Myers and wife, Cathy, and Debbie L. Myers, sister, Betty Garner-Tippett and husband, Tommy Tippett, grandchildren, Christian J. and Mattalyn R. Edelen, Mandy, Alaurie, Deaunna, Gabriel, and Robert Myers, nephew and niece, Daniel and Breanne Garner. Family will receive friends to Celebrate Tommy’s Life on Friday, December 4, 2009 from 3-5 & 7-9 p.m., 7 p.m. prayers, at Brinsfield-Echols Funeral Home, P.A., 30195 Three Notch Rd., Charlotte Hall, MD where a Funeral Mass will be celebrated Saturday, December 5, 2009 at 11 a.m. with Reverend Thomas Gude. Interment will follow at Trinity Memorial Gardens, Waldorf, MD. After service family and friends are welcome to join us at St. Pauls Parish, Baden M.D., for food, drinks and memories.

Brice Lee Elliott, Sr., 81 Brice Lee Elliott, Sr., 81, of Broomes Island, MD passed away on November 20, 2009 in Prince Frederick, MD. He was born January 10, 1928 in


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Thursday, December 3, 2009

The County Times

Continued Broomes Island, MD to the late James Emerson and Marion Estelle Mister Elliott. He is also predeceased by his wife, Dorothy Mae Elliott. In his younger years, Brice was an avid drag racer all over the East Coast. He won the

Marie Hamilton & husband, Raymond, David Wayne Geris & wife, Alva, and Michael William Geris, brother, Edward Geris & wife, Mary Ann, sister-in-law, Ann Geris, grandchildren, Thomas L., IV, David K., and Erica C. Geris, Joshua M., David W., and Justin M. Smith, and Nicole Thompson., great-grandchildren, Brooke and Chloe Thompson, Alex, Matthew, and Jackson Smith, Robert and Hannah Mogel. Family received friends to Celebrate Thomas’s Life on Wednesday, December 2, 2009. at Brinsfield-Echols Funeral Home, P.A., 30195 Three Notch Rd., Charlotte Hall, MD where Funeral Service was. Interment will be held on Monday, December 7, 2009 at 10 a.m. at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD.

David Johnson, 49 “Presidents Cup” at Budds Creek several years. Brice served in the Army from 19461947 receiving the WWII Victory Medal. He was a member of the VFW, American Legion, Lions Club and Boumi Temple all in St. Mary’s County and the National Guard in Annapolis. Father of Brice L. Elliott, Jr. of Broomes Island, and Deborah Wood, of Vidor Texas. He is also survived by his granddaughter, Danielle Nicole Burgan of Prince Frederick, MD. The family received friends at the Rausch Funeral Home, PA, 4405 Broomes Island Road, Port Republic, MD on Saturday November 28, 2009 from 10:30 AM to 12 noon where services were held at 12 noon. Interment is private. Memorial contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s Association National Capital Area, 11240 Waples Mill Road,Suite 402, Fairfax,VA 22030 Arrangements by Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., Port Republic, MD.

Thomas Geris, 73 Thomas Leo Geris, 73 of Mechanicsville, MD, formerly of Hillcrest Heights, MD died on November 27, 2009 at St. Mary’s Hospital, Leonardtown, MD. Born on April 11, 1936 in Manassas, VA, he was the son of the late Thomas Leo and Alice Grace Mayhew Geris. Mr. Geris retired from DC Army National Guard as Master Sergeant. His enjoyments were food, football, basketball which he would watch with his grandchildren after retirement. He is predeceased by a brother, Charles Geris. Survived by his wife, Enid Claire Brennan Geris, children, Thomas Leo Geris, III, Linda

22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD with prayers recited. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Monday, November 30, 2009 at St. John Francis Regis Catholic Church in Hollywood, MD. Father Ray Schmidt, pastor of the church, was the celebrant. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. In lieu of f lowers, donations can be made to the memorial fund for the children of David A. Johnson or the St. John’s Church Building Fund, 43950 St. John’s Road, Hollywood, MD 20636. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements provided by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD

LeRoy Wagner, Jr., 63 LeRoy Junior Wagner, Jr., 63 of Lexington Park, MD died November 22, 2009 at his residence. Born April 5, 1946 in Williamsport, PA, he was the son of the late LeRoy Wagner, Sr. and Charlotte Robinson. Mr. Wagner served in the U.S. Navy, retiring as a Radio-

man First Class. Mr. Wagner was an Engineering Technician for the U.S. Government, LeRoy was a devoted husband, father and grandfather, he loved to fish, bowl and playing softball, he also coached little league baseball. LeRoy is survived by his wife Mary Frances Wagner of Lexington Park, MD, stepmother Joyce Wagner of Miff linburg, PA, children; LeRoy Wagner, III of Lusby, MD, Jason Wagner of California, MD, Scott Wagner of St. Petersburg, FL and Todd Wagner of Lake City, FL, siblings; Mike Wagner of Miff linburg, PA, John Wagner of Millmont, PA, Jim Wag-

ner of Johnstown, PA, Kathy Zimmerman of Miff linburg, PA, Wanda Boop of Miff linburg, PA and Lori Zechman of Beavertown, PA. In addition to his parents LeRoy was preceded in death by a brother Rick Wagner and sister Tina Wagner. Family received friends for LeRoy’s Life Celebration on Friday, November 27, 2009 in the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD. Interment Arlington National Cemetery, January 4, 2010 at 10 a.m. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of St. Mary’s, Inc., P.O. Box 625, Leonardtown, MD 20650 Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfunreal.com Arrangements provided by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD

To Place A Memorial Please Call: 301-373-4125

Serving St. Mary's County Since 1978 Free eSTIMATeS / QuICk TurnArOunD David Allan Johnson, 49, formerly of Hollywood, MD died on November 23, 2009 in Covington, Louisiana. Born March 2, 1960, in Leonardtown, MD he was the son of Albert and Juanita Johnson of Hollywood, MD. He graduated from Chopticon High School in 1978 and the Florida Institute of Technology in March 1986 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. David enjoyed using his knowledge of electrical engineering and working with his hands to rebuild computers and doing home improvements. He is survived by his children Joseph, Jason, and Jaclyn Johnson; by his brothers and sisters Frannie (Dago) Bostich, Karen (Warren) Farr, Donnie (Lynda) Johnson, Walter (Sue) Johnson, Wayne (Charlene) Johnson, Denise (Sam) Parris, Diane (David) Walker, and Marie (Mike) Dick; plus16 nieces and nephews and 4 great nieces and nephews. The family received friends Sunday, November 29, 2009 at the Brinsfield Funeral Home,

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The County Times

Briefs Man Arrested, Charged With Vehicle Burglary On November 25, 2009, Deputy First Class Michael Harrison responded to a business parking lot in Charlotte Hall for a theft. Harrison’s investigation revealed Joseph D. Ransom III, 19, of Mechanicsville entered a 2004 Ford Van via an open window and allegedly removed currency from the center console. Ransom was located at a residence off Baptist Church Road , arrested and charged with Theft under $1000, and theft from a motor vehicle. Ransom was released to the custody of the St. Mary’s County Detention Center pending an appearance before the District Court Commissioner.

Woman Charged With Fleeing And Eluding With Illegal Prescription Drugs

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Former Ryken Teacher Convicted Of Molestation To Move To Florida

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

A Xaverian Brother convicted of abusing a student of his more than 30 years ago while teaching at Ryken High School had his sentence amended Wednesday to allow him to move to Florida where he will be monitored

On November 25, 2009, Deputy Elizabeth Croyle attempted to stop a 2002 Chevrolet Suburban for suspicion of driving while impaired on Three Notch Road in the vicinity of Popular Ridge Road in Lexington Park. The vehicle failed to stop, proceeding south on Three Notch Road at a top speed of about 65 mph. The vehicle eventually pulled to the shoulder in the area of Bay Forrest Road and the operator, Chrystal K. Patton, 45, of Lusby, was arrested. A search incident to her arrest resulted in the recovery of Ativan tablets, a schedule IV narcotic for which she did not have a prescription. Patton was charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance and numerous traffic related offenses to include driving while impaired by alcohol, fleeing and eluding, speeding and failing to drive right of center. Patton was released to the custody of the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Man Charged With Possession Of Marijuana On November 28, 2009, Deputy Melissa Green responded to Premery Drive in Lexington Park for a report of persons in a vehicle using drugs. Green located the vehicle, Gold Mazda with Louisiana registration. As Green approached the vehicle, the occupants exited and fled the area on foot. Reshaud Nelson, 20, from Lexington Park was detained a few feet from the vehicle. A check of the vehicle revealed a strong odor of burnt marijuana and the recovery of a suspected marijuana cigarette from the vehicle floorboard. Nelson was determined to not be the owner of the vehicle. The vehicle owner is listed as a subject from Louisiana and the last known user was determined to be active military and currently deployed overseas. Nelson was charged with possession of marijuana, possession of burglar’s tools (knife) Possession of burglar tools (a knife) with intent to use in the commission of a burglary and being in the motor vehicle of another with the intent to commit theft of the vehicle or property within. He was released to the custody of the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Philip H. Dorsey III Attorney at Law

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Philip M. Spoelker

constantly at a Xaverian Brothers facility. Philip M. Spoelker, 67, had served about a year in the county detention center after his Dec. 2007 conviction and had been staying at a residence in Takoma Park where he had to report to parole and probation officers as part of his parole agreement. Assistant State’s Attorney Joseph Stanalonis said that the victim in the case had agreed with the proposal from Spoelker’s attorney John Mudd that he be allowed to move to the Venice-based facility where

reports would be compiled on his activities every three months and sent to the court for review. Spoelker would be away from the public at the facility, particularly children, and would be listed as a sex offender in Florida. “We take our responsibility in this very, very seriously,” said Cornelius Hubbard, the Xaverian Brother in charge of the program that will watch over Spoelker at the facility. Judge Michael J. Stamm, who had originally handed down a five year sentence against Spoelker suspended down to 18 months, said he agreed that the program was probably the best to monitor Spoelker’s behavior. But that did not ameliorate the nature of Spoelker’s offenses so long ago. “I think it’s a travesty what you did to people under your charge,” Stamm told Spoelker, who did not make a statement at the reconsideration hearing. But Stamm warned Spoelker that if he came back before him for any violation of his probation agreement that he would face three-and-a-half years in the state’s Department of Corrections. Stamm said earlier that he would not have agreed to the change in the sentence if the victim had not consented to the plan. The victim was not present in court. Detectives with the Bureau of Criminal Investigations began their investigation two years ago when the victim came forward about the abuse decades after the 1978 incident; they set up several phone calls where Spoelker admitted to inappropriately touching the victim while at school. Spoelker was arrested while he was in Florida teaching at a community college and he came back to St. Mary’s County to face the charges against him. He pleaded to one count of child abuse. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Man Arrested In Hit And Run Of 4-Year-Old By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

-Serious Personal Injury CasesLEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000 TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493 EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net

www.dorseylaw.net

A man who county deputies arrested in connection with the striking of a 4-year-old boy Dec. 1 with his vehicle has been released with no bond requirement after being charged with leaving the scene of a personal injury accident and driving while his license was suspended. Gerald Gerome Keemer, 43, of Lusby, became a suspect in the alleged hit-and-run incident that occurred on Brighton Avenue in Lexington Park Tuesday after deputies gathered information from the scene. According to police reports, Keemer was traveling northbound on Brighton Avenue when the child entered the roadway and was struck. Keemer stepped out of his car and talked to the child’s caretaker but got back in his vehicle and left before sheriff’s deputies arrived, police allege. A state police helicopter took the child to Children’s Hospital in the District for his injuries, police state. By about 4:40 p.m. that same day Keemer came to a district office where sheriff’s deputies transported him to headquarters for an interview; afterwards he was arrested and charged. This is not the first time Keemer has been

Gerald Gerome Keemer

charged with driving on a suspended license. Keemer pleaded guilty in November of 2008 to that charge and served 59 days in the county detention center. guyleonard@countytimes.net


13

Thursday, December 3, 2009

The County Times


In The

Know Education

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009 In the Sahara Desert, there is a town named Tidikelt, which did not receive a drop of rain for ten years.

Universal Pre-K and Technology are “What Counts” School Officials Say Budget Crisis May Delay Both Initiatives By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer Nearly 200 students, parents, school officials and community members crowded into the James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center Tuesday evening for the school system’s third “What Counts” education forum, during which attendees exchanged ideas on how to bridge gaps in county school services. “This is the third one. We’ve done it every two years since 2005,” said Jeff Maher, Director of Professional and Organizational Development for St. Mary’s County Public Schools. “And each year we see what the community has and we use it for our master planning process, and bringing alignment to our initiatives.” As groups brainstormed and prioritized their concerns over gaps in the school system’s services, a common thread seemed to emerge as many groups identified technology disparities and universal pre-k as their primary concerns. “I think really the technology and pre-k are the two biggest things I’ve seen,” said Board of Education Vice Chair Cindy Allen, adding that not all schools had Smart Boards, which was causing a technological disparity between classrooms in the county. “We’ve learned that some schools are going out and buying their own and not waiting for the school system to be able to provide it for them, and there’s been some frustration about that,” she said. Funding will be an issue for the implementation of universal pre-kindergarten as well, said Allen, explaining that state officials who previously set the goal of statewide universal pre-k by 2014 are now saying it may not be feasible. “The delivery model is somewhat in question, because arguably there are lots of good preschool programs across the state, and we can’t afford all the bricks and mortar it would take to have universal pre-k,” she said, adding that the state may have to consider certifying outside programs rather than funding additional classrooms and teachers. When asked if the public school system was close to achieving universal pre-k, Chief Academic Officer Linda Dudderar said, “not really … we have just a little over 600 pre-kindergarteners this year, and little over 1,200 kindergarteners, so only about half of the kindergarteners would have received pre-k through our public school system.” Though not all county students are receiving early childhood education through the public school system, Dudderar said there was not a severe shortage of space for qualifying students. She said that not all pre-k classrooms are at capacity, and there are currently no wait lists for pre-kindergarten.

Photo by Andrea Shiell Jamie Jones from the Tri-County Youth Services Bureau noted universal pre-k as a priority at the school system’s third “What Counts” education forum.

In the meantime school officials said it was important for the school system to maintain its current programs, and would have to consider sustainability when weighing the value of new initiatives. “Right now we’re trying to preserve and maintain the level of programs that we have,” said Superintendent Michael Martirano, as he noted increasing unease over the economy. Martirano added that the Board of Education had to push the budget cycle back to January because of uncertainties over state funding. “I’m anticipating the worst-case scenario with falling revenues … nothing’s rebounding,” he said. Echoing concerns over the budget was Board of Education Chair Bill Mattingly, who smiled as he talked about the cost of some of the initiatives proposed. “You know what we’ll need for these notes is a really big checkbook,” he said while looking at the posters outlining attendee suggestions. “I really wish we could do them all.”

14

un Fact

Forrest Center Hosting Breakfast with Santa Students and staff of the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center will have their annual Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. with Santa making his grand entrance at 8:30 a.m. The morning will include a breakfast prepared by the Forrest Center’s Culinary Arts students. The cost for breakfast is $8.00 per adult and $4.00 per child (ages 3–11). An omelet bar will be available for an additional $2.00. Santa’s Workshop will be available for children to purchase small gifts under $10. Students from the Forrest Center’s Graphic Communications program will also be on hand to photograph children with Santa, for a small fee, and students from the TV/Video Production program will be available to record holiday greetings on CD’s for $7.00 and DVD’s for $8.00. New this year is a gingerbread man decorating room. For $2.00, attendees will have a chance to decorate their own gingerbread man. Proceeds will benefit the Forrest Center’s student programs and SkillsUSA chapter. For more information, contact the Forrest Center at 301-475-0242.

andreashiell@countytimes.net

Information Systems Programs Annual Auction Selling Gingerbread Houses for Charity Expand at Higher Ed Center By Andrea Shiell A new Master of Science in Information Systems Engineering and Management (MS-ISEM) will be coming to the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center (SMHEC) from Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Summer 2010. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics identifies ten industries with the largest wage and salary growth from 2006-2016 to include “management, scientific, and technical consulting services” which are estimated to gain 77.9% more positions; and “computer systems design and related services” which are estimated to gain 38.3% more positions, by 2016. In line with these target occupations, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation’s Division of Workforce Development and Adult Learning projects that by 2016 over 32,500 job openings in Maryland will be available in the combined categories of computer and information systems managers, engineering managers, software engineers, computer systems analysts, network systems data communications analysts, and management analysts. Southern Maryland also projects high growth rates in “professional, scientific, and technical services” job classifications. This particular industry subsector is the largest private industry subsector in Southern Maryland, with 10,126 jobs; and it is within the top five industries that were projected for growth in Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary’s counties in 2008. For more information on the program and to be put on an email list to be notified about upcoming Information Sessions call Dr. Cynthia Shoemaker at 301-737-2500 ext. 204. For more information go to www.smhec.org, or check the Harrisburg University website at www.HarrisburgU.edu/. Representatives from this Master of Science in Information Systems Engineering and Management degree will be present at the March 25, 2010 SMHEC Open House from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Staff Writer

It takes about 900 graham crackers and 60 pounds of icing for students to construct all the gingerbread houses that are sold every year at the auction held at Lettie Marshall Dent Elementary School, but it seems to be worth every sweet step, according to fifth grade teacher Sherri Jilek. This year students are putting together approximately 90 houses for the school’s 9th annual auction, which is held to raise money for needy families in the area. So far the auction has raised nearly $20,000, netting about $3,000 last year to help struggling families over the holidays. “We adopt local families, and we get a list of things that they want and need, and we go to Target and shop for all of those things, and some of the money goes to our secretary, and she goes and shops for the rest,” said Jilek, adding that the school adopted five families last year, and they are hoping to earn enough to adopt more this season. Jilek said she did not expect the economy to affect this year’s auction negatively. “Last year we thought it would be a stretch and we made money, and this year seems to be a little bit better than last year, so I think that will help us,” she said. Lettie Marshall Dent Elementary will have its annual gingerbread auction on Friday, Dec. 4 at 6:30 p.m. For more information call 301-472-4500.

Photo by Andrea Shiell 2nd graders DeShai Dorsey and Kierstyn Lewis construct one of the 90 gingerbread houses that will be auctioned off this year to raise money for needy families.


15

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

First Fridays are Happening in Leonardtown ON THE FIRST FRIDAY OF EACH MONTH, HISTORIC LEONARDTOWN'S ART GALLERIES, RESTAURANTS, CAFE'S, GIFT SHOPS, ANTIQUE SHOPS, BOOKSTORE, ETC. OPEN THEIR DOORS TO SHOWCASE LOCAL ARTISTS AND/OR SERVE SPECIALS AT THEIR ESTABLISHMENTS. THE TOWN HOSTS A FREE EVENING OF ART, ENTERTAINMENT, AND SPECIALS WHERE PEOPLE GATHER TO ENJOY LOCAL ART, THE COMPANY OF OTHERS, AND EVEN A FREE GLASS OF WINE.

First Friday in Leonardtown is Here! Next big event is December 4 starting at 5:00 p.m.

Visit uptown and downtown to rediscoVer the many treasures of historic/new Leonardtown! bELOw iS A LiST OF pARTicipATiNG buSiNESSES THAT ARE OFFERiNG NOVEmbER FiRST FRiDAY EVENiNG SpEciALS. ViSiT THESE buSiNESSES AND GET A FREE RAFFLE TickET TO wiN A FuJi cROSSTOwN 3.0 bikE. DRAwiNG wiLL bE HELD ON DEc 4 FiRST FRiDAY! YOu muST bE pRESENT AT 7:30 ON THE SQuARE, mARYLAND ANTiQuES cENTER OR ARizONA pizzA TO wiN! -> NORTH END GALLERY - 41652 FENwick STREET: DAYS OF GOLD, EVENiNG OF SiLVER- THE NORTH END GALLERY pRESENTS iTS 23RD ANNuAL HOLiDAY SHOw wHicH wiLL RuN FROm NOVEmbER 24 THROuGH JANuARY 17. THiS iS AN ALL mEmbER SHOw AND iS TiTLED DAYS OF GOLD, EVENiNGS OF SiLVER. THERE wiLL bE A FiRST FRiDAY GALA HOLiDAY REcEpTiON 5-8.

301-475-8040 Fax: 301-475-8658

-> QuALiTY STREET kiTcHENS - 41675 FENwick ST: A cOmbiNED iNDOORS/OuTDOORS EVENT. iNDOORS: wE wiLL bE OFFERiNG A SELEcTiON OF wiNES AND AccOmpANYiNG HOLiDAY DipS, SAucES AND AppETizER iDEAS. THiS iS A GREAT TimE TO pick-up SOmE QuALiTY wiNES AND FOOD iTEmS FOR GiFT-GiViNG! puRcHASE pRicE wiLL bE $5 AND OuR SuppLiER wiLL bE THERE TO EDucATE YOu AbOuT FOOD/wiNE pAiRiNGS. OuTDOORS: wE'RE mAkiNG A bATcH OF LOcAL cHEF TREVOR bOTHwELL'S AwARD-wiNNiNG cHiLi AND SELLiNG HiS SpicES. HE wAS THE "pEOpLE'S cHOicE" AwARD wiNNER iN THE wORLD cOmpETiTiON, OcTObER 2009. cOmE bY FOR bOTH. NOTE - OuR wiNTER cLASS ScHEDuLE iS NOw AVAiLAbLE!" -> cAFE DES ARTiSTES - 41655 FENwick ST: RE-ViSiT THE OYSTER FESTiVAL! wE wiLL FEATuRE THREE OF THE wiNNiNG AppETizER REcipES FROm THE LAST TwO YEARS OF THE NATiONAL OYSTER FESTiVAL cOOk-OFF! cAFE OYSTERS, OYSTERS bOuRGuiGNON iN puFF AND OYSTER EN bROcHETTE wiTH REmOuLADE SAucE! AND TAkE A TRip TO FRANcE wiTH OuR cLASSic 'cASSOuLET TOuLOuSAiN' ALL wHiLE ENJOYiNG THE DELiGHTFuL & ENTERTAiNiNG muSic OF RANDY RicHiE ON piANO. ->THE wiNE bAR & cAFE- 22697 wASHiNGTON ST: TbA -> THE bREwiNG GROuNDS- 41658 FENwick ST: pLEASE JOiN uS FOR AN EVENiNG OF FESTiVE HOLiDAY SOuNDS wiTH THE NORTHERN HiGH ScHOOL cHAmbER cHOiR. THEY wiLL bE pERFORmiNG FROm 6:00pm uNTiL... iF YOu miSSED THEiR pERFORmANcE LAST YEAR, YOu NEED TO STOp bY AND ENJOY THiS immENSELY TALENTED GROup OF YOuNG muSiciANS. A bREwiNG GROuNDS EVENT NOT TO bE miSSED!" AS ALwAYS, ENJOY OuR DELiciOuS SEASONAL cOFFEE OFFERiNGS AND TREATS!

41658 Fenwick St. Leonardtown, MD 20650

ERIE INSURANCE GROUP BURRIS’ OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR Auto • Home • Business • Life

-> THE GOOD EARTH NATuRAL FOODS cOmpANY- 41765 pARk AVE: mELiSSA wiTH bAccHuS impORTERS wiLL bE HERE TO HELp cELEbRATE THE HOLiDAYS. SHE wiLL bE SAmpLiNG SAkE2mE, A SpARkiNG JApANESE SAkE wiTH ALL NATuRAL FLAVORS THAT iS GLuTEN-FREE. LARRY AND LAuRA’S FAmOuS VEGETARiAN SuSHi AND ASiAN SNAckS wiLL bE AVAiLAbLE AT OuR SAmpLiNG TAbLE TO cOmpLEmENT THE SAkE2mE. pLuS, YVETTE JONES, mASSAGE THERApiST, wiLL bE HERE OFFERiNG SEATED mASSAGE miNi-SESSiONS. -> ON A ROLL- (LOcATED ON THE bANk OF AmERicA cORNER, FENwick AND wASHiNGTON ST): TbA ->cRAzY FOR EwE - 22715 wASHiNGTON STREET: JOiN uS FOR kNiTTiNG AND LiGHT REFRESHmENTS, YARN TASTiNG EVERY FiRST FRiDAY. TbA ->wHiTE RAbbiT cHiLDREN’S bOOkSTORE- 25470 pOiNT LOOkOuT RD # G (ROuTE 5: LOcATED iN THE SHOpS AT bRETON bAY). TbA

-> mARYLAND ANTiQuES cENTER- 26005 pOiNT LOOkOuT ROAD: THE mARYLAND ANTiQuES cENTER iS cELEbRATiNG THE bEGiNNiNG OF THE cHRiSTmAS SEASON ON DEc.4TH, FiRST FRiDAY AND SATuRDAY, DEc. 5TH. THERE wiLL bE A FREE 22720 WASHINGTON STREET • P.O. BOX 707 DRAwiNG FOR A $25 GiFT cERTiFicATE TO uSE ANYwHERE iN THE cENTER ON FiRST FRiDAY. iF YOu ARE pARTicipATiNG iN THE bikE FREE RAFFLE, YOu cAN bE DOwNTOwN, LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650 OuT AT THE ANTiQuE cENTER cOmpLEx OR AT ARizONA pizzA TO wiN. AS SOON AS (301) 475-3151 • Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 • Fax: (301) 475-9029 THEY DRAw FOR THE bikE ON FiRST FRiDAY, THEY wiLL cALL uS AND wE wiLL LET YOu danburris@danburris.com • danburris.com kNOw THE TickET NumbER. THE NExT DAY iS THE ANNuAL OpEN HOuSE wiTH

mANY AcTiViTiES AND GOOD buYS. wE wiLL ALSO HAVE “bASkET OF GiFTS” DONATED FROm EAcH DEALER TO bE RAFFLED OFF THROuGH OuT THE DAY. cOmE JOiN uS!!!! -> cREEk SiDE GALLERY - iN THE mD ANTiQuES cTR, RTE 5 NORTH: cONTiNuES THEiR HiSTORic SOuTHERN mARYLAND ART SHOw OF LOcAL ScENES THROuGH DEcEmbER. ViSiT FOR A pREViEw OF THE ANTiQuES cENTER OpEN HOuSE, SATuRDAY, DEcEmbER 5TH.

-> SOuTHERN mARYLAND ARTiSANS cENTER - RTE 5 AT mD. ANTiQuES HOURS OF OPERATIONS: cENTER bLDG 2: wE’RE A cOOpERATiVE OF LOcAL ARTiSANS AND cRAFTSmEN OFFERiNG HANDcRAFTED ORiGiNAL wORk iNcLuDiNG JEwELRY, HANDwOVEN ScARVES AND Monday – Thursday: 7am – 3pm • Friday: 7am – 8pm Saturday: 8am – 8pm • Sunday: 8am – 3pm SHAwLS, STAiNED GLASS, pOTTERY, TAbLES, HANDSpuN YARNS, AND mucH mORE. www. FuzzYFARmERS.cOm TbA -> TREADLES STuDiO – RTE 5 AT mD. ANTiQuES cENTER bLDG 2: kick-OFF THE HOLiDAY SEASON THiS FiRST FRiDAY, DEcEmbER 4, AT TREADLES STuDiO. ENJOY muLLED ciDER wHiLE cHATTiNG wiTH miSTi AS SHE DEmONSTRATES wEAViNG ON THE FLOOR LOOm. THEN, ExpLORE THE FiNE HAND-wOVEN iTEmS mADE bY AREA wEAVERS THAT ARE AVAiLAbLE iN THE SHOp. TREADLES STuDiO iS RAFFLiNG A GiFT cERTiFicATE wORTH $50 DuRiNG THE bikE GiVE-AwAY. THE cERTiFicATE cAN bE uSED FOR A puNcH-NEEDLE cLASS OR TOwARDS wEAViNG LESSONS; pERFEcT FOR THE HAND-cRAFTER ON YOuR GiFT LiST. -> LEONARDTOwN GALLERiA- (LOcATED iN THE mARYLAND ANTiQuES cENTER) ROuTE 5. THE THEmE OF THiS mONTH SHOw wiLL bE HiSTORic SOuTHERN mARYLAND bY ALL mEmbERS. THiS SHOw wiLL RuN THROuGH DEc. 31ST THERE wiLL bE SpEciAL SALES, GOODiES THROuGH OuT THE GALLERY ON bOTH FiRST FRiDAY DEc 4TH AND SATuRDAY, DEcEmbER 5TH. wE ALSO wANT TO cONGRATuLATE ONE OF OuR ARTiSTS, “RObERT bEALLE” wHO HAS JuST wON TOp HONORS iN THE FEDERAL Duck STAmp cONTEST. FOR 2009. -> FENwick STREET uSED bOOkS & muSic- 41655A FENwick STREET: THE EDS pERFORm 5 TO 8! JOiN wARD cARROLL AND ED GASSiE FOR A muSicAL JOuRNEY! wE SpEciALizE iN uSED (cuRRENT AND cLASSic FicTiON, NON-FicTiON AND cHiLDRENS/ YOuNG ADuLT LiTERATuRE), RARE AND ANTiQuARiAN bOOkS. wE ALSO HAVE DVD'S AND ViNTAGE ViNYL REcORDS. 10% OFF ALL puRcHASES!

THE MARYLAND ANTIQUES CENTER OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 10 – 5 OPEN FIRST FRIDAYS 10 - 8

www.marylandantiquescenter.com

301-475-1960

26005 Point Lookout Rd. (Rt. 5) • Leonardtown, MD

-> SHELbY'S cREATiVE FRAmiNG - 26005 pOiNT LOOkOuT RD. (ROuTE 5): mD. ANTiQuE cENTER, bLDG. 2. GATHER THOSE OLD OR NEw TREASuRED, FAmiLY pHOTOS AND HAVE THEm cuSTOm FRAmED wiTH cONSERVATiON mATERiALS. miNiATuRES SHOw: TiNY TREASuRES FOR cHRiSTmAS, ALSO cONTiNuiNG GiFT cERTiFicATES FOR ANYONE wHO ORDERS A cOmpLETE cuSTOm FRAmE ORDER: ONE FOR YOu AND ONE FOR A FRiEND !

Creative Custom Framing & Art

-> cORbELS RESTAuRANT- 22770 wASHiNGTON ST: iN THE ORiGiNAL, HiSTORic STERLiNG HOuSE: TbA

Hours:

-> cOLLEEN'S DREAm - 41665 FENwick STREET: wE TAkE ON cONSiGNmENT Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m. QuALiTY wOmEN'S cLOTHiNG AND AccESSORiES AND ViNTAGE cLOTHiNG AND AccESSaturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m. SORiES. wE ALSO HAVE A VARiETY OF NEw AND cONSiGNED JEwELRY AND GiFTS. ViSiT OuR NEw cLEARANcE ROOm! TbA

301-904-2532

->ARizONA pizzA cOmpANY- 40874 mERcHANTS LN (RTE 5): LATE NiGHT HAppY HOuR FROm 9 TO 11 pm. 1/2 pRicE DRAFTS AND AppETizERS FROm $3.99

MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd ~Leonardtown, MD 20650

Executive Inn & Suites

(301) 475-3130

Park Avenue

by Southern Original Art d Artists Marylan

41655 Park Avenue, PO Box 635 Leonardtown, MD 20650

In a casual, relaxing atmosphere

On the square in historic Leonardtown Classy entertainment, Prix-Fixe Menu & more Reservations Recommended 301-997-0500 www.cafedesartistes.ws

301-475-5151

-> THE TEA ROOm - iN THE mD ANTiQuES cENTER, RTE 5 NORTH: TbA

North End Gallery

Fine Dining

Located on the Square in Leonardtown

41652 Fenwick St. Leonardtown, MD 20650 Tues. - Sat. 11 am - 6 pm, Sunday Noon - 4 pm

301-997-0700

http://www.northendgallery.org

P.O. Box 937 41675 Fenwick Street. Leonardtown, MD. 20650

Phone: 301.475.3000 Fax: 301.475.3002

Monday - Friday 9:30 to 7 Saturday 9:30 to 5

301-475-1630

P.O. Box 540 • 41675 Park Avenue Leonardtown, MD 20650

Leonardtown Galleria executiveinnparkave@yahoo.com www.GoodEarthNaturals.com Grand Opening Reception

Leonardtown Galleria GrandLeonardtown OpeningGalleria Reception

Saturday, April 26, 2008

Saturday, April 26, 2008 Grand Opening Reception From 12:00-4:00 p.m. From 12:00-4:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 26, 2008

Come meet the Artists and celebrate the Grand Opening

301.997.0008

41665 Fenwick Street Leonardtown, Maryland 20650

(301) 475-8899

CheCk Our Website WWW.COrblesrestaurant.COm fOr speCials! Lunch: Friday and Saturday 11:30-2:30 CLOSED MONDAY

Dinner: Tuesday - Thursday 5:00 – 9:00 Friday and Saturday 5:00 – 9:30 Brunch: Sunday 9:30 - 1:30

From 12:00-4:00 p.m.

Come meet the Artists and celebrate the Grand Opening

Artists Represented: Robert Bealle Come meet the Artists and celebrate the Tanner Nancy Wathen . Lucretia Leonardtown Galleria Barbara Hance . Tricia Darrow Located in the Maryland Antique Center Jane Williams Grand. Opening Maria Fleming . Kay Duval . Sally Huff. 26005 Point Lookout Rd . Mary Ida Rolape . Rose Beitzell Leonardtown, MDBealle 20650. 2008 MD Duck Stamp Robert Design Winner Open Daily 10a.m-5p.m. Tammy Vitale . Faith Gaillot . Harry Revis For information call Carol Wathen, Owner MaryArtists EttaRepresented: VanNetta . Carol Wathen Robert Bealle . 2008 MD Duck Stamp Design Winner

Robert Bealle . 2008 MD Duck Stamp Design Winner

Artists Represented: Robert Bealle 301-475-2797 Nancy Wathen . Lucretia Tanner Robert Bealle LeonardtownNancyGalleria Wathen . Lucretia Tanner Leonardtown Located inGalleria the Maryland Antique Center Jane Williams . Barbara Hance . Tricia Darrow Located in the Maryland Antique Center Jane Williams . Barbara Hance . Tricia Darrow Maria Fleming . Kay Duval . Sally Huff. 26005 Point Lookout RdDuval . . Sally Huff. Maria Fleming . Kay 26005 Point Lookout Rd . Mary Ida Rolape . Rose Beitzell Leonardtown, MD Mary Ida20650 Rolape . Rose Beitzell Leonardtown, MD 20650 Open Daily Tammy 10a.m-5p.m. Open Daily 10a.m-5p.m. Vitale . Faith Gaillot . Harry Revis Tammy Vitale . Faith Gaillot . Harry Revis For information call Carol Wathen, Owner Mary EttaWathen, VanNetta . CarolOwner Wathen For information call Carol Mary Etta VanNetta . Carol Wathen 301-475-2797 301-475-2797


The County Times

Cover On The

Thursday, December 3, 2009

16

17

Thursday, December 3, 2009

The County Times

Garden in Lights, Glow Exhibits Will Illuminate Annmarie Gardens Customer Must Present Original Coupon. Purchase Required. No Cash Back

coupon

By Sean Rice Staff Writer Southern Maryland is transitioning from an area founded by farmers and watermen to an area at the forefront of technology and engineering. Numerous government and academic studies show Southern Maryland has a problem attracting and keeping qualified individuals in the thousands of positions at industries supporting Naval Air Station Patux-

you just see a piece of sculpture. We take great care to place them properly,” said Kathy Magiera, marketing coordinator at the center. “The Smithsonian affiliate really uses us as a model of how to get things done and how to collaborate,” she said. One would have to travel to Washington D.C. to see artwork of a similar caliber of that at Annmarie Garden, but its infusion with nature is unmatched by any arts center

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27056 Mt. Zion Church Rd • Mechanicsville, MD

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ent River. One of the most common reasons listed for this is the “there’s nothing to do around here” factor. Tucked away on 30 acres off Dowell Road in Solomons, Annmarie Garden Sculpture Park is quietly fighting that notion, providing a one-of-a-kind artistic experience, where art meets nature, that rivals destinations found in cities up the road. An affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, Annmarie Garden art center is anchored by an 18-month-old Arts Building that is considered a work of art in itself. The two-f loor building features themed exhibits that change throughout the year. In addition to permanent sculpture created solely for Annmarie Garden, the center features many sculpture works on loan from the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and from the National Gallery of Art. What sets Annmarie apart from other art centers is the quarter-mile path that meanders through the 30-acre property and past meticulously placed sculptures. “[People] really like the way that our sculpture fits with nature here. It’s not as if

in driving distance. Donated by Francis and Ann Marie Koenig, who passed away in the 1990s, the center was intended to be a gift to Southern Maryland that would last in perpetuity as a place where visitors can explore the Chesapeake Bay region the couple loved, in a setting where art and nature commingle. And the facility is not only for Calvert County residents.

“It’s all-inclusive, for everyone,” Magiera said. “It’s wonderful to have fine art so close to us.” One of Annmarie’s annual events that is sure to please everyone who visits is Garden in Lights, running nightly, 6-9 p.m., from Dec. 4 to Jan. 2. Garden In Lights is a walking tour that takes visitors on an illuminated trip on the wooded path to see dozens of light sculptures that are handmade by the staff at Annmarie Garden. Guests will be surrounded by mythical beasts, wild animals, pirates, illuminated works of art, and other fantastical creations. This is the second year the program as a walk-through event. In the past it has been a drive-through attraction. “Last year we got a lot of positive feedback from it,” Magiera said. “It’s more of a community event, and you can take your time. It’s very magical.” As visitors pull into the entrance of Annmarie, it will be all illumined out front. On the walkway, it is lit up just enough to see the walkway and still enjoy the lightshow in the woods off the path. “It takes all the staff and many volunteers weeks to coordinate all this,” Magiera said. “These are all hand-made. There is nothing commercially bought in our show, and it changes year after year.” “We have many small vignettes throughout the Garden in Lights, and we’ll have a few things up above eye level,” she said. “We try to keep it relevant and newsworthy. This year we have a star appearance by the King of Pop … We’re always thinking of new ideas.” They are also trying out other new features to compliment the event, including a “Holiday I Spy” game for kids to play while taking the walk and several special nights for teachers, police, fire and military personnel, and even a first-ever pet night on Dec. 13. “They must behave. Unruly pets without etiquette will be asked to leave,” Magiera said, adding that pets must be on a leash no longer than six feet. Garden in Lights guests will enter through the main entrance and be treated to Glow, the featured exhibit in the main gallery in the Arts Building, which runs through Feb. 14, and features the illusory and symbolic qualities of light in artwork. Also in the Arts Building is the second annual ornament show and sale, with more than 20 Christmas trees on display with hand-made ornaments for sale. Local choirs and singing groups will fill the building with sound, Magiera said, and Dunkin Donuts of Lusby will be selling yummy treats and warm drinks in the Café Gallery. “We have several new things this year, and we’re excited about that,” Magiera said. seanrice@countytimes.net

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Schedule and Special Nights

Garden in Lights runs from Dec. 4 to Jan. 2 is open 6-9 p.m. nightly, but closed the following nights: Dec. 7, 8, 14, 16, 24, 25. This year Annmarie Garden has included special nights for our patrons. Wednesday, Dec. 9 & Wednesday, Dec. 30 - Golf Cart Tours - Golf cart tours will be available for those guests unable to walk the path. Sunday, Dec. 13 - Pet Night - Bring your pet to Garden In Lights! $1 per pet, all other admission rates apply. All pets must be on a 6 ft or shorter leash. Pets lacking in manners will be asked to leave. Please note: pets are not allowed on any other nights of Garden In Lights. Dec. 31, January 1 and 2 – New Year’s Activities- Participate in New Years activities as you celebrate the New Year at Annmarie Garden. Fun for all ages. Also new this year, Ammarie Garden will honor our community with $1 Discount Tuesday Nights for select groups with valid ID. “Thanks” for all you do for us! Tuesday, Dec. 15- Police, sheriff, EMT, & firefighters Tuesday, Dec. 22- Active duty military Tuesday, Dec. 29 – Public school teachers

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The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

ewsmakers

Briscoe Honored by School System By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer

can student to attend a “white” school in St. Mary’s County after Brown vs. the Board of Education ended segregation. During that Officials from St. Mary’s County Public time period, St. Mary’s County had two pubSchools gathered on Tuesday to recognize lic schools. George Washington Carver was Joan Groves Briscoe, the first African Amer- the high school attended by African Ameriican student to attend and graduate from the cans and Great Mills was the high school atSt. Mary’s County Public School System. tended by white students. As chronicled in the documentary “With St. Mary’s County did not rush to impleAll Deliberate Speed: One High School’s ment a desegregation plan until a class acStory”, a film produced by St. Mary’s Col- tion lawsuit was filed in early 1956 in U.S. lege professor Merideth Taylor about the de- District Court on behalf of African Amerisegregation of Great Mills High School, Joan can students, who requested the desegregaGroves Briscoe was the first African Ameri- tion of St. Mary’s County schools in addition to admission to the schools of their choice. Lawyers for the Board of Education argued at the time that the Federal District Court wasn’t the appropriate arbiter for such an action, and he judge agreed so the case was dismissed. Change didn’t occur until William Groves, on behalf of his children Joan and Thomas Conrad Groves, appealed the decision, taking the case to the United States District Court. The Groves family, with support from NAACP lawyers, finally won that case and the subsequent appeal by the Board of Education. On Sept. 4, 1958, under a court order, Joan and Conrad Groves entered Great Mills High School in Submitted Photo Great Mills, MD, becoming the first Joan Groves Briscoe with Superintendent Michael African American children to attend Martirano.

white public schools in St. Mary’s County. “It was difficult, sometimes it was fearful, and it was definitely different,” said Joan in an interview with The County Times. “We were on a segregated bus, which was guarded by state troopers. But some of the children were nice because we were down there by the base, so there were some kids who went to school at Great Mills who were not from that area, and that really helped, so I wasn’t there by myself,” she said. “I think that made it a lot better than it could have been … it was fearful sometimes, and it was difficult … but I thank God I was able to go there, and my brother was, too.” In the 50 years since her graduation from Great Mills, Joan said she has had a whirlwind career, first working for the United States Government in the Department of Labor, and later going back to school to develop housing for low and moderate income families. She is now retired and living in Largo with her husband, where she participates in missionary work with her church to help needy families. When asked about her reaction to her recognition by the board, Joan said, “I was shocked … my life has been like a TV set with a bunch of channels on it. I’d flip from one thing to another … I hadn’t thought about it. It hadn’t crossed my mind. I’ve just been very busy with so many things … I really don’t know where 50 years have gone.” andreshiell@countytimes.net

3

Question Interview

Paul Fancella, 44, from Mechanicsville is the principal of Lettie Marshall Dent Elementary School. Living in St. Mary’s County for 18 years, he has held a number of positions within the school system. He took a break from his school day to talk with The County Times. CT: How did you get started in education?

PF: I started as a classroom teacher. I actually started with teaching 4th grade at Mechanicsville Elementary, teaching all subjects. CT: Which is your favorite subject to teach? PF: Probably mathematics. I think the biggest thing for me right now is looking at how students learn mathematics, and us not necessarily telling students how to do everything. And that’s what our program focuses on, letting students use their own problem solving skills to come up with the answers … they’re looking at inventing algorithms and being able to look at a problem and dissect it and come up with a strategy on their own. CT: What are the best and worst parts of your job? PF: I don’t know if there is a worst part, but the best part is the whole school community, the students, the teachers and the parents together. It’s just wonderful to be able to work with all three.

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The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

20

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Thursday, December 3, 2009

Thursday, December 3 • So. Md. Mobile Compassion Center St. Paul’s Lutheran Church (Mechanicsville) – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Compassion Center provides food, clothing and spiritual care to people in need. Call 301-8845184 for more information. • Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (Colton’s Point) – 12 noon Enchanting exhibit of antique and collectible dolls, toys and miniature trains. Call 301-7692222 or go to www.stmarysmd. com/recreate/museums. • Turkey Burner 5K Run/Walk CSM (Leonardtown Campus) B Building – 12:30 p.m. Sessions are free, participants are asked to bring one non-perishable food item to be donated to one of the tri-county food pantries. For information and to pre-register, contact CSM Fitness Coordinator Judi Ferrara at 240-725-5371 or judithf@ csmd.edu. • Free Spaghetti Dinner St. Paul’s Lutheran Church (Mechanicsville) – 5:30 p.m. • Taco Night VFW Post 2632 (California) – 5:30 p.m. • Holiday Candlelight Tours Members’ Night Sotterley Plantation (Hollywood) – 6 p.m. Discounted event for members only. Tours start at 6 p.m. Reservations required. Call 301-373-2280 for more information. • Am. Legion Post 221 Meeting AL Post 221 (Avenue) – 8 p.m. Visit our website at http://www. geocities.com/alpost221 or e-mail us at alpost221@netscape.net. Call Gail Murdock for more information at 301-884-4071.

Friday, December 4 • So. Md. Mobile Compassion Center St. Paul’s Lutheran Church (Mechanicsville) – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (Colton’s Point) – 12 noon • Gender Role Lecture St. Mary’s College (Cole Cinema) – 3 p.m. Former St. Mary’s College of Maryland (SMCM) psychology professor Terell Lasane will speak on “Gender Role Orientation and Sexual Orientation in Elucidating Student Academic Behavior”. Part of the Psychology Diversity Lecture Series, the talk is free and open to the public. • Holiday Candlelight Tours Sotterley Plantation (Hollywood) – 6 p.m. Admission $15. Tours start at 6 p.m. Reservations required. Call 301373-2280 for more information. • Chopticon HS Madrigal Dinner Christ Episcopal Church (Chaptico) – 6 p.m. Tickets are $35 per person and include a three-course meal and rous-

ing entertainment. Reservations are taken on a first come, first serve basis and guests are seated around tables of eight. Go to ChopticonChorus.org to download reservation. • First District Community Christmas Tree Lighting Ridge Vol. Fire Department (13820 Point Lookout Rd.) – 6:30 p.m. Bring a non-perishable food item to help support local food pantries. • Madrigal Dinner Historic St. Mary’s City State House – 6:30 p.m. Music by St. Maries Musica. Reservations required. Admission. Call 240-895-4991. • Ninth Annual Gingerbread Auction Lettie Marshall Dent Elementary (Mechanicsville) – 6:30 p.m. For more information call the school at 301-472-4500. • Texas Hold’Em VFW Post 2632 (California) – 7 p.m. • Pitch Card Party Mechanicsville Vol. Rescue Squad – 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Mechanicsville Vol. Rescue Squad Auxiliary. Refreshments available. Must 16 or older to play. $5 admission. Call 301884-4108 for more information. • SMCM Jazz Band Concert St. Mary’s College (Auerbach Auditorium) – 8 p.m. Featuring the music of Duke Ellington, Ray Noble, and Sting. For more information, contact the music department at 240-895-4498 or hghamilton@smcm.edu.

Saturday, December 5 • Christmas/ Holiday Craft Fair Immaculate Conception Catholic Church Mechanicsville from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Craft tables, vendor tables, raffles, food table, bake table. Free admission for information call 301884-3123 or 301-290-0186. • Christmas Market and Sale At Oldfields Church, Church Hall & Thrift Store. Rt. 231 Prince Frederick Rd in Hughesville. From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Christmas items, decorations, and toys. Great prices and free refreshments. For more information call 301-274-3480. • 3rd Annual Breakfast with Santa Bay District Volunteer Fire Department Lexington Park Station Breakfast with Santa from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. $8 Adults, $5 kids 5-12, 4 & under free. Scramble eggs, home fries, pancakes, sausage, bacon, French toast. For more information call Melissa 240-298-3305 • Community Breakfast: Father Andrew White School Home and School Association is sponsoring a community all-you-can-eat breakfast at Father Andrew White School in Leonardtown from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The menu features eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits with gravy, pancakes and more. Cost: Ages 13 and up - $7 Ages 8-12 - $5 Ages 5-7 - $3 Under 5 - FREE

The County Times • Prayer Breakfast The Life Changing Healing Church invites you to A Prayer Breakfast & Fellowship 8:30 am – 12:00 noon 28943 Three Notch Road (Route 5), Mechanicsville, MD (Across from Tidewater Pharmacy) Guest Speaker: Pastor Sylvester Williamson National Church of God, Fort Washington Donation $15.00 Adults and Children 9-12 $8.00 For ticket information contact 301-884-2939 • Family Plantation Christmas Sotterley Plantation (Hollywood) – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visits with Mr. and Mrs. Claus, horse-drawn taxi rides, games, crafts, live music and local vendors. Admission $5. Call 301-373-2280 for more information. • PRE-Holiday “Sale of the Season!” Sotterley Museum Shop Our pre-holiday “Sale of the Season” will be held at the Sotterley Plantation Museum Shop from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Not only are the shelves stocked with some new and special merchandise, but shoppers will also receive up to 60% off a number of items. Even further discounts are extended to Sotterley Members and Volunteers. Come and find that unique, one-of-a-kind present for that hard to please person on your gift list. • Christmas Bazaar Golden Beach/Patuxent Knolls Civic Association will be holding a Christmas Bazaar, from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the Golden Beach Fire House on Therese Circle, off Golden Beach Road in Mechanicsville. Vendors can rent a table for $25. Baked goods and food for sale. Pictures will be taken with Santa. Please bring an unwrapped new toy for the Toys for Tots and/or canned goods for help the local food bank. For information, call Kathy Owens at 301-884-8432. • SMAWL Pet Adoptions PetCo (California) – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (Colton’s Point) – 12 noon • St. Mary’s Square Holiday Festival Santa will be there to greet the kids, Live Music, Dancers, Magician, Food, Vendors, Crafters, and more.. Parking Lot of St. Mary’s Square Shopping Center from 1 to 6 p.m. This even will be lots of fun!! Vendors, Contact Tina 240-5770955 to reserve a space. Food, Fruit, Gift, craft, new items, collectibles, and homemade, and handmade items only. No yard sale items (old clothes, furniture, etc.) will be set up at this event. • Benefit for Serena Wade Medical Fund Big Dogs Paradise (Mechanicsville) – 2 p.m. Food, raffles, auctions and music by No Green Jelly Beans. $15.00 dollar donation. Serena Wade is a young girl who has Ewing’s Sarcoma Cancer. She is undergoing treatments at Children’s Hospital in Washington D.C. • Shrimp/Oyster Feast The Mechanicsville Volunteer Fire Department will be holding an All-

You-Can-Eat Shrimp/Oyster Feast at Station 2 located at 28165 Hills Club Road from 3 to 6 p.m. The menu will be as follows: Steamed shrimp, fried, steamed and raw oysters, coleslaw, potato salad, lemonade, tea, coffee, soda and beer. The cost will be $30.00 per person. Tickets will be sold in advance and at the door. For more information or to purchase tickets call 301-884-8602 or 301-8844709. This fundraiser is being held to raise money to support the campaign of member William G. Wilkerson who will be the incoming President of the Southern Maryland Volunteer Firemen’s Association in 2010. • 3rd Annual Christmas Tree Lighting and Winter Wonderland Bay District Volunteer Fire Department from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Tree Lighting at 6:15 p.m., Fire Truck rides from 6:30- 8:30 p.m. Magic show, Christmas choir, Crafts for kids. It is Free of charge everyone is welcome. For more information Lauren Johnson 301-481-3191. • Chopticon HS madrigal Dinner Christ Episcopal Church (Chaptico) – 6 p.m. • Holiday Candlelight Tours Sotterley Plantation (Hollywood) – 6 p.m. • Madrigal Dinner Historic St. Mary’s City State House – 5:30 p.m. Music by St. Maries Musica. Reservations required. Admission. Call 240-895-4991.

• Longaberger Basket Bingo Fundraiser Moose Lodge (27636 Mechanicsville Rd.) – 2 p.m. Doors open at 1 p.m. Admission is $20, includes 1 admission ticket with 20 games. Additional books are $5 each. Specials will be $1 each. Sponsored by the Tri-County Youth Services Bureau. For more information call 301-843-2960. • Shrimp and Oyster Feast Mechanicsville Vol. Fire Department – 3 p.m. $30.00 per person. For more information or to purchase tickets call 301-884-8602 or 301-884-4709. • Handel’s Messiah Immaculate Heart of Mary Church (Lexington Park) – 4 p.m. St. Mary’s College of Maryland Choir and Orchestra will perform under the direction of Larry Vote. For more information call 240-895-4498. • Madrigal Dinner Historic St. Mary’s City State House – 5:30 p.m.

Monday, December 7 • No Limit Texas Hold’Em “Bounty” Tournament St. Mary’s County Elks Lodge (California) – 7 p.m.

Tuesday, December 8

• Leonardtown Rotary Performing Arts Series: Elisabeth von Trapp Christmas Concert Great Mills High School – 7 p.m. For more information call 301475-6999 or go to www.leonardtownrotary.org.

• Special Olympics No Limit Hold’Em Tournament Bennett Building, 24930 Old Three Notch Rd. (Hollywood) – 7 p.m.

• Family Entertainment Show and Santa Claus Leonardtown High School – 7:30 p.m. Proceeds from this event will go directly to the children’s advocacy programs. Children under 12 are $10. General Admission $35. Reserved Premium Seats $50. Call 301-8847232 or 301-247-3283 and ask for Carol Ann.

• National Weather Service SKYWARN Class St. Mary’s County Gov’t Chesapeake Building (Leonardtown) – 6 p.m. SKYWARN is a volunteer program that trains citizens to become severe weather spotters. To attend this SKYWARN Basic I class or for more information, call the Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management Division at 301-475-4200 Ext. 2124 or 2125.

• 3 Swingin’ Tenors Leonardtown High School – 7:30 p.m. Call 301-884-7232 or go to www.3swingintenors.com.

Sunday, December 6 • FAW Community Breakfast Father Andrew White School (Leonardtown) – 8:30 a.m. Ages 13 and up $7. Ages 8-12 $5. Ages 5-7 $3. Children under 5 are free. • 3rd Annual Breakfast with Santa Bay District Volunteer Fire Department (Lexington Park) – 8:30 a.m. $8.00 Adults / $5.00 Kids 5-12, 4 and under free. • Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (Colton’s Point) – 12 noon

Wednesday, December 9

• SMAWL Monthly Public Meeting Garvey Senior Center (Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. Call 301-373-5659 for more information. • Town Hall Meeting with Del. John Bohanan Ridge Vol. Fire Department – 7 p.m. Discussion on the state budget and other issues that will be considered in the upcoming 2010 Legislative Session. Looking for ideas on how to further reduce the State’s General Fund budget. For more information regarding the meetings please call the Lexington Park District Office at 301-866-4000 or email: john.bohanan.district@house. state.md.us.


Community

The County Times

SMH Foundation Ain’t Misbehavin’ When Raising Funds for Scholarship Program

The 22nd Annual St. Mary’s Hospital Foundation Gala held Nov. 20 at the Hollywood Social Hall, brought in more than $179,000 to go toward the Foundation’s scholarship program. The 1920s inspired evening was a sold-out affair with the theme of Ain’t Misbehavin. “We are extremely thankful for the continued support of our community, given these economically challenging times. This extraordinary commitment, from each and every one of our sponsors, guests and contributors has made this year’s Gala one of the most successful in the event’s ¬¬¬¬22-year history,” said Jacquelyn V. Meiser, chairperson for the 2009 Gala. Guests walked the red carpet into one of the most unique black tie events sponsored by the Foundation. As individuals stepped into the social hall, they stepped back in time, surrounded by Submitted Photo cityscapes, silhouettes of flappers and Enjoying this year’s 1920s inspired SMH Foundation Gala are members of dancers, Chicago street signs and images the SMH Foundation Board. of mobsters and movie actresses, as well and white gold accented with bezel set diamonds apas newsreel footage of the era. Several of Southern Maryland’s most prominent praised at more than $4,000. Gala attendees Barbara and businesses, medical professionals and local organizations Del. John F. Wood Jr. won the necklace donated by Blair’s sponsored the night’s festivities, which also featured de- Jewelry and Gifts. Proceeds from the Gala will be dedicated to the licious cuisine from renowned caterer, Ken Upton, and music from the band Highway Star. Major event sponsors hospital’s scholarship program, which provides funding included presenting sponsor Shah Associates M.D., LLC to help train talented local scholars for a career in healthand premiere sponsors MedStar Health System, W.M. Da- care, especially in the nursing and Allied Health fields. vis, Inc. and Wyle. Diamond sponsors were Associates in In its ninth year, this unique program is a proactive step Radiation Medicine, IAP World Services, iLuMinA So- to recruit and retain highly qualified employees at St. lutions, Inc., ManTech Systems Engineering Corporation Mary’s Hospital. “It was a pleasure to showcase the 2009 scholarand MEP, your partner in emergency care. Attendees purchased a box of Godiva chocolates, ship recipients and we look forward to highlighting these with proceeds from the sales going to the scholarship pro- scholarship recipients in years to come so Gala guests can gram. The purchase put them in the running for a chance gain an understanding of the direct benefit derived from to win a beautiful Simon G. necklace in 18kt yellow, rose their generosity.” Meiser said.

Shelli

“Hi, my name is Shelli and I’m a beautiful four year old pure bred female Doberman Pinscher. I’m good with children but I’m very shy around other dogs so I’d be happier as an only dog. I have a wonderful warm and loving personality and would make a great companion for anyone. I’m up to date on vaccinations, spayed, house trained, and identification micro chipped. For more information, please call 240-925-0628 or email Kathy at katmc@secondhoperescue.org. Please Adopt, Don’t Shop!”

Wish Upon A “Star” And Benefit The St. Mary’s Nursing Center The St. Mary’s Nursing Center Foundation is selling a five point stained glass “Star” ornament for $18. There only 200 of these exquisite ornaments made by local artist, Nancy Wathen exclusively for the Foundation. Each year a new color is selected to adorn your tree or window. For 2009 the “Star” is amethyst edged in silver. Hurry and place your order before December 4th. The Foundation’s annual ‘Tree of Remembrance’ celebration will be held on Thursday, December 10, 2009 at 5 p.m. at the Nursing Center. During the celebration our loved ones names are read and the ornaments are given to family members/friends. After the remembrance celebration everyone enjoys a great buffet among family and friends. If you are not able to attend the celebration, your ornament will be waiting for you at the front desk at the Nursing Center, to be picked up after December 11th. Donations in lieu of having an ornament are greatly appreciated. Your donation will go to a special fund to support projects that enhance the residents’ quality of life. If you have any questions, please call Brenda Pruett at 240-298-5019.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

22

Photos With Santa Second Hope Rescue is teaming up with Petco again this Christmas to bring you Photos With Santa on Saturday, December 5th and 12th from 11am to 4pm. PALS members get a FREE photo on December 5 with any purchase. Photos cost $8.95 plus tax with a portion of the proceeds going directly to the animals of Second Hope Rescue. For more information, please call Second Hope Rescue at 240-925-0628.

Holiday Candlelight Tours ~ The War of 1812 Kick-off the holiday season with a historical dramatization of life at Sotterley during The War of 1812 in the Holiday Candlelight Tours at Sotterley Plantation, December 4th & 5th from 6–10 p.m. The tours take place inside the over 300-year-old historic Mansion, which will grace with period decorations. Sotterley is under siege by the British occupation. The family is determined to hold their annual holiday celebration no matter what! Family and friends join the Platers for a very entertaining evening, which will be quite different than holiday celebrations experienced in previous years.

Join the Sotterley Players as we step back in time and witness for yourself the unfolding dramatic holiday events. Live musical performances from local premiere high school choral groups and complimentary cookies will be available in the historic Barn, prior to the reserved tour time. The cost is $15 per person. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED! Call 301-373-2280 to make your reservation at this Sotterley Plantation annual holiday event or for further information. Visit www.sotterley. org for more details.

L ibrary

Items

• Leonardtown closed for staff training Leonardtown library will close this Friday morning, Dec. 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for staff training. Charlotte Hall and Lexington Park will be open. • Mini book sale to be held at Leonardtown Library Friends of the Library will hold a mini book sale in the parking lot of Leonardtown Library on Sunday, Dec. 6, from noon to 4 p.m. This is an excellent opportunity to purchase “almost new” books for gifts. Rain date is Sunday, Dec. 13. • Movie, Gangs of New York, to be discussed A film discussion of the movie, Gangs of New York, will be held at Charlotte Hall on Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. The 2002 film is directed by Martin Scorsese and stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis and Cameron Diaz. The movie is available to check out prior to the discussion. • Free family movie scheduled at Charlotte Hall The Muppets put their unique twist on Charles Dickens’ Christmas tale in this G-rated movie, which will be shown on Dec. 17 at 5:30 p.m. at Charlotte Hall. Snacks will be provided.

• Leonardtown TAG to meet Leonardtown TAG (Teen Advisory Group) will meet on Dec. 10 at 5:30 p.m. All teens are welcome. • Holiday parties planned for children Children of all ages are invited to an evening of holiday stories and crafts at the libraries’ holiday parties. Lexington Park’s will be Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m., Charlotte Hall’s on Dec. 15 at 6:30 p.m. and Leonardtown’s on Dec. 16 at 6 p.m. Registration is required. • Libraries offer book discussions The public is invited to participate in the following book discussions: Christopher Bohjalian’s “The Double Bind” on Dec. 7 at 7 p.m.; John Guy’s “Queen of Scots: The True Life of Mary Stuart” on Dec. 14 at 6 p.m. and Katherine Paterson’s book, “The Bridge to Terabithia” at Leonardtown on Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. • Charlotte Hall a collection site for food drive Charlotte Hall is a collection site for the Mechanicsville Optimist food drive. Donations of nonperishable food can be dropped off until Christmas.


23

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

A Journey Through Time The

Chronicle

By Linda Reno Contributing Writer “December 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy.” These famous words were spoken by President Roosevelt in a speech before Congress the day after Japanese bombers attacked Pearl Harbor, killing 2,388 Americans. Within an hour, Congress passed a formal declaration of war. Nine ships of the U.S. Fleet had been sunk and another 21 severely damaged (three beyond repair). Among those sunk was the USS Oklahoma. Hit by up to nine torpedoes, she sunk upside down less than 20 minutes after the first hit. “Some of Oklahoma’s men were still alive inside her upturned hull, and their rescue became the focus of an intense effort over the next two days. Thirty-two Sailors were recovered alive, but over four-hundred were killed.” Those killed aboard the USS Oklahoma were interred in mass graves at the Punch Bowl Cemetery on Oahu with markers reading “Unknown Dec 7, 1941.” One of them was Albert Eugene Hayden of St. Mary’s County. Now, 68 years later, efforts are being made to individually identify these men, to return their

remains reinterred at the family’s request in Oahu, the family cemetery, or at Arlington. David and Dianne Bachmann, volunteers for the Naval Casualty Office, help to locate the families of service people whose remains have been recovered. In February of this year, they contacted me seeking my assistance in discovering the maiden name

of Albert’s mother. They wrote: We need mtDNA from a relative to verify the results of their testing, and a primary next of kin to release those remains for burial…..We have done a lot of researching and have found that the father, James D HAYDEN died 8 July 1917, and the mother, Emma J HAYDEN died 21 Jul 1955 at her home in Mechanicsville. Both are buried in the Saint Joseph Parish Cemetery. Emma’s obituary, published in the “St Mary’s Beacon”, 28 July, 1955, lists their children as Bernard W. of Pasadena, Md., James D. of Pittsburgh, Pa., Roland F. of Hyattsville, and Ralph V. of New York. We also believe that all of these sons are deceased. If living, they would have been mtDNA possible donors. However, and unfortunately, their children are not mtDNA possible donors.” I quickly wrote back and told them that his father was James Dolan Hayden and his mother was Emma Jane Trice, daughter of George J. Trice and Julia Anna Hobbs. There had been one daughter named Dorothy but she died in infancy. The search would now focus on Emma’s sisters and their female descendants. I had no record of Henrietta Trice after 1880, but Mary

d

Min A Different Route

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer You would think four people in a car could remember the way to a family member’s house when they travel to it at least once every year for 12 or so years. But I’m talking about our family. We blithely get into the mom mobile and take off for my brother’s house with no sense of direction or maps every year. We look at it as more of an adventure. This year we allowed three hours for a two-hour trip – planning in advance for the inevitability of getting lost. Well, we were also planning on leaving at 11:00 a.m., because my husband wanted to be at our destination in time for the Redskins kick-off. We are not just fair-weather fans. We nearly made the 11-start time, my sons were even early. But, I forgot to take the tinfoil off the turkey for it to brown, and the turkey also overflowed its juices into the oven again, and I still had to clean out the van in order for everyone to fit. (My van is kind of like my purse, I travel with everything I need for any kind of weather, or emergency – doesn’t everyone need blankets, coats, office accessories and corkscrews on their emergency list?) So? We were delayed a half-hour – I didn’t see the problem. My brother Billy lives in Opal, Virginia; a blip of a town before you get to Warrenton, known mainly for two things: Having what must be one of the busiest Sheetz convenience stores in the midAtlantic region (they even have outdoor seating for date night), and a huge hunting and gun fantasyland called Clark Brothers Guns and Shooting Range. We seem to take a different route each year. This year I said I wanted to see the mountains, and that happened to be the route we ended up on. The Redskins were on the radio, and I got to see all the beautiful old homes. Occasionally, I would ask if anyone remembered seeing anything we were pass-

Elizabeth Trice married William Walter Biscoe April 7, 1885 and had 13 children, six were girls—surely a match could be found here. As it turns out, it wasn’t so easy. Three daughters (two named Julia Maria and one named Mary Emma) had died young. Charlotte Elizabeth had married James Herman Dyer and died without issue. Dorothy married Joseph Floyd Turner and had only one child, a son named Allen. I now pinned my hopes on Cora A. Biscoe.

Creature Feature

Wanderings of an Aimless

USS Oklahoma during attack, Courtesy of U.S. Navy

ing before. There was some debate if this were the same route where we bought my brother a gag gift of Ripple (cheap wine) one year, until I yelled out, “There’s the Ripple store!” It was the only little country store for probably 30 or 40 miles. We didn’t get the Ripple, since we had brought a nice bottle of Sangiovese with us. Right in the middle of Opal is the death-defying, hair-raising turn, off of an extremely busy Rt. 29 onto Billy’s road, Old Culpeper Road. You come up over a hill and must immediately get in the turn lane at high speed without all traffic smashing you from behind, and then quickly slam on the brakes. This is because the turn lane is about half the length of a normal turn lane. We noticed after bumping around on the pitted gravel road for a half a mile that Billy’s neighbor had rebuilt his garage after the fried turkey explosion last year, then finally, we had arrived. Unlike my husband’s family, who see and talk to each other quite a bit, my two brothers and I talk on the phone two or three times a year, and see each other rarely. We all love each other I’m pretty sure, but as in driving, my brothers and I take a different route to love. When we talk, it’s for an hour and we try to get in all the news quickly for the previous months, and then we are good for another year. In person, we usually have endless stories about my Mother, who we have decided was a different Mother to each one of us. Many stories and much laughter flow, and I am happy that the three routes of life my brothers and I have chosen converge when they do. I look forward to our next visit and trying a new route. Who needs a map to decide what adventure lays ahead? To each new day’s adventure, Shelby Please send comments or ideas to: shelbys. wanderings@yahoo.com.

Meet the Mighty Moose

By Theresa Morr Contributing Writer Wow! Scope out this big guy. It’s a bull moose sporting an awesome set of antlers. Those fearsome looking antlers will drop off after the breeding or rutting season is over in the fall. That way, these hardy animals conserve energy during the winter months. Come early spring, a new set of antlers will start growing back. During this rapid new growth period, the tender antlers are covered with a soft skin called velvet. The velvet contains thousands of tiny blood vessels, which supply the antlers with nutrients. As growth comes to an end, the velvet dries up and falls off. The moose helps the process along by scraping the hardened antlers against shrubs and trees. As a moose ages, its antlers get bigger and heavier; can span six feet from tip to tip; and weigh 60 or more pounds. So when two bulls compete for a cow to mate with during the rutting season, there’s some serious head-to-head wrangling going on. In case you wondered, female moose don’t have antlers. Now take another peek at the picture. See that “thingie” hanging down from the moose’s throat? That’s called a dewlap or bell and both sexes have this pendulous flap of hairy skin. It looks odd but probably serves an important purpose, like attracting the opposite sex (“Hey, Maude, check out the bell on that dude!”). Moose are tall, averaging about six to seven feet at the humped shoulders. Males have long black faces, while female faces are brown. When full grown, a male moose can weigh more than 1,500 pounds, while females are about half the size. Despite their bulk, these guys can trot along at a steady pace of 20 miles per hour; however, when the need arises, moose can

double that pace over short distances. Their eyesight is poor, but that big nose gives them a keen sense of smell. A moose’s diet consists of yummy stuff like twigs, sedges, roots, grasses, buds, and leaves. When food is scarce in the winter, they’ll eat pine cones or strip bark from trees. But as soon as the ice melts, these adaptable creatures head for lakes and rivers where they swim and forage for aquatic plants. They can stay submerged for short periods, just enough time to gobble up a quick lunch of algae from the river bottom. In spring, females usually give birth to a single calf and occasionally, to twins. Newborns weigh about 30 pounds and in five days can outrun you! The youngsters are vulnerable to wolves, and the main threat for larger moose comes from grizzly bears and packs of wolves working together. Moose are found in the northern forests of North America, Europe, and Asia, and are equipped for their role in nature. Their outer hair coat is long and hollow, while their undercoat is dense and soft, keeping them well-insulated from the cold. Deep snow is no big deal for these rugged, long-legged animals. In fact, a “warm” temperature of 23 deg. F. will make a moose pant, while your teeth would chatter. And guess what? The word “moose” comes from the Algonquin word “mooswa,” meaning “eater of twigs” and “animal that strips bark off of trees.” And here’s another nugget of wisdom: The moose is the largest species of deer. Other than Alaska, can you name some other northern states where moose live? For more moose stuff, check out www. gomoose.com/moosefacts.php. Comments to kikusan2@comcast.net.

Moose Jokes: What do Alaskans celebrate in December? Answer: Chris-Moose! What holiday plant do Alaskans kiss under? Answer: Moosel-toe! Who is Alaska’s most famous cartoon character? Answer: Mickey Moose! (Source: “The Alaska Joke Book for Kids” by Jeff Brown)

Now come up with some of your own moose jokes!


The County Times

Thursday, December 3 • Fair Warning Irish Pub Band CJ’s Back Room (Lusby) – 5 p.m. • David Norris DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m.* • Gretchen Richie jazz cabaret Vincenzo’s (Calvert Marina) – 6:30 p.m. • Quiz Night Buffalo Wings & Beer (Leonardtown) – 7:30 p.m. • UpStroke Chef’s American Bistro (California) – 8 p.m.* • Karaoke “On Demand” Cadillac Jack’s (Lexington Park) – 9 p.m.

Friday, December 4 • Fair Warning Irish Pub Band Donovan’s Pub (California) – 5 p.m. • David Norris DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m.* • Country Dance – Solid Gold Entertainment Hotel Charles (Hughesville) – 7:30 p.m. • Coastal Flats Houligans Drought House & Eatery (Prince Frederick) – 8 p.m. • Live Jazz Night Chef’s American Bistro (California) – 8 p.m.* • Wolfs Music Open Blues Jam Fat Boys Country Store (Leonardtown) – 8 p.m. • Absinthe Memories (Waldorf) – 9 p.m.*

(Hughesville) – 9 p.m.

• Karaoke with DJ KayCee Club 911 (Mechanicsville) – 9 p.m.

• Middle Ground Full Rack Sports Bar (Waldorf) – 9:30 p.m.

• Karaoke “On Demand” Cadillac Jack’s (Lexington Park) – 9 p.m.

• No Green JellyBeenz Big Dogs Paradise (Mechanicsville) – 9:30 p.m.

• Permanent Damage Murphy’s Pub (Bryans Road) – 9 p.m.*

• Too Many Mikes Memories (Waldorf) – 9:30 p.m.

• Three Sixty Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (Lusby) – 9 p.m.

Saturday, December 5 • Fair Warning Irish Pub Band DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m. • Joey Tippett and the California Ramblers Anderson’s Bar (Avenue) – 8 p.m. • Live Jazz Night Chef’s American Bistro (California) – 8 p.m.* • DJ Steadyrockin’ Cadillac Jack’s (Lexington Park) – 9 p.m. • Frankie & the Actions Apehanger’s Bar (Bel Alton) – 9 p.m. • HydraFX Cryer’s Back Road Inn (Leonardtown) – 9 p.m.

Sunday, December 6 • Joey Tippett and the California Ramblers Apehanger’s Bar (Bel Alton) – 3 p.m.

Monday, December 7 (No events scheduled)

Tuesday, December 8 • Fair Warning Irish Pub Band DB McMillan’s (California) – 6 p.m. • Richard Wagner Ruddy Duck Brewery (Solomons) – 7 p.m.

Wednesday, December 9

• Jimmie’s Chicken Shack Hula’s Bungalow (California) – 9 p.m.

• Karaoke with DJ Harry Big Dogs Paradise (Mechanicsville) – 7 p.m.

• Karaoke with DJ T and DJ Tommy T Applebee’s (California) – 9 p.m.

• Wolfs Music Open Blues Jam Beach Cove (Chesapeake Beach) – 8 p.m.

• Nuttin’ Fancy Bel Alton VFW – 9 p.m.

• Mike Mead Blue Dog Saloon (Port Tobacco) – 9 p.m.*

• One Louder Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (Lusby) – 9 p.m. • The Worx w/ Full Steam Hotel Charles

*Call to confirm Email events to andreashiell@countytimes.net. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 5 p.m.

n O g n i o G

• Apehanger’s Bar

What’s

(Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

In Entertainment

For family and community events, see our calendar in the community section on page 21.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

24

The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or entertainment announcements, or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail andreashiell@countytimes.net.

Chamber Orchestra Rings in Holidays with a Big Hallelujah! COSMIC Producing Handel’s Messiah

By Andrea Shiell Staff Writer It happens every year. Lights go up and flyers for holiday concerts start peppering the county with advertisements and promotions. Before the first note is played, Southern Marylanders are humming familiar tunes in anticipation. This year one holiday mainstay, the Chamber Orchestra of Southern Maryland In Concert (COSMIC), who normally feature Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite during the winter holiday season, will instead be performing George Frideric Handel’s “Messiah”, arguably one of the most famous and recognizable oratorios (pieces featuring a chorus, orchestra and soloists) ever produced. The concert will feature 50 singers from across Southern Maryland performing Handel’s piece under the direction of musical director Vladimir Lande and choral conductor Joey Hoopengardner. “It appears to have been quite successful,” remarked Lynn Keates, Secretary for the COSMIC Board of Directors, in an email to the County Times discussing the change of holiday programming. “I have been to every rehearsal and seen the evolution of the music and just recently enjoyed the or-

Newtowne Players Team Up with Blue Sky Puppet Theatre Santa’s in trouble, the elves have the flu, and presents need to be made, so he calls for help! Who responds? Oh, no! It’s the three (not so) little pigs! Christmas has never been in this much trouble! These pigs have a lot to learn about cooperation and working together. This modern show features remote control cars, electric guitars, and a vegetarian wolf. Pigs at the Pole is filled with audience participation, laughs, and a wonderful message. This is a hilarious action-packed show perfect for audiences of all ages. Pigs at the Pole will be performed Saturday, Dec. 12 at 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Performances are at Three Notch Theatre on 21744 South Coral Drive in Lexington Park, Md. All tickets are $5 at the door. DiscoverUChildren’s Museum will also be in the lobby with information about their activities. For more information, call 301-737-5447 or visit www.newtowneplayers.org or www.blueskypuppets.com.

chestra and choir rehearsing together. While the music alone is grand and majestic, hearing the powerful words put to that music was a wonderful experience. I never tire of it!” Keates said this year’s piece was chosen less for its notoriety than for its price, explaining that The Nutcracker had become too expensive for the non-profit to produce. “The financial commitment would have been too risky. The Nutcracker became too costly to produce and would have required an increase in ticket prices, and in this economy we were unable to do that,” wrote Keates. Feeding into the change of programming have been cuts to the group’s grantors including the Maryland State Arts Council, and the loss of some of the group’s corporate sponsors, which Keates explained had become regular contributors to COSMIC in recent years. “We lost significant Photo By Sean Rice funding from sources (Target Stores and SAIC) we’d come to expect and that was devastating. We are currently working vigorously on finding other sources. It is always a challenge,” she wrote. COSMIC will perform Handel’s Messiah featuring the COSMIC Community Chorus on Saturday, Dec. 12 at 4 p.m. at Patuxent Presbyterian Church in California, and on Sunday, Dec. 13 at 5 p.m. at Crossroad Christian Church in St. Leonard. Tickets are $10 for individuals and $8 for seniors, students and military personnel. Tickets may be purchased online at www.cosmicmusic.org/purchaseTickets.php or by cash or check at the door at no additional cost. For more information call 301-373-5277 or email orchestra@cosmicmusic.org.

TICKET PRICES: $8 - Seniors, Students $10 - Regular Admission Tickets: 301-373-5277 orchestra@cosmicmusic.org www.cosmicmusic.org

Sat, Dec. 12, 2009, 4:00 pm Patuxent Presbyterian Church California, MD

Sun, Dec. 13, 2009, 5:00 pm Crossroad Christian Church St. Leonard, MD


25

Thursday, December 3, 2009

The County Times

Business

DIRECTORY Call to Place Your Ad: 301-373-4125

Law Offices of

P.A. Hotchkiss & Associates Since 1987

WHERE YOUR LEGAL MATTER-MATTERS

Auto Accidents – Criminal – Domestic Wills – Power of Attorney DWI/Traffic – Workers’ Compensation 301-870-7111 1-800-279-7545 www.pahotchkiss.com

Don’t spend what you don’t have! www.ProfessorMoneyWise.com

(301) 997-8271

Serving the Southern Maryland Area

Deadlines for Classifieds are Tuesday at 12 pm. To Place a Classified Ad, please email your ad to: classifieds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm. The County Times is published each Thursday.

Classifieds Real Estate All brick rambler priced to sell in the beautiful Town Creek neighborhood. 3 bedrooms and 1 full and 3 half baths. Hardwood floors throughout but with carpet in the hall and bedrooms. 1 car finished garage. 2 large sheds in back. Private well and septic. Mature trees on 1.13 acres give it that park like feel without leaving home. Built in bookshelves around a real wood burning fireplace for cozy winter nights or jump in the hot tub in back w/ 2 firepits for entertaining. Enclosed heated/ cooled breezway. Kitchen partially remodeled and can still be tailored to new owners design. Community playground with swimming pool and tennis court but without the HOA fees. $264,000. 301-769-8875.

Real Estate Rentals

Accepting All Major Credit Cards

2 BR 1 BA house for rent $1,100.00. Located in CRE with many ammenities including beaches, lake and local shopping within 5 mins. Large deck in rear overlooking nice usable level yard with huge storage shed w/electric. Call Ron, 443.532.6634 before 8:00 p.m.

Help Wanted $$ EARN EXTRA MONEY $$ DELIVER THE NEW VERIZON® TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES

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301-737-0777 Heating & Air Conditioning “THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE” 30457 Potomac Way Charlotte Hall, MD 20622 Phone: 301-884-5011

Est. 1982

Lic #12999

snheatingac.com

Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

Men & women 18 years and older with insured vehicles needed to deliver in LaPlata, Waldorf, Mechanicsville and surrounding area. We are also looking for office clerks and loaders. Delivery starts December 9. Work a minimum of 4 daylight hours per day and get paid within 48 hours, upon successful completion of route. Call 1-800-979-7978 between 9 am and 5:30 pm, Mon – Fri. Refer to Job# 3530-B. Distribution of the Verizon Yellow Pages are conducted on behalf of IDEARC MEDIA CORP., the official publisher of Verizon print directories. Equal Opportunity Employer.

U.S. Census Bureau

IS NOW RECRUITING FOR Crew Leader Assistant Crew Leader Enumerator Office Clerk Recruiting Assistant

Computer & Network Service/Sales Security Camera Service/Sales Serving Southern Maryland

PC Repair Fee: $79-$99 Residential Only

Call our TOLL FREE number to be scheduled for a basic skills test:

1-866-861-2010

New “Business Client” Special!

No hourly Labor charge! Contact us for more details!

www.tsbtechnologies.com

301-475-8711**410-326-4442**301-885-3000

C&C

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Photography

Photographer

Creating your Digital Memories Ridge, Maryland 20680 (301) 872-4656 (301) 481-9606 coopandcoopphotography@gmail.com www.candcphotography.org

Important The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.


The County Times

CLUES ACROSS

1. Gas usage measurement 4. Decomposition 7. SNL’s S___ Meyers 10. Data transmission speed measure 12. Sayon____: goodbyes 14. ___compoop 15. Solo operatic songs 17. ____ngeti: Tanzanian plain 18. Cautious and shrewd 19. Fairytale beginning 22. Comely 23. More reasonable 24. 7th Hindu month 25. Sound units 26. Atomic #73 27. Of I 28. Fixed charges 30. Cigarfish 32. Roman 60 33. Jupiter satellite 34. Considerateness 36. Preserving substance 39. Arabian chieftain 41. Provides food

Last Week’s Puzzles Solutions

ner

KiddKioer

Thursday, December 3, 2009

43. Singer Lady Day 46. Large quantities 47. Lyric poems 48. Ecuadorian money unit 50. Wet, spongy land 51. Container weight counterbalance 52. Israeli Prime Minister Golda 53. Volcanic mountain in Japan 54. More (Spanish) 55. UN head Hammarskjold

CLUES DOWN

1. License for Wall Street 2. Parikia - island city 3. = to 21 shillings (Br.) 4. A rough voice 5. Chocolate cookie with white filling 6. Small lake (Br.) 7. Cloisonned

26

8. Big cats 9. Honey (abbr.) 11. Cyprinid fishes 13. Mains 16. One who speaks a Semitic language 18. A film theater 20. Arm bones 21. A restaurant bill 28. Pink plastic yard bird 29. Surpasses 30. A plant fiber used for making rope 31. Coon cat 34. Prohibitions 35. Cablegram (abbr.) 37. Labrador tea 38. Followed exactly 40. Public violence 41. Romaines 42. Eastern Mediterranean country 44. Mild yellow Dutch cheese 45. Queen of the gods 46. Don’t know when yet 49. Heat unit


27

Thursday, December 3, 2009

un Fact

The County Times

Slugs have 4 noses.

A View From The

BLEACHERS

Thank You For The Priceless Memories

12/03-09/2009 Thurs., Dec. 3

Mon., Dec. 7

Boys’ Basketball

Girls’ Basketball

Cesar Chavez at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Meade at Great Mills, 6:30 p.m.

Fri., Dec. 4

Tues., Dec 8

Boys’ Basketball

Boys’ Basketball

Leonardtown at McDonough, 7 p.m.

Great Mills at Meade, 6:45 p.m. Eastern at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Girls’ Basketball Gwynn Park at Great Mills, 6:30 p.m. McDonough at Leonardtown, 6:30 p.m. Chopticon at Reservoir, 7 p.m. Bishop McNamara at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Girls’ Basketball St. Mary’s Ryken at St. John’s, 7 p.m.

Ice Hockey

Ice Hockey

St. Mary’s Ryken vs. Southern at Tucker Road (Ft. Washington), 5 p.m.

Northern vs. Leonardtown at Capital Clubhouse, 6:45 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken at Bowie High School, 7 p.m.

Wrestling

Swimming Chopticon vs. Calvert at Lackey, 4:30 p.m. Great Mills at Lackey, 7 p.m.

Chopticon at McDonough, 7 p.m. Patuxent at Great Mills, 7 p.m. La Plata at Leonardtown, 7 p.m.

Wed., Dec. 9

Wrestling

Boys’ Basketball

Chopticon Tournament, 3 p.m.

Huntingtown vs. Chopticon, 7 p.m.

Sat., Dec. 5

Girls’ Basketball

Boys’ Basketball Princeton Day Academy at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Leonardtown at Thomas Stone, 6:30 p.m. Colonial Beach (Va.) at Great Mills, 7:30 p.m.

Wrestling

Swimming

Chopticon Tournament, noon

Great Mills vs. Northern at Lackey, 5 p.m.

SPECIAL NOTE: All high school, recreational and youth league coaches, if you would like the scores, statistics and standings from your respective games and leagues to be published, contact Chris Stevens at 301-373-4125 or at chrisstevens@countytimes.net

By Ronald N. Guy Jr. Contributing Writer High turnover is an accepted element of today’s professional sports. Players are routinely cut or traded and even the iconic face of cruelly brief athletic clocks. The shelf life of coaches isn’t any better. They are seemingly hired to be fired with only a select few getting to write their own endings. This volatility has made the start of each season something of a first date for fans and their favorite teams. Free agents and rookies have to be sized up and the philosophy of the new coaching staff deciphered. The constant amidst the organizational chaos of professional sports is team ownership. Owners, mainly because they reside at the top of the company’s food chain, rarely change. To illustrate the point, in my 30 years of memories of our local teams, the ‘Skins have had three owners (two if you want to consider John Kent Cooke’s brief tenure simply the completion of his father Jack’s term), the Orioles have had three, the Capitals two and the Bullets/ Wizards just one. So when ownership changes, as it did on November 24, 2009, it’s a big deal. On that day, Abe Pollin, the only owner of the Washington Wizards that I’ve ever known, died. He was 85. I would be remiss if I let him pass without a humble attempt at giving him his due and appreciating what he meant to me. Abe Pollin lived the American Dream. The son of Russian immigrants, he came to Washington D.C. in his childhood, worked in his family’s construction business and became a very successful real estate developer. So successful in fact that in 1964 business and pleasure merged when Mr. Pollin, an avid sports fan, procured the Baltimore Bullets. In 1973 he moved the Bullets to Washington and added a NHL expansion team, the Washington Capitals, to his portfolio. Mr. Pollin owned the Capitals until 1999 and the Bullets, who he renamed the Wizards in 1996 to disassociate his

team from the gun violence plaguing Washington, until his death. On the court and ice, Mr. Pollin’s teams were far from a fan’s dream. The Capitals were terrible in the 70’s and while a consistent playoff team in the 80s and 90s, never won the Stanley Cup. The Bullets were good in the 70s, winning Mr. Pollin’s lone title in ’78, competitive in the 80’s and somewhere between terrible and insignificant since. But I will say this about Mr. Pollin: the competitive success – or general lack thereof - of his teams is inconsequential to his legacy. Mr. Pollin’s contributions to the community and to this Southern Maryland sports fan transcend wins and losses. Abe Pollin will be best remembered as a philanthro-

pist, the owner who brought the NBA and NHL to D.C. and the man who revitalized a portion of downtown with the self-financed Verizon Center. His gift to Southern Marylanders though was a professional sports alternative and Verizon Center’s predecessor, the Capital Centre, that unmistakable arena with the Pringle-shaped roof. For many of us the ‘Skins, clearly the town’s #1 sports attraction then and now, were an untouchable live commodity. You simply couldn’t get tickets to a game at RFK Stadium. Tickets were usually available for the Caps or Bullets though and Mr. Pollin did us the favor of dropping the Capital Centre in Landover, MD just off Rt 202. Could he have possibly justified a location any farther southeast of Washington?

Heck, we didn’t even need the Beltway to get there! In the days following Mr. Pollin’s death I pondered the source of my passion for sports. Certainly I’m indebted to my dad, Uncle Wayne and grandfather. But I also realized I owe much to Mr. Pollin. My oldest sports memory is of the Bullets’ ’78 championship and the countless trips to the Capital Centre in my childhood solidified what has been and certainly will continue to be a rewarding, lifelong relationship with sports and my favorite teams. The Capital Centre was demolished in 2002 and now gone too is its architect. My priceless memories of each though shall endure. Thank you Mr. Pollin. Send comments to rguyjoon@yahoo.com.


The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

28

Football

Zorn ‘Trying Not to Lose Heart’ With 3-8 Redskins By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer ASHBURN, Va. (AP) – With a winning season no longer possible, even Jim Zorn could use a motivational kick in the pants. Or, as he put it: “I’m trying not to lose heart.” The Washington Redskins coach held the sort of news conference Monday that is commonplace throughout the league this time of year. He’s resigned to the fact that the team won’t accomplish its goals this season, but he’s proud of his players. The losing hurts, it’s his responsibility, and it’s all he can do to poke fun at his own plight even as speculation mounts that he won’t be back next year. Never mind that the Redskins are playing as well as they have all season, having lost back-to-back close games to the Dallas Cowboys and Philadelphia Eagles. Never mind that Chris Cooley and Jeremy Jarmon were added Monday to an injured reserve list that now has nine names with a combined 25 starts this season. The reality is a 3-8 record, and that’s a downer for any coach. “I certainly am accountable for our football season – no question about it – and I’ll be held accountable. It’s awful,” Zorn said, adding a bit of nervous laughter. “It really is. But I’m trying not to lose heart myself, I want to stay positive. Our players inspire me, our coaching staff inspires me because we’re working hard to try to make good decisions and sound decisions. “That’s what I’m trying to contend with. Not just give up, and not just go ‘woe is me’ and sink back into a hole. I try to face what’s before me. It’s difficult. I’ll be a better coach because of

what I’m going through. It’s just hard to go through it.” The Redskins allowed a late touchdown to lose 7-6 to the Cowboys and allowed 11 fourth-quarter points Sunday to fall 27-24 to the Eagles, adding to what is now a nine-game road losing streak that ties the franchise record. Given the state of the NFC, Washington would be very much a contender if it had won both games. “That’s good, maybe, around the lunch table,” Zorn said, “but it’s not very good in the planning stage because there’s just not enough time to lament on what could have been.” With five games remaining, it’s time for the coach to appeal to his players’ sense of pride. To their credit, the Redskins haven’t shown signs of splintering during a difficult season. “I’m going to call for them to dig down deep,” Zorn said. “They’ve been doing that all year, and I’m not trying to create any fantasy that’s not there. We kind of know what the real situation is for us. These have been excellent

players. I’m very proud of our football team. I’m very proud of the way that they’ve played. “They’ve hurt after every loss. It’s not the type of thing where we come in after the game and just take showers and just leave. It hurts. It hurts the coaches, it hurts the ownership, the fans. There’s nothing good about the end result. The only thing I can say is what were pushing towards is just that pride in doing a good job and being pros.”

Whew! Ravens Now Certain They Can Win Close Games By DAVID GINSBURG AP Sports Writer OWINGS MILLS, Md. (AP) - Now that they’re back in the middle of the playoff hunt, the Baltimore Ravens hope their experience in close games will prove beneficial over the final five weeks of the season. Baltimore’s five losses have come by a total of 23 points, including three defeats by three points or fewer. The Ravens’ tendency of coming up short had become a concern until Sunday night, when they rallied in the fourth quarter and beat the Pittsburgh Steelers 20-17 in overtime. Asked if all those close games could be advantageous to a team, coach John Harbaugh said Monday, “If they are, we’re going to be in good shape. We’ve had plenty of those. We know how to play in a tight game, and winning a tight game against that kind of a team was huge for us.’” Denver (7-4) currently has the edge over Baltimore (6-5), Pittsburgh (6-5) and Jacksonville (6-5) in the AFC wild-card race, but the Ravens’ 30-7 win over Denver gives them the tiebreaker over the Broncos. Even though the Steelers used third-string quarterback Dennis Dixon and were without star safety Troy Polamalu, Baltimore needed a gutsy fourth-quarter drive and an interception

in overtime to win. “We knew it was going to come down to the wire,” Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis said. “Last year, we lost games in the last 10 seconds. This time, we came out and made some good plays. We kept our composure as a team and we did great, no matter what the circumstances were.” After Dixon’s 24-yard touchdown run put Pittsburgh up 17-14 with 6:32 left, Ravens fans began getting that familiar squeamish feeling. Things got worse when Baltimore found itself in a third-and-22 situation on its own 29. But Joe Flacco completed a 17-yard to Derrick Mason, then hooked up with running back Ray Rice for a 44-yard gain on fourth down to set up the game-tying field goal by Billy Cundiff. Harbaugh initially considered punting on fourth down, but opted instead to take a chance – much to Lewis’ delight. “Let it ride,” the linebacker said. “We have one of the most electric young weapons on offense in the game in Ray Rice. When you’ve got that kind of weapon, use it.” In overtime, an interception by rookie Paul Kruger set up Cundiff’s game-winning kick with 6:42 remaining. “This was big. There’s no denying it,’” Harbaugh said of the victory. ``It was the Steelers, they’re in our division, they’re our rival.”


29

The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

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Youth Football League Partners with Rec and Parks By Chris Stevens Staff Writer The Southern Maryland Youth Football League, along with the St. Mary’s County Department of Recreation Parks are teaming up to provide a constant presence for young football players and their parents, as they plan to meet with parents, volunteers and coaches on Wednesday, December 9 at the Hollywood Recreation Center at 7 p.m. “We realized that the program needs some longterm stability,” says SMYFL co-founder and president Pat Murphy. “It’s critical that parents kids know that we’re going to be around next year.” The league, currently comprised for the Hollywood Blue Raiders, Mechanicsville Braves and Lexington Park

Hornets, will continue to have their teams independently run, but the County will oversee weigh-ins, schedules, availability of fields as well as game officials. “It’s a good mixture of county officials and volunteers for us to have a model youth football program,” said Rec and Parks recreation division manager Arthur Shepherd. Shepherd and Murphy both hope that the league will expand, as well as have plentiful participation an NFLsponsored flag football league scheduled to be announced this coming January. An added plus is that along with being independent, the presidents of each football club will be allowed to sit on the board and give their input about ideas and concerns for the new county-sponsored league.

“We wanted a lot more say when expansion happens and how the management was going to take shape,” Murphy says. “It’s critical so parents can plan and sign their kids up and know that everybody is going to be on a level playing field.” In keeping their current staff as well as relying heavily on dedicated league volunteers, the Rec and Parks budget does not take a hit because they won’t have to hire a new employee, something Shepherd said would’ve diminished the chances of this partnership happening. “We know that we wouldn’t have taken this on if we had to hire someone new,” he said. “We are confident that this current model can work.” chrisstevens@countytimes.net

Grund’s Three-Pointer Lifts Ryken Girls in Season Opener By Chris Stevens Staff Writer LEONARDTOWN – In an up and down girls’ basketball contest Tuesday night at St. Mary’s Ryken, junior center Molly Grund’s three-point shot with 30 seconds left in the fourth quarter was the difference as the Knights held off pesky Severn 69-65 in the season opener for both teams. “It was the first game of the season, so we had some itters, but we found a way to get it done,” said head coach Tara Everly after a see-saw second half that saw the Knights lose a nine-point lead, and come from behind three points with less than a minute to go to get the win. “[Finishing the game] is a good sign.” “We just kept it together and didn’t let their run get to us,” said Grund, who led all scorers with 18 points. “We played smart.” Smart basketball almost wasn’t enough against Severn, who had several leads against the Knights, their final one coming on a Liz Harbeson three-pointer with a minute to go, opening up a 65-62 advantage for the visitors. Alexa Kanowsky paced four Severn players in double figures with 15 points. After Harbeson’s bomb, Ryken quickly came down court and got a baseline lay-up from sophomore forward Krishauna Lefridge to narrow it to one. After junior guard Zakiya Hunter came up with her fifth steal of the game, Grund was left wide open at the top of the key and knocked it down for the go-ahead basket. Severn couldn’t tie on the next possession and two foul shots by Hunter with 13.1 seconds to go closed out the scoring. “I could breathe again,” Everly said of her thoughts when Grund’s deciding shot twirled through the net. “We talked about closing out, and my hat goes off to Severn, they never gave up.”

Photo By Chris Stevens

St. Mary’s Ryken guard Zakiya Hunter looks for an open teammate.

Along with Grund’s offensive output, Ryken got 17 points from sophomore guard Bryanna Robinson, a transfer student from Bishop Ireton and 13 points from Katie McCormick. “I think we can do very well because we have players inside and outside,” Robinson said. We just have to keep it going and put up some points.” chrisstevens@countytimes.net

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ck into ‘Tis the Season to put “Christ”tiba cation du E n a s i hr C of t f gi e th g n i v gi by as tm s i hr C Join in helping St. Michael’s School raise $150K to keep the school open. Go to www.smsthanksamillion.org to make it happen. If people sign up their store cards to support St. Michael’s School, McKays, Target, and Giant will donate percentages of those sales to the school.

www.saint-michaels-school.org Learn More About St. Michael’s School’s Fundraising Initiative with the Affinity VISA Credit Card Program. St. Michael’s School gets benefits from enrollments and card usage. www.saint-michaels-school.org/SMSAffinity.html

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The County Times

Thursday, December 3, 2009

30

Basketball

Hornet Boys Have Height, Intensity This Season By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

at eye-level with most of his players during timeouts. He won’t have that problem this year as transfers who bring size and intensity will take the floor the Hornets this season. “It’s an advantage for us to have height,” Peck said with 6’5 Kamaron Barker and 6’6 Michael Harris coming over from St. Mary’s Ryken and King’s Christian Academy respectively. “Now, we have to find the best way to utilize that height and fit it in with the other guys.” No one’s happier to see taller teammates than senior Basil Moye, who at just a shade under 6’2 was the starting center and the tallest player on the team last season, when the Hornets struggled and were eliminated in the 3A South first round by La Plata. “It helps out a lot because last year, I had to rebound by myself,” he said. “The new big guys will help us out tremendously on the boards.” Barker, a regular member of Ryken’s rotation last season, came over to Great Mills for a new opportunity. “I just wanted a new start and a better chance to win,” he said. “I’m very excited for the challenge.” With Barker and Harris, along with returning players like Moye and guard Moe Queen, expectations are high for the Hornets, and that’s how Moye likes it. “We’re real confident, we’re talking about playoffs and states already,” he said. “We’re ready to keep focused and keep our

GREAT MILLS – Last season, Great Mills boys’ basketball coach Frank Peck was

Photo By Frank Marquart

Michael Harris

minds on basketball.” “It’s going to motivate us work that much harder in practice,” Barker said of preseason predictions. “It’s going to take chemistry and teamwork for us to do it.” A key to the development of this year’s Hornet team is how well the newcomers work well with the veterans, something Peck hopes to achieve through practice. “It’s so important that they spend time practicing together,” Peck says. “So we make sure they’re constantly together, working with teammates.” Peck has also noticed that confidence and drive to be one of the top teams in the always-competitive Southern Maryland Athletic Conference, which he believes will aid the team in its quest to make some noise. “What I really like is that this team has developed a common goal – winning basketball games,” he said. “You can see that these guys hate to lose, and I think once you develop that desire to win, you’re on the right track.” chrisstevens@countytimes.net

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Knights Plan to do it With Defense By Chris Stevens Staff Writer LEONARDTOWN – The cliché of defense winning championships has held true for St. Mary’s Ryken’s boys’ basketball team in preparation for the season. With capable scoring on deck, head coach Dave Tallman has chosen to stress defense as the key to the team’s hopes of advancing to the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference final four this season. “Our top goal is to get to American [University] and be a top four team in the league,” Tallman said. “It all starts on the defensive end.” “We’ve just got to play hard and play good, tough D,” said senior point guard Kai Smith. “Everybody in this league can score, but the teams that can play defense usually are the best.” “We play seven teams ranked in the top 50 in USA Today,” said Elijah Matthews. “They all can score, so defense is what we’ve been focused on.” Stepping up on defense will be key for the Knights, who cruised to a 7351 over Archbishop Carroll in the WCAC play-in round before dropping a 54-44 decision to legendary DeMatha Photo By Catholic in the quarterfinals. Frank Marquart “We want to get stops and create offense out of our defense,” Tallman said of the plan for the season. “We were inconsistent on D last year, so in practice, it’s been 100 percent defense.” Matthews and Smith are the leading returning players for Ryken, with key contributions from junior guards Deon Andrews and Traveon Graham and forward Dominique Robinson are expected as well. “Traveon’s put on about 25 pounds of muscle during the summer,” Tallman said. “The guys have been working very hard and have gotten a lot stronger.” They also get taller with 6’11 Lazar Petrob, a transfer student from Macedonia, who Tallman is sure will help offset the losses of Gokhan Sirin (University of Charlotte), Gorkem Sonmez (Radford University) and team leader R.J. Buck (North Carolina A&T). “We graduated three Division I players,” Tallman said. “These guys have to be ready to step up.” Going into his third season on the job, Tallman is confident his team can compete with any team in the WCAC this season. Kai Smith “Those guys play against each other in AAU leads the St. ball, so they play their opponents year-round,” Mary’s Ryken Tallman says. boys’ basket“We’re going to take this season one game at a ball team into time, and if we can do that, I think we’ll be okay.” WCAC play this season.

chrisstevens@countytimes.net


31

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Basketball

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The County Times

Chopticon Boys Starting Fresh This Season

By Chris Stevens Staff Writer MORGANZA – When a high school basketball team graduates 11 seniors, one being the conference’s most outstanding player, most coaches look at the following season with a sense of despair. Well, most except for Chopticon boys’ coach Terry Mumau. “The guys we do have returning have improved, so that’s going to help us out a lot,” Mumau said of the Braves, who won 18 games and advanced to the 3A south regional semifinals before falling to Lackey last season. “They just have to play together as a team. That’s going to be the biggest challenge.” Another huge challenge will be replacing the core of a team that came to-

gether as seniors to be a competitor in the Southern Maryland Athletic Conference. Also, coping with the loss of just about all of their scoring. “Well we averaged 54 points per game last season and we lost 52 to graduation,” he said. SMAC player of the year Derrell Armstrong was the bulk of that scoring, averaging 25.6 points last year, with senior guard Daryl Blackwell the only two points per game coming back for 2009-10. To counter the loss of Armstrong and other capable scorers like Devon Yates and Joel Pease, Mumau has placed the focus on defense in the early going. “We’ve spent much of practice teaching the guys our defensive style,” he said. “They have to learn to not be so passive.” Mumau looks at some players com-

ing up from junior varsity, especially three players at least 6’2 or taller (led by junior Damien Thomas) as a bright spot in the rebuilding process. “We do have some new faces and we actually have some good size,” Mumau says. “We just have to hope that they can gel, that’s what’s going to Chopticon head coach Terry Mumau be important.” hopes team play will keep the Braves chrisstevens@ countytimes.net

in the SMAC boys’ basketball title race this season.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Senior guard Daryl Blackwell is Chopticon’s returning leading scorer.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Copsey Hopes Teamwork Carries Raider Boys Far By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

week, I look forward to spring, when I’m not coaching anything, but I am enjoying it.” Before Copsey can get his springtime break, he hopes this group of Raiders, who won a 4A East first round game last season before falling to Old Mill in the quarters, hopes his team is aware of the challenges that face them every night in the Southern Maryland Athletic Conference.

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LEONARDTOWN – There are no stars on the Leonardtown boys’ basketball team, and that’s not a bad thing in the eyes of firstyear head coach Jamie Copsey. “You win as a team and you lose as a team,” Copsey said during practice Monday evening. “If you asked me to name key players, I couldn’t do that. We just have to play together as a team.” Copsey is in his first year heading up the varsity program, taking over for Jake Heibel, who stepped aside at the conclusion of last season. Senior guard Toddrick Daniel, one of several players returning to the team this season, notices similarities Copsey shares with Heibel. “I don’t see any negative differences,” he said. “They’re both great coaches, really nice guys and they’re great to play for.” Copsey, a 1998 Leonardtown grad, credits Heibel and former Raiders coach/athletic director Glenn Larnerd, Sr. for preparing him

dT

“You can’t go into a game thinking you’re going to beat anybody, there are no nights off in this conference,” he said. Toddrick Daniel believes defense is key. “We play good team defense, talk, and listen to what our coaches are trying to teach us, we should be fine,” he said. chrisstevens@countytimes.net

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Toddrick Daniel believes team defense will help the Leonardtown boys’ basketball team win games this season.

Photo By Chris Stevens

First-year head coach Jamie Copsey looks forward to the challenge of leading the Leonardtown boys’ basketball team.

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for this opportunity. “I was fortunate to learn under two great coaches in Jake and Coach Larnerd and I’m ready for the challenge now,” he said. “The more you learn, the better.” Copsey played basketball and ran crosscountry at Leonardtown, and did the same at Lynchburg College in Virginia before returning to LHS upon graduation to coach and teach. “My dad was a PE teacher, so I’ve been around sports my whole life,” he says. For his part, Copsey, who also is head coach of the successful Raider boys and girls cross-country teams, the extra hat of head basketball coach is a lot to wear, but his enthusiasm for it all remains strong. “It’s more paperwork, obviously responsible for overseeing the whole program. People don’t understand how time-consuming coaching really is,” he explains adding that assistant coaches David Layman and Kenny Parnell have been a huge help. “It’s pretty much a second job. You’re working six days out of the

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THURSDAY Decmber 3, 2009

Great Mills Boys Focused On Season Mayor Wants Library Closer to Downtown Story Page 5

Photo By Frank Marquart

Gridiron Grill Open in Callaway Story Page 8

Page 30

School Budget Crisis Delays Pre-K Plan

Story Page 14

The County Times -- Dec. 3, 2009  

The County Times -- Dec. 3, 2009

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