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c M Y K 50 inch proGress 2012:

www.herald-dispatch.com

progress 2012:

the herald-Dispatch’s annual progress Editions take a look at our tri-state economy and business community. today’s sections focus on commerce and transportation. other topics will be examined next sunday.

Sunday, March 18, 2012

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coMMerce

Mark Webb/The Herald-Dispatch

Summer and Melanie Ogg of Portsmouth shop at Charming Charlie on Feb. 25 at the Huntington Mall. The accessory store opened in the former FYE location in April 2011.

INsIDe THIs secTIoN

New life for Heritage station

the historic train depot has reinvented itself with its blend of eclectic artisan shops. / 8G

EvEr-incrEasing opportunitiEs to shop

Renovations, new stores mark year for area malls sTorY BY JeAN TArBeTT HArDIMAN / THe HerAlD-DIspATcH F

T lady Antebellum

Arena an economic draw huntington’s Big sandy superstore arena

he past year has been a busy one at the Huntington Mall, which celebrated its 30th year in Barboursville with a multi-million dollar renovation project by its parent company, Cafaro Company. It also has undergone a variety of other changes in its offerings. Seventeen new skylights, flooring and updates to the entrances and restrooms are among many of the changes that can be seen today at the mall, along with some new stores, such as a Books-A-Million! in the old Borders location and a Sephora inside JCPenney. Feedback to the mall’s new look has been great, said mall Manager Joe Johnston. “I get stopped all around town by people making positive comments about it,” he said. “Everyone loves the brightness, and it lifts people’s spirits,” he said.

helps to keep downtown area bustling. / 11G

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C M Y K 50 inch 2G The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Commerce

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

KineticPark seeing exciting growth By JEAN TARBETT HARDIMAN The Herald-Dispatch

LEFT: Amazon had a ribbon-cutting for its new 70,000-square-foot Customer Service Center at KineticPark on Nov. 4, 2011. The new call center allowed the company to add 200 full-time jobs and hundreds of seasonal positions during the next two years.

jeant@herald-dispatch.com

HUNTINGTON — KineticPark had an active 2011 and has developments underway this year as well. Amazon dedicated its new call center on the upper level of KineticPark last November, replacing two Amazon call centers in downtown Huntington and allowing the company to add 200 full-time jobs and hundreds of seasonal positions during the next two years. Amazon already employed 500 people in Huntington, according to tax incentive forms that the company signed with city officials in 2011. The $10.6 million, 70,000-squarefoot call center opened for business Oct. 10. Also last year, Huntington Pediatric Dentistr y a nd Ort hodontics opened on the upper level at KineticPark. The 10,500-square-foot facility was opened by Dr. Patrick Martin, who also has an office in Teays Valley, and has three other dentists: Nathan Kirk II, Shane Holmes and Eric Bailey. With a giant smiling elephant protruding out of an exterior wall, it has safari-themed decor on the inside, along with video games and televisions. T h e Hu n t i n g to n Mu n i c ip a l Development Authority, which owns KineticPark, also is in the final stages of selling 2 acres for a new Hampton Inn, which hopefully will open this fall, said Tom Bell, executive di rector of t he development authority. And 3.32 acres on the lower level have been

Toril Lavender/ For The Herald-Dispatch

BELOW: Huntington Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics opened at the upper level at KineticPark last year. Sholten Singer/ The Herald-Dispatch

sold to Moses Automotive for a Moses Chrysler dealership. Bell thinks the spurred success at KineticPark is “a combination of people realizing it’s a desirable location, a nd we’ve been more cooperative in dealing with people — the city has,” he said. “Also the economy has sparked some of this activity.” There’s very limited space on the bottom level at this point, he said. One remaining parcel on the lower

commercial level has 2.6 acres and another has 1 acre, Bell said. “On the top, we have about 10 acres,” he said. There are some prospects for purchase of remaining parcels, but details were not released. “I’m excited for the city,” Bell said. “These are all new jobs coming in from the outside. We’re excited about the prospects of filling up KineticPark, which was the dream of the city all along.”

“I’m excited for the city. These are all new jobs coming in from the outside. We’re excited about the prospects of filling up KineticPark, which was the dream of the city all along.” Tom Bell

executive director of the Huntington Municipal Development Authority

Malls

SHOP THE RED CABOOSE

n Continued from 1G

REGIONAL ARTISAN CENTER at Heritage Station

All Aboard! for the Mark Webb/The Herald-Dispatch

The train carries passengers through the Huntington Mall in Barboursville. The new family attraction sells 10-minute rides for $3 per person. lion!, and the accessory store Charming Charlie opened up in the former FYE location in April of 2011. With Books-A-Million replacing Borders so quickly last fall, “They were fortunate, but (Cafaro Company) created that fortune by having that lined up before Borders closed,” Johnston said. “That made for a great, easy segue. ... We didn’t miss much of a beat there, and that’s important because (a book store plays an important role at the shopping center). It adds something for everybody. It’s a nice store, and that’s a gateway to the mall.” Also in 2011, Buckle remodeled its store right after Adams Hallmark combined with Adams Collectibles and relocated down the Dick’s Sporting Goods hallway in a larger and brighter store. The nTelos operation left its kiosk location and moved into what was once Adam’s Collectibles. Across from it, Pam Primitives also moved to a new space in 2011. In the former D&D Outfitters and TeaCo location came FOX, which sells apparel and protective gear for action sports including MX, Surf, MTB and BMX. “Our Foxhead store is one of only six in the country,” Johnston said. “We were picked by the head of their real estate for a medium to smaller market, and it’s doing very well.” Also new at the Huntington Mall last year was Cindy’s Country Gifts in November 2011, also

down the Dick’s Sporting Goods Hallway.

Ashland Town Center 2012 2011 was a good year at the Ashland Town Center, said its marketing director, Jaime Bloss. It added several retailers to the tenant mix, including a Crazy 8 children’s apparel store, which opened late last year, and Wet Seal, which has juniors apparel for girls and young women. Cellairis, a cell phone accessory cart, also opened last year, along with Aspen Dental, a full service dental office. Ntelos relocated to the food court late last year and Aeropostale remodeled its existing store to a new updated look, Bloss said. This year has some news as well, she said. A Verizon provider, Wireless Communications, opened in March of 2012. Victoria’s Secret is remodeling its Ashland store, expanding its location and designing a new store layout to offer more merchandise. During the remodeling project, it is located in the space next to Kentucky Korner. “2012 is looking to be a great year for the Ashland Town Center. We are currently in the process of negotiating new and current leases for the mall,” she said. “Retail is ever changing, and Glimcher(themall’sparentcompany) is working to fill locations with thebestfitandmix ofretailtocompliment our current merchants. Negotiationscontinueandwehope tomakeadditionalannouncements in the near future.”

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“The biggest surprise has been the reaction to the 74,000plus square feet of carpeting. People think we’re nuts, and we are in a steep learning curve on how to clean it. You can’t mop it up and go. We’re spending daily time with extractors, and we feel we’re going to continue that as a daily standard routine, but it’s quiet and comfy on the feet, and it’s been well received.” A new family attraction is a trackless train offering rides around the mall for kids and all. The All Smiles Aboard train sells 10-minute rides for $3 per person, departing from its depot now set up between the new Fox store and Wet Seal. The train is available from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. “The preschool-age children enjoy the thrill of riding, and the parents and grandparents get a kick out of the pleasure they see in their children’s eyes,” Johnston said. “It’s such a nice-looking train. It adds to the sights, sounds, motion and emotion that bring atmosphere to the mall and make for an interesting trip.” The mall also is opening an hour earlier on Sundays now. Hours of operation for the shopping center are now 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. The Huntington Mall is soon welcoming a new cosmetics store called bareMinerals, located near Macys. Meanwhile the Bow Love hairbow kiosk that opened about a year ago is moving into a new store next to Sears and Old Navy in the former Party Penguin location this spring. More store openings are forthcoming. Along with the overall mall remodeling project was a complete in-store renovation of JCPenney, which included the addition of Sephora. There also was a remodel of Hibachi Master, China Max, and Cosimos Pizza in the food court and the opening of a new food tenant, Dave’s Hot Dogs. D&D Outfitters relocated to a larger and brighter store next to the new Books-A-Mil-


Progress 2012: Commerce

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Kenny Queen Hardware & Supply 4350 Fifth St. Rd. Huntington, WV 25701 304-523-2331 www.kennyqueen.com

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JOB: President and CEO, Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YOUR CAREER? Was a Chamber volunteer for over 30 years and when I retired from my utility career in 2004, was asked by Mike Perry (Heritage Farm) and Mike Sellards (St. Mary’s) to consider running the Chamber on a full time basis. FIRST JOB: My first “volunteer” job with a Chamber was distributing litter bags to high school students in Kokomo, Indiana, in 1971. FAMILY: Wife Patti, a former teacher. Children Christy, Dawn, Grant, and Chris, and three grandchildren, twins Jake and Isabella, and Danny. SPECIAL SKILLS: Antique clock repair. FAVORITE BOOK: “Time and Again” by Jack Finney. FAVORITE MOVIE: “Air America.” FAVORITE TV SHOW: “Modern Family.”

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C M Y K 50 inch 4G The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Commerce

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Business from downtown Ashland expanding uptown to Russell, Ky. Russell mayor: ‘There is a draw for people at this location’

By LACIE PIERSON The Herald-Dispatch

lpierson@herald-dispatch.com

ABOVE: Ava Vanderhoof, 5 of Columbus, paints a ceramic princess at the Pottery Place on March 3 in the Russell Centre. LEFT: The Pottery Place opened in Russell last fall. Photos by Mark Webb/ The Herald-Dispatch

Kilns are used to fire ceramics at Pottery Place. Pottery Place owner Laya Hutchison says the expansion to the Russell Centre has gone well for her.

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business owners, things certainly are looking good. “We always encourage residents to go to these stores and restaurants and do business with them,” Hammond said. “It’s worth giving to them because they often are the ones who, in turn, give back to the community in a lot of ways.” That giving back has made a lot of difference in the down economy, Hammond said. However, while things have slowed down some, the greater Ashland area has not had to carry the brunt of the downturn in the economy. “I would look at Ashland, and really the Tri-State in genera l, a nd say that it’s a stable community. We haven’t had the drastic ups and downs we’ve seen nationally,” he said. “That’s not to say that it couldn’t change, there’s no way we can predict that. What we can do is take care of what we’ve got and work with the existing industries. What that means to us is to support them in any way we can and just be as friendly and welcoming to businesses as we can be.”

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RUSSELL, Ky. — It’s possible that since expanding her business to the Russell Centre in Russell, Ky., just outside of Ashland, Laya Hutchison, owner of The Potter y Place, has become one of the biggest cheerleaders for new business in the area. “I know in the shopping center we’re in, there’s one more vacant space, and I am constantly telling business owners I know in Huntington, where I’m from, that they should expand into that area as fast as they can,” said Hutchison, who opened her second store in Ashland earlier this year. “It’s gone so well for me, and other business owners I know there said it’s gone well for them, too.” It certainly is no secret that business in the past year has been booming for the greater Ashland, Ky., area, which also has meant growth in Russell, five miles to the north, as downtown space quickly filled up, said Bob Hammond, director of development for the Ashland Alliance, which serves as the chamber of commerce for the city of Ashland and Boyd and Greenup Counties. In the past year, locally owned businesses like The Pottery Place, which opened in Russell last fall, and the popular Huntington-based restaurant Fat Patty’s have set their sights on Ashland and Russell. Fat Patty’s is “When these busislated to open this ness owners look month. for a new place they Additionally, need to know the regional chains like number of people Gold Star Chili, out that will come there of Cincinnati, Mattress Warehouse and where their customers are going a n d D u n h a m ’ s Spor t i ng G oods to come from. We have all opened can tell them all of up locations in the that. ... People have area in the past 12 traveled and will months. K i ng’s Daughtravel here to shop, ter’s Medical Ceneat and spend the ter a lready was day. That’s what the area’s largest businesses are look- employer at the start ing for, and when of the year, accordwe see them open ing to information here, they get that from the Ashland Alliance, and they and they’ve been continued to add successful.” jobs when t hey Bill Hopkins opened an Outreach Russell mayor Clinic in Russell. Hammond said the rapid growth of the area can largely be accredited to the “if you build it, they will come” success that those new businesses have experienced. “We’re trying to put Boyd and Greenup Counties out there,” Hammond said. “It’s all client driven on our end. We do everything we can to put them in the best place we can for them to be successful, and, so far, they have been very successful. They are all very busy all the time.” Business is expected to only get busier in that area, said Russell Mayor Bill Hopkins. He couldn’t get into specifics, but Hopkins did say officials were “looking at a couple more” business that could be opening in the area soon. Hopkins estimated that more than 30,000 cars drive through the area each day, and he said that is a number worth looking at twice for business owners. “When these business owners look for a new place they need to know the number of people that will come there and where their customers are going to come from,” Hopkins said. “We can tell them all of that. There’s no major commercial area on this side of the river, so there’s a draw for people at this location. People have traveled and will travel here to shop, eat and spend the day. That’s what businesses are looking for, and when we see them open here, they get that and they’ve been successful.” Hutchison said she could attest to the success of opening a business in Russell, which she said appeared to be a good decision even before the store opened. “When we were looking to open a second store, we just looked at the customer base and the areas we were pulling from, and we had a significant number of people coming in from Kentucky and Ohio, near Ironton,” Hutchison said. “For us, it was nice to have that base. Going into Kentucky just seemed like a natural progression, and it wasn’t too far away to manage. Even though it’s somewhat nearby, we have been able to service an entirely different group of people.” It’s a group of people who, Hammond said, is nothing if not prepared and welcoming for any new business that comes its way. It’s too soon to put numbers on how successful businesses have been or how much of an impact they have had on the local economy, but Hammond said, based on traffic in the area and general world of mouth from both residents and

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C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Commerce

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Downtown boasts eclectic mix of specialty shops, eateries

LEFT: Amy Maphis tops her yogurt with sprinkles and fresh berries at Tropical Moon Frozen Yogurt in Huntington. The yogurt shop joins Soma Intimates and White House Black Market as new retailers which opened in the downtown Huntington area this past year.

By JEAN TARBETT HARDIMAN The Herald-Dispatch

jeant@herald-dispatch.com

HUNTINGTON — Kim Sarka Lake loves to walk outside one of her downtown stores and see people on the sidewalks. They’re shopping, they’re going out to eat, or just looking around. It’s a sign of the progress downtown, and she’s pleased with it. She just wishes there were even more. “More people are realizing what we have downtown,” said Lake, who owns Mug and Pia at 939 3rd Ave., and Simply Whisk at 901 4th Ave. “If you haven’t seen it lately, come check it out. Don’t take somebody else’s word for it. I hear people say all the time, ‘I had no idea you were here. I’ll come downtown all the time now.’ ” I n Apr i l , L a ke w i l l celebrate t he fourth anniversary of opening her gift shop, Mug and Pia, downtown. By no means has it been an easy task, to open a small retail shop — and then another — in the midst of Huntington’s gradual redevelopment. But she’s glad she has and she’s glad to see others joining in the revitalization effort, including her husband, Edwin Lake, a retired operations manager at WSAZ who opened Tropical Moon Frozen Yogurt at 907 4th Ave. last year, and has a second store under development in the Merritts Creek shopping Center in Barboursville. “Every store has a niche of their own,” Kim Lake said. “I like that we’re getting different things. We need to realize that we deserve these stores and we have to appreciate these stores.” Along with Tropical Moon, some of the new stores downtown include Soma Intimates and White House Black Market, both national retailers in the same retail family as Chico’s, which has a store in Pullman Square. Paula Vega Cakes has expanded and opened a successful freestanding shop at 308 9th St., meanwhile Heritage Station has a variety of new offerings over the past year and more forthcoming, all of which Lake said are exciting. Huntington Prime opened a piano bar on the top floor of the West Virginia building,

BELOW: Paula Vega prepares a confection at Paula Vega Cakes & Cupcakes, a freestanding shop on 9th Street. Photos by Lori Wolfe/ The Herald-Dispatch

in the former location of Permon’s. And an artisan pizza place is expected to open on 4th Avenue this spring as well. Things are looking great, said Richard Wittman of Richard’s Hallmark at 905 4th Ave. “I think it’s progressing quite well. We had a great Christmas and Valentine’s Day,” he said. “I think the weather has helped. People will get out and shop when it’s sunny, whereas they won’t when it’s snowing. “We’re gradually getting some empty storefronts closed. I think we have a good mix now.” Joe Chapman, owner of C.F. Reuschlein Jewelers on 3rd Avenue, is looking forward to 2014. That’s when Marshall University is expected to move its art and design program into the old Stone & Thomas building on 4th Avenue, and every storefront will be filled in the 900

block of 3rd Avenue across from Pullman Square. “We’re seeing a lot more traffic,” Chapman said. “The holiday was really good and it’s been crazy good weather. ...The last two or three years, people have decided to come out and spend a little.” Vickie Rosenberg of the Village Collection said she’s seen a slight uptick in business as well. “For us, things have picked up a little — not like it used to be but I can tell a difference,” she said of her nearly 35-year-old store, which started selling the popular TOM’s shoes in the past year. Because of the warm weather, she thinks, spring sales exploded early as well. “I think more people are coming downtown,” she said. “The past three years (were slow) but I’m optimistically hopeful.”

Real progress found in the journey Part of the reason we are progressing is because regular people are coming together and Thomas getting engaged as never McCHESNEY before. Huntington is a place where anyone can they love this area because have a meaningful role in they feel like they can make a our community’s progress. real contribution. Our progress to becoming a community of do-ers rather than don’t-ers, to being yeahsayers rather than nay-sayers, was no more evident than in our quest to win the PetSafe “Bark for Your Park” $100,000 dog park competition. We joined together as a community in a single-minded pursuit of a dog park. It made little difference if one had a dog or didn’t, if one lived in Huntington or had moved away, or if one could contribute financially or not. We rallied together as a community in support of a common goal — and won. Further evidence of our progress as a community is seen in the revitalized Heritage Station. A little over a year ago, two public entities, the Greater Huntington Parks and Recreation District and the Cabell Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau, launched an effort to improve our quality of life by revitalizing the historic Heritage Station into an artisan center. Knowing the project would not be easy and understanding our town’s history of “that’ll never happen,” they took great risk in doing so. The result of their work has been an inspiration for artists, artisans, and entrepreneurs who dreamed of opening a business and are now able to do so. A place that was once forgotten is now alive with several locallyowned shops and host to regular events. This was all possible because the leadership in these two organizations saw a need and an opportunity, and came together to make Huntington better. Our future is even brighter. Marshall’s construction of an engineering complex, relocation of the School of Art and Design to the central business

district, and development of an athletic complex on Huntington’s east end are game-changes for our town. The plan to redevelop Harris Riverfront Park has the potential to open our city to the river and create a space that will draw residents and guests alike. And volunteer efforts to make Huntington more bike-friendly and improve our access to local meats, eggs, dairy, and vegetables will make great strides to improving our quality of life. Huntington is making tremendous progress. We are moving forward and we are becoming a better place to live. Our journey is exciting, fun and rewarding. Part of the reason we are progressing is because regular people are coming together and getting engaged as never before. Huntington is a place where anyone can have a meaningful role in our community’s progress. If you’d like to learn how you can help our town move forward or if you have ideas that will make Huntington a better place, join your friends and neighbors at the Create Huntington Chat ‘n Chew. These open forums are held every Thursday, 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the lobby of the Frederick Building. They are an opportunity for you to be around other engaged people, to share your ideas in a positive environment, and to work on projects that will make a difference. For information about Create Huntington, go to www.createhuntington.com. Thomas McChesney is the director of marketing and business development for Huddleston Bolen LLP.

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Wants & Needs (Shopping) Adell’s Antiques 926 4th Avenue 304-962-2459

Mack & Dave’s 1010 3rd Avenue 304-697-4211

Bottle and Wedge 210 11th Street (Heritage Station) 304-522-8818

Magic Makers 545 4th Avenue 304-525-5333 Mug & Pia 939 3rd Avenue 304-525-7880

C.F. Reuschlein Jewelers 947 3rd Avenue 304-697-7710

Richard’s Hallmark 905 4th Avenue 304-522-2643

City Kids & Co. (Children’s Fashions) 948 4th Avenue 304-525-2511

Saad’s Oriental Rugs 324 9th Street 304-522-3898

George H. Wright (Womens & Mens Apparel) 952 4th Avenue 304-781-5602

WV Business Products 1026 4th Avenue 304-525-4714

Glenn’s Sporting Goods 1051 4th Avenue 304-523-7766

Cabell Huntington Convention & Visitors Bureau (The Red Caboose) 210 11th Street 304-525-7333

Ritter Park (Greater Hgtn Park District) Rose Garden, Tennis Courts 8th Street & 13th Avenue 304-696-5954

Cabell County Public Library 455 9th Street 304-528-5700

Keith Albee Foundation 925 4th Avenue 304-525-4440

Manage Your Money (Finance) Star USA Federal Credit Union 607 3rd Avenue 304-697-4900

Hungry (Restaurants) Crumpets & Tea/Framing by Jenks 926 4th Avenue 304-522-1112

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Tropical Moon Frozen Yogurt 907 4th Avenue 304-522-YUMM (9866)

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Where To Stay (Hotels) Pullman Plaza Hotel 1001 Third Avenue 304-525-1001

Get There (Transportation & Parking) Huntington Municipal Parking Board 701 3rd Avenue 304-696-5909

Tri-State Transit (TTA) Bus, Dial-A-Ride 1120 Virginia Avenue W 304-529-RIDE (7433)

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Things to Do (Points of Interest)

First Sentry Bank 823 8th Street 304-522-6400

Give Back (Volunteer or Seek Help) Huntington City Mission United Way of 624 10th Street the River Cities 304-523-0293 820 Madison Avenue 304-523-8929 Mountain State Centers for Independent Living 821 4th Avenue 304-525-3324

Ashland Daily Independent 226 17th St - Ashland KY 606-326-2600 Etromay 239 11th Avenue 304-529-7653 “Discover Downtown” Download the App

Huntington Quarterly Magazine PO Box 384 304-529-6158 The Herald Dispatch 946 5th Avenue 304-526-2820

The Pros (Professional Services) eve, Inc. Website Services 1650 8th Ave, Suite 10 304-697-7705 Frederick Management 940 4th Avenue 304-697-4800 Huntington Area Developmental Council 916 5th Avenue 304-525-1161

Huntington Chamber of Commerce 1108 Third Ave, Suite 300 Rivertower 304-525-5131 Sullivan–Webb PLLC 422 Kinetic Drive 304-697-0565

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The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines progress as: 1. A royal journey marked by pomp and pageant; 2. A forward or onward movement; and 3. A gradual betterment, especially the progressive development of human kind. However, I, and perhaps we all, use the term “progress” in our everyday conversations to describe the completion of a journey, rather than the journey itself. We see progress when a new building has been built, when our team wins a championship, when our goal is achieved. To be sure, luring the new employer to the area, getting the win and achieving our goals are important but how we accomplish these successes are as — if not more — vital to our long-term success. Recently, Huntington has seen many successes: The new Amazon facility at Kinetic Park and the new Alcon facility on W.Va. 2; the opening of bioengineering company Progenesis in the Red Cross Building; the dozen-or-so new retailers and restaurants that have opened downtown; new access to recycling stations; and winning the PetSafe “Bark for your Park” contest are all important wins for our community. They are milestones we can build on for the future. While we celebrate these milestones, it is also important to recognize the progress we are making as a community. I have had the good fortune of seeing our progress, our forward movement, our gradual betterment through my involvement in Create Huntington, the Chat ‘n Chews and other community projects. I have watched our progression to becoming a community where people work together to solve our problems and accomplish our objectives. There was a time, not too long ago, that Huntington was a town where people regularly said “no,” “that’ll never happen,” and “why would you want to move here?” Today, one is more likely to hear entrepreneurs talk about new opportunities; volunteers discuss ways they can make something happen; and newcomers describe that


C M Y K 50 inch 6G

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch 7G

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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1880 1887 RolexAuthorized Dealer serving the Tri-state area

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Across from Pullman Square

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C M Y K 50 inch 8G The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Commerce

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

“We want the community to feel a part of what the CVB does and our mission is to bring people to events like this. We hope it familiarizes them with who we are and what we do. If you’ve not been to Heritage Station in a while then maybe they’ll come and visit the shops and find things they might not have known about.” Tyson Compton

president of the Cabell-Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau

Photos by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Heritage Station is located at 210 11th St. in Huntington.

New life for Heritage Station

Historic train depot attracting visitors with its mix of artisan shops By DAVE LAVENDER The Herald-Dispatch

lavender@herald-dispatch.com

HUNTINGTON — On a sunny March afternoon, Greater Huntington Park and Recreation District director Kevin Brady sat outside at a table on the freshly poured concrete patio at the historic Heritage Station smiling and watching folks browsing the shops. Oh, what a difference a couple of years makes. It was about 21 ⁄2 years ago that the Cabell-Huntington Convention and Visitor’s Bureau breathed new life into the historic depot at Heritage Station, teaming up with the Huntington Park and Recreation District, which rents and manages the Heritage Station shops, to begin a two-year plan to turn Heritage Station into a multi-use artisan/boutique retail center reminiscent of markets in larger cities. But it was last year when Heritage Station really started chugging along thanks to the influx of a slew of businesses from River and Rail Bakery and Bottle and Wedge to Finds and Designs and Common Ground, as well as steady events from Party on the Patio to a number of sold-out Murder Mysteries drawing in flocks of people to the historic train depot area that was built in 1887. Sitting where six new tables are located, Brady couldn’t hold back his excitement for the renewed energy in the historic station area that is continuing to evolve and grow in 2012. Outside, it is easy to see the improvements. The exteriors of the cozy and quaint shops are cloaked in new color popping alive from a distance, and below the shops, the patio has gotten a makeover making it ready for the people. Over late fall and winter, the Park District transformed the gravel lot in the back of the depot building, pouring a rectangular concrete slab now packed with tables and chairs for patrons of the shops as well as the monthly “Party on the Patio” music series which started back up March 16. That free music series will run from 5 to 10 p.m. once a month on Friday nights into the fall. Brady said the improvements open the station area up for not only more capacity at Party on the Patio and such annual events as the Diamond Teeth Mary Blues and Art Festival and the Tour de Path ride in July, but also for rentals as well since people can rent the gazebo and patio area for only $100. “This has doubled our capacity for people,” Brady said of the new improvements. “I can take rows of

River and Rail Bakery is one of the many businesses located at Heritage Station in Huntington. chairs and line the back walls and get a lot more people in here and it is handicap accessible and we do have a lot of visitors who come from the retirement center over here on their scooters and they like to have a good seat to watch the music and this will be a good place for that.” That re-energized feeling can also be felt in the small boutique shops that line the L-shaped station that wraps behind the gazebo and the train station that has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972. Brady said Bottle and Wedge, tucked into the 1875 Bank of Huntington building once robbed by the infamous James Gang, has turned into one of the leading craft beer sellers in the state. Businesses such as James Cigar Company and Finds and Designs have seen dramatic increases in sales since moving to the station. To be added this April will be “SIP Wine Bar,” which will offer a wide variety of wines by the glass and bottle, as well as wine samples and wine flights. The bar also will sell microbrews and light appetizers. SIP also will be a place for food pairings, wine classes and private events. “It’s 3 o’clock on a nice afternoon and here we could be sipping a glass of wine and this is just a perfect environment for something like that,” Brady said. “As we get more into the season,

this is going to be a dynamite place to be. It truly is turning into a unique local shopping destination.” No one is happier about the turnaround than Tyson Compton, the president of the Cabell-Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau. Shortly after taking the job, Compton convinced the CVB it needed a major move to the historic train depot from its former small office across from the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. “I think it all started about 21 ⁄2 years ago when the CVB moved its offices here and that in itself is where the investment began,” Compton said. “We started seeing a huge up-tick of visitors coming to our office. Many of them were tourists who could now find us better and we know a lot of the local community were glad to see these buildings being used because so many people had so many great memories going to the restaurants that were here. From there we started looking at what Heritage Station had originally been redeveloped for in the late 1970s by the St. Clair’s and some other people. So we were looking to see if we could restore it to an original version.” ComptonsaidfromtheRandallTourism Study completed about four years ago came the idea that the first thing needed was a hub for artisan shops. Compton said out of that study and the flood of artists they were meeting at such venues as Chat ‘n’ Chew, they began with the Greater

Huntington Park and Recreation District along with Thomas and Stacy McChesney, and the Create Huntington folks, to formulate a plan for fostering art and artisan-based businesses in the Station. For the CVB that effort centered mostly around its Red Caboose Regional Artisan Center, which shares the depot with River and Rail Bakery and the CVB at 210 11th St. “The CVB also felt that there is a strong artists’ community in Huntington and that spurred us to create The Red Caboose — not only as an on-site gift shop and souvenir shop with typical things but also for a place to see some one-of-a-kind items made by our artists. We’ve not only been able to give visitors something unique but to help in providing an outlet for these artists to make a living.” In fact, the Caboose just celebrated an Artisan Showcase in early March to celebrate and show the scores of talented artists and artisans whose work is featured in the shop, as well as in the surroundingshopssuchasLilandBruce Bowersock’s Watercolor Dreams. Compton said Heritage Station’s shops are set up to be an incubator of sorts. It’s also been exciting to see businesses spread their wings and move into the heart of downtown. In November four businesses at the Station teamed up to move into the Frederick Building. Those businesses are Crumpets & Tea, Adell’s

Antiques, Framing by Jenks and MiAppa and are now part of Unique Huntington Collection. “We had hoped that it could be an incubator and so those shops partnered together to move to a large joint space on 4th and so that grows not only them but it fills up space on 4th Avenue and brings even more vitality to that area, so that is another aspect that is also exciting,” Compton said. Compton feels in some ways they have just begun to draw people to Heritage Station. Lastyear,theycompletedtheVisitor’s Center Pedestrian Corridor Project transforming the alleyway between 10th and 11th Streets — behind Mack and Dave’s — with new railroad track stamped sidewalks, snappy graphic wraps on miniature railroad water towers, and clear signage between Pullman Square and Heritage Station. While Heritage Station has seen a slew of success in the past year, including the kick-off and celebration and party for winning the $100,000 dog park grant, one of the coolest on-going successes has been the string of sold-out murder mysteries conducted by Huntington actor and writer George Snider and his Murder and Merriment Troupe. Sponsored by the new Heritage Station Shopkeeper’s Association, the sold-out Murder Mysteries have drawn hundreds of new people to the station, and has helped fill the shopkeeper’s coffers with funds for advertising the Station as a destination. While Murder and Merriment has been traipsing around the region doing murder mysteries of late, it is back at Heritage Station March 23-24 and March 30-31 with a new original trainthemed murder mystery, “Trial By Murder,” that actually stars West Virginia Family Law Judge Ron Anderson of Huntington, as the judge. Tickets are $35 and reservations are now being taken for those two weekends of performances at 304-523-7526. “It’s been so incredibly popular from the very beginning and I think part of it was the mystique of holding it in the old Depot and he’s been able to change the theme every time and so there’s a train theme during the New River Trains and a ski theme in the winter and so each one of them is interesting and exciting,” Compton said. “We want the community to feel a part of what the CVB does and our mission is to bring people to events like this. We hope it familiarizes them with who we are and what we do. If you’ve not been to Heritage Station in a while then maybe they’ll come and visit the shops and find things they might not have known about.”


C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Commerce

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

9G

REvitalization in iRonton

Photo by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Photos by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Renovations are under way on the Depot Square in Ironton. The new transit center is expected to open in the next 30 days.

Work progressing on city’s riverfront, downtown projects

NAME: Edwin Lake. JOB: Owner of Tropical Moon Frozen Yogurt. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YOUR CAREER: Retired as operations manager at WSAZ and decided it was time for a new adventure. Wanted to work for myself. FIRST JOB: Age of 12, picking tomatoes for a local farmer, 75 cents an hour. FAMILY: (See Kim’s answers). SPECIAL SKILLS: I believe I have good work ethic and am able to work with and talk to people. Sense of humor helps, too. Also believing in what you are doing, no matter what. FAVORITE BOOK: None. FAVORITE MOVIE: Stupid humor movies. FAVORITE TV SHOW: Anything on the History Channel.

By DAVE LAVENDER The Herald-Dispatch

lavender@herald-dispatch.com

NAME: Kim Sarka Lake. JOB: Owner of two downtown retail shops, MUG and PIA, which is an acronym for “Most unique gifts

Workers construct a canopy in Ironton on March 1. The canopy will be used for concerts and other outdoor events. about Phase 8 of ongoing downtown revitalization projects that have taken in a range of ongoing efforts. One of the most extensive projects is the Ironton Loft Apartments, a $7.2 million project that calls for 16 market rate apartments in the 200 block of Vernon Street in the heart of downtown. The historic Berg Building and the historic Bromberg Buildings are part of that project. “Hopefully in 2012 we will see those renovations under way,” Kline said. “Because of course, the residential community is key to the downtown area and the overall redevelopment strategy is about bringing traffic into the downtown community with offices, businesses, residences and events. The funding strategies have been built around that. If we can figure out ways of attracting people to the downtown area, then businesses can take advantage of that traffic.” Also in the heart of downtown, renovations continue on the historic Ro-Na Theatre, which is seeing continued basic improvements. It was used last year during the Rally on the River, and work has been done to begin replacing doors and windows in the theater. The theater is already hosting some unique events. David Driskell, whose DownHome Decadence troupe helped stage a couple years of weekly midnight movie showings of the cult-classic rock opera, “Rocky Horror Picture Show,” at the now-closed Cinema Theatre in downtown Huntington, is bringing the film to the Ro-Na at midnight, Friday, March 30. “There have been improvements made between the city and the support of Friends of Ironton that allows that building to be utilized for temporary events like Rally on the River and they are continuing to focus on that,” Kline said. “The windows and doors are being replaced and we did get tax credit support for that project at the end of 2011. So we are all working on that financing and operating plan and hopefully we will see more happening on it in the 2012-2013 time frame because that is all being complementary to supporting the other things in the downtown area.” Maybe the largest project for 2012 is the start of the replace-

ment of the Ironton-Russell bridge, and Kline said in addition to that three-year project, there’s also a new traffic flow improvement project set for U.S. 52 into Park Avenue that connects the highway to the downtown. In addition to the highway gateways, there’s a 9th Street Gateway Project that is working on turning underutilized blighted properties into reuse as viable commercial properties. Kline said significant brownfield projects are also under way around the county and the city is reclaiming vital industrial spots such as the sites of the former Dayton Malleable Iron Co., and the old Alpha-Portland Cement plant. Last year, the county got $800,000 to tear down the old cement plant for develop some six acres for Marietta Industrial Enterprises to build a 30,000square-foot warehouse that will employ 10 to 20 people. Last year, the city was awarded $1.5 million for the Ironton Riverfront project that is being finished with the brownfields grant to restore the land down river of the existing boat ramp to be removed from a four to five acre section in the 800 block of North 2nd Street. The city, the Ironton Port Authority and the IrontonLawrence County Community action organization are planning to redevelop the area into a public park with a boat launch, bike paths and walking trails. “That is being finished and hopefully in 2012-2013 that will be completed. Once that is certified it will be readied for reuse that will allow for the development of trails on the Riverfront as well as the potential for commercial and residential areas,” Kline said. Kline said while these are the major projects, there are many layers of projects by many organizations such as Ironton in Bloom, the Rotary Club and so many others, all bent on pitching in to better the Tri-State community. “It has been busy and in our business that has been good news,” Kline said. “I think that we are seeing a lot of reinvestment and I think the thing to take note of is there too are a lot of smaller initiatives and efforts that might not be big ticket items but that show there is a lot of pride being re-instilled in the community.”

SPECIAL SKILLS: Being able to fly by the seat of your pants, but keeping some discipline and structure at the same time. Also being daring. You have to have faith and be passionate about what you do and always find the good in things. The glass is always half full. FAVORITE BOOK: I’m reading more business magazines, along with catalogs and newspapers. FAVORITE MOVIE: Any movie that is not scary. FAVORITE TV SHOW: No time for television. I prefer date night at the movies. Also too busy with family time, working and traveling on days I’m not working.

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IRONTON — There are projects aplenty boiling up along the brick streets of Ironton from the banks of the Ohio River to the gateways of the iron city. To take stock of just some of the projects happening in Ironton and Lawrence County, we checked in with Ralph Kline, assistant executive director for Ironton-Lawrence County Area Community Action Organization. Without a doubt, one of the largest projects and a gamechanger for Lawrence County will be the completion of the St. Mary’s Medical Campus in Ironton that will bring 100 jobs, including 75 new jobs, to the community. Sitting out on Ohio 141, the site of the old Cooke’s Farm Center, that $18.5 million medical center building is expected to open this summer. The two-story, 46,000-squarefoot building will house 24-hour, seven-day-a-week emergency room services, imaging services and lab services. Ironton has been without emergency services since River Valley Health Systems closed its Ironton hospital in 2000, putting about 400 people out of work. “The previous hospital in today’s modern medical world was not practical and so this seems to be a good alternative to providing those essential and cost-efficient services to people in the county,” Kline said. “In addition to that is the jobs that are associated with that. We are looking at new jobs in the 75 to 100 category. That in turn also provides us with what a community has to offer when it comes to recruitment of industry or business. A community always goes back to quality of life issues and they are looking for that rapid response and emergency care and we see that as being important.” In t he dow ntow n a rea , excitement is building for the completion of the new transit center, the Depot Square Project, that should be open in the next 30 days, Kline said in early March. That historic building and surrounding area is being transformed into a multi-purpose facility that will house a bus transit station, a farmer’s market and staging for outdoor entertainment that complements the other recent improvements in the downtown area such as the Friends of Ironton Sprayground that opened last year. “That is going forward, and construction should be all completed for festivals season starting with Gus Macker in May,” Kline said. “Right now they are putting on the covered passenger walkway to this multi-purpose shelter and so the concept is to try and develop for as much use as possible. In downtown it all connects and ties together. For the Depot project some of that has been from 2007 funding so that goes to show you how long it takes.” Kline said the city is now on

and paper items anywhere” and which opened in April 2008, and Simply Whisk, which opened in September 2010. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YOUR CAREER: Leap of faith. FIRST JOB: Started work at age 10, stringing silver and turquoise beads for my parents’ business, Sarka/ Kauffmann Jewelers, and yes, I did get paid. I got 25 cents a strand, and my sister Kelly and I would charge our brother 5 cents to tie his off. FAMILY: Husband Edwin of 32 years this year and mother to two grown sons, Chad and Ryan.


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C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Commerce

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Photos by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

ABOVE AND TOP: Todd Benners and workers rearrange seating on Feb. 27 as they prepare for the next event at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington. The arena is in the midst of a $4.5 million overhaul, which included a $2.3 million seat replacement project completed in 2011.

Arena a major economic draw By DAVE LAVENDER

Fans dance as they wait for Lady Antebellum to take the stage on Feb. 3 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington. Lady Antebellum is just one of the national acts that have been booked at the arena.

The Herald-Dispatch

lavender@herald-dispatch.com

HUNTINGTON — Marshall University may be considered one of the main economic engines of Huntington, but when it comes to constantly reeling in and turning over tourists’ entertainment dollars the big orange barn doesn’t do too badly at bringing in “the big green.” The Big Sandy Superstore Arena and Conference Center brings in an estimated 200,000 people a year to Huntington to see a never-ending parade of national-act concerts such as recent sold-out concerts by Lady Antebellum and this week’s Zac Brown Band to dozens of annual events from the Dogwood Arts and Crafts Festival to the Ohio River Festival of Books. Now in the midst of a $4.5 million overhaul and set to celebrate its 35th anniversary, the arena and itsadjacentnewstate-of-the-artConferenceCenter are poised to play an even bigger role in Huntington’s entertainment scene with the demolition of the Veteran’s Memorial Field House. The arena closed out 2011 with the unveiling of the new $2.3 million seat-replacement project that is just one part of the overhaul at the arena facilities. Otherimprovementsasidefromthecomfortable new seats with cup-holders have included 10 new dressing rooms, new vendors (Reading, Pa., barbecue vendor, The Pig Pit just signed a three-year contract), and new HVAC and cleaning of all the ductsatthearenatocreateamorecomfortableand healthy airflow during such motor-revving events as monster trucks and Arenacross. Fresh off of packed houses for the West Virginia State Wrestling Tournament and staring at a slate of a couple dozen concerts and spring events, the arena really stands out as an economic engine for the area, said Tyson Compton, president of the Cabell-Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau. “The arena is a huge driver for economic development in Huntington,” Compton said. “When you think about the number of people attending an event there, looking at the state wrestling tournament, and the majority of hotels are sold out for two to three nights and the majority of people are also going out to eat and parking and some of them are shopping in addition to that, so every event has a definite impact on the community.” Withthenewimprovements,thearenawillonly play a larger role in the future, Compton said. “I thought the reinvestment in the arena was a very smart and timely move,” Compton said. “Events in the arena are competing with so many other obvious events and venues both in and

Mark Webb/The HeraldDispatch

out of our area, but also we compete with the comforts of home. People love to be comfortable so the fact that we they are able to have the new seating with the new drink holders, that will be a very big benefit to them. Obviously, the more comfortable people can be the more apt they are to go out and see a show.” Arena manager Brian Sipe said in late 2011 they began launching a marketing campaign at an industry conference in Nashville, where they put 600 business card/mirrors promoting the $4.5 million facelift with the phrase, “Guess who is getting a $4.5 million facelift? “When I am calling an agency in New York or L.A. it’s great that I can brag about all the new seats and all the new heating and air, and they will give you a second look whereas they might not have before,” Sipe said. In addition to the physical improvements, Sipe said the arena will unveil a new website in April designed locally by Bulldog Creative and that’ll be ripe with interconnectivity with fans. “Wearetheentertainmentbusinessandweneed to have a website conducive to that,” Sipe said. “In this day and age if you’re not out in the front then you’rethreestepsbehinditalready,sothat’swhywe neededtoupdatethewebsiteandincorporateTwitterandFacebook.Peoplecanbeataconcertposting abouttheirliveexperience,‘Ohmygosh,ZacBrown just hit the stage.’ We needed to do that.” Sipe said this year, they should really be able to market the improvements and hopefully bring

in even more shows to the arena, the conference center, as well as the historic Keith-Albee, where SMG hopes to book about 10 shows a year. He said that marketing happens hand in hand with Compton and the CVB. “I attend the monthly CVB meetings and Tyson Compton and Will Holland are great to work with and I probably talk to them once every couple of weeks and Will’s role is to go out to the conferences and try to recruit people to come to Huntington, so we are definitely working hand in hand there and once I have a final product, and a plan as to what the Conference Center will be, that will make it much easier to attract people.” Sipe, who began booking smaller touring shows, such as the Newsboys on March 11 at the Keith-Albee, and who also books events at Harris Riverfront Park, said they’re also working hard to incorporate and bring over as many of the annual Field House events as possible. The annual St. Joseph Basketball Tournament and the Huntington Kennel Club Dog Show will both be held at the arena, and Sipe said he’s working with the Park District to get contacts to reach out to all the event coordinators who had annual Field House shows. “We want everyone to know that anything that was there we want to work out here — without a doubt,” Sipe said. “We want to make a lot of those events work here.” Compton said the new improvements combined with the hustle and vision of Sipe and his staff, should make 2012 one of the most

Upcoming events

Here’s a look at just a few of the upcoming events at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena: WHERE: Big Sandy Superstore Arena, Huntington. GET TICKETS: at the Arena Box Office, all Ticketmaster outlets, online at www.ticketmaster.com and by calling 1-800-745-3000. ON DECK AT THE ARENA: Sesame Street Live: Elmo’s Super Heroes, April 10-11; Toughest Monster Trucks, April 13-14; Barry Manilow, April 19; Dogwood Arts & Crafts Festival, April 20-22; Billy Currington, April 27 and Godsmack & Staind with Halestorm and Brook Royal on May 12. ON THE WEB: Go online at www. bigsandyarena.com.

exciting years yet for the arena. “I think Brian has done an extremely good job of basically hitting the ground running since he has been there,” Compton said. “He’s great to work with and we’ve partnered with him on many projects. I love his energy and his vision and he just doesn’t let himself be held back by any negative thinking in that a certain act wouldn’t work here. You can see that in acts coming in like Barry Manilow or Lady Antebellum and the caliber of performances we are starting to see, as well as the cross section of those performances. It’s not all country or rock ’n’ roll and I like that fact that he is looking at bringing in events that might not fill up the full arena but also looking at things for the conference center and the Keith-Albee.” Sipe said they’re stoked for the new year, and in planning the arena’s 35th anniversary celebration for September. “We will turn 35 in September and we are very excited about some new events that we are planning and there is definitely some events we would like to try that we haven’t done before or we may bring back some events that were here in the 1970s and 1980s and make them 2012,” Sipe said. “... I think what I am most proud of right now is the reaction I am getting from the town that there are so many people coming downtown for events that we’re ecstatic. The hotels are full, the restaurants are full, and we’re full. It appears that there’s something going on every weekend because there is. I’m pretty proud of that.”

11G


C M Y K 50 inch 12G

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Ginger Mundell, RNC, MSN

In recognition of Certified Nurses Day, Cabell Huntington Hospital honors its nursing professionals who have demonstrated a passion for caring and learning by obtaining advanced knowledge and skills through national certification. We are proud to share the names of these outstanding nurses, as well as to assure our patients that they are receiving care from some of the most qualified professionals in the

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ADVANCED SKILLS THROUGH NATIONAL CERTIFICATION Marcia Adkins, OCN

Henry Estep, CDN Martha Ferguson, CNOR

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Erica Francks, CDN Chris Frazier, CTRN

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Alexa Iaquinto, CNOR Kathy Imes, RN-BC Lynn Jarrell, FNP-ONC

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Juanita Jeffers, CNRN Karen Jewell, FNP/BC Barbara Jones, CIC

Cindy Smith, RN-BC Charlotte Smith, IBCLC Bunny Smith, NE-BC

Jennifer Jones, CNN Michelle Jones, CNRN Dawn Kinser, IBCLC

Paula Spears, CCRN Steve Spurlock, CNOR Emily Stacy, IBCLC

Norma Kirk-Vaden, RN-BC Kathy Leonard, CCRN

Sheila Stephens, AOCN Regina Stickler, IBCLC

Rhonda Leonard, DNC Chris Leonard, CDN Stacy Linville, CCRN

Dottie Stollings, CNOR Karen Sullivan, RN-BC Ginny Taylor, IBCLC

Josie Marcello, RN-BC Krista Marcum, CCRN Liz May, CCRN

Melissa Taylor, FNP-BC Merrily Taylor, RN-BC Gerry Thompson, RN-BC Jennifer Thompson, IBCLC Valery Thompson, CNRA Beth Toppins, CNN Barb Tufts, CNOR Russell Villars, CNOR Margaret Wagnerowski, AOCNS/AOCN/CNS-BC

Debbie Adkins, CNRN Melanie Archer, ONC Candie Armstrong, CPN Belinda Baisden, CCM Stephanie Barker, CDN

Chanin Boyle, FNP-BC Judy Branham, OCN Tabitha Bremer, CBN Tammy Brooks, CCRN Lisa Browning, RN-BC Lunata Buchanan, CHN Elaine Burchett, RN-BC Melissa Burley, RN-BC Karen Campbell, CPAN Kathy Carrico, IBCLC Chris Carter, NE-BC Annette Cartwright, RN-BC Katrina Chapman, RN-BC Deborah Chevalier, ONC Leigh Christian, ONC Sherry Clagg, RN-BC Kathy Clark, RN-BC Fina Coleman, RN-BC Julia Colliflower, WOC Nathaniel Collins, CCRN Cindy Conley, CNRN Shane Conn, CCRN Bridgett Cunningham, FNP-BC Vicki Courts, COSC/HCSD Alice Davis, CCRP Destiny Day, FNP-BC Delaine Davis, RN-BC James Davis, ONC Lisa Davis, CPN Jennifer Dawson, CEN Jody Dean, RN-BC Karen DeLong, CDN David Dick, CCRN Charlotte Dillon, IBCLC

Mila McCleary, CNOR Terri McCoy, CCRN Donna McKeand, CMSRN Mary Meadows, RN-BC Betty Mease, RN-BC Sandra Melvin, RN-BC Christina Menking, RNBC Veronica Messick, CCRN Cheryl Midkiff, RN-BC Carol Mills, CMC Adriana Montgomery,

Marsha Dillow, CBCN Jo Dunlap, CNOR Penny Early, IBCLC

CNOR, RNFA Keith Moore, CDN Laura Mullarky, CDE

Ada Edwards, RN-BC Becky Edwards, CNRN

Ginger Mundell, RN-BC Dee Murphy, OCN, CDE

Kathy Watrous, IBCLC/RNC Denise Webb, RN-BC Marsha Williams, RN-BC Scott Williams, CCRN Kathy Willis, RN-BC Betty Womack, CNN Terri Yancey, OCN Albert Joe Zabel, CCRN


c M Y K 50 inch progress 2012:

www.herald-dispatch.com

progress 2012:

the herald-dispatch’s annual progress editions take a look at our tri-state economy and business community. today’s sections focus on commerce and transportation. other topics will be examined next sunday.

Sunday, March 18, 2012

TrANsporTATIoN

Mark Webb/The Herald-Dispatch

Gigi Rollins checks in with Alison Smith of US Airways at Tri-State Airport in Kenova on March 7. Tri-State Airport Director Jerry Brienza says US Airways experienced moderate growth at the airport over the past year.

INsIDe THIs secTIoN

good times coming for car industry?

the automotive industry in West Virginia is expected to continue an upward climb in 2012. / 1I

Bucking the trends for smaller airports

Tri-State holds steady, working to diversify sTorY BY JeAN TArBeTT HArDIMAN / THe HerAlD-DIspATcH F

JEANT@HERALD-DISPATCH.COM

I

Aground longtime need addressed is beginning to move for a new ironton-russell Bridge. / 1J

n an ever-changing economic climate, Huntington Tri-State Airport is always looking forward, moving toward future goals. After a few years of adding new flights and watching its boardings rise, things have leveled off some, but in the face of today’s trends for smaller airports, they’re doing well, said Airport Director Jerry Brienza. Last year was more exciting with high growth, but overall passenger enplanements over the past year are holding steady, he said. “Although Allegiant made some adjustments to the schedule, which reduced the frequency of their flights, both USAirways and Delta experienced moderate growth,” Brienza said. “It appears the move from Cincinnati to Detroit by Delta Airlines is working in our favor. We are very fortunate to have not lost any commercial air service in today’s volatile airline climate, as have many airports of similar size and larger.”

“We are very fortunate to have not lost any commercial air service ... as have many airports of similar size and larger.”

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C M Y K 50 inch 2H The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

“We know everyone has options when it comes to travel, and we continue to show very productive numbers, which translates that

our community is looking at Tri-State Airport and choosing us as their preferred option.” JERRY BRIENZA, Tri-State Airport director

Photos by Mark Webb/The Herald-Dispatch

The Tri-State Airport is pictured on March 7.

Passengers arrive at Tri-State Airport on a Delta flight from Detroit on March 7. Delta experienced moderate growth at the airport over the past year.

Airport

n Continued from 1H

Earlier this year, he addressed the Tri-State Airport Authority about some trends in the industry that are concerning. “Due to the soaring costs of fuel, the regional jet model is broken,” he said. “Airlines are starting to retire this equipment well before its useful life cycle solely because it is not productive anymore. “ Regional jets burn fuel quickly and have a smaller passenger capacity, causing revenue problems for the airlines, particularly when fuel costs are high, he said. “More and more, we can expect to see the return of the larger jets which are more economical overall,” Brienza said. What does that mean for HTS? “Small and medium non-hub airports such as ours will suffer the worst,” Brienza said. “As airlines rely more on larger aircraft, small communities located within three to four hours drive of larger airports will experience reduced or eliminated service.” It is essential that Tri-State residents continue to look at Tri-State Airport as their primary point of departure, he said. If the airport’s traffic begins to slow down, it could jeopardize what service it already has. “But it’s not such a bad thing,” Brienza said. “We are generally faster, cheaper and more reliable than the larger airports.” There’s a lot in motion right now to keep the airport strong, particularly in the way of diversifying its portfolio. Although the airport is primarily looked at in the community as a commercial air service provider, it also has a small, loyal base of general aviation, he said. “We simply needed to pay more attention to our general aviation services and help it grow,” he said. “In the past two years, we have reached out to our general aviation community and tried to understand their needs and wants. We have invested a lot of money in our general aviation terminal and service amenities that we offer our pilots.” It’s also started fuel discount programs and offers new services in an attempt to be more “concierge-like.” “As a result, we have completely filled our hangars with aircraft and have four new aviation businesses on the field including an

LEFT: Travelers wait for their luggage after arriving at Tri-State Airport on a Delta flight from Detroit on March 7. BELOW: Betty Sellards of Huntington grabs her luggage after arriving at Tri-State Airport on a Delta flight from Detroit. Remaining a primary point of departure for TriState residents is essential for continued service from the airport, says director Jerry Brienza. The airport is also seeking to diversify its portfolio by offering more to its general aviation customers.

aircraft maintenance repair facility, two new flight schools (one of which offers aircraft charter services), and Mountwest Community Technical College,” he said. And there’s more. To continue to enhance its general aviation competitiveness, Tri-State has secured funding for improvements to the south side of the airport to reconstruct the roadway and build new utilities to service that side of the airport. “This project will pave the way for future economic development activities on our 95acre development site,” Brienza said. “We anticipate that new aviation business and private development will happen within two years on this site. Additionally, we are seeking to improve our capacity issues in both the terminal and our parking lots. We have been aggressively attempting to secure grants that will allow us to expand or relocate the main terminal and construct a parking garage.” He expressed thanks to the community for its past, present and future support of the we appreciate their continued loyalty,” he productive numbers, which translates that our airport. “We continue to strive to make the whole said. “We know everyone has options when it community is looking at Tri-State Airport and experience more pleasant for our guests and comes to travel, and we continue to show very choosing us as their preferred option.”


C M Y K 50 inch

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The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Transportation

4H The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

HEARTLAND CORRIDOR

Work to start on intermodal facility By JEAN TARBETT HARDIMAN The Herald-Dispatch

jeant@herald-dispatch.com

PRICHARD — Earth work is set to begin in upcoming weeks to prepare for the longawaited intermodal facility at Prichard. The planned facility is meant to play a key role along the Heartland Corridor, a stretch of Norfolk Southern Rail Road that carries double-stacked containers on trains headed from the Virginia coast to Columbus, Ohio. It’s intended to serve as a pit stop where goods can be transferred from rail to roadways, river or air transport. Accordi ng to Don Perdue, executive director of the Wayne County Economic Development Authority and a state legislator, “Things are goi ng ver y wel l with the first con“Over time, the struction fill phase entire complexion set to begin in late of the Prichard M a rc h or e a rly area will change Apr i l ,” he sa id . dramatically, so “R FQ (Redquest for Qualification) our preparations for that bright new is ‘on the street’ face change must be for t he de si g nbuild construction complete and of the bridge and resolutely engaged.” the intermodal site proper. Don Perdue “Once qualified executive director of the Wayne County Economic cont r ac tor s a re Development Authority identified, then the RFP (Request for Proposal) will be let. I am told the RFQ phase should be complete within 30 days then the RFP somewhat longer. Once this is complete I believe actual construction of the bridge and facility could begin in early 2013.” The Heartland Corridor is a project a decade in the making. At the end of last year, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced the Prichard intermodal terminal would receive $12 million through the TIGER (Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery) grant program. The entire project is a local, state, federal

Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Double-stacked trains are pictured running along Norfolk-Southern’s Heartland Corridor in Prichard in this Sept. 13, 2010, file photo. Earth work is set to begin in coming weeks on an intermodal facility meant to serve as a pit stop where goods can be transferred from rail to roadways, river or air transport. and private partnership with a price tag of about $30 million. At the end of the 2011-2012 fiscal year June 30, there should be about $20 million in the project’s fund. Also, $4 million has been allotted per year from the state for rail enhancement until 2016. That will go to this project and others, though this right now is a key project of scope, said Doug York, who took over as executive director of the West Virginia Public Port Authority in January.

“I’m excited about coming into a job with a project to learn about and go after with vigor,” York said. “People will start to see some real movement in the summer.” Everything is on track and there’s an aggressive plant to get it going, he said. Representatives of the port authority even toured other intermodal facilities of similar size to get some ideas of how to make Prichard “a good, formidable player between Virginia and Chicago for our rail lines,” York said. “We want to be a good, cost-effective point to transfer cargo.”

Perdue said that “As this process is evolving, completing any needed local infrastructure will be undertaken so that firms who may wish to locate in the near area (such as warehousing, distribution and fuel centers) may be confident their needs may be met. “Over time, the entire complexion of the Prichard area will change dramatically, so our preparations for that bright new face change must be complete and resolutely engaged,” Perdue said.

Improving economy a boon for Toyota plant For The Herald-Dispatch

BUFFALO — When annual car and truck sales in the United States droppedfrom17millionto10.4million during the recent recession, all sectors of the industry felt the shock, including the Toyota Motor Manufacturing plant in Buffalo. During the lean times, the Buffalo plant focused on improving its processes and investing in the future, General Manager Mike Lutz said. The hard work is beginning to pay dividends. The company recently announced the second expansion of its automatic transmission line in the past two years. The two expansions will add 120 jobs at a total investment of $109 million. “The industry is starting to return, but it’s not returning at the pace it once was,” Lutz said. “It’s slowly recovering. That was the most severe period we’ve ever had to face. I’ve been here coming up on 15 years. When the economy slipped, we caught it late and fast. Our vehicle plants were beginning to experience it before us. They had a severe condition, but their slowdown was more gradual. “In a very short period of time, we prepared and made plans to keep everybody working, and we would use that time for people to work on the operations, improve efficiencies, work on their stations, their tools, their fixtures and improvement ideas. “Our commitment at that time was to focus on getting stronger now for the future,” he said. “It’s proven to help us because we invested in our people and invested in our company. And now we’ve got the expansions.” The first expansion also increased capacity at two Bodine Aluminum plants to supply the Buffalo plant with more transmission cases and housing parts. With the economy slowly improving, consulting firm A.T. Kearney projected vehicle sales to hit 13.2 million this year. Lutz said he expects the plant’s sixspeed transmission to be in high demand. “T he seasona lly a nnua l adjusted rate for sales was once at 17 million,” Lutz said. “We’re down now to 13 million or 12.5 million. So it’s a big difference in total volume. “The difference now is there are more competitors working within

that amount of sales. So sales are getting stronger, but competition is also getting stronger. We believe that’s a good thing. That competition forces us to remain focused on what we’re doing.” The Toyota plant, which employs more than 1,000 workers, manufactures automatic transmissions for the Toyota Avalon, Camry, Venza, Sienna and the Lexus RX350. It also produces four-cylinder engines for the Toyota Corolla and Matrix and V6 engines for the Toyota Highlander, Sienna, Rav4 and Lexus RX350. When the two expansions are completed in 2013, the plant will employ an additional 120 workers, raising the production line count to more than 800. Lutz said an improving economy will drive up vehicle sales. “As long as we can continue to see a stable economy, people are

going to buy vehicles,” he said. “I think they’ve delayed buying vehicles, but I think they’re going to get back.” Prior to joining Toyota, Lutz worked for Denso Manufacturing, a Battle Creek, Mich., supplier to Toyota, Honda and other auto manufacturers. “When I came to Toyota, I joined as a project leader — production control and helped set up the conveyance and logistics and things like that, and then moved over into administration to help on that side of the business.” During its 15 year of operation, the Buffalo plant has expanded seven times. Lutz credits the workers’ focus on safety, quality, efficiency and cost management for the plant’s success. “As long as our folks continue to see those targets and achieve those targets,ourbusinesswillbestrong,”

*$1,000 o� Coupon o�er is available between February 1, 2012, and March 31, 2012. O�er available on new select unregistered Suzuki models. Models include: 2011 and prior Boulevard M109R/Limited Edition, GSX-R1000, GSX-R750, and GSX-R600. See dealer or visit www.SuzukiCycles.com/SalesEvent for more details. O�er is non-transferable and holds no cash value. No transfer, substitution or cash equivalent of Coupon permitted. Promotion is subject to change without notice. Limit one Coupon per purchase. Void where prohibited. **The above �nancing programs are o�ered by She�eld Financial, a Division of BB&T Financial, FSB. Minimum Amount Financed $1,500; Maximum Amount Financed $50,000. Subject to credit approval. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Other �nancing o�ers are available. Financing promotions void where prohibited. An example of monthly payment required on a purchase where the Amount Financed is $7,500, your Down Payment is $0 with 60 monthly payments of $125.00 each. ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE 0%. At Suzuki, we want every ride to be safe and enjoyable. So always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing. Never ride under the in�uence of alcohol or other drugs. Avoid excessive speeds. Never engage in stunt riding. Study your owner’s manual and always inspect your Suzuki before riding. Take a riding skills course. For the course nearest you call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-800-446-9227. Suzuki, the “S” logo, and Suzuki model and product names are Suzuki Trademarks or ®. © American Suzuki Motor Corporation 2012.

DEALER INFO 2605 Greenup Avenue Ashland, KY 41101 244731

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(606) 329-2945

he said. “Global competition is tough. For us to get this announcement proves we’re a strong company. But we have to continue on that path for staying in front of that curve and remain strong. “You don’t get something for nothing. Folks were doing good work. People with that kind of capability overall make our company one the strongest in Toyota’s family. That’s what they like. “We can rise up to a challenge,” he said. “Every two years we’re expanding and changing. You’ve got to be able to have the right mindset and attitude to do that.” Lutz also credits the community and elected officials for the plant’s success. “The community has welcomed us,” he said. “We struggle through a lot of things on a day-to-day basis. When it really comes down to it, the communi-

Boulevard M109R/Limited

GSX-R1000

File photo/The Herald-Dispatch

The Toyota Plant in Buffalo, W.Va. is expanding again. ty’s welcomed us in such a way that I think that’s a big part of our success, too. “To all the businesses out there,

the community leaders, the elected officials, it’s been a good experience. The community’s been a very big help to us.”

GSX-R750

SELECT

MODELS

GSX-R600


C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Transportation

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Courtesy of Metro Creative Graphics

The Associated Press

This undated photo provided by American Airlines parent company AMR, shows workers installing larger bins for carry-on luggage on a Boeing 737, in Tulsa, Okla. Fliers can stop sharpening their elbows. Overhead bins are getting bigger.

Overhead bins getting bigger By JOSHUA FREED The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Fliers can stop sharpening their elbows. Overhead bins are getting bigger. Packed planes and a high volume of carry-ons are forcing airlines to expand the space above passenger’s heads. United and Delta are the latest airlines to replace or upgrade bins so they hold more luggage. And engineers at Boeing are designing jet interiors with today’s bulkier luggage in mind. It’s a chance to placate passengers who feel like they’re thrown into a roller derby every time they board a plane. Because of fees on checked bags, more passengers are bringing carry-ons, which are growing in size. And with planes more crowded than ever, bins fill up before everyone has reached their seat. Travelers fight physics and one another to shove one more bag overhead. Or they’re forced to check luggage at the gate. The result is upset travelers, harried flight attendants and delays. The percentage of passengers bringing bags on board has hovered around 87 percent in recent years, United Continental says. And “the size of the carry-on has increased ... They are stretching the limits of their bags,” says Scott O’Leary, managing director of customer solutions at United Continental Holdings Inc. Expanding bins is a smart way for airlines to set themselves apart, says Henry Harteveldt, who leads airline and travel analysis at Atmosphere Research Group, a market research firm. “Especially if they cater to the business traveler, they’re hoping it will give them a small but noticeable competitive advantage.” Business travelers, for example, avoid an airline that doesn’t have room for their carry-ons. At first blush, it might seem like airlines risk giving away fees if more people can fit carryons on board. But they’re not risking much as it turns out. Airlines often waive bag fees when luggage can’t fit overhead and must be checked at the gate. And business travelers, who generate most of the industry’s revenue, are often exempt from baggage fees anyway. Butwillbiggerbinsencourageflierstobringlarger bags?Airlineshopenot,andaretryingtocrackdown before luggage makes it into the cabin. Airlines expanding their bins include: n United: The airline is replacing bin doors

“A bigger bin is good because at least more stuff will fit up there. But it just seems to encourage (travelers) to bring more stuff.” Tim Kirkwood

a flight attendant for 35 years

on 152 planes starting in April. The new doors curve out more than the old ones. That allows passengers to slide bags into the compartment wheels-first instead of sideways. The renovated bins will be on all of United’s Airbus A320s, one of the main jets the airline uses for domestic flying. The planes will hold 106 typical roll-on bags, up from 64. The bins are also getting more rugged latches because latches on overstuffed bins are more likely to break. Passengers on United’s A320s have had to check their bags at a higher rate than travelers on other planes because there wasn’t enough room. “That’s a real sore point,” O’Leary says. n American Airlines: The airline’s new 737s will hold 48 more bags than the planes they are replacing, although they have 24 more seats, too. That means more people and luggage. American’s older 737s are also getting new baggage-bin doors that curve out more. The work is finished on about half of the 76 planes. n Delta Air Lines: Passengers on international routes like Atlanta-Paris or MinneapolisAmsterdam are starting to see new bins on the airline’s 767 jets. The compartments hold 26 more bags than the bins they are replacing. It’s an increase of 23 percent. n US Airways Group Inc.: In 2008, it enlarged bins on its 757s, a mid-sized plane flown on routes including Phoenix to Hawaii and Charlotte, N.C., to Dublin. Like United, the change allowed fliers to slide bags in wheels-first instead of sideways. “We know it’s a customer enhancement, and yeah, they like it,” says US Airways spokeswoman Michelle Mohr. Tim Kirkwood, a flight attendant for 35 years, remembers overhead bins that were basically open shelves for coats and hats. Now, leisure travelers trying to avoid a bag fee will bring as much as they can into the cabin. “A bigger bin is good because at least more stuff will fit up there,” says Kirkwood, who asked that his airline not be identified. “But it just seems to encourage them to bring more stuff.”

Boeing wants its new planes to have the right bins for all that stuff. The company is engineering its bins to be a better fit for a standard 9 x 14 x 22-inch rollaboard bag. That’s a change from the past. Designers used to focus on maximizing cubic inches. That produced impressive-sounding space that would be quoted in Boeing’s sales materials. But it wasn’t necessarily a good fit for actual carry-on luggage, says Kent Craver, Boeing’s cabin expert. “We never used to talk about how many bags would fit. We talked about volume,” he says. In designing bins on its new 787, Boeing dispatched workers to Costco and other stores to buy roll-aboard bags to make sure they would fit. The 787-8 holds 10 percent more carry-on bags than the larger 777, even though the volume inside the bins is about the same. For passengers, “volume doesn’t really matter. It’s whether or not my bag fits,” Craver says. And that’s the number Boeing now shows in its sales materials. The extra space also makes it more likely that bags will end up close to the passenger who brought them. “They don’t want it 20 rows behind them or 20 rows in front of them, because that causes a lot of anxiety,” Craver says. Bigger bins help. So would passengers who follow the rules about carry-on sizes. Passengers with bigger-than-allowed bags might take bin space from others. It can be tough for airlines to enforce the rules with passengers who print their own boarding pass at home. That’s because the first time an airline worker sees them is at the gate. United is trying to be stricter about carry-on sizes. It has been running an experiment at a few airports, where agents are told to look out for bags that are too big or passengers who bring too many. Oversized bags are checked at the gate. As a result, there’s more room to stow carry-ons. United declined to identify the airports. American is also trying to be tougher about

The Associated Press

US Airways Group is among airlines expanding their overhead bins. US Airways enlarged bins on its 757s, a mid-sized plane flown on routes including Phoenix to Hawaii and Charlotte, N.C., to Dublin. The change allowed fliers to slide bags in wheels-first instead of sideways. carry-on sizes. At every gate, it has installed new size-checking boxes with three hard sides. Bags either slide in or they don’t. The old checkers had no walls, so it was easier to fudge. Airline spokesman Tim Smith says the new boxes act as an arbiter when customers deny that their carry-on is too bulky. American will check a bag for free at the gate if it’s too big. Emily Quinnell, who studies social work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, had to check some small bags at the gate on a recent flight between Minneapolis and Denver. There was no room in the bins. She says airlines should have known that charging for luggage would cause passengers to push the limits of what they can bring on board. “I’m not going to pay for it,” she says. “I’m a student.”


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The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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FANNIN MOTORS A HISTORY OF SUCCESS...

Let us start by saying thank you tri-state for helping us have record-breaking month in February

Fannin Motors started in 1949 with a small used car lot in Flatwoods, KY and has grown over the past 61 years to become one of the regions premier dealerships by offering over nine new franchises in one location and over 200 pre-owned and certified vehicles offered at two locations to serve you. No other dealership in the Tri-state can match what we have to offer when it comes to convenience of one stop shopping to you the customer. The convenience doesn’t end once you buy from us either , After your purchase, Fannin Motors takes care of you and your vehicle like nobody in the business Fannin Motors has one of the largest service departments in the Tri-State with over 50 state-of-the-art bays along with an impressive parts department and body shop.

The dealership also has new and used car buyers’ best interest in mind with our caring and friendly finance staff who can help you with all you financing needs. At Fannin’s we pride ourselves in helping first time buyers and people with slow pay, repossession, divorce even after bankruptcy, get financed for a new or late model car with second chance financing. It’s one of the things that make us different, and it makes us better.

Don’t be fooled by our size, we are still and always will be the same dealership where you can come in and speak with the owners or one of our managers. Fannin Motors will always extend a genuine personal touch to each and every customer.. Helpful, familiar people. state-of-the-art facilities. hassle-free shopping. honest low price. All part of the tried-and-true family tradition you’ll come to appreciate at Fannin Motors.

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C M Y K 50 inch 8H The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Photos by Sholten Singer/The Herald-Dispatch

Workers continue construction of the new WVDOT bridge on Feb. 28 in Guyandotte. The new span linking Huntington and Guyandotte is set to be completed by late May.

New 5th Avenue Bridge on track to open by late May By DAVE LAVENDER The Herald-Dispatch

lavender@herald-dispatch.com

HUNTINGTON — Folks in Guyandotte may one day refer to it as the Memorial Day miracle. Because Lord willing and the river doesn’t rise — after being closed since 2007, the new 5th Avenue Bridge project is set to be completed by late May. For Guyandotte residents, the new bridge, which reconnects Huntington and the historic neighborhood of Guyandotte, has been a long time coming. The old 5th Avenue Guyandotte Bridge — a truss built in 1926 — was closed in 2007 because it was deemed unsafe to carry traffic. A f te r t he re qu i re d e nv i ron me nt a l assessment, the old bridge was demolished in June 2010. The project, which started later that year, was supposed to be done by September 2011, but the wettest year on record for Huntington caused high water levels and delayed construction of one of the piers, said Moe Karimpour, an area engineer with the West Virginia Division of Highways. However, thanks to an unseasonably warm winter, the $3.7 million project was able to pick up the pace in the past few months allowing crews to pour the concrete deck and begin completing the project. Work on the bridge is being done by contractors Bush and Burchett Inc. of Allen, Ky. The new bridge, Karimpour said, will have a cobblestone covering and decorative street light fixtures as well as sidewalks for pedestrians and bicyclists. Rick Simmons, an active community advo-

“You get a part of the community back, and a part of history since that bridge was there for more than 80 years. You’re sort of getting part of your community flow back, so to speak.” Rick Simmons

community advocate for Guyandotte

The new 5th Avenue Bridge was originally scheduled to be completed by September 2011, but the wettest year on record for Huntington caused high water levels and delayed construction. Thanks to an unseasonably warm winter, the pace on the project sped up. cate in Guyandotte and organizer of such festivals as Swinefest and the Fourth of July celebration, said folks are looking forward to the new and improved bridge to help with the flow of traffic and people in and out of the neighborhood. “You get a part of the community back and a part of history since that bridge was there for more than 80 years,” Simmons said. “You’re sort of getting part of your community flow

back, so to speak. It will take some traffic off of 3rd Avenue and with it out, it’s taken people an extra 15 to 20 minutes to come home with all the traffic on Main Street and Route 2. So the main thing is that it helps get the community home, home to have supper and family time. That little bit makes a difference in families and communities.” Simmons said the completion of the bridge will be good timing since the Guyandotte

neighborhood has plenty of fun festivities from festivals such as Fourth of July and Swinefest to Civil War Days in the summer and fall. “It actually will help with the festivals and the Civil War Days,” Simmons said. “When we’d have a parade here the traffic really got tied up. This will really help open up Guyandotte for the positive events that we have. We do a lot of events and sometimes we throw an event together in three or four days if somebody needs help. With the bridge open it can help more people come over to see the historic district of Guyandotte. People can drive through and see some of the rich history so it opens up the avenues to improvement for the community.”


F

inalWishes:

C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

9H

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At Reger, we understand the meaning of old-fashioned value.

304-736-3707

Contact us today, and ask about the following:

Property Owners...

We need for you to contact us to make sure that your file is up to date and accurate... We want to make sure that you have copies of all of the paperwork that you will need in the future. Some of our files date back to the early 1950’s and have nothing more than a name and an incorrect address. Please contact us if you are a property owner or you think you might be or your parents or grandparents were and there are additional spaces in their names...

(304) 736-5221 (800) 254-2609

The worst possible time to find out that something is not exactly as you thought, is while you are here to make final arrangements. PO Box 273 • Barboursville, WV 25504

Name: State:

Phone:

S

ince 1924 families in the Tri-State have depended on Reger Funeral Home before, during and after their times of loss. At Reger, there’s a tradition of value. We have continually proved our ability to balance individual preferences and budgets. Compare the costs. Because we have remained locally owned and operated for generations, we have experience to add more value Reger Chapel - Built in 1947 to your arrangements, and to your memories. • Pre Need Planning • Cremation Available

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Personal Planning Guide National Transferability Pre-arranged Discounts Grief Management Library Spaces near a loved one 100% Service Guarantee Mausoleum vs. Lot pricing Low monthly payments Free price quote Zero % interest An honor provider of the Dignity Memorial Network www.dignitymemorial.com or www.woodmerememorial.com

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Woodmere & Ridgelawn 5547 West Pea Ridge Road Huntington, WV 25705

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C M Y K 50 inch 10H

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Offers good on new and unregistered units purchased between 3/1/12-4/30/12. *On select models. See your dealer for details. ** Rates as low as 3.99% for 36 months. Offers only available at participating Polaris® dealers. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Other financing offers are available. Applies to the purchase of all new ATV and RANGER models made on the Polaris Installment Program from 3/1/12 - 4/30/12. Fixed APR of 3.99%, 7.99%, or 10.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. Examples of monthly payments over a 36 month term at 3.99% APR: $29.52 per $1,000 financed and at 10.99% APR: $32.73 per $1,000 financed. Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RANGER RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet firmly on the floor. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on difficult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Polaris adult models are for riders 16 and older. For your safety, always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing, and be sure to take a safety training course. For safety and training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887. You may also contact your Polaris dealer or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. ©2012 Polaris Industries Inc.

Certain restrictions and exclusions apply. See your Victory® dealer for full details. Victory and Victory Motorcycles® are registered trademarks of Polaris Industries Inc. Always wear a helmet, eye protection, and protective clothing and obey the speed limit. Never ride under the influence of drugs or alcohol. ©2012 Polaris Industries Inc.


C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

2012 Ford

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C M Y K 50 inch FIND More PHoTos oNLINe AT WWW.HerALD-DIsPATCH.CoM.

Progress 2012: TrANsPorTATIoN

www.herald-dispatch.com

Sunday, March 18, 2012

1I

Moses Auto Mall in Huntington

State auto industry anticipates good year By CARA BAILEY

For The Herald-Dispatch

Photos by Sholten Singer/The Herald-Dispatch

Steven Harriot, left, assists Jeff Miller of Huntington as he shops for a vehicle on Monday at Dutch Miller Kia in Barboursville.

HUNTINGTON — The automotive industry in West Virginia is expected to continue an upward climb in 2012, after plummeting in 2008. Ruth Lemmon, the president of the West Virginia Automotive and Truck Dealers Association, said the current trend of increased sales will continue this year. “The industry is rebuilding and dealers are doing very well,” Lemmon said. “2012 should be the best year we’ve had for a while.” The issues produced in 2008 — bankruptcies, loss of dealerships and consumers facing an uncertain economy — seem to have dissipated, Lemmon said. There are 136 new car franchised dealers in West Virginia, with three additional stores anticipated to open this year. One of those new stores is the Moses Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram dealership, opening at Kinetic Park in Huntington. Owner Jason Moses said he anticipates the dealership will be open by the end of 2012. Those dealers sold 61,818 new vehicles in 2011, up 2.6 percent from the 60,204 new vehicles sold in 2010. Lemmon said West Virginia dealers are expecting to see a cumulative 14 percent growth in car sales over last year. “The opportunities are out there for consumers to enjoy a better buying experience because of new products being introduced, the financing availability and the stabilization of our economy,” Lemmon said. With the average West Virginia automobile owner holding onto his or her vehicle for at least 10 years, Lemmon said the automobile industry is poised to fill a longterm need. “There is a pent-up demand that will be met with the consumer, if the economy holds,” she said.

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C M Y K 50 inch 2I The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Fill ’er up ...

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

with natural gas Racing to

be first:

Chrysler, GM plan natural gas vehicles

The Associated Press

The 2012 Honda Civic Natural Gas car, named Green Car of the Year for 2012, is displayed after its unveiling at press preview day for the Los Angeles Auto Show in this Nov. 17, 2011, file photo. The natural-gas version of the Civic joins a growing list of natural-gas vehicles planned for production.

Automakers offering vehicles, but consumers slow to embrace option The Associated Press

DETROIT — More natural gas-powered vehicles will hit the market soon, as rising gasoline prices, booming natural gas production and proposed tax credits make them a more attractive option. But they’re a long way from being a common sight in U.S. driveways. Starting in July, Chrysler will sell a Ram 2500 Heavy Duty pickup that runs on compressed natural gas (CNG). The truck has both gasoline and natural gas storage tanks, and the engine shifts automatically between the two, without the driver needing to push a switch. The truck can run for 255 miles on natural gas and the range is extended to 367 miles using gasoline. Once the CNG tanks are empty, the vehicle shifts to gasoline. The dashboard has gauges for both fuels. Chrysler will have competition. Late this year, General Motors Co. will sell natural-gas versions of two pickups — the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500 HD. The GM trucks will run on gasoline and natural gas for 650 miles. Ford Motor Co. has offered natural-gas ready pickups and vans since 2009. Natural gas is appealing for a lot of reasons. It comes from domestic sources, for those concerned about importing oil. It produces 30 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than traditional gasoline or diesel. And it costs less than gasoline because of abundant production and supplies in the U.S. Natural gas prices have dropped more than 23 percent this year, reaching a 10-year low on Wednesday. Regular gasoline prices have climbed 23 percent over the same period. At the pump, drivers paid an average of $3.37 a gallon for gasoline in late January. That compared with $2.13 for compressed natural gas, according to government data. But U.S. buyers have been slow to adopt natural-gas vehicles, which make up less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the vehicles on American roads. Even the newest trucks aren’t intended for average buyers. They’re work trucks, capable of plowing snow and towing three tons or more. Chrysler will only sell its natural-gas Ram to fleet customers like local governments, utilities and construction companies. GM anticipates that 90 percent of its sales will be to fleets. Here are some reasons that U.S. buyers have been slow to adopt natural-gas vehicles: n Lack of fueling stations. There are around 1,000 natural-gas fueling sta-

The Associated Press

This Jan. 24, 2011 photo, shows the 2011 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra heavy-duty pickups assembly line at the Flint Assembly in Flint, Mich. General Motors Co. plans to sell natural-gas versions of the two pickups starting later this year. The trucks will run on gasoline and natural gas for 650 miles. tions in the U.S., but only half of them are open to the public. Most are operated by local governments or private companies to refuel buses and other fleet vehicles. California-based Clean Energy Fuels Corp., a natural gas provider backed by oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens, is planning a big expansion. It aims to install natural-gas pumps at 150 truck stops nationwide over the next few years. But that pales in comparison to the availability of gasoline, which is sold at 117,000 stations in the U.S. That’s why natural gas is still primarily relegated to fleets, which can return to a central refueling station. Filling up at a CNG station is just like pumping gasoline, although the fuel is a highly-compressed gas, not a liquid. n Few choices. There is only one factory-built, natural-gas car sold in the U.S. It’s the natural-gas version of the Honda Civic. Around 13,000 have been sold since the car f irst went on sale in 1998, mostly to fleets. But Honda’s making a bigger push to sell them to individual buyers. Last

yea r, t he compa ny expa nded t he number of dealers selling naturalgas Civics to nearly 200 in 36 states, up 50 percent from 2010. The company expects to build nearly 4,000 natural-gas Civics in 2012, double t he nu mber it i n it i a l ly pl a n ned thanks to strong buyer interest. But regular, gas-powered Civics remain the overwhelming favorite. Honda sold 27,000 gasoline-powered Civics in February alone. n Cost. Additional fuel tanks and parts, and small-scale production make natural gas vehicles more expensive. The CNG Ram, for example, starts at $47,500, almost $20,000 more than a base Ram 2500. The natural-gas Civic starts at $26,155, or $10,000 more than a base four-door Civic. GM won’t announce the price of its natural-gas trucks until next month, but expect a premium. It can also cost up to $18,000 to convert a gasoline vehicle to a natural gas one, according to Natural Gas Vehicles for America, a lobbying group. The economic benefits aren’t com-

pelling enough for most drivers, says Mary Barcella, director of North American Natural Gas research at consulting f irm IHS CER A . With gasoline prices of about $4 per gallon, it would take five years or more to recoup the extra cost of a natural gas vehicle. She thinks natural gas vehicles will only become more popular if pump prices rise and stay high for a long time. It’s the same story with hybrid cars, which have been on the market for more than a decade but have a price premium that is difficult to recoup, especially if gas prices are low. Three out of every 100 cars sold in the U.S. are hybrids. The price for a natural gas vehicle could go down significantly if Congress approves a tax credit proposed in the Obama administration’s 2013 budget. The administration has proposed replacing the current $7,500 electric vehicle tax credit with an advanced technology vehicle credit of up to $10,000. The credits would go to manufacturers in an effort to encourage lower prices and spur demand.

DETROIT — Chrysler aims to be the first U.S. automaker to produce a factory-built pickup truck that is powered mainly by natural gas. The privately held company said Tuesday that its new Ram 2500 Heavy Duty CNG truck will be sold to commercial customers that operate truck fleets. The company expects to deliver the first trucks in July. The truck will have natural gas tanks and an 8gallon fuel tank for gasoline. Chrysler said a small amount of gasoline is needed to start the truck, but after ignition it runs entirely on natural gas. If the natural gas tanks run out, the engine can switch to gasoline. Natural gas prices have dropped steeply over the last year thanks to higher production. Chrysler said the gaspowered trucks will save money for their owners over the long term. Other automakers are moving into the natural gas market. On Monday, General Motors Co. said it would release two 2013model pickup trucks powered in part by natural gas. The company said it would start taking orders in April for the natural gas-powered 2013 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500 HD. GM said it expects to ship its vehicles toward the end of the year. The trucks will be available to both commercial fleet operators and retail customers. Chrysler said its truck will have a 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 engine. The pickup will have a driving range of about 255 miles on natural gas alone. The backup supply of gasoline boosts the range to 367 miles. Chrysler said it expects commercial customers like public utilities and telephone repair crews to buy the trucks for their fleets. GM said its trucks will run on a Vortec 6.0L V-8 engine that uses both natural gas and gasoline. The trucks will have a total range of about 650 miles using both fuels, the company said.


C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Autos

n Continued from 1I

In 2011, the Ford F-150 was the top-selling truck — for the second straight year — and the Toyota Camry was the top-selling car. The Ford Escape was the topselling sports-utility vehicle. Mike Maddox, the new cars manager for Turnpike Ford in Huntington, said the F-150 has always been a good seller. “Our bread and butter is the F-150,” he said. “We sell more F-

JOB: Executive manager, Moses Automall. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YOUR CAREER? Born to do it. FIRST JOB: If you don’t count filling Coke machines at the dealership, it was working in the parts department. FAMILY: Wife Halcyon; daughter Eowyn, son Jackson. SPECIAL SKILLS: Multitasking. FAVORITE BOOK: “The Black Swan” by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. FAVORITE MOVIE: “The Village.” FAVORITE TV SHOW: Whatever is on WSAZ.

150 pickups than anything.” However, Maddox said the possible increase in gasoline prices over the next few months might mean customers trade in the truck for a more fuel-efficient vehicle. After the Camry, the Ford Focus and Ford Fusion were the top-selling cars, while the Escape was followed by the Kia Sorento and Chevy Equinox. Chris Miller, the operator of Dutch Miller Kia, said his dealership experienced a record-setting year in 2011 and led the nation last year in Sorento sales. New

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

car sales were up 39 percent from 2010. Miller said he expects that trend to continue. “We anticipate about a 10 percent increase in new car sales and a 40 percent increase in used car sales,” he said. Used cars are also holding a higher value, not only in West Virginia, but across the nation. Fewer people are buying new cars or leasing cars from manufacturers, which leads to overall fewer vehicles entering the marketplace. Miller said supply has dropped, while demand has

3I

stayed the same. “People are holding onto their cars longer,” Miller said. “The value of used cars, which traditionally depreciate, has held very strong. We’ve never seen a phenomenon like this before.” Lemmon said she anticipates more vehicle owners trading in their cars this year, as manufacturers release new models. “West Virginians always buy vehicles that meet their needs,” Lemmon said. “Our cars are very much a part of our daily life and have to meet those needs.”

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For more information,contact the Parks andVisitors Bureau at 562-0727 Extension 102


C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Transportation

4I The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Photos by The Associated Press

Bobby Thompson, of St. Joseph, Mo., fills is gas tank at the Shop $ Hop at County Line Road and the Belt Highway in St. Joseph, Mo., on Feb. 20.

This Feb. 27 photo, shows gas prices at a Pittsburgh Exxon mini-mart. With drivers wondering how high prices can go this time, now’s a good time to brush up on simple ways you can cut your gasoline costs — like filling up midweek and skipping premium fuels.

Simple ways to reduce your gas costs The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Spikes in gasoline prices occur so regularly that ways to combat them should be almost second nature to car owners. But the latest surge brings worries of the highest price yet at the pumps, underscoring the urgency of really following up on those money-saving moves this time. It may be on pace to shatter the all-time record of $4.11 in July 2008 by next month, according to some experts. Could $5 gas loom in the not-too-distant future? If higher prices stick, drivers may have to take more drastic steps. Using public transportation is one option to consider. Making the long-term investment to buy a high-mileage hybrid car is another. “People can cut their gasoline bills by a lot by moving to fuel-efficient vehicles,” says Brian Castelli, executive vice president of the Alliance to Save Energy, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprof it that promotes energy efficiency. “When you’ve got $4 gasoline, you can save a lot of money by going to the gas station once every two or three weeks instead of once every week. The average U.S. household is on track to spend more than $3,300 this year on gasoline for its vehicles, according to the alliance. That could jump significantly depending on how much pump prices rise. Short of buying a new vehicle, here are some tips on ways to shave your costs regardless of how high prices climb:

Reduce idling

Fill up the tank midweek

Warming up a car engine in cold weather is one thing. Letting it idle needlessly outside stores, in front of a friend’s house or at railroad crossings is another. That wastes fuel, costs money and pollutes the air. Cut the engine if you will be at a standstill for more than a minute. If there’s a line of cars in the drivethru at Starbucks or McDonald’s, just park and go inside. The line inside is often much shorter anyway. While you’re at it, combine errands to conserve fuel. Several short trips from a cold start can consume twice as much gas as one over the same distance when the engine is warm, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Drive slower and smarter

Shop smarter

Easing your foot off the accelerator is a guaranteed way to reduce expenses. Every 5 mph you drive over 60 costs you an additional 24 cents per gallon, the Department of Energy estimates. That’s because the faster you go, the more work your engine has to do to propel your vehicle. The sweet spot for fuel efficiency on the highway is about 55 mph. But slowing from 70 to 60 can help a lot. Doing so on an average 20-mile highway commute saves about 1.3 gallons of gas in a five-day work week, according to the American Automobile Association. Drive more smoothly around town, too — avoid fast acceleration and quick stops.

Smartphones make it easier than in past years to find the best prices in a given location. Websites like GasBuddy.com and some GPS devices also help. Apps from AAA, GasBuddy and CheapGas all can guide you to the cheapest options on your route. Just be wary of ads hawking products that can improve your mileage. The Environmental Protection Agency says it has tested more than 100 purported gas-saving products — automotive devices and oil and gas additives — and found that very few provided any fuel economy benefits. Some can even damage your car’s engine or cause it to spew more exhaust. Track your gasoline expenses and miles

Gas up on Wednesday, or first thing Thursday. Prices are raised on Thursdays in anticipation of weekend travel. And 10 a.m. is roughly when most station owners make their price change for the day, according to CEO Chris Faulkner of High gas prices are posted at a Shell gas staDallas-based Breitling Oil & Gas Corp. “Unless it is an emergency, do not buy gas tion in South San Francisco, Calif., on Feb. 22. Friday, Saturday or Sunday,” Faulkner says. lutely no benefit,” according to the Federal Trade Do regular maintenance Commission. “It won’t make your car perform betKeep your vehicle running smoothly to ter, go faster, get better mileage or run cleaner.” An exception would be if your engine starts get maximum fuel economy. Stick to the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance to knock or ping when using a lower-grade schedule. Taking the car in for tuneups based fuel. on the owner’s manual’s timetable can improve mileage by an average of 4 percent, according Use gas cards to the Energy Department. Gasoline cards can cut your costs by providA simple but often overlooked part of main- ing rewards, incentives or cash back. There tenance is keeping tires properly inflated and are many types: prepaid cards or certificates, aligned. Under-inflated tires add resistance, credit cards issued by gasoline companies and requiring more effort from your engine. cards issued by credit card companies. Using the recommended grade of motor oil Companies such as BP, ExxonMobil and also can make a difference. Shell issue their own cards. They can offer the most savings to customers who are loyal Skip premium fuel to a particular brand. Shop carefully and pay Unless your vehicle absolutely requires pre- close attention to the fine print, however. Stamium gas, don’t spend the additional 15 to 30 tion-branded cards are known for their high cents per gallon. Consumer Reports says motor- interest rates, which can range from 21 percent ists should not waste money on premium if their to 26.99 percent, according to card comparison owner’s manual says the vehicle takes regular site LowCards.com. Consider one only if you — the car won’t run better. The higher-octane pay off your balance in full every month. Another option is a cash-back credit card fuel is designed to improve performance. “In most cases, using a higher-octane gasoline with an extra bonus for gasoline purchases. thanyourowner’smanualrecommendsoffersabso- Some cards can save you up to 5 percent.

“Unless it is an emergency, do not buy gas Friday, Saturday or Sunday.” Chris Faulkner

of Dallas-based Breitling Oil & Gas Corp.

“In most cases, using a higher-octane gasoline than your owner’s manual recommends offers absolutely no benefit. It won’t make your car perform better, go faster, get better mileage or run cleaner.” according to the Federal Trade Commission

Aggressive driving can lower a car’s fuel driven and view your trends at http://www. FuelFrog.com . economy significantly.


C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Transportation

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Competition forcing automakers to better quality, meaning fewer problems for consumers By DEE-ANN DURBI and TOM KRISHER The Associated Press

In this Feb. 8 photo, Ford introduces a 2013 Ford Focus ST during the media preview of the Chicago Auto Show.

Photos by The Associated Press

This May 31, 2011, file photo shows a detail of the grill of a 2011 Chevrolet Cruze compact car, right, near another Chevrolet Cruze, left, on the lot of a dealership, in Norwood, Mass. If you’re shopping for a car today, you’re less likely to end up with a lemon. In the past five years, global competition has forced automakers to raise the quality and reliability of their vehicles — everything from inexpensive mini-cars to decked-out luxury SUVs. It used to be that the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic were the far better than the rest, and they cost more. But the new Chevrolet Cruze, and the vastly improved Hyundai Elantra and Ford Focus are giving consumers more options.

In this Jan. 9 photo, the 2012 Hyundai Elantra is shown at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

DETROIT — Car shoppers today are less likely to end up with a lemon. In the past five years, global competition has forced automakers to improve the quality and reliability of their vehicles — everything from inexpensive mini-cars to decked-out luxury SUVs. The newfound emphasis on quality means fewer problems for owners. It also means more options for buyers, who can buy a car from Detroit or South Korea and know it will hold up like a vehicle from Japan. With few exceptions, cars are so close on reliability that it’s getting harder for companies to charge a premium. So automakers are trying to set themselves apart with sleek, cutting-edge exterior designs and more features such as luxurious interiors, multiple air bags, dashboard computers and touch-screen controls. “It’s a great time to be a consumer,” says Jesse Toprak, vice president of industry trends for the TrueCar.com auto pricing website. “You can’t really screw up too badly in terms of your vehicle choice.” It wasn’t always this close. In the 1990s, Honda and Toyota dominated in quality, especially in the key American market for small and midsize cars. Japan began building high-quality small cars and tapped into America’s growing appetite for fuel efficiency in the 1970s. With their sterling reputation, they were able to charge more than Detroit automakers and cut Detroit’s U.S. market share from 78 percent in 1980 to just under 43 percent in 2009, “It’s a great time to be according to Ward’s AutoInfoBank. a consumer. You can’t Cars from Detroit generreally screw up too ally weren’t as trouble-free badly in terms of your in the 1980s and ‘90s. Hyunvehicle choice.” dai executives concede their Jesse Toprak quality used to be poor. vice president of industry However, around 2006, as trends for the TrueCar.com General Motors, Ford Motor auto pricing website Co. and Chrysler Group LLC were heading into financial trouble, they realized that people were shifting away from trucks and sport utility vehicles to smaller cars and car-based crossover SUVs. Gas prices were on the rise again, and the companies, which relied on bigger vehicles for their profits, had few cars to offer. Fearing the shift, Detroit decided to go after the Japanese and shifted research dollars from trucks to cars after years of neglect. Detroit also realized that Hondas and Toyotas were quieter and more reliable, so they spent more on engineering and parts to close the gap. Meanwhile, Korean automakers Hyundai Motor Co. and Kia Motors Corp. were busy redesigning their cars, changing to more cutting-edge looks to boost sales. Then, Toyota’s reputation was tarnished by a series of safety recalls, and Honda played conservative with new models that looked similar to the old ones. The newfound emphasis on quality has closed the gap between best and worst in the industry. In 1998, J.D. Power and Associates, which surveys owners about trouble with their cars after three years, found an industry average of 278 problems per 100 vehicles. By this year, the number fell to 132. In 1998, the most reliable car had 92 problems per 100 vehicles, while the least reliable had 517, a gap of 425. This year the gap closed to 284 problems. “We don’t have total clunkers like we used to,” says Dave Sargent, automotive vice president with J.D. Power. Nearly all automakers are improving in quality, but manufacturers that are at the bottom of the rankings are improving more quickly than those at the top, Sargent said. Detroit’s three automakers have narrowed the quality gap considerably against brands from other countries. In 1998, J.D. Power found 42 more problems per 100 vehicles with GM, Ford and Chrysler cars and trucks. This year the gap had narrowed to just 13. While car prices are still rising, the narrow gap keeps Japanese automakers from charging a premium over rivals with similar models. The competition helps consumers by giving them more choices and more car for their money. Some examples: n Compacts: It used to be that the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic were far better than the rest, and they cost more. But the new Chevrolet Cruze and the vastly improved Hyundai Elantra and Ford Focus are giving consumers more options. The Cruze, which went on sale in 2010, is far better than the car it replaced, the Chevrolet Cobalt. GM sold 231,000 Cruzes last year to pass the Civic for second place and come within 9,000 of the Corolla, the small-car sales leader. While Corollas and Civics were in short supply following Japan’s March earthquake, the Cruze offered a good alternative for people who didn’t want to wait. In May, Cruze sales surged 40 percent over the Cobalt’s year-earlier sales, besting all rivals to become the top-selling U.S. compact that month. The competition has nearly erased the premium paid for Hondas and Toyotas. But that’s largely due to price increases by competitors. Since compacts have more features, people are paying more for the Focus, Elantra and Cruze. For example, in 2007, Toyota got an average of $15,820 for every Corolla it sold, a premium of $1,708 over what GM charged for a Chevy Cobalt. The average Cobalt sold for $14,112. But last year the roles reversed. The premium instead went to General Motors, which got an average price of $19,858 for the Cruze, which replaced the Cobalt in 2010. That’s $2,028 more than the Corolla at $17,830, according to the TrueCar. com website. n Midsize cars: Toyota’s Camry and Honda’s Accord used to be dominant. But Ford’s Fusion, Nissan’s Altima and Hyundai’s Sonata are cutting into their sales. The Camry kept its long-held title as the nation’s top-selling car last year, but the Altima and Fusion passed the Accord, which is typically No. 2. The price premium paid for Hondas and Toyotas has nearly vanished in midsize cars as well. Like with small cars, people are paying more because of more standard equipment and options.

Please see QUALITY/6I

5I


C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Transportation

6I The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Quality

n Continued from 5I

“It’s very hard to find products that aren’t good anymore,” says Jeremy Anwyl, CEO of the Edmunds.com automotive website. “In safety, performance and quality, the differences just don’t have material impact.” First-year law student Randall Rosales found many good choices last year when he began looking for a small luxury SUV to replace his mother’s 2008 Infiniti sedan in Dallas. At 22 years old, he’s his family’s designated car expert. Unlike previous searches, he’s found that every vehicle on his list has similar quality and options. “It’s getting harder to choose because every manufacturer, at least in the luxury class, tends to have all the features we consider essential,” Rosales said. In past searches, some automakers, including those based in the U.S., were behind in features like Bluetooth cell phone links and touchscreen controls, Rosales said. But that has pretty much evened out, he said. He considered the BMW X3, Mercedes GLK350, Lexus RX 350 and In f initi E X 35 before pick ing a n

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Chrysler is hoping to seize a share of the compact car market with its 2013 Dodge Dart. Prices will start at about $16,000. The Associated Press

Audi Q5 because the fuel economy of its turbocharged four-cylinder engine and its interior quality set it apart. With quality, fuel economy and price close to equal across the U.S. market, companies also are pushing the edge on exterior design to differentiate their cars. Honda, for instance, unveiled a daring new Accord coupe in Detroit that looks like a far more expensive car, while Ford did the same with its new Fusion. “It’s got to be beautiful,” says Mary Barra, GM’s product development chief who led work on a new Cadillac small luxury sports sedan. Another way to stand apart is to lower a car’s base price, sacrificing profits to gain market share, at least initially. That’s what Chrysler is hoping for with the new Dodge Dart compact, which starts around $16,000, about $700 less than a Cruze and $500 less than the Ford Focus, the Dart’s two main competitors.

CEO Sergio Marchionne says the company won’t make much money on a basic Dart. But the lower price will get the car on shopping lists, and Marchionne is hoping people will add

Step Back In Time WITH A VISIT TO HUNTINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA’S ONLY AUTO MUSEUM

features and pay more. Chrysler in the past spent little on compact-car development and hasn’t offered a competitive one for years. But being late has its benefits. Chrysler

learned by avoiding mistakes made by other companies, says Ralph Gilles, the company’s chief designer. “Coming last to the party, you can bring a nice bottle of wine,” he says.

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C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch 8I The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

From rail to road to air, a look back at the Tri-State in motion

The Camden Interstate Railway Company was organized on Dec. 13, 1900, to splice together several local streetcar lines to form a true interurban route between Guyandotte, Ashland and Hanging Rock, Ohio, by using a ferry boat between Ashland and Coal Grove, Ohio. Soon afterward, local steamboat traffic dried up and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway’s “shuttle” to Ashland and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad’s “dummy” to Kenova were discontinued. Eventually, all of the original horsecars gave way to electrically powered streetcars, which in turn bowed to buses in 1937. Camden Park, a picnic spot started by the company in 1902, still operates as a separate entity.

The body of Chief Justice Fred Vinson (Jan. 22, 1890 — Sept. 8, 1953) arrives from Washington, D.C., on a Chesapeake & Ohio train in Louisa, Ky., in September 1953. Vinson had served in all three branches of U.S. government. According to the Oyez Project, “Fred Vinson was the son of a rural Kentucky county jailer and his wife. He worked his way through college and law school and entered the practice of law in Kentucky at the age of 21. Vinson was a congressman for 8 terms and served on the influential Ways and Means Committee during much of the New Deal. He resigned his House seat to accept an appointment by Roosevelt to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. After five years on the bench, Vinson resigned to accept an appointment in the Roosevelt administration as head of the Office of Economic Stabilization. Vinson later succeeded former justice James Byrnes as head of the Office of War Mobilization. Vinson became a trusted advisor to President Harry Truman, who appointed him Secretary of the Treasury. Truman later nominated Vinson to the position of Chief Justice. Vinson avoided the announcement of sweeping constitutional principles. He resisted overturning prior decisions. Though he helped chip away at the ‘separate but equal’ doctrine of racial separation, he resisted a head-on confrontation of the issue in Brown v. Board of Education. Vinson’s sudden death from a heart attack in 1953 paved the way for the unanimous opinion crafted by Vinson’s successor, Earl Warren.” Vinson is buried at Pinehill Cemetery in Louisa, Ky.

American Airlines pilots and stewardess. Possibly at Tri-State Airport shortly after it opened in 1952. American Airlines and Eastern Airline served the airport. “The plane is a Douglas DC-3 of the tail down type,” said Richard McCoy of Huntington. Date is unknown, although the photo is likely from the early 1950s.

PhoToS From The herald-diSPaTch archiveS

Gillen Ford Sales and Service on 3rd Avenue in Chesapeake, Ohio, dates back to 1920. Date unknown, but possibly from around 1950.


C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Transportation

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

ABOVE: This is at the Island Creek coal loading facility at 11th-12th streets, according to Richard McCoy. “The sternwheeler Crescent is putting in a day’s work, positioning barges to be loaded,” he said. “This is what Huntington was all about — Collis P. Huntington building the C&O railway, getting coal loaded on the Ohio River where transportation was cheapest and connected to the great markets both upstream and down and around the world. Island Creek Coal Co. is up in a hollow above Logan. A nine-foot thick seam of high-grade coal that will never play out.” Date is unknown. LEFT: Before succumbing to the lure of diesel power, the C&O tried other ideas. One was streamlining some of its old steam locomotives. An even bolder attempt to stave off the spread of the diesels was C&O’s 500, the first coal-burning steam turbine-electric locomotive ever constructed and the largest passenger locomotive in the world. Built in 1947, it was more than 154 feet long, including its water tender, and had a rated top speed of 100 miles per hour. Unfortunately, the ill-fated locomotive never lived up to its ambitious billing, and the C&O quietly abandoned the project. Shown here posing with the 500 is one of the uniformed airline-style hostess who briefly appeared on C&O passenger trains in the 1940s. Like the 500, the stewardess idea proved unsuccessful and was discontinued. Thanks to Jim Casto for the information.

Caption from James Casto’s “Images of America: Cabell County”: “James Arthur Garner is shown at the wheel of his fourcylinder Winton 6 automobile, purchased in the fall of 1909 and credited by George Selden Wallace with being the first automobile in the city of Huntington. The car is shown parked in front of Gallick’s Book Store in the 900 block of 4th Avenue. Note the gas tank located above the running board for fueling the headlights.”

According to the Tri-State Airport web site, the Tri-State Airport Authority was formed in 1948. The Authority appointed a committee to buy the land, 534 acres in Kenova. A contract was signed March 7, 1950, and the Tri-State Airport was dedicated Nov. 2, 1952.

Today’s Lawrence County Airpark was known as the HuntingtonChesapeake Airport in 1938. American discontinued service at the airport in 1945, deeming it no longer adequate. The end of World War II and the departure of American Airlines at Chesapeake, Ohio, gave new momentum to the idea of building a modern airport. The result was Tri-State Airport, which opened in 1952. Thanks to Jim Casto for the information. Date is unknown, but this photo was taken before the Nick J. Rahall Bridge was built in 1968.

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C M Y K 50 inch 10I

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch 12I

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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C M Y K 50 inch FIND More PHoTos oNLINe AT WWW.HerALD-DIsPATCH.CoM.

Progress 2012: TrANsPorTATIoN

www.herald-dispatch.com

Sunday, March 18, 2012

1J

Ground beginning to move for a new Ironton-Russell Bridge here were times during the past five years when Ironton Mayor Rich Blankenship said it felt like the plans to build a new Ironton-Russell Bridge were falling apart faster than the existing 90-year-old bridge itself. The long road to replace the bridge predates Blankenship’s tenure as mayor by nearly two decades, as far back as 1991, when the Ohio Department of Transportation deemed the bridge “structurally deficient” and placed restrictions on the bridge, prohibiting semi tractor-trailers and big box-style trucks weighing more than 65 percent of federal weight limits at the time. That was followed by feasibility studies during the late 1990s by ODOT to explore just the possibility of building a new bridge in addition to more extensive weight limits and years of routine shut downs for inspections and repairs. Even with those restrictions in place, at least 10,000 cars cross the bridge each day. While the red tape was being untangled, a $1.1 million rehabilitation project was enough to keep the bridge open in 2009, but the restrictions and red tape remained. “For the four plus years I’ve been mayor this has been a major project I’ve been working on for state officials,” Blankenship said. “Within the first 60 days of my term I met with Ted Strickland, who was the governor at the time, about this bridge. We’ve been working at this for a while, and there are so many others who worked on this project prior to my being mayor.”

All of that hard work seemed to finally have paid off earlier this month as crews with Brayman Construction of Saxonburg, Pa., began clearing brush and moving the earth on both sides of the river to make way for the new bridge, which is expected to be completed in 2015. The current bridge should be taken down by summer 2016, Fuller said. The third time was the charm this January when State officials Brayman was awarded an $81 million contract to hatch new plan construct the bridge. for threatened In 2007, the bidding process came to a screechfalcons living on ing halt when bids came in well above $100 million Ironton-Russell for a project, which, at the time, had an $85 million budget, said Kathleen Fuller, a spokeswoman for Bridge / 2J the District 9 office of ODOT in Chillicothe. Fuller attributed that skyrocketing cost to the original design of the bridge and the cost of materials, which spiked well above their anticipated levels during the bidding process. The original design called for a one-of-a-kind bridge that Fuller said would have been the only bridge of its type and scale in the Midwest, possibly the U.S. That design called for a single tower bridge with wide shoulders and a sidewalk, similar to the U.S. Grant Bridge in Portsmouth, but a little bit bigger, Fuller said.

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C M Y K 50 inch 2J The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

“I said, ‘Thanks, but I’m going to have to go talk to your director about this,’ and that’s exactly what I did. I went to him and expressed the necessity of this new bridge. I told him about the history of this whole process. He was a new director, and it was important to make sure he understood what all had happened in the process of us trying to get this new bridge. After that meeting, I was informed the bidding process on the bridge would move forward.” Rich Blankenship

Ironton mayor on the work he did after being told by ODOT officials the bidding process for the Ironton-Russell Bridge would again be postponed

Photos by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Bridge

n Continued from 1J

In the redesign, it was changed to a twotower structure with standard shoulders, and the sidewalks were eliminated. “In doing this we were able to bring down the cost significantly,” Fuller said. “There were a few other less-recognizable changes that were made to bring the cost down, but the biggest cost driver in the original design was the single tower.” Following the redesign, it seemed like it was once again back to the bidding process in August 2011, but that process was halted before it even began. ODOT officials said at the time they were looking for potential public-private partnerships to finance the project. That was followed up by a visit to Blankenship from the same ODOT officials, who told him the bidding process would be “It’s a very positive postponed until step. This bridge will June 2012. That moment be a direct connection nearly was the of two great places. breaking point It will be a tremendous for two decades asset to both of work, Blankencommunities.” ship said. “I said, ‘Thanks, Bill Dingus but I’m going to executive director of the have to go talk Greater Lawrence County Area Chamber of to your director Commerce about this,’ and t h at ’s ex ac t ly what I did,” Blankenship said. “I went to him and expressed the necessity of this new bridge. I told him about the history of this whole process. He was a new director, and it was important to make sure he understood what all had happened in the process of us trying to get this new bridge. “After that meeting, I was informed the bidding process on the bridge would move forward.” The result of that final push can be found on full display at the future access points of the bridge, near South 2nd Street and Madison Street in Ironton, and near U.S. 23 in Russell. On the Russell side, the bridge will touch down over a residential area with CSX train tracks running through the area, and Fuller said construction crews have already planned their construction around existing sewer, water and communication lines. “We certainly don’t want to interrupt those lines or the service in them,” Fuller said. “Everything has been carefully marked, so contractors don’t get involved in any of those areas and create a nightmare for residents. We’re taking every precaution we can.” While the new, more structurally appropriate bridge will mean more traffic travelling through the area, namely tractor trailers, Russell Mayor Bill Hopkins said he is concerned the traffic might not flow in his town’s favor. The bridge currently feeds right into downtown Russell, but the new access point will steer traffic away from the area Hopkins said has been developing at a good pace in recent years. “We just have to take what we can get in this situation. We won’t really know what kind of impact it will have until it happens. We’re hoping we’ll eventually be able to get a new entrance into Russell to make it easier to get downtown after the bridge is built. ,” Hopkins said. “The real focus is on the importance of getting a new bridge because it’s no secret it’s not

State officials hatch new plan for threatened falcons living on bridge IRONTON — Counting chicks before they hatch is a big part of Jennifer Norris’ job as a wildlife research biologist for the Ohio Division of Natural Resources. Specifically, Norris is the statewide coordinator for the ODNR peregrine falcon recovery program, which began in 1988 when the falcon was part of the federal list of endangered species. Today, thanks to the efforts of wildlife experts like Norris, the falcon is no longer considered to be endangered, but it remains on the list of threatened species, which means the falcons still area closely monitored by state officials. Research has showed that DDE, which is a by-product of DDT, accumulates in the fatty tissue of female peregrine falcons, which disrupts their production of normal calcium layers in egg shale formation, according to the ODNR website. Norris and a team of DNR employees keep track of the falcons that live throughout Ohio, which includes a pair of falcons that nest on the Ironton-Russell Bridge, which is slated to be torn down in 2016. Norris and her team have been tracking falcons living at the bridge since 2002. She said there have been at least two pairs of falcons to live at the site. The nesting area on the bridge may sound unusual, but Norris said the peregrine falcons historically nest on cliffs and have adapted to urban development by nesting on bridges and skyscrapers. “The Latin word ‘peregrine’ means ‘wandering,’ and that is fitting as the birds are migratory,” Norris said. “As their Latin name suggests they do wander around, so as the population has been increasing, more falcons are looking to find nest locations that are suitable. The bridge in Ironton has provided a suitable habitat.” The wandering nature of the falcons is evident by the most recent pairing to take to the bridge. The male falcon was from Kentucky, and the female was a native of Pennsylvania. “When they get together, they are monogamous, but if their mate dies, they will find a new one,” Norris said. She said that might be the case for this couple. She said the male’s presence at the Ironton-Russell bridge can be traced back to 2007, but 2011 was the first year the female was known to nest at the bridge. The life expectancy for a peregrine falcon is between 12 and 18 years in the wild. Norris said the two oldest falcons in Ohio are 17 and 19 years old. Now that the days are numbered on the 90-year-old IrontonRussell Bridge, which is a 10-year-old nesting area, Norris said a new nesting plan already is in place. “The Division of Wildlife has been working closely with the Department of Transportation in the plans for the new bridge,” Norris said. “We’re going to be providing a new habitat on the new bridge, and we’ll be working to move the birds to that bridge well before the current bridge is torn down. “We’re hoping the better digs will entice them.” safe. It can’t carry the weight or volume of today’s traffic. It’s getting old fast, and I think we’re all more concerned about safety right now.” In Ironton, the mood surrounding the bridge is nothing if not uplifting, according to Bill Dingus, executive director of the Greater Lawrence County Area Chamber of Commerce. Dingus’ involvement with bridge planning has been extensive. He serves on the Governor’s Transportation Review Advisory Committee, and he said he has kept his eye on this entire process. “I have monitored this project closely,” Dingus said. “We are very pleased to see this project taking shape. The majority of the construction cost will be spent in the local region thus adding huge economic benefits to the local region on both the Ironton and Russell sides of the Ohio River.” Dingus estimated between $40 million and $50 million could be fed into the local economy, taking into consideration the effects on

Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Dave Scott of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife, displays one of the four baby peregrine falcons that were retrieved from the Ironton-Russell Bridge in this 2007 file photo. Officials from the Ohio Division of Natural Resources have been working on a new nesting plan for the threatened peregrine falcons that nest at the existing Ironton-Russell Bridge. “We’re going to be providing a new habitat on the new bridge, and we’ll be working to move the birds to that bridge well before the current bridge is torn down,” said Jennifer Norris of the DNR. There are some concerns that the destruction of the current bridge might scare off the falcons, but Norris said the bird’s nesting season typically takes place slightly before the construction season when the bridge would be torn down. John Jenkins is the manager of the Cooper Hollow Wildlife Area, and he said the presence of the falcons in the state is a unique one. “I hope people appreciate the opportunity to see them. Not anyone has the chance to go across the street and see one,” Jenkins said. “Of course, they are a wild species, so it is important to keeping in mind they can get aggressive at times. That is pretty normal, but when it comes to having a rare chance to see a rare bird, people in this area are pretty privileged.” — Lacie Pierson, The Herald-Dispatch

local restaurants and lodging facilities. He also was excited at the prospect of having a stronger link between Ironton and Russell. “You look at that region with Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital, all of the industrial space in the area, the population that resides just within one mile of the bridge in Kentucky, and the link to U.S. 23, and you have to know it’s an excellent idea,” Dingus said. “It’s a very positive step. This bridge will be a direct connection of two great places. It will be a tremendous asset to both communities.” Despite their differing perspectives on what the future might hold for their communities the mayors of both towns said they are pleased to have been able to work with one another in making this 20-year long dream a reality. “We’re very happy things have gotten started,” Hopkins said. “For the problems that have come from the planning perspective, there’s been no problem at all between communication in the towns.

We’ve a ll been able to work toget her across the river on so many different things, and the bridge is just another one of them. We’ve given the bridge all of the support we possibly can, and likewise they do the same for us.” Blankenship said the battle for the bridge has been well fought. “A lot of these issues have been with the state, but even with those problems everyone in ODOT has been courteous, kind and professional. This bridge is just a continuation of a lot of good working relationships,” Blankenship said. “When I think about how important this is to the community here and throughout the Tri-State it really feels like I’m doing my job and I’m doing it the right way. When I look out and see these construction crews, I just have to sit back and think, ‘I’m finally getting a bridge.’” Lacie Pierson is a reporter for The HeraldDispatch. Comments may be emailed to her at lpierson@herald-dispatch.com.


C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

3J

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C M Y K 50 inch 4J The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Progress 2012: Transportation

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

A barge carries coal on the Ohio River between Chesapeake and Huntington in this Sept. 2010 file photo. Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Rolling on thE

RiVER

Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch

Patrick Donovan is the director of Maritime and Intermodal Transportation at the RTI and director of the National Maritime Enhancement Institute at Marshall University.

Ohio River, Port of Huntington looking to integrate with planned intermodal facility at Prichard By WHITNEY JOHNSON The Herald-Dispatch

wjohnson@herald-dispatch.com

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The price of everyday items depends on several factors, but the importance of waterway transportation is sometimes overlooked. Products can travel by railway, air, highway and by water. Locally, tons of cargo travel down the Ohio River through the Port of Huntington Tri-State daily. The port is the largest inland port in the United States, made up of a waterway stretching 199 miles through the Ohio, Kanawha and Big Sandy rivers, according to the Environmental Protection Agency website. “We’re moving about 63 million tons of cargo through the port system,” said Patrick Donovan, director of Maritime and Intermodal Transportation at the Rahall Transportation Institute. Coal accounts for 44 million tons of the cargo. The majority of the coal stays local but some becomes exported for the global market, Donovan said. The product supply chain is directly affected by the production of coal and the amount of pressure the coal industry experiences since it is considered the primary product traveling by waterway in the area, said Donovan, also the director of the National Maritime Enhancement Institute at Marshall University. If mines are not receiving permits or being closed down, that affects the amount of cargo traveling through the port. In return, the funding received for the port’s upkeep can decline. All means of transportation in the Tri-State are controlled by the Department of Transportation, except the waterways. The Huntington port is controlled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as part of the Department of Defense. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers currently bases funding for the port on the tonnage that travels through it, rather than the value of the products, Donovan said. If the amount of cargo traveling through the port begins declining, investments into the locks and dams are affected. “If you do not have reliable locks and dams, then the ability to take high dollar containerization products is greatly reduced,” Donovan said. “If we continue on a downward trend on coal and we lose the maintenance on our locks and dams, then the reliability declines.” With the coal industry under pressure, an integration could change the entire outlook.

Integrating the Port of Huntington Tri-State into the regular supply chain with Norfolk Southern’s Heartland Corridor, Prichard Intermodal and other means of transportation, would cause “phenomenal things,” Donovan said. Once the Prichard Intermodal opens, containers from the double-stacked trains traveling the Heartland Corridor can be transferred to trucks. These trucks would then be able to deliver the items to vessels traveling through the port’s waterways. Donovan estimates that probably 20,000 containers travel by the road system annually. However, projections show that the Prichard Intermodal Facility could move up to 60,000 to 65,000 containers each year. “You start talking about a market that size and you’re talking about users,” Donovan said. “You’re going to grow (current) businesses and bring more businesses in. While you’re doing that, we need to start thinking about competitive modes. Keep costs down and that’s the marine highways.” Instead of truck drivers having to travel long distances to deliver containers of product, they would be traveling from the facility to the port terminal, Donovan said. These drivers would then be able to be home at night since the vessels and railways would be hauling the containers the farther distances. “Getting the product there is what we’re talking about. There are so many costs associated that people don’t think about,” Donovan said. “That truck running down the road creates costs. It creates an economic impact on the highway department and there’s costs with the maritime. The costs of the locks and dams. All of these have to be taken into account.” Once the Panama Canal expansion is complete, there will only be one port on the East Coast that will have a deep enough draft to accommodate the Post-Panamax vessel, Donovan said. That port is located in Virginia and is tied to the Heartland Corridor. This will allow West Coast products to be carried by train up the Heartland Corridor, where they can then be transferred to trucks and later to vessels. Any time products can be delivered via waterways, that is less maintenance the Department of Transportation will face on roadways. If the maintenance and delivery costs are lower, customers will experience lower costs in stores when buying new products.

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C M Y K 50 inch Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Progress 2012: Transportation

The Associated Press

A couple watches as the refurbished cruise ship Costa Neo Romantica departs from Savona harbor, Italy, for its inaugural cruise on March 2 the day after the Costa Allegra cruise reached the Seychelles main island after being towed for three days in the Indian Ocean following a fire in the engine room, and the day before the first hearing to discuss evidence for the accident in which the Costa Concordia crashed in the tiny Italian island of Giglio, killing 32 people. In the wake of such recent disasters, cruise industry leaders have sought to drive home their commitment to safety at their annual convention.

Cruise industry leaders re-emphasize safety

By MITCH STACY

The Associated Press

MIAMI — Cruise industry leaders on Tuesday gathered for their first annual convention since the Costa Concordia disaster, driving home their commitment to safety and expressing confidence that the resulting lull in business is only temporary. The Concordia accident, in which 32 people died when the ship ra n aground in January off the coast of Italy, cast a long shadow over this year’s Cruise Shipping Miami conference. The annual meeting draws thousands of people who work in the cruise and travel industries in more than 100 countries. Costa’s parent company, Carnival Cor p. , t he world’s l a r ge st c r u i se operator, sa id book ing trends a re running behind last year, leading it last week to slash 201 2 prof it forecasts nea rly in ha lf. Mia mi-based Carnival’s brands also include Princess Cruises, Holland America Line and Cunard Line. “As everyone here well knows, the Concordia incident has focused considerable attention on our industry,” Carnival Corp. vice chairman and COO Howard Frank said in his keynote address. “While most of this attention has been negative, and we are clearly seeing some setbacks in the short term, we have faced similar setbacks in the past, and in each case we have shown tremendous resiliency in bouncing back.” Frank, who is also chairman of the Cruise Lines International Association trade group, said that in the aftermath of Concordia, despite the industry’s good safety record, cruise lines are reemphasizing passenger and crew safety, implementing “a comprehensive, top-tobottom review of our shipboard safety and emergency response procedures.” That will include improved emergency muster training for all passengers prior to departure. Other high-prof ile incidents also have di nged t he i ndustr y i n f i rst

“My perception was, most of our guests recognize — especially those who have been a cruise before — that the cruise industry provides a very safe vacation. I do think there were some people who aren’t as familiar with the industry, who were scared off by a lot of the media. There certainly was constant attention, and it did affect our business, no question about it.” Gerald Cahill

president and CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines

two months of the new year. Late last month, another Costa ship —the Allegra — caught fire and lost power, leaving passengers without working toilets, running water or air conditioning for three days. An outbreak of norovirus on ships on Princess and Royal Caribbean lines and the robbery of 22 Carnival passengers on a bus tour in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, added to the parade of bad news. Still, industry leaders said with 14 new ships coming online in 2012 and the continued trend toward globalization, they expect to see a record number of people taking cruise vacations this year. The trade group is expecting 17.2 million passengers across its 26 member lines this year, up 5 percent from 201 1 . Internationa l business is up — about 68 percent of the passengers will be from North America, compared with 74 percent two years ago. In addition to the new ships this year, 10 more will debut between 2013 and 2015. Still only about 3 percent of the people in the United States have ever taken a cruise, creating “abundant prospects for growth,” said Christine Duffy, president of the industry trade group. Gerald Cahill, president and CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines, lamented

that the Concordia tragedy came at a time when the industry was expected to further recover from the recession and get more people onboard without offering deep discounts. He said the company stopped all of its marketing after the accident but has now resumed, leading to an uptick in bookings. “My perception was, most of our guests recognize — especially those who have been a cruise before — that the cruise industry provides a very safe vacation,” Cahill said. “I do think there were some people who aren’t as familiar with the industry, who were scared off by a lot of the media. There certainly was constant attention, and it did affect our business, no question about it. “I think the industry will weather this in the United States,” he said. “I don’t think we’ll get back as much pricing probably as we otherwise would have had this not occurred, but I think we move into future years we’ll continue to get stronger.” Vicky Garcia, executive vice president of Cruise Planners/American Express, a network of more than 800 travel agents, said bookings for the remainder of the year have remained strong, even though it’s likely some would-be f irst-time cruisers were scared off by the Concordia accident and the other negative stories. “We don’t know what we missed out on in terms of first-time cruisers that may not have called,” Garcia said. “Those who we were in the process of dealing with didn’t change (their plans).” Prior to the Concordia accident, the Cruise Lines International Association counted 28 fatalities on its member lines from 2002 to 2011, 22 of which were crew members. During that period, cruise ships carried 223 million passengers and crew. “All the surveys we’ve done say people see this as an isolated incident and they will continue to cruise,” said Daniel J. Hanrahan, president and CEO of Celebrity Cruises.

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

5J

Huntington boasts variety of options for travel by rail

Looking for a travel experience by rail? Of course, you always can book passage on Amtrak’s Cardinal, which runs between New York, Washington, Huntington, Ashland, Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Chicago on Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Passengers can travel in coaches or sleepers, and food and beverage service is available. Call (304) 523-7721 or (800) USA-RAIL (872-7245). But suppose you’re more interested in a rail trip that’s more, as we say, outside the box? Several upcoming jaunts sponsored by the Collis P. Huntington Railroad Historical Society Inc. may be just the ticket. The society’s most wellknown excursion is the New River Train, which runs between Huntington and Hinton, W.Va., four times during October, and has been operated on various dates most years since 1966. But the group also sponsors several lesser known outings, too. n First up is a four-day trip to Washington, D.C., from Sunday, March 25, through Wednesday, March 28, aboard Amtrak’s Cardinal. Passengers ride in two of the society’s luxury railroad cars — parlor car Braddock Inn and lounge car NYC 38 — and enjoy five meals while on board. The fares - $739 per person based on double occupancy and $839 per person based on single occupancy — include three nights at the Holiday Inn Express, motorcoach transportation while in town, three continental breakfasts at the hotel, two dinners in the D.C. area, a trip to Arlington National Cemetery to witness the changing of the guard at The Tomb of the Unknowns, and visits to the Smithsonian Institution’s museums and the National Cathedral. n Four trips are planned to The Greenbrier at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. — three one-day trips on April 20, Sept. 26, and Dec. 2, and an overnight trip on May 9-11. On the day trips, travelers ride the eastbound Cardinal to the resort and return via motorcoach with a stop at Tamarack. Included in the $209-per-person fare are a buffet lunch, a Bunker tour and afternoon tea time at the resort. The overnight trip — available for $769 per person based on double occupancy — includes round-trip transportation on the Amtrak train and two nights’ lodging at the resort, access to its new

Bob

WITHERS casino, two breakfasts and two dinners, afternoon tea time, and a historic hotel tour. n The society will sponsor two four-day getaways to New York City on June 3-6 and Dec. 9-12. The $709-perperson fare includes roundtrip transportation between Huntington and Newark, N.J., aboard the Braddock Inn and NYC 38 on the rear of the Cardinal, six meals on the train, three nights’ lodging at the Hampton Inn in Linden, N.J., round-trip bus transportation between the Newark station and the hotel in Linden, two breakfasts at the hotel, a 48-hour Gray Line sightseeing pass, time to shop on your own, and the option of buying a New York City pass — $80 for one day or $130 for two days — to gain access to more than 55 attractions in all five New York boroughs. Fares aboard New Jersey Transit trains between Linden and New York Penn Station are extra. n This year’s four oneday New River Train trips will operate on Oct. 20, 21, 27 and 28. Per-person fares are $149 in coach, $239 in premium service lounge and parlor cars, and $269 in glass-topped dome cars. Premium and dome passengers receive hot breakfasts and dinners. Coach passengers can purchase food in a café car. Passengers can enjoy the “Railroad Days Festival” during the afternoon layover in Hinton. This train is operated in conjunction with Amtrak and several private railroad car owners throughout the nation. Society members who serve as car hosts, travel escorts, chefs and waiters on these trips — and many of their passengers as well — would agree with the words of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay: “ ... there isn’t a train I wouldn’t take, no matter where it’s going.” All prices are subject to change. For more information, call (304) 523-0364 or (866) 639-7487 or go to www. NewRiverTrain.com or Facebook.com/newrivertrain. Bob Withers is a retired reporter for The Herald-Dispatch and a railroad enthusiast.

Photo courtesy of Tyson Compton

The New River Train Excursions travel through Hawk’s Nest, which offers scenic views of the New River Valley. The New River Train trips for 2012 are scheduled for Oct. 20, 21, 27 and 28.


C M Y K 50 inch Progress 2012: Transportation

6J The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

Questions? Call the newsroom at 304-526-2798 www.herald-dispatch.com

Get on board with TTA 529-RIDE

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C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

7J

OUR PRE-OWNED VEHICLES ARE PRICED TO GO OUT IN A “BLAZE OF GLORY” 2005 Toyota Camry

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2009 F150 CrewCab Lariat

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BOYD COUNTY FORD ANNOUNCES $500 DISASTER RELIEF ASSISTANCE PROGRAM. If your vehicle was damaged during the recent Tornado outbreak, you could qualify for the $500 DISASTER RELIEF ASSISTANCE PROGRAM being offered by Boyd County Ford. See us for details.

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2012 Ford

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C M Y K 50 inch The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

244774

8j

TO HIS FRIENDS, HE’S IN MAINTENANCE. TO THE LANDLORD, HE’S A MAGICIAN WHO MAKES PROBLEMS DISAPPEAR.

President - Bluefield State College Bluefield State College (BSC) is seeking applications and nominations for the position of President. Reporting to the Board of Governors (BOG), the president is the chief executive officer of the Institution, defining its educational commitments, its standard of excellence and securing necessary resources for the fulfillment of its mission. The president will lead BSC to success through inspirational and purposeful leadership. He or she will be expected to articulate the mission, vision, and core values of the college, and to work with each of the Institution’s constituents to enable them to achieve the mission. The president is the executive agent of the BOG and shall, as educational and administrative head of BSC, exercise such powers that are inherent in the position in promoting, supporting, and protecting the interests of the school and in managing and directing its affairs. The successful candidate must have an earned doctorate from an accredited institution; demonstrated senior executive and/or management level experience in higher education; college level teaching experience; an appreciation for and sensitivity to the uniqueness of Appalachian people; an understanding of the importance and roles of historically black institutions; experience interacting with state legislators and state governing bodies; outstanding communication skills; capacity to attract and maintain diverse students, faculty, and staff; and involvement in external fund raising. Review of applications will begin on March 31, 2012. To ensure full consideration, applicants must submit a resume or curriculum vitae with an accompanying letter of interest that addresses specifically how the candidate’s experiences and qualifications intersect with the College’s mission and strategic priorities and the names and addresses of five professional references to BSC Presidential Search, P.O. Box 1538, Bluefield, WV 24701-1538 or by e-mail to: bscpresident@bluefieldstate.edu. Application materials should include a complete “BSC Presidential Application Overview” which can be found with the position profile at www.bluefieldstate.edu. Applications and expressions of interest in the presidency will be treated in confidence. Bluefield State College is an EO/AA institution. Minorities, women, veterans, and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Great employees are the lifeblood of any great company. Finding them is the hard part, and

Bluefield State College (BSC) is a historically black college with a rich and diverse history nestled in the terraced hills of Southern West Virginia. The College’s student body represents a cross section of “cultures, races, and ethnicity, but also of age, gender, and socioeconomic, family, and employment status” (Bluefield State College Institutional Compact 2007 - 2012, p.6). The College offers baccalaureate and associate degrees and has an enrollment of approximately 2,000 students. Instructional programs are offered in engineering technology, business, teacher education, arts and ciences, and nursing and health science professions. The College has 14 accredited programs and plans to begin offering programs online. The Institution is accredited by the North Central Association and The Higher Learning Commission. BSC is a member of the NCAA Division II and the West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletics Conference. ������

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St. Mary’s Medical Center, a 393 bed tertiary care teaching facility with medical school affiliation, has immediate openings for the following position:

Full - Time RN Operating Room Circulator

Experience Required Excellent Benefits Contact: Tony Aluise 740-886-9911

������

������

Supervisor Documentation and Coding Successful candidate will have 2 yrs. management experience, extensive knowledge of hospital inpatient and outpatient reimbursement methodologies. In-depth knowledge of medical terminology; ICD-9-CM and CPT-4 Coding conventions as well as knowledge of the various DRG Systems. Basic concepts of human anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Strong knowledge of health records, computer systems, Microsoft applications, data integrity, and processing techniques. Ability to mentor; guide, and motivate Direct Reports through the demonstration of best practices and leading by example. Excellent organizational skills including the ability to multi-task; prioritize essential tasks, and follow-through and meet timelines. Leader within the organization for ICD-10-CM implementation. RHIA, RHIT, CCS, or RN/LPN with experience and training in this arena. Excellent salary and work family benefits, including free health insurance for full-time employees. Please visit our website at: www.st-marys.org and apply on-line under Careers & Education.

EOE

Sales Professional Wanted Forest Memorial Park is seeking a self-motivated experienced sales professional. This is a full time position with great income potential. Must possess great communication skills and experience working with people. This position requires prospecting, meeting with families, giving presentations and selling pre-need cemetery arrangements. This is a career opportunity as everyone will someday need the products and services we provide.

EOE

Please call 304-743-9072 - Ask for Tami

EOE M/F/D/V

������

������

PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPER AT THE EMOGENE DOLIN JONES HOSPICE HOUSE

PER DIEM CRISIS CARE LPN’S FOR THE HOME CARE PROGRAM

������

WE OFFER: • Excellent Compensation Program • Weekly & Monthly Performance Bonus • Awards Programs for Excellence in Service • Lead Programs • Complete Benefit Pkg. (dental, health, life) • 401K • Paid Training

Primary duties include but are not limited to: Providing routine nursing visits and personal care to patients as necessary: providing comfort oriented physical care to patients: providing emotional support to patients/families Qualified applicants will be licensed in WV and Ohio; minimum of 1-year licensed practical nursing experience, hospice or home health preferred; proof of liability insurance; reliable transportation; must be able to travel to all of Hospice of Huntington’s service area and must have flexibility in scheduling. Mileage paid at the IRS rate. Applications may be downloaded from the Hospice of Huntington, Inc. website at www. hospiceofhuntington. org or picked up at the Hospice office at 1101 6th Avenue, Huntington, WV. Applications may be submitted on line or mailed to HR Director, 1101 6th Ave., Huntington, WV, 25701. Hospice of Huntington, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

Hospice of Huntington, Inc. is seeking qualified applicants for a part-time housekeeper at the Emogene Dolin Jones Hospice House. High school diploma, GED, and reliable transportation required. Applications may be downloaded from the Hospice of Huntington, Inc. website at www.hospiceofhuntington.org or picked up at the Hospice office at 1101 6th Avenue, Huntington, WV. Send the completed application to HR Director @ 1101 6th. Hospice of Huntington, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

Interested in a rewarding career in Behavioral Health? Starlight Behavioral Health Services is now accepting applications for the positions of: Direct Care Staff These positions will be working with individuals with Developmental Disabilities. Candidates must have high school diploma or GED and current, valid driver’s license with proof of insurance & registration. Experience preferred. All Shifts Available $7.25 - $9.25 / hour To apply send interest letter to: Starlight Behavioral Health ATTN: DCS 5317 Cherry Lawn Road Huntington, WV 25705 304-302-2078 Print out an application online at www.starlightbhs.com or stop by our Huntington office ������

EOE


C M Y K 50 inch 9J

244775

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Account Executive - Ashland, KY Suddenlink Media has one of the largest advertising sales forces in WV and the Tri State area and is a division of one of the largest cable companies. Cable television viewership and advertising continues to grow as networks like Discovery, ESPN, FX, TNT and USA dominate the ratings race. If you are looking for a fast paced career in the world of television this could be your dream job. Suddenlink Media Account Executives sell an established product and advise local business owners on marketing their business using the world’s most powerful medium, cable television. If you have outside sales experience, especially in media, and if you are not on track to make at least $60,000 this opportunity could be for you! Our professional sales people are critical to our success. We are committed to providing top sales training and products to our clients and our employees. We provide an excellent benefits package including health insurance, expense reimbursement, entertainment allowance, salary, and some of the highest commission rates in the industry. apply on-line at www.work4suddenlink.com and send your resume to: Suddenlink Media 300 Star Ave. Suite 321 ~ Parkersburg, WV 26101

Administrator

Full-time Float Registered Nurses - Home Care Program Primary duties include but are not limited to: Perform assessment of assigned patients and derive nursing diagnoses based on assessment data; evaluate patient for appropriateness for admission; provide teaching to patients/ families to assist in the patients’ comfort as needed and promote working in a team environment. Qualified applicants will be a graduate of an accredited professional school of nursing; BSN preferred; licensed in West Virginia and Ohio; minimum of 2 years registered nursing experience; home health or hospice nursing preferred; must have the ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing. Must have reliable transportation. Applications may be downloaded from the Hospice of Huntington, Inc. website at: www.hospiceofhuntington.org or picked up at the Hospice office at 1101 6th Avenue, Huntington, WV. Applications may be submitted on line or mailed to HR Director, 1101 6th Ave., Huntington, WV, 25701. Hospice of Huntington, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

Shift+ Weekend Differential Excellent Health Care Package Paid Professional Fees Scholarship Opportunities and more! Stop by to fill out an application at Lincoln Nursing & Rehabilitation Center PO Box 386 200 Monday Drive Hamlin, WV 25523 Phone: (304) 824-3133 Fax: (304) 824-7577

Send resume to WVU Physicians of Charleston, Attn: Human Resources, 3110 MacCorkle Ave SE, Charleston, WV 25304 or fax to (304) 347-1328.

AA/EEO.

West Virginia Advocates, Inc. West Virginia’s designated protection and advocacy system committed to promoting and protecting the human and legal rights of citizens with disabilities is seeking an advocate.

EOE M/F/V/H o Drug Free Employer

American Medical Facilities Management (AMFM), LLC has an exciting opportunity for a Quality Standards Nursing Coordinator. This position will be responsible for monitoring and evaluating the overall operations of the Nursing Department in our 11 skilled nursing & long-term care facilities. The successful candidate must have demonstrated long-term care experience, leadership ability, excellent communication skills, legal nurse consultant certificates desired but not required, and a valid WV registered nursing license. Frequent travel will be required. We value the passion and experience of our employees and offer a competitive salary, paid professional fees, 401 (k), wellness program and much more!

������

Quality Standards Nursing Coordinator

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree and minimum of one year experience with disabilities. Applicant must have exceptional writing and speaking skills. Experience investigating abuse and neglect preferred. This is a full time non-exempt position in our Charleston office. Only qualified individuals should apply. Salary range is $1,973-$3,154 per month with generous benefit package. Please submit resume by 03/31/2012. Send resume to: Executive Director West Virginia Advocates, Inc. 1207 Quarrier Street, 4th Floor, Charleston, WV 25301 Fax 346-0867 • Email: jobs@wvadvocates.org

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Full-time Registered Nurse for the Home Care Program with Long Term Care Experience Primary duties include but are not limited to: Perform assessment of assigned patients and derive nursing diagnoses based on assessment data; provide information about the hospice program to potential hospice patients and referral sources; plan nursing interventions in collaboration with the interdisciplinary team to resolve current problems or prevent potential problems; provide teaching to patients/families to assist in the patient’s comfort as needed; assess the need for home health aide services. Qualified applicants will be a graduate of an accredited professional school of nursing; BSN preferred; licensed in West Virginia and Ohio; minimum of 2 years registered nursing experience; long term care experience, preferred; home health or hospice nursing; must have reliable transportation, current driver’s license, and automobile insurance. Mileage paid at the IRS rate..

������

RN POSITIONS

Now accepting applications for: Certified Nursing Assistants $500 sign on bonus!!

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HOSPICE OF HUNTINGTON, INC. IS SEEKING QUALIFIED APPLICANTS FOR

������

EOE/AA Employer

WVU Physicians of Charleston is presently recruiting for a full-time Administrator for its Pediatrics Department. This position is responsible for supporting the financial, administrative and operational management of the department. Functions as the major operations officer for the department. Responsible for personnel management of support staff. Oversees billing and collection process for department. Assists in faculty recruitment. Bachelor’s degree in Business, Health Care Administration or related field required. Master of Business or Healthcare Administration is preferred. Three years’ experience at the administrator level required, preferably in the health care field. Experience with managed care issues preferred. Experience in an academic environment preferred. Excellent benefits package provided.

EOE. WVA encourages persons with disabilities and minorities to apply

Please send resumes to: AMFM/HR - 240 Capitol St. Suite 500 Charleston, WV 25301 recruiter@amfmwv.com

EOE M/F/V/H Drug Free Employer


C M Y K 50 inch 10j

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

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5 YEAR WARRANTY - 5 YEAR WEAR & TEAR - 5 YEAR SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

volvocars.com/us

*Excludes $875 destination charge. **Lease payment does not include taxes, title or licensing. No security deposit required. $3,293 due at signing. Offer expires March 31, 2012. †The Conquest Program is available for eligible customers that currently own or lease an Acura, Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Lexus, Mercedes, Honda, Nissan, Saab, Toyota or Volkswagen. Customer must provide a copy of either U.S. registration or U.S. insurance documents showing VIN, name, address and expiration date. Supporting documentation must be available at time of delivery. Conquest Bonus is $1000 towards a lease or purchase of a new model year 2012 S60. Customer eligibility requirements must be met for the Conquest Bonus offer. Please see retailer for details. Offer begins March 1, 2012 and expires on April 2, 2012. Offer open only to legal U.S. residents who have a valid U.S. driver’s license. Offer is not transferable. Offer only available on purchases or leases of new model year 2012 S60 vehicles. Vehicle purchases outside of the program dates will not be eligible for this offer. Offer cannot be used toward the payment of sales tax. This offer is subject to federal, state, and local taxes. Offer cannot be applied to lease or purchase of any other model year Volvo or vehicles purchased as used and/or Overseas Delivery (VCIC) program sales or combined with the Volvo Loyalty Offer. Safe + Secure Coverage Plan excludes tires. Safe + Secure Coverage Plan offer ends April 2, 2012.

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CORRIDOR G, SOUTHRIDGE • 1.800.427.4034 • SMITHCARS.COM • LIKE US AT FACEBOOK.COM/SCMCWV


C M Y K 50 inch 11J

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The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV Sunday, March 18, 2012

Immediate Opening PHYSICIAN PRACTICE ADMINISTRATOR UNITED HOSPITAL CENTER United Hospital Center has an immediate full time opening for a Physician Practice Administrator. The responsibilities of this position will be to manage the day to day operations of the Physician Practices with the support and help of the individual office managers. Primary responsibilities include coordinating issues involving physician enrollment, practice start up, accounting, purchasing, human resources, facilities, information technology and other practice management issues. United Hospital Center offers a comprehensive benefit program including a competitive salary, health and life insurance, retirement and TSA plans, vacation and ill time, tuition reimbursement, and much more! A sign on bonus is negotiable. If you are interested in the opportunity and meet the posted qualifications, please complete an application online at www. theNewUHC.com. Linda Radcliff, Allied Health Recruiter

To learn more or to find your next great hire, call Linda Waddell (304) 526-2723

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The West Virginia State University Research and Development Corporation/Gus R. Douglass Institute Family and Consumer Sciences Program invites applications for the FULL-TIME POSITION OF HEALTHY FAMILIES/HEALTHY CHILDREN ASSOCIATE. The HFHC Extension Associate will contribute to high-impact educational programs by instructing individuals and groups in the areas of computer skills, literacy, workforce development training, financial education, healthy relationships, and parenting education. The HFHC Extension Associate will also be expected to deliver timely, research-based information and programs to our diverse clientele and stakeholders, and will be responsible for developing promotional materials, creating program schedules, and maintaining relations with outside agencies in Kanawha County and the surrounding areas. For a complete job description, required qualifications, and instructions on how to apply, please visit: http://grdi.wvstateu.edu /employment. WVSU R&D Corporation is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workplace.

Contact us at (304) 302-2010 or stop by 6351 Rout 60 East, Suite 8, Barboursville, WV for an application. You may also apply online at www.paiswv.com or email a resume to cgarris@paiswv.com

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HEALTHY FAMILIES/ HEALTHY CHILDREN

PAIS, Inc. is currently seeking full-time motivated and dedicated LPNs to provide medication administration and nursing services to individuals with disabilities. Pay ranging from $13.00 to $15.00 per hour. Don’t miss this opportunity to make a difference!

Mechanic Mechanic needed for Construction Equipment Dealership in Cannonsburg, KY. Must have own tools. Competitive Salary and Benefits. Send resume to: P.O. Box 3939, Charleston, WV 25339 or email to: info@stateequipment.com

HOSPICE OF HUNTINGTON, INC. IS SEEKING QUALIFIED APPLICANTS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: Community Outreach Coordinator (Full-Time) Duties include, but are not limited to: Increase awareness and understanding about hospice programs and services through public speaking engagements, presentations, health fairs, workshops and special events throughout the agency’s five-county service area; manages internal Speakers Bureau; solicits and coordinates various outreach opportunities among hospice employees and volunteers to; provides accurate reporting and analysis of outreach efforts; maintains various contact databases and schedules. Qualified applicants: BS or BA in communications, marketing, public relations or related field; prior project management in a health care setting experience preferred; requires some evenings and weekends; advanced Microsoft Office skills; desktop publishing skills a plus and time management skills; possess effective communication skills and be highly organized; minimum 5 years progressively responsible experience in program implementation and public speaking.

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EXTENSION ASSOCIATE

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LPN

Application may be downloaded from website at www.hospiceofhuntington.org or picked up at the Hospice of Huntington business office at 1101 Sixth Ave., Huntington, WV. A current resume and 3 professional references are req’d. Send complete application package to Pamela Hilgendorf, HR Director at P.O. Box 464, Huntington, WV 25709. Hospice of Huntington, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

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TO APPLY GO TO: www.TheNewUHC.com Click on Career Opportunities Paper Applications Will No Longer Be Accepted

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C M Y K 50 inch 12j

The Herald-Dispatch — Huntington, WV, Sunday, March 18, 2012

(304) 736-5291

5200 US RT. 60 EAST NEXT EXIT WEST OF HUNTINGTON MALL (EXIT 15, I-64) ABOVE MCDONALDS ON LEFT.

MON-FRI 9:00-8:00 SAT. 9:00-5:00 SUN. 1:00-5:00

2012 GMC ST. PATRICK’S DAY

BONUS

CASH

• ALTIMA COUPE • ALTIMA SEDAN • VERSA HATCHBACK • MAXIMA • ROGUE • MURANO • MURANO CROSS CABRIOLET • TITAN • ARMADA

SIERRA 1500

49

OFFER GOOD 3/16/12 THRU 3/19/12

IN STOCK

2012 Nissan

Sentra 2.0 for Virtual Test Drive

14,499

$

MODEL#12012 STOCK#N12108

2012 Nissan

Rogue S AWD

MSRP $24,240

Text

Moses1N12310 to48696

for Virtual Test Drive

SALE PRICE

20,999

$

MODEL#22212 STOCK#N12310

0% 2000 PLUS

MSRP $32,030

Text

Moses1N12159 to48696

for Virtual Test Drive

SALE PRICE

26,999

$

MODEL#23212 STOCK#N12159

2012 Nissan

Altima 2.5 S

MSRP $24,760

Text

Moses1N12253 to 48696

for Virtual Test Drive

SALE PRICE

19,974

$

MODEL#13112 STOCK#N12253

2012 Nissan

Maxima

LIMITED EDITION PACKAGE MSRP $33,415

Text

Moses1 N12080 to 48696 for VirtualTest Drive

SALE PRICE

27,999

$

TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE

APR FOR 72 MONTHS FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS

2012 GMC

ACADIA AWD

32,989

$

2012 Nissan

Murano

$

Text

Moses1 G12123 to 48696

forVirtualTest Drive

G12123

Moses1N12108 to48696

SALE PRICE

2012 GMC

TERRAIN

25,290

$

Text

Moses1 G12266 to 4869t6Drive forVirtualTes

G12266

Text

2012 GMC

SIERRA 4X4

21,994

$

Text

Moses1 G12146 to 48696 ive forVirtualTest Dr

G12146

MSRP $18,270

2012 GMC

SIERRA

MODEL#16112 STOCK#N12080

2012 Nissan

Murano

Cross Cabriolet MSRP $47,520

Text

Moses1N11447 to 48696

for VirtualTest Drive

SALE PRICE

39,999

$

MODEL#27011 STOCK#N11447

*MUST FINANCE THROUGH NMAC TO QUALIFY. TIER 0 AND TIER 1. PRICES INCLUDE ALL APPLICABLE REBATES INCLUDING ST. PATRICK’S DAY BONUS CASH. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/2/12

(304) 736-5291

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www.moses-nissan.com

Moses1 G12165 to 48696 ive forVirtualTest Dr

0% 8000

$

SAVE

PLUS

APR FOR 72 MONTHS FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS

G12165

• ALL WHEEL DRIVE • CONVERTIBLE • NAVIGATION

Text

www.moseshuntingtongm.com Pictures are for illustration purposes only. price includes all manufacturers rebates & dealer discounts. to qualify for GM’s Trade-In assistance, must trade in a ‘99 or newer light duty vehicle. expires 3/31/12

PROGRESS 031813  

PROGRESS COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION

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