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Lauderdale County’s Fun Family Newspaper - July 2010

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Dear Kids, July is here, and I had a great time with my family watching the fireworks on Independence Day! The birthday of our

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Kidsville News! 3


Math Puzzler

Try to ďŹ ll in the missing numbers. Use the numbers 1 through 9 to complete the equations. Remember: Each number is used only once. Each row is a math equation. Each column is a math equation. Remember that multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.

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Barbeque Word Scramble Unscramble the words to complete the sentences. 1. Many people prefer to grill over L H R C A A O C. 2. People often use the word A E B Q R B U E and grill interchangeably. 3. Grilling enables you to entertain in the R Y D A. 4. Cook foods to the right M E P T E T U E R A R.

     

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Š Cool Kind Kid

Source: www.metrocreativeconnection.com

Answers on Page 22

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July 2010


Art Gallery

Alexander Calder: A One-Man Art Circus

Ever wonder who came up with the idea for a mobile like the one hanging above your little sister or brother’s crib? The inventor was Alexander Calder, and he was a famous American sculptor. Alexander (Sandy) Calder was born into a family of artists on July 22, 1898, in Lawton, Pennsylvania. His father was a sculptor who created large sculptures all over the country. Because of that, the family moved a lot when Alexander was a child. Alexander’s parents encouraged their son’s creativity. From the time he was in elementary school, he had his own workshop space. Although he was a talented artist, Alexander wanted to be an engineer. After high school, Alexander attended Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. He graduated in 1919 and worked a series of different engineering jobs before deciding that what he really wanted to do was be a professional artist like his parents. In 1923, Alexander moved to New York City and took classes at the Art Students League. He also worked as an artist for the National Police Gazette magazine. In 1925, he spent two weeks with the circus, where he drew pictures of circus scenes for the magazine. This experience left a huge impression on him and greatly influenced his art. In 1926, he left school and New York behind and moved to Paris, France. There he created Cirque Calder, a one-of-a-kind art exhibit of a circus made from wire, cloth and other materials. As part of the artwork, Alexander would give shows where he moved the pieces to create a circus performance. Word spread about the artist who put on sculpture

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performances. In 1928, he had his first major exhibit in New York. Although the exhibit included paintings, Alexander realized he really liked creating sculptures best. He continued building them and began playing with more abstract ideas. No longer did his sculptures look exactly like people or animals. Flamingo, 1974, in the Federal Plaza, Chicago, IL. Instead they were freeform. In 1931, Alexander started making truly movable sculptures. He added cranks and motors to these pieces and called them “mobiles.” Soon, he saw that it was possible to make mobiles that could move with the air so he stopped adding the motors. Alexander also designed large outdoor sculptures, many of which were like mobiles and had parts that moved with the wind. During his long career, Alexander had exhibits in major museums and galleries and made sculptures for places like Aztec Stadium in Mexico City and John F. Kennedy International Airport (then Idlewild Airport) in New York. Alexander died on November 11, 1976, in New York. He was 78. Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary school teacher who now works as a freelance writer and curriculum developer for PBS, the Discovery Channel and other education-related companies. Sources: Calder Foundation: calder.org; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation: www.guggenheimcollection. org/site/artist_bio_26.html.

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Local History

Written by Billy Warren

Did You Know? Public Buildings Named For People In this column last month, we explored place names in the Shoals and learned that communities and towns get their names in a wide variety of ways, from their geographic location to well-known people who might have lived in a particular place, etc. This month, the focus is on the names of certain public buildings in the Shoals. Of course, the house in which a person or family lives will often be known as “Mr. Brown’s house” or the Brown family’s home.” But a public building (i.e., a building constructed or purchased with public tax dollars) is often named for a well-known local person as a way of giving honor and public recognition to him/her. Here are some local public buildings, along with a brief identification of each person for whom a given building is named: 1. Bibb Graves Hall (UNA campus) – named for the Honorable Bibb Graves, a former governor of Alabama. 2. Hibbett Middle School (Florence) – named for Rufus G. Hibbett, a former Superintendent of Education in Florence. 3. Rogers School (Greenhill) – named for Thomas M. Rogers, former owner of Rogers Department Store in Florence and donor of the land on which the school is located. 4. Guillot University Center (UNA campus) – named for Dr. Robert M. Guillot, former president of the University of North Alabama. 5. Helen Keller Public Library (Tuscumbia) – named for world-famous Helen Keller, a native of Tuscumbia.

6. Justice John McKinley Federal Building (Florence) – named for the Federal Supreme Court Justice who lived in Florence. This building also houses the U.S. Post Office. 7. L. E. Willson Middle School (Sheffield) – named for a local philanthropist who established an educational foundation for Sheffield City Schools. Now, it’s your turn! Have a good time learning about the person about whom each building in the list below is named. Use any resource available to you, including local people who might have knowledge of these buildings. 1. Harlan Elementary School (Florence) 2. Coby Hall (UNA Campus) 3. Trenholm Elementary School (Tuscumbia) 4. Brooks High School (Killen) 5. Winfrey Sanderson Gymnasium (Florence) 6. Threadgill Primary School (Sheffield) 7. Willingham Hall (UNA Campus) 8. Kennedy-Douglass Art Center (Florence)

Don’t try this at home In 1752, to prove that lightning was electrical, American colonial patriot and inventor Benjamin Franklin flew a kite during a thunderstorm. He tied a metal key onto the kite string and, as he suspected it would, electricity from the storm clouds flowed down the string and he received an electrical shock. Ben Franklin may have advanced the cause of science, but he was extremely lucky not to have been killed during his famous experiment. When you see lightning, go inside!

For electrical safety information, call Florence Utilities at 740-6056.

July 2010

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Kidsville News! 7


Mirrors On The Moon July 20 will be the 41st anniversary of the first landing of humans on the moon in 1969. Commander Neil Armstrong, and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, Jr. stepped onto the lunar surface, collected some lunar rocks to bring back, placed some experiment packages on the surface, and then climbed back into the “lunar module” and prepared for the liftoff to join Command Module Pilot Michael Collins who was circling the moon above them. All three arrived back on earth 4 days later. The returned rocks were measured to be 4.5 billion years old. One of the packages quickly left on the moon was a very special mirror (actually a collection of many mirrors). Scientists wanted to place a mirror on the moon so that a light beam could be sent to the moon from Earth and the mirror would reflect the light back to the Earth. Since we know the speed of light, the time it takes for the light to reach the moon and then back would tell us the lunar distance to within a few inches. That is very precise indeed. Shortly I'll discuss why that is so important. An ordinary mirror wouldn't work since the moon is rocking back and forth. A “corner cube” mirror has three flat mirrors joined at 90° angles. The drawing shows 2 perpendicular mirrors which will

HELP! Truman Lost His Hat! Maybe you can help him find it & WIN A PLUSH MINI-TRUMAN Somewhere in this Kidsville News! is Truman’s small red hat! This hat will not be on Truman. Find only his red hat! Send us the form below for a chance to win! A Kidsville News! representative will call your house to let you know if you are a winner. The name of the winners will also be in the next issue of Kidsville News! Last month the hat was on page 13.

June Winners of a Mini-Truman

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of Florence

of Muscle Shoals

Pick yours up at the Courier Journal Office 1828 Darby Drive, Florence, AL

Mail this or bring the entry to us by July 21! Hat on pg. _________ Your Name mail to: Address Kidsville News! Town 1828 Darby Drive Florence, AL 35630 School

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illustrate the principle. A ray from any direction that strikes a “corner cube” mirror also gets reflected off the other mirror so that it travels back to from where it came. Ray A, moving horizontally, gets reflected horizontally and ray B moving upward from below gets reflected down and back to its source. No matter how the moon rocks back and forth, the light ray sent from earth gets reflected right back to earth. The lunar instrument consisted of 100 corner cubes forming a package about 1 1/2 feet across. Before they blasted off to return to Earth, scientists on Earth were already aiming powerful laser beams at the moon and looking for a reflection. This sounds easy but consider this. A laser beam leaving a large telescope on Earth spreads out to about 6 miles wide when it reaches the moon so only a very small amount of the transmitted light actually hits the lunar mirror. Then the light that is reflected by the mirror again spreads out on its way to the Earth so a very small percentage gets back to the observing telescope on Earth. Light is made up of minute particles called photons. Normally millions of photons enter our eyes every second and we aren't aware of the individual photon bits. However, by the time the light returns from the moon less than 1 photon is received every second. Very special instruments are required to “see” that single photon. By timing that returning photon to a few trillionths of a second (0.000000000001 sec) they can determine the distance to the moon to within a few inches. That is incredible precision. That's like measuring the distance from Alabama to California to within the thickness of a hair. The mirrors on the moon are passive, that is they have no batteries or machinery to run down, so they still work today and the distance to the moon has been monitored from the Earth for over 40 years. Russia landed two mirrors on the moon in the 1970s and reflections from one of them was just found, 40 years later. Why is the exact distance to the moon so interesting? For one thing, they show the moon is moving away from the Earth one and a half inches every year, and that tells us much about Earth tides and internal motions. Long ago the moon was much closer, and thus the “month” was much shorter and an Earth “day” was shorter too. The measurements also show the movement of continental plates of the Earth: Hawaii is drifting slowly away from California, and America is slowly moving away from Europe by a few inches per year. Distance variations show that the moon still has a liquid core. Einstein's Gravitational Theory has been shown to accurately predict the moon's orbit. These are the most precise distance measurements ever made! “When a finger points to the moon, the fool looks at the finger” Chinese Proverb Copyright © Dr. David R. Curott, UNA Professor Emeritus

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July 2010


Where in the world is... Egypt? It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Get out your globe, find longitude 30° E, latitude 27º N, and you will find the country of Egypt. Egypt’s official name is Arab Republic of Egypt, and it is located in northern Africa. Egypt is near the Mediterranean Sea between Libya and the Gaza Strip and the Red Where in the Sea, north of Sudan, and includes the World Word Asian Sinai Peninsula. delta [del-tuh], a flat In terms of size, Egypt is slightly plain of sandy soil deposit between bigger than three times the size of the branches of the mouth U.S. state of New Mexico and has hot, of a river desert-like weather, with dry summers and mild winters. Egypt's terrain is an immense desert plateau interrupted by the Nile valley and delta. Its population is over 80 million people.

Egypt arose as a unified kingdom around 3200 B.C. From there, dynasties, or empires, took control and ruled Egypt for the next three thousand years. Persians conquered the last dynasty in 341 B.C. and were replaced by Greeks, Romans and Byzantines. In the seventh century, Arabs introduced Islam and the Arabic language to Egypt and ruled for the following six centuries. The Mamluks, a local military group, took over around 1250 and continued their rule after the Ottoman Turks won favor in 1517. Through the completion of the Suez Canal in 1869, Egypt developed into an important transportation point for the world, but fell heavily into debt. Britain gained control of Egypt’s vulnerable government in 1882, and allegiance to the Ottoman Empire continued until 1914. Egypt finally gained full sovereignty through the overthrow of the British-backed monarchy in 1952 and remains independent today. Sources: CIA The World Factbook “Egypt”; Map of Egypt. http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/timezone/africa/egypt/map.htm. Article written by contributing writer Ashley Young.

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Kidsville News! 9


R o b e r t M . M i t c h e l l ’ s J o u r n ey t o F r e e d o m By Lee Freeman, Florence-Lauderdale Public Library, Local History/Genealogy Dept. In the very back of the Florence City Cemetery, in what historically was the black section, stands a beautiful marble tombstone in the form a church lectern or pulpit with an open Bible on top. “MOTHER’” is inscribed near the top of the stone and the text reads: Sacred to the memory of Mother Martha Cook, born at Dinwiddie, Co. Va., 1828 Died at Florence, Ala., 23 August, 1903. The stone was placed in the cemetery by Martha’s son, Robert M. Mitchell (1855-1908), who lived in Chicago. But the story of how Robert Mitchell, who was born in Florence, got to Chicago is a fascinating story and the subject of this month’s article. In its Saturday, November 9, 1895 issue, the Florence Times published a story titled “A War Echo.” It read in part: “In 1864, when the Federal troops Tombstone in the city cemetery of ‘Aunt’ were in Florence, a little colored boy Martha Cook (1828-1903), erected by her son Robert M. Mitchell (1855-1908), a named Robert Mitchell, while playing slave boy who left Florence in 1864 with with his companions, was picked up by Capt. Alex Smith (1841-1917) of the 7th Ill Capt. Smith of the 7th Illinois Regt. and Inf., USA. carried away. He was a bright chap and the man who took him off said he was too likely a boy to remain in slavery. He belonged to the Hawkins family and his departure created quite a stir among those immediately interested. Mitchell was carried along with Capt. Smith’s regiment until the close of the war, when he was taken in hand by Northern friends and educated in a Catholic School and subsequently in law in Chicago. He is now a successful practitioner in Chicago.” The Times wrote the piece because Mitchell was back in Florence visiting his mother “Aunt” Martha Cook. Martha Cook was born a slave in Dinwiddie Co., Virginia in 1828. Somehow or other she wound up in Lauderdale County, Alabama. The first record we have of Martha is her 1870 Lauderdale County federal census enumeration. She was enumerated in the house of a 50 year-old black man named Clay Mitchell, with 21 year old Robert Mitchell, and two girls, Sarah and Liza Mitchell. Though the census doesn’t say, we think Clay Mitchell was Martha’s husband, and that the Robert is the Robert who was carried away by Capt. Smith during the War (Robert was possibly home on a visit). The girls may have been Martha’s daughters, or they may have been Clay’s from a previous marriage. We know that Martha had grandchildren, because one of them, a little girl named Mattie Cook, died of typhoid fever at ten years old in September of 1882. What became of Clay Mitchell and the two Mitchell girls isn’t known. Most likely Clay died sometime after this census was taken. The next record we have for Martha is the marriage license for her December 26, 1874 marriage to Henry Cook. We know almost nothing about Henry Cook, save that he died in late July, 1899, a victim of palsy, which he had had for a long time. He was probably buried in the city cemetery. The Captain Smith who carried Robert Mitchell away from Florence was Captain Alexander “Alex” Smith (1841-1917) of the 7th Illinois Infantry, USA, commanded by Col. Richard Rowett, and which was stationed in Florence in March of 1864. Alex was born in Eaton, Preble County, Ohio in 1841, one of several children of John A. and Ellen Smith. Before the war Alex Smith worked as a harness-maker, and after the war he worked in a couple of hotels before owning two of his own. Alex Smith enlisted in the 7th Ill in April of 1861 as a private. He was soon promoted to corporal, then lieutenant, and in 1862 he was promoted to captain. It was Capt. Smith who was responsible for getting the 7th Illinois their new Henry Repeating Rifles. Smith managed to track down 500 that had been 10

Kidsville News!

shipped to Chicago. Smith eventually got the rifles, but had to pay $52.20 each rather than the standard $47.40 each, paying the difference out of his own pocket (for which he was never reimbursed). Smith also wound up having to borrow money from a friend to get enough money to have the rifles shipped to his regiment. After the war, Capt. Smith returned to Illinois and worked as a hotel clerk in the town of Mattoon, before moving to Jacksonville, where he worked at the Dunlap House Hotel. In April of 1875 he married Josephine Marie Litzleman. She and Capt. Smith later adopted a son whom they named Alexander Smith, Jr. Captain Alexander Smith died January 15, 1917 at 76 years of age. He died from smoke inhalation when his house next door to the hotel caught fire. In 1864 when he was carried away from Florence by Capt. Smith, young Robert M. Mitchell was a 9 year-old slave of the Hawkins family (it was not unusual for slaves and masters to have different last names). We aren’t sure if Robert’s mother Martha was a Hawkins slave or not, though she probably was. At any rate, the Hawkins family and probably Robert’s family, were understandably upset at his being carried away. We don’t know the precise details of why he carried him away, but Captain Smith probably had the young boy’s best interest at Alexander Smith (1841-1917) of heart. He thought young Robert was theCaptain 7th Ill, Inf, USA,, who left Florence in too smart and had too much potential 1864 carrying the nine year-old slave boy to remain a slave. Apparently the Robert Mitchell with him. After the war, Hawkins family didn’t inform their Northern friends of Smith put Robert through school. slaves of Pres. Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, which ironically only freed slaves in Confederate controlled territories. Nevertheless, many Southern slave-owners freed their slaves after they heard of the Proclamation; but apparently not all. Robert eventually became a successful lawyer in Chicago and married a woman named Amanda. For most of their married life they lived on Dearborn Street. According to his Chicago Tribune obituary, in 1872, the year he came to Chicago, Robert became steward of the Illinois Club, and later he became clerk of the Harrison Street Court, and then deputy clerk of the Criminal Court, before becoming deputy clerk of the Internal Revenue Bureau. A Florence Times article about Robert from 1905 said that in 1903 he became the Assistant City Attorney of Chicago, a very prestigious position for a man from such humble circumstances. Periodically, Robert would make trips back to Florence to visit his mother, “Aunt” Martha Cook. Robert once said that he was still a patriotic Southerner despite living in Illinois, and was proud to be from Alabama. Martha Cook, “a worthy colored woman, a venerable landmark of the old times of Florence,” passed away Monday, August 23, 1903 at 83 years old. She was interred with honors from a fraternal association she had been a member of, in the city cemetery. Robert came back for funeral and paid for her funeral as well as her beautiful marble tombstone. The whole funeral, including buying the coffin and digging the grave, cost $39, a lot of money in 1903. Robert M. Mitchell passed away in Chicago on September 18, 1908. He was only 53. His wife Amanda lived on for several more decades on Dearborn Street. His Florence Times obituary said of Robert that “one of his special traits was his attachment to his old home here and the respect he had for southern [sic] people.” Robert’s mother, Martha Cook was proud of him, and what he had achieved on his journey to freedom, and apparently so was the town of Florence.

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July 2010


Back In School!

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We’ll be back in classrooms next month beginning on August 11. Enjoy the rest of Summer Vacation! We will also be in the usual racks all Summer and Fall if you lose your copy or are absent from school when Kidsville News! is handed out!

Lauderdale Co.

Colbert Co.

• Books-A-Million • Children’s Museum of the Shoals • Florence-Lauderdale Public Library • Funland Park • Killen Public Library • Lexington Library • McDonald’s on Florence Blvd. Cloverdale Rd. • Rogersville Public Library • Skate Center-Florence • Shoney’s, Florence • YMCA of the Shoals • Courier Journal office

• Cherokee Public Library • Colbert County Tourism • Helen Keller Hospital: -Emergency Room -4th Floor- Pediatrics -1100 Building -1120 Building • Helen Keller Public Library, Tuscumbia • Sheffield Public Library • Shoneys, Muscle Shoals • Muscle Shoals Public Library

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Find these Finditems! these items. Be sure to find Be sureHat! to fiFor nd more Truman’s Truman’s more puzzleshat! andFor games visit www.kidsvillenews.com/shoals puzzles and games, visit www.kidsvillenews.com. Answers On Page 22

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Anna Stafford 7 Lexington

Chasity Jackson 12 Florence

Ryleigh Hunt 8 Florence

Haley Hill 10 Florence

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Carson Ticer 10 Florence

Madison Jenkins

Kassidy Wilkins 9 Waterloo

Orlando Decatur 14 Florence

Shelby Boatwright 8 Florence

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NASA Established, 1958

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MOSTLY BLUES ART EXHIBIT July 8-August 12 Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts Florence, M-F 9-4

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Battle of Gettysburg Anniversary, 1863

Tour de France, July 3-25

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Disneyland Opened, 55th Anniversary, 1955

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Paperback Books Introduced, 1935

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This reminder is from your friends at:

HAVE FUN AND BE SAFE!

y. too hot – if you have a headache or feel queasy.

n • Tell an adult if you think you might have gotten

• Drink lots of water!

4 p.m. Take extra precautions during that time.

nd • The sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and

• Wear sunglasses.

outdoors. Also, reapply every couple of hours!

• Use sunscreen – have an adult help you apply sunscreen before going

• Wear a hat to protect your head, face, and neck!

WHILE YOU ARE PLAYING OUTSIDE THIS SUMMER, PLAY IT SAFE!

(the SAFE Way!)

Fun in the Sun

First Day of Birthday of Harry Potter’ and Author School J.K. Rowling August 9th

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W.C. HANDY MUSIC FESTIVAL The Shoals, Alabama July 23-31

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W.C. HANDY MUSIC FESTIVAL The Shoals, Alabama July 23-31

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First Special Olympics, 1968

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World Cup Inaugurated, 80th Anniversary, 1930

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✪ This symbol recognizes the holiday as a Presidential Proclamation.

Buck Moon This exhibition is a multimedia survey of work by Tennessee Valley Art Association artist members. . At TN Valley Art Center In Tuscumbia

July 25-August 27

❍ FULL MOON, ARTWORKS ’10 also known as the

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Solar Eclipse, visible in South America

● New Moon

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Independence Day

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A juried competition of works by Alabama children who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind. At TN Valley Art Center In Tuscumbia

Now - July 16 2010 Helen Keller Art Show of Alabama

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July


12 Kidsville News! www.kidsvillenews.com/shoals July 2010 www.kidsvillenews.com/shoals Kidsville News! 13

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19

12

5

Anna Stafford 7 Lexington

Chasity Jackson 12 Florence

Ryleigh Hunt 8 Florence

Haley Hill 10 Florence

Please Note: the age of the artist given is WHEN THE ARTWORK WAS DONE.

11 Killen

Carson Ticer 10 Florence

Madison Jenkins

Kassidy Wilkins 9 Waterloo

Orlando Decatur 14 Florence

Shelby Boatwright 8 Florence

See page 2 to find out how!

Do you want your work here? Send it to us! We may use it in an upcoming issue.

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21

14

7

NASA Established, 1958

29

22

15

MOSTLY BLUES ART EXHIBIT July 8-August 12 Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts Florence, M-F 9-4

8

Battle of Gettysburg Anniversary, 1863

Tour de France, July 3-25

24

Disneyland Opened, 55th Anniversary, 1955

17

10

3

Paperback Books Introduced, 1935

30

1300 S. Montgomery Ave. • Sheffield, AL 35630 • 256-386-4196 • www.helenkeller.com

This reminder is from your friends at:

HAVE FUN AND BE SAFE!

y. too hot – if you have a headache or feel queasy.

n • Tell an adult if you think you might have gotten

• Drink lots of water!

4 p.m. Take extra precautions during that time.

nd • The sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and

• Wear sunglasses.

outdoors. Also, reapply every couple of hours!

• Use sunscreen – have an adult help you apply sunscreen before going

• Wear a hat to protect your head, face, and neck!

WHILE YOU ARE PLAYING OUTSIDE THIS SUMMER, PLAY IT SAFE!

(the SAFE Way!)

Fun in the Sun

First Day of Birthday of Harry Potter’ and Author School J.K. Rowling August 9th

31

W.C. HANDY MUSIC FESTIVAL The Shoals, Alabama July 23-31

23

16

9

2

W.C. HANDY MUSIC FESTIVAL The Shoals, Alabama July 23-31

27

First Special Olympics, 1968

20

World Cup Inaugurated, 80th Anniversary, 1930

13

6

✪ This symbol recognizes the holiday as a Presidential Proclamation.

Buck Moon This exhibition is a multimedia survey of work by Tennessee Valley Art Association artist members. . At TN Valley Art Center In Tuscumbia

July 25-August 27

❍ FULL MOON, ARTWORKS ’10 also known as the

25

18

Solar Eclipse, visible in South America

● New Moon

11

Independence Day

4

A juried competition of works by Alabama children who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind. At TN Valley Art Center In Tuscumbia

Now - July 16 2010 Helen Keller Art Show of Alabama

1

S U N D A Y M O N D A Y T U E S D A Y WEDNESDAY T H U R S D A Y F R I D A Y SATURDAY

July


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In the city of Pamplona, Spain, young men run through the streets being chased by bulls! This event takes place as part of the festival of San Fermin. On the morning of July 7, runners gather at the starting line at the bottom of Santo Domingo. Then a rocket explodes, and some fighting bulls are released onto the streets. The bulls run along the narrow street half a mile to a bull ring. The runners run in front of the bulls, getting as close as possible but trying to avoid getting gored by their sharp horns!

July 1 is celebrated as Canada Day, Canada’s birthday or national day. It was also formerly known as Dominion Day. This special day commemorates the confederation in 1867 of Upper and Lower Canada and some of the Maritime Provinces into the Dominion of Canada. The anniversary is celebrated with music concerts, games and activities for the whole family and a spectacular fireworks show.

The French love to celebrate on July 14, Bastille Day. The fall of the Bastille prison marked the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789. The people of Paris stormed the Bastille prison and freed the political prisoners, who were placed there by order of the King. Although there were not many prisoners, the storming of the Bastille was a symbol of defiance to the King and the monarchy. Now, the French national holiday is celebrated by dances, parades, dinners and fireworks.

Gila Monster What would your life be like if… … you could hardly move whenever it got cold? … you had to bask under the sun on a bed of hot rocks? … you couldn’t eat until your body warmed up? That’s how the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum explains the life of a lizard in the Sonoran Desert. During the hot summer months, they must be careful not to get too hot. They move back and forth from sun to shade in order to control their body temperature. Then, in the winter when it gets too cold, they hibernate. The Gila monster is one of only two venomous, or poisonous, lizards in the world! It is found in deserts located in the Southwestern United States, especially in western and southern Arizona, and northwestern Mexico. It is one of the sole survivors of an ancient group of lizards Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Subphylum: Vertebrata Class: Reptilia Order: Squamata Family: Helodermatidae Species: Heloderma suspectum

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known as the Monstersauria. It is a very large lizard and usually reaches about 18 inches in length. The Gila monster ordinarily has a large head, bulky body, a thick tail it uses to collect food and short legs with strong claws. The texture of its skin consists of beadlike scales, and its movements are slow and clumsy. A combination of brown or black with orange, pink, yellow or dull white makes up its marbled color. The Gila monster eats young birds, mammals and eggs and has a low metabolism, making its eating patterns similar to that of a snake. Gila monsters typically eat their entire food supply for a year within three to four months. In fact, young Gila monsters can eat up to 50 percent of their body weight in one feeding (if you weigh 80 pounds, imagine eating 40 pounds of food for dinner!). The Gila monster spends most of its time underground in burrows. Sources: Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, www.desertmuseum.org; The Columbia Encyclopedia, encyclopedia.com; Dictionary.com, Animal-World, animal-world.com. Research assistance, Ashley Young.

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Red, W h i t e & True Mysteries Former Football Player Becomes National Icon His name was Marion, and he was born in Winterset, Iowa, exactly one hundred years ago. I wasn’t sure where that was, so I looked it up. Turns out that it is between Missouri and Minnesota. (As for Winterset, it is roughly 30 miles southwest of Des Moines.) His father, Clyde, was the son of a Civil War veteran. Clyde and Mary had one other son named Robert, and they were of Irish descent. The family moved to Glendale, California, which is not too far from the Rio Grande, when he was 11 years old. Marion’s voice was as distinctive as Paul Harvey’s, but he wasn’t a radio star. No, Marion Morrison was an actor. In fact, his father ran a drugstore that was housed in the same building as a movie theatre, and young Marion was allowed to see several movies a week as a boy, for free. This no doubt instilled in him a love of movies. He became one of the most popular actors of all time, and there probably isn’t a person in this country who hasn’t heard of him. He made more than 175 movies in his 50-year career, which began in the 1920s with silent movies, and some of his movies are still being shown on TV, more than 30 years after he made his last movie in 1976. He won an athletic scholarship to play football at USC. I don’t know what his team’s record was when he played, but I do know that his team wasn’t one of The Undefeated. An injury cut short his college football career. Marion was too scared to tell his coach how he injured himself — it was a bodysurfing accident — and he lost his scholarship and had to get a job in order to pay for school. While he was in school in the late 1920s, he worked at a few of the local film studios. He then went to work as a prop man, earning $75 per week. In 1930, he got his first starring role in a western movie, The Big Trail. He went on to become nearly synonymous with western movies, and he still went by the name of Marion at that point. This first film was a box office failure, but something good came out of July 2010

it. The director and the studio head gave him his stage name that is now known all over the world — and Marion wasn’t even at the meeting when they gave him his new name! Marion’s movies required him to ride occasionally in a Stagecoach; since he stood about 6’4” and loved riding horses, you could say that he always stood Tall in the Saddle. Speaking of horses, his friend James Arness also rode one in the TV show, Gunsmoke. It was Marion Morrison who recommended James Arness for the role of Matt Dillon. Marion became such a star that he even had an airport named after him (in Orange County, California), as well as an elementary school (in Brooklyn, New York) and a trail (in a state park in Washington). Marion was married three times, all to Hispanic women. He was divorced three times, too. He had four daughters and three sons, and these seven kids produced 18 grandchildren. There are many things for which Marion Morrison is known, but you know him by both his nickname and his stage name: The Duke, John Wayne. He starred with legendary actresses such as Marlene Dietrich, Katharine Hepburn and Maureen O’Hara. It was O’Hara who once said, “No other description for John Wayne is necessary than this: American.” There’s one other thing that you should know about the Duke: His drawl and the way he walked were not natural. The man born as Marion Morrison made them a part of his character when he became an actor. And how did he get the nickname of Duke? That was the name of the dog he had as a child. The dog was known as “Big Duke” while Wayne was known as “Little Duke!” As for all the italicized words in this story, those were the titles of some of his most popular movies. © 2010 Paul Niemann. This story is part of the Red, White & True Mysteries series by author Paul Niemann. For more information, please visit www.InventionMysteries.com.

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Kidsville News! Happy Birthday, America! All of us have a birthday. It’s a time to celebrate the day that we were born and the joy over our existence. Our nation has a birthday, too! Our nation’s birthday is coming up on July 4! Happy Birthday, America! Do you know how our country, the United States of America, was born? The birthday of the United States of America is known as Independence Day, or the Fourth of July. On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence. This meant that the colonies were separating from Great Britain and becoming an independent country. So what led to the birth of our nation? In 1750, there were 13 small colonies in America. Each colony was separate, but they were all ruled by the king of England. The colonies had to send money to England to pay taxes. All of the laws and rules were also made in Great Britain, and there was no representation or input from the people of the American colonies. The people of the colonies began to believe that they should be independent and not ruled by a king who lived across the ocean. They wanted to be free to choose the kind of government they wanted. The king refused to give up the American colonies and sent ships filled with soldiers to America. The colonies realized that in order to fight the king and his army, they would need to unite. Each colony chose men to go to Philadelphia and meet. This was called the “First Continental Congress.” They drafted a letter to the king and asked him to change unfair laws and to send his soldiers back to England. Instead, the king sent more soldiers to America, and the Revolutionary War began. The Declaration of Independence was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in June of 1776. In the Declaration, Jefferson expressed the feelings of the American people. It explained the ideals of individual liberty through “self-evident truths,” proclaiming that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain rights, and among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The document also explained that governments are created to help ensure these rights. When a government abuses the people and denies their rights, it is the duty of the people to remove or change that form of government. The Declaration listed grievances against the King and how the government of The first U.S. Zoo opened on July 1, 1874. The Philadelphia Zoological Society had 1,000 animals in the zoo on opening day, and 3,000 visitors came to visit.

Great Britain was infringing on the rights of the people, and justified the separation of the colonies from Great Britain. On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was adopted. The ringing of the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia signaled that a new nation had been born. It was five more years before the British surrendered at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781. The United States of America was finally a free nation! All Americans are encouraged to read the Declaration of Independence, to understand better the rights that our forefathers fought for so that we can live the lives that we do today. Have you read it?

by the numbers!

2.5 30 150 5.2 50

Million people living in the 13 original colonies back in 1776. (Historial Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970) Number of places in America with “liberty” in their names. (Examples are Liberty, Missouri, Liberty, North Carolina and North Liberty, Iowa.) Number — in millions — of hot dogs estimated to be eaten at July 4th celebrations.

Million dollars are spent importing American flags, as of last count in 2004. Most of the flags are made in China. percent of America’s potatoes are grown in either Idaho or Washington. Potatoes are common foods at July 4th celebrations, usually in the form of potato salad or potato chips! Aviator Amelia Earhart planned an around-the-world trip in 1937. She completed 22,000 miles of the journey when her plane disappeared on July 2. It was never found.

The poem “America the Beautiful” was first published on July 4, 1895, in a church publication. It was later set to music and is one of America’s most patriotic songs.

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The anniversary of man’s first landing on the moon is July 20, 1969. Two U.S. astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin Jr., landed the module Eagle on the moon from the Apollo XI. They brought back photos and rock samples.

July 2010


It’s “Cool” to Live The Golden Rule By Barbara Gilmour

Hello, again! Tanner, Truman the Dragon and their friends are learning more about being a “Cool Kind Kid.” The kids thought meeting Truman and having a dragon for a friend was very cool. Truman told them that he likes having kids for friends. He said he was excited to learn how to be “cool” and “kind.” He tries to be kind most of the time, but sometimes it’s hard. Do you try your best to be kind, too? Truman, Tanner and the other kids all agreed that being kind wasn’t always easy. Some kids laughed at them when they were nice. Other kids called them names and hurt their feelings. Do kids tease you when you try to be kind? They have it all backwards! “Kind” is the “cool” way to be. Are there kids at your school who think hurting someone’s feelings is okay? How uncool! Do kids in your neighborhood have fun picking on others, especially little kids? That makes them look “little.” Are kids bullying on your bus? They have no idea how far from cool they look. Last time, we talked about manners and how they can help us learn to be “Cool Kind Kids.” Manners teach us how to treat other people. They show us how to be “kind” and “cool.” They help us have more friends. You’ll remember that we also talked about The Golden Rule and said it was the basis for good manners. What have you heard about The Golden Rule in school or at home? Many people in the world think it’s an important rule to live by. It says, “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” What if a friend punches you in the arm, and you punch him back? Is that The Golden Rule? Or, is that “Treat others the way they treat you”? See the difference? Tanner, Truman and the other kids are going to create some role-plays or skits to show the difference. Their first set of role-plays will show kids treating their friends the same way the friends have treated them —“he did it to me, so I can do it to him!” In these role-plays, kids are mean and hurtful. Then they’ll create a second set of role-plays showing the same situation but with people acting out The Golden Rule — “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” You can write role-plays just like theirs. Maybe your parents, brothers, sisters, or some friends will want to help you. When you’re writing your role-play, ask yourself, “How do I want to be treated? Do I want to be teased, picked on or bullied? Or, do I want to be treated with kindness and respect?” Send in your Golden Rule role-plays to write@kidsvillenews.com. You could win a “Cool Kind Kid” CD, see your role-play printed in Kidsville News! and get some cool gifts from Truman. Be sure to include your name, age and address and your parents’ permission.

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“Litter Adds Up ... One Piece at a Time”

Is any of the litter yours?? The litter in the photo was picked up by volunteers in a three hour period in the Shoals. Please Keep The Shoals Beautiful by placing trash in its proper place.

Barbara Gilmour, Tanner’s grandmom, is the creator and developer of the Tanner’s Manners: Be a “Cool Kind Kid” Social Skills, Character Values and Anti-Bullying Elementary School Curriculum; the “Cool Kind Kid” Camp Kits and the award-winning “Cool Kind Kid” Audio CD. © Cool Kind Kid 866-KID-KIND www.CoolKindKid.com July 2010

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Come Out And Play! Lassos, Broncos and Steers, Oh My! Quick! Can you name the official state sport of Wyoming and Texas? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rodeo! Rodeo is a popular professional sport involving horses and other livestock and consisting of events like roping, bronc riding, steer wrestling, barrel racing and bull riding. The word rodeo comes from the Spanish word, rodeo, which is often translated in English as â&#x20AC;&#x153;round upâ&#x20AC;? and was first used around 1834. Rodeo events originated from tasks of the Spanish vaqueros or cowboys in cattle ranching, such as moving cows to different pastures or to market. In the 1820s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;30s, informal â&#x20AC;&#x153;rodeosâ&#x20AC;? in the western U.S. and Mexico allowed cowboys and vaqueros to test their work skills against each other. The first rodeo competition occurred in Cheyenne, Wyoming, after the Civil War. The first professional rodeo to charge admission and award trophies was held in Prescott, Arizona, in 1888. Between 1890 and 1910, rodeos sometimes featured Wild West Shows with stars like Buffalo Bill Cody and Annie Oakley. Rodeos became popular across the U.S. and even took place in Madison Square Garden in New York City. And rodeos were not just for men! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prairie Roseâ&#x20AC;? Henderson first competed in 1901, and today, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s barrel racing is a

competitive event in professional rodeos. Rodeos include timed and rough stock events. Roping, which involves throwing a rope with a loop, called a lariat or lasso, over a calfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head or cowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horns or legs; barrel racing, where a rider races around barrels on a horse without knocking them over and steer wrestling or â&#x20AC;&#x153;bulldogging,â&#x20AC;? where a cowboy jumps off his running horse and wrestles a steer by the horns to the ground, are all timed events. Bronc riding and bull riding are rough stock events. As you might imagine, rodeos involve many rules for the many different events, and several professional associations exist. The oldest, formed in 1929, is the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PCRA). Others include the Professional Bull Riders (PBR) and the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), as well as organizations for youth, high school and college competitions. Rodeo arenas must be at least 100 feet by 175 feet, and all events require medical professionals present for both people and animals. And if you want to â&#x20AC;&#x153;rodeo,â&#x20AC;? donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your Western hat and boots! They, too, are required. Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodeo; http://rodeo.about.com/od/history/a/rodeohistory1.htm and http://www.igra.com/Resources/RodeoRules/RodeoRules.htm#I.

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What’s It Like To Be... A Dude Rancher? I recently had the opportunity to visit Tucson, Arizona, home of the saguaro cactus and beautiful mountains. While I was there, I met a real live dude rancher. Russell True and his brother Michael own White Stallion Ranch, which was started by their parents. Three generations of the True family work hard on the ranch to give their guests the real feeling of the Old West. White Stallion Ranch is on 3,000 acres of wide-open land at the foot of the rugged Tucson Mountains, adjacent to the Saguaro National Park. Here, ranch hospitality is blended perfectly with the comforts of a top resort, on a real working cattle ranch.

some to get a suntan, some to meet other TRUMAN: What does it take to become a dude rancher? people. I have all this cool stuff around us and RUSSELL: I think to do it well it takes a wide range of get this unique interaction with this group of experience. Some people, like my parents who bought a ranch, pretty cool people. learned it the hard way — they got in, applied their work ethic, TRUMAN: I understand that you get to their good minds, and just figured it out. To really do this job meet some very special kids, too, through the well, you need to have horse experience, hospitality Make a Wish Foundation (an organization experience — both hotel and restaurant — and some business that grants wishes to children with lifeexperience and training. You also have to be good with people threatening medical conditions). on both sides of the fence, folks that work for you and guests. RUSSELL: Yes, we’ve done a lot of them. I We have a wide variety of guests: different have kids, so if you are a parent, there is ages, with families, without familes, Above: Russell True. Left: Guests absolutely nothing worse than a sick kid — a Europeans, Asians. You also have to be good head out on a trail ride at White gravely ill kid. It is heart wrenching, and some at maintenance. The smaller your ranch is, Stallion Ranch. of these kids aren’t going to get a fair chance at the more diverse you must be because you life. But some of these kids have had pretty miraculous recoveries. One kid can’t hire people to do everything. was so sick she couldn’t come here without her doctor coming with her, and TRUMAN: When and why did you first we told her, “When you get better, you come back and see us.” Two years become interested in this profession? later she did. It was a tremendous experience to see her recovery. It is just RUSSELL: Really I was born into it. My uplifting to see these sick kids who come through Make a Wish and other parents bought the ranch when I was five. organizations. I have never seen one of them feel badly for themselves — When my family bought it there were 30 they are just happy to be here and upbeat and excited to have the opportunity. ranches in Tucson; today there are two. We They never feel sorry for themselves. It renews faith in humanity at its most chose it in the sense that we stayed — for me innocent. and my brother, it’s the only thing we’ve ever TRUMAN: What’s like to work with horses all the time? done. We went to college and came back here. We both studied business and RUSSELL: The average-size horse weighs 1000 pounds, and we have some finance, and the general business education is very helpful. But I wish I’d that are 800 and some that are 2000 pounds. But most people don’t realize gone to hotel school. Sometimes dude ranchers forget they are running a that this half-ton animal is pretty fragile. It’s surprising: 1. They have some hotel, but you are — you have to have good rooms, good food. You’ve got flaws, like they can’t throw up, so if they get an intestinal disorder, it could to get the whole hospitality part done correctly. My son is at hotel school kill them. And a broken leg or damaged leg could be the end for them. 2. They now, and the plan is that he’ll come back to the family business one day. are afraid of everything — even though they essentially have no natural TRUMAN: What do you do each day? What’s a typical day like? predators, they are a prey animal, and a piece of Kleenex can spook them. RUSSELL: There is really essentially no typical day. I do all sorts of things. They are very fearful and react to the other horses around them. Everything But a typical day is probably going to start with me heading to the kitchen to you do with horses involves keeping them healthy and coping with them cook breakfast with the chef; then I go to the corrals and make sure being fearful. The thing that is really cool, is that horses mirror people, so if everything is moving out there. I’ll hit my desk at some point and do you’re tense, they are tense; if you’re afraid, they’re afraid. Horses have been paperwork and e-mails. My brother and I divide our responsibilites, so I do used for quite a while in a variety of ways to help people with handicaps, but most of the marketing and go to meetings, and he is more of the behind-thenow they are also being used to just help people discover their strengths and scenes guy. I’m also president of the Dude Ranchers Association, so I travel weaknesses. Horses are like people; they are each unique. Some are more with that some. I take trail rides, manage the corral, and although our shoer fearful, some want to run fast and some want to walk slow. My older son [the person who puts horse shoes on the horse] is contracted, I had to shoe plays polo and rides ropes, and he is a very calm, even person. The horses three horses the other day because it needed to be done. My day is pretty absolutely love him and are calm around him. diverse, and that’s part of the fun for me. TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in this TRUMAN: What is the hardest part of your job? profession? RUSSELL: I think that historically, the hardest part is dealing with the crew. RUSSELL: Get out and do it. As a young person, when you are old enough But since the economy has taken its huge downturn, our crew is really, really (16-18), go out and get a summer job at a dude ranch. I can guarantee you it good, and essentially there is no turnover. Managing the folks that work here will be one of the best jobs you will ever have, in one of the prettiest spots, is historically the hardest part, but today it’s more of contending with and you’ll do things you never thought you could do, see nature at its best, government coming at you from all different angles, dealing with regulations meet people, and you’ll get a sense of whether this very specific, different and such. We are very small, and government is very big, so that is always a type of life is for you. There are a lot of skills involved, but none of them is challenge. rocket science, so go out and get a feel for whether or not this is something TRUMAN: What is the best part of your job? you would like to do. This is real — it’s not a Wii horse ride — this is the RUSSELL: I love the diversity. Where else do you get to live in one of the real thing. prettiest places in the country and meet people from all over the world? Two TRUMAN: What an amazing career! Thanks for sharing with Kidsville weeks ago, we had people from six countries here. You meet these amazing News! people who come here for all kinds of reasons, some to learn to ride horses, 20

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I hope everyone is having a great summer. Here are the books on my wish list that will be release in June and July. There are new releases in the Warriors and Seekers series by Erin Hunter so look for them at the bookstore. Submitted By Patricia J. Weaver

Seaglass Summer By Anjali Banerjee From Booklist Eleven-year-old Poppy wants to be a veterinarian like her uncle Sanjay. So while her parents are in India visiting relatives, she spends several weeks with him on Nisqually Island, Washington, helping out at his Furry Friends Animal Clinic. One terrific thing about this book is that there’s no talking down, either to Poppy or the reader. Everything’s on the table, from Sanjay’s father’s negative reaction to his son’s career choice to the limits of care a vet can provide when a pet is terminal. There are many moving events here, and only the hardest of hearts won’t soften when Poppy tries to comfort an elderly man whose beloved cat is being put down. Sometimes amusing, sometimes gross, and always true to itself, this should find a wide readership. Pencil illustrations enliven the chapter headings. Grades 4-6.

Samirah s Ride: The Story of an Arabian Filly (The Breyer Horse Collection) By Annie Wedekind Samirah is an eight-year-old Arabian mare, who has been carefully raised and trained by her girl, Jasper, to be the ultimate family ranch horse. Sami has long sensed that Jasper is itching for freedom, and wants to be a real cowgirl. When Jasper hears a rumor that her family is being forced to sell their ranch and decides to run away, the filly and her girl find themselves lost in a beautiful, legendary wilderness, but one fraught with dangers. Sami must use all of her resources and strength to keep them both alive. Our Arabian will do everything for her girl, and the girl will do everything for her horse. “Horse fans and animal lovers will embrace this book with unbridled enthusiasm. It deserves a place next to Marguerite Henry or even Jack London on young readers’ bookshelves.”—School Library Journal

The Shadows: The Books of Elsewhere: Volume 1

By Jacqueline West From School Library Journal Grade 4–6—Olive Dunwoody and her mathematically minded parents move into an old Victorian home complete with the deceased owner's furnishings. Olive first notices that something is wrong when she can't

July 2010

take the paintings off the wall. She sees things moving in them. Then, while rummaging through the drawers, she finds a pair of glasses and tries them on. Olive can now enter the paintings and talk to the people in them. She is warned by a talking cat named Horatio not to spend too much time in there or to lose the glasses. She meets Morton in a painting and learns that he was forced into it because of a conversation he overheard. Olive is determined to find out more about the house and its history. But who can she trust? Her neighbors, the talking cats, or the people in the paintings? The expressive black-and-white illustrations contribute to the overall spooky mood of the story. The plot moves quickly as Olive pieces together clues. Recommend this book to reluctant readers and fans of Neil Gaiman’s Coraline.

Magic Below Stairs

By Caroline Stevermer Young Frederick is plucked from an orphanage to be a footboy for a wizard named Lord Schofield in Victorian England. Is his uncanny ability to tie perfect knots and render boots spotless a sign of his own magical talent, or the work of Billy Bly, the brownie who has been secretly watching over him since he was little? No matter, for the wizard has banished all magical creatures from his holdings. But Billy Bly isn’t going anywhere, and when he discovers a curse upon the manor house, it’s up to Frederick and Billy Bly to keep the lord’s new baby safe and rid the Schofield family of the curse forever. “Her characters are clever, courageous, and charming, even in the midst of harrowing adventure.” —Holly Black “It’s a romp! I read straight through, cheering for the plucky servant kids, loving the household magic, and terrified of the curse!” —Tamora Pierce “I loved it.” —Jane Yolen “Absolutely compelling.” —Sarah Prineas

The Magnificent 12: The Call

By Michael Grant

Twelve-year-old Mack MacAvoy suffers from a serious case of mediumness. Medium looks. Medium grades. Medium parents who barely notice him. With a list of phobias that could make anyone crazy, Mack never would have guessed that he is destined for a more-than-medium life. And then, one day, something incredibly strange happens to Mack. A three-thousandyear-old man named Grimluk appears in the boys’ bathroom to deliver some startling news: Mack is one of the Magnificent Twelve, called the Magnifica in ancient times, whatever that means. An evil force is on its way, and it’s up to Mack to track down eleven other twelve-year-olds in order to stop it. He must travel across the world to battle the wicked Pale Queen’s dangerous daughter, Ereskigal—also known as Risky. But Risky sounds a little scary, and Mack doesn’t want to be a hero. Will he answer the call? A laugh-out-loud story filled with excitement and magic, The Magnificent Twelve: The Call is the first book in bestselling author Michael Grant’s hilarious new fantasy adventure series.

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Kidsville Kitchen

Answers

Together Time - Ask an adult for help with projects!

Wild About Blueberries! July is Blueberry Month! You can get big taste and big benefits from a little fruit — Wild Blueberries. Wild Blueberries get their color from naturally occurring phytochemicals, which are primarily responsible for antioxidant activity. Wild Blueberries are antioxidant rich, making them a great choice for their nutritional benefits and disease fighting potential. Wild Blueberries are a different berry from cultivated blueberries. They grow naturally in the fields and barrens of Maine and Canada. They are smaller in size, have a unique sweet-tart taste, and are only available frozen.

Math Puzzler

Wild Blueberry Ice Cream Pops Prep Time: Approximately 15 minutes, plus thaw and freezing time Yield: 6 Pops WHAT YOU NEED: • 1 cup frozen Wild Blueberries • 1 ounce milk chocolate chips • 2 cups fat-free vanilla frozen yogurt, softened slightly • Small wooden or plastic sticks HOW TO MAKE IT: • Thaw Wild Blueberries and purée • In a bowl, combine puréed Wild Blueberries, chocolate and frozen yogurt • Mix thoroughly. • Rinse 6 standard muffin cups with cold water and spoon in Wild Blueberry mixture, dividing it evenly between the cups (silicone muffin cups need not be rinsed first). • Place a stick in the center of each “muffin” and freeze until firm, at least 2 hours. • Tip: Mixture can also be frozen with plastic sticks in small glasses or espresso cups.

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Barbeque Word Scramble Answers: 1. charcoal 2. barbecue 3. yard 4. temperature.

Wild Blueberry Lemon Jam Prep Time: 25 to 30 minutes Yield: about 8 half-pints WHAT YOU NEED: • 5 cups frozen Wild Blueberries • 1 package dry pectin • 5 cups sugar • 1 tablespoon lemon zest • 1/3 cup lemon juice HOW TO MAKE IT: With adult help: • Crush thawed Wild Blueberries one layer at a time, or chop frozen in food processor. • Combine thawed, crushed Wild Blueberries and pectin in a large saucepot. • Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. • Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. • Stir in grated lemon zest and lemon juice. • Return to a rolling boil. • Boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. • Remove from heat. • Skim foam if necessary. • Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. • Adjust twopiece caps. • Process 15 minutes in a boiling water canner. Courtesy of Family Features and the Wild Blueberry Association. 22

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ParenTown’s KidShape Explaining the Oil Spill to Children What Effects Do Oil Spills Have on the Environment? Your children have been hearing about the oil spill in the Gulf on the TV news and in the newspaper. But how do you answer their questions and help make sense of everything that you are hearing? Oil spills have profound and immediate effects on the environment. Plus, the damage slicks cause can be long-lasting. In April 2010, an oil leak occurred from an underwater BP drilling well in the Gulf of Mexico. Thousands of gallons of oil spilled into the ocean each day from a leak that the company said was difficult to plug quickly. Some experts anticipate that this spill has the potential to eclipse the Exxon Valdez oil disaster of 1989. Oil spills certainly attract public attention while under the media spotlight. Environmental experts come out of the woodwork, and volunteers line up to help do whatever they can to protect the wildlife impacted by the oil. However, what are the ramifications of an oil spill, including what occurs once the media attention has dissipated? What Is Oil? Oil is a natural substance formed over millions of years. It is thought to be created by plankton, decaying matter, sand and rock under extreme pressure. This is crude oil straight out of the ground. Although crude oil is of natural origin, the oil that is transported and pumped today may contain additives to help it perform better. Benzene, for example, is an important industrial solvent and precursor in the production of drugs, plastics, synthetic rubber and dyes and can sometimes be found in oil and as an additive to gasoline. Oil is used to make gasoline, serve as fuel, form a basis for plastic products, and many other purposes. Immediate Effects of an Oil Spill Oil enters the marine environment daily through runoff from everyday living and from natural seeps. The planet can sustain itself in this type of situation. It’s when a large amount of oil is introduced to an area in a short period of time that serious ramifications can occur. When a spill or leak occurs, most of the volatile compounds of oil evaporate quickly. However, the oil remains on the surface of the water, mixes with the water and becomes a different consistency. It can be a very sticky composition that some refer to as a “mousse.” The slick can quickly spread through water currents and wind. Many fish are attracted to the oil slick because of its sweet smell and its resemblance to food. Other marine life simply may not know how to avoid the oil. There are a number of effects that can occur, depending on the animal: • Oil can break down insulating fur or feathers in seals and marine birds, resulting in hypothermia. • Marine life that breathes through gills can suffocate. • Oil can coat the body, making mobility difficult and resulting in inability to forage for food or escape predators. • It may foul breeding grounds or result in mutation or death of young. July 2010

• Oil can taint algae and other marine food sources, resulting in elimination of certain species of plants and animals. Longer Effects of an Oil Spill After the cleanup efforts have ceased and the attention on the spill has slowed, oil can still have an impact on the environment. Eventually the oil can sink into the sea bed or remain under the water. This can impact burrowing animals, such as crabs or bottom feeders. Other marine life and birds may eat these animals and then become contaminated. The cycle of poisoning can continue for many years. More Than Marine Life Affected It’s not just the animals that live in and around the water that are impacted by an oil spill. It can have profound effects on humans, too. • Cost: People often pay the financial price for an oil spill. Costs of everything from plastic products to gasoline may rise as oil companies attempt to recuperate the lost money from the oil spill. • Fishing: Individuals who make their living from the water could lose significant portions of their income. Fishing may be banned in and around the oil spill area for an extended period. • Tourism: Many coastal towns and cities make their living from the tourists who frequent the seaside. An oil spill close to the shore can spoil fishing, boating and swimming in these areas. • Contamination: Individuals who live by a spill may come in contact with the same toxins as the marine life. Oil may infiltrate water systems or end up in the soil. Some oil additives can be carcinogenic. Also, inadvertently eating contaminated seafood can lead to poisoning. How Oil Spills Are Remediated While no two oil spills are the same, there are some common methods of cleanup. • If there is no chance for coastal contamination, some oil is left to break down by natural means and be dispersed by the currents and wind. • Skimmer nets are used to collect oil from the water’s surface. Booms and other devices may be used to push oil into a centralized location for collection. • Dispersants may be used to break down oil and have it biodegrade more quickly. However, careful consideration must be given to dispersants and weigh the factors of how the oil will contaminate underwater sea life. • Biological agents are introduced. These agents feed on components of the oil and break it down into harmless substances such as fatty acids and carbon dioxide. • Animal life impacted by the spill may be collected, cleaned and tested for contamination. Oil spills have the potential to be an environmental disaster if not quickly assessed and handled by professionals. Information and image courtesy of metrocreativeconnection.com.

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Why Am I Thirsty? When it’s hot outside and you’ve been sweating, you get thirsty. This is a sign of dehydration (say — dee-hye-dray-shun), which means your body isn’t getting enough water. Our bodies need water to work properly. In the summer, make sure you get enough water before, during, and after you play outside. Signs of dehydration are: • feeling dizzy or tired • fast heartbeat • dry mouth

Limit sodas and sugary drinks. Stick to water to make sure you have a safe and fun summer! This reminder brought to you by your friends at

1300 S. Montgomery Ave., Sheffield, AL • 256-386-4196 • www.helenkeller.com 24

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Courier Journal - Kidsville News!