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OF THE

YUKON The Case of

"THE

WHISPERING

RA


A

SERGEANT PRESTON'S ARCTIC DIARY

PERMAFROST The

its four seasons, but its foundations never thaw. That is to from the top twelve or eighteen inches of Arctic ground does the

Arctic has

say, only

Freezing cold melt in summer. This freezing cold, or PERMAFROST, underlies every inch of soil, every tree and plant— yes, and every river and pond in the Arctic. Buried streams of water How through the permafrost. Sometimes these streams are under such

pressure that if the heat of an inhabited hut or cabin finally melts the thin layer of frozen soil above it, the stream will burst upward with almost explosive force— and freeze again when it strikes the below-zero air. Tree roots cannot work down into the permafrost. Often, in the Arctic, one will see trees slanting

enough

to

over at odd angles, because their roots cannot grow deep And there is another reason for their queer

keep them upright

the permafrost is always heaving or lowering the surface soil. The cold of midwinter keeps sinking deeper in the permafrost for the next half of the year-and retreating upward toward the surface the second half of the year. This causes a rising and falling of surface layers which cracks the foundations of buildings and tilts them out of place. Owing to permafrost, no water can be piped underground, even in summer! Residents of the Arctic store household water in indoor tanks or barrels-and drain all waste water out at ground level, through large pipes, lest it freeze tilting:

before

it

reaches the end!

POSTM.-i-T-i; TH: Ne* York 16,

5.

SERGEANT PRESTON OF

,

nn Form 3579 to 76 Ninth A No. 21. Nov.-Jan. 19S7. Puhliit

< T.

261 Fifth AvonuD.

Depone.

Jr.. Prenidritt:

H*li

3 Albert P. Delo iplion. In U.S.

York l.N. Y,

CHANGES OF ADDRESS

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enclosing ! possible »oui old oddrcss label.

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WHISPERING RAVEN

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DELL COMICS ARK GOOD COMICS


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the team. king ---while i go ON TO POPS PLACE!

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THE REPORT OF BAGLEY'S PISTOL BLENOS WITH THE SPLINTERING OF WOOD. ..

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--AND SERGEANT PRESTON PITCHES FORWARD.

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because

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SHIPPED OUTALL MY GOLD BEFORE THEY AND

ARRIVED! MY ORE IS RICH? THEY HAVE CLEANED UP QUITE

A STAKE*


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WELCOME,

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SERGEANT, BUT A WHERE'S YOUR /

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YOU THE REST. 71

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STRUCK IT RICH A POCKET ---AND 1M HEADING FOR DAWSON. .. BUT ['M OUTOF GRUBf IF YOU COULD LET ME HAVE I

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TsiJReT STRANGER-I

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YOU THERE

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j—

ALIAS "MACKSON" ---YOU ARE \ UNDER ARREST FOR ROBBERY AND ATTEMPTED I MURDER! CUTOUT -/ YOUR HANDS J

LINK BODRY 1

ENOUGH T0 6ET

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LEADER OF THE

WOLF PACK LIFTING HIS EYES FROM HIS OWN PORTION. GRAY WOLF SEES THE SUDDEN, BULLYING RUSH OF TWO YOUNG WOLVES, DRIVING NEETKA FROM THE FEAST'

THE OTHER FLEES AS THE GRIM PACK LEADER WHIRLS ON HIM.


HIS

WORR

LIFTED, GRAY WOLF MEADS BACK TO REJOIN

HIS PACK

WOULD BE QUITE SAFE NOW.

'

HIS

MOTHER

HE BELIEVES

.

.

.


.

MOST BEARS WOULD HAVE FELT NO INTEREST AT ALL IN A WOLF'S DEN — - OR EVEN IN THE SCENT OF WOLVES— - 8UT 5ILVERTIP HAD A SLIT EAR.

NEVER. NEVER WOULOHE FORGET THAT A WOLF HAD NIPPED HIM PAINFULLY WHEN HE WAS A LITTLE CUB HIS MOTHER HAO RESCUEO HIM ---BUT THE SLIT EAR REMAINED '

TOREMIND HIMf


to eat," smiled Ben, as he returned pocket.

"What

is

it

smiling proprietor. this time,

Ben?

I've

new Gordon

got a

kind of canned bread for you." held out o can and smiled.

"Now don't poke fun at mp, Gordon. I've been a sourdough now for thirty years and HATE the bannock bread make with my sourdough! Is it wrong for a man to want something good for a change?" Ben asked Gordon plaintively. "I've been carrying this lump of sourdough in my pocket for months now and can't stand to eat it." Ben held up a lump of dough that looked had been crammed into the like putty. some pocket with some cartridges, and rifle bullets were sticking out of it. "If you ever bake that, you'll never have I

I

I

It

to worry about eating sourdough again!" Gordon laughed at the thought. Ben bought some of the new conned bread and then started out on one of his

endless streams

trips to look for

gold

in

the

many

in the Yukon. Ben stopped at the RCMP post at Lake Brand to see his friend. Corporal Hill.

"Don't go into the territory of the Ongilway Indians, old-timer. They're pretty sore at all white men since they were robbed last month by some bad hombres!" warned.

Hill

soid.

Ben traveled for two more days toward the Ongilway Indian region, unworried by Hill's warning. That night he made camp

and tried some of the canned bread Gordon had sold him.

that

I

out of sourdough!" Ben looked dis-

gustedly at the lump of sourdough mixed with rifle cartridges that he still carried. "I

keep

ought to throw this away, but I'll just used to have it to remind me of what I

watchful eyes of the old men. "This diet of Indian food is almost as bad as the bannock bread used to be. Oh, for a piece of that canned bread that Gordon sold me!" Ben mused to himself as he ote

some of the berries thai an old man gave him. "Say, I've still got my lump of sourbet even bannock bread would dough. taste good now." Knowing that the young Indian braves would not let "htm bake his bread, Ben waited until only the two old braves who guarded him were left in camp. Then, he made sign longuoge to the old men. Finally, he succeeded in getting his sourdough on o rock by the fire. Then he sat down and waited for his bread to bake. Worily, the old men held their rifles on him. Suddenly, there was the sound of shots, and Ben looked to see Ihe two old Indians running from the fire, their guns forgotten. "The sourdough! forgot about the rifle cartridges mixed in with the dough!" Ben I

I

the rifles

and ran

out of the

camp

toward the RCMP post ot Lake Brand. Two days later, Ben stumbled through the door and told his story. Hill helped him to get to the settlement. Then, he went after the Indians.

Ben walked into Gordon's trading post and saw Gordon smiling at him. "Now don't laugh at me, Gordon. All ever want from now on, is a lot of sourI

"This bread is mighty finel At least, won't have to eat any more bannock bread

made

"You come with us 6s hostage until Red Jackets bring us the man who stole from us," the leading Indian said to Ben. The Indians dragged the protesting sourdough off to their hidden camp in the mountains. Here, Ben was a captive in the small hidden Indian village, left under the

grabbed

"It's too late for me to worry. Hill. I'm too old and they won't bother me," the old

man

to his

the stream.

Gnarled old Ben Thomas, the sourdough, walked into Gordon's trading post

and faced the

it

Next day, Ben was panning a stream nearby. Suddenly he looked up to see three Indian warriors watching him. They grabbed his arms and dragged him out of

THE SOURDOUGH

dough! Yes sir, there's nothing better than bannock bread." Ben glared at the surprised Gordon. "But thought you hated sourdough "Don't you believe it! Sourdough is a lifesover!" declared Ben.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I


PRESTON


"\~, BARLUM--- AND THESE GENTS ARE NICKY HAWKINS AND SPADE LANGEH.. .WE UNDERSTAND J TOU OWN SOME WORTHLESS STOCK IN THE OLD iffl CHINOOK MINE' COULD WE SEE IT?

I'M

l

,

'

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wbst .1

MEBBE l

IF

WED

LIKE TO

BUT

IT

THE PRICE IS LOW ENOUGH.

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u

/THIS

X

STUFF' BUT THOUGHT-AND YOU JUST / 1

SAID— IT'S \ ^WOKTHteSSf

J

^fJ/i 0&&

WAYOH ANOTHER-- -, SAID 40/

I

DON'T

\

1

HB

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L LAY OUR CARDS ON THE TABLE, TANNER » WE I J NI THE STUFF TO SELLTO SOME EASTERN tenderfoot: maybe we can doit, and MAYBE LBE STUCK WITH IT! SO WHAT'S YOUR PRICE?

N.

X


IC'S

JUDGMENT IS USUALLY

SOUND— -BUT

UW

IT'S THE THAT BE SATISFIED, SAM! I'LL YOU LATER • COME,

SEE


A

strange new arrowhead ripped into Sioux shields! Defeat was carta inâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unless they made a journey to "THE LAND OF THE SMOKES" .

.

.

INDIAN CHIEF Only 10c

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Comics Deafei

DILL COMICS ARE COOD COMICS


the

Eskimo

'ESKIMO TABLE MANNERS' At an Eskimo

feast, anil in

limes of plenty the Eskimos really

are necessary, but forks and spoons

speaking of the Eskimos who

know how

to feast.

Knives

even cups, are unknown. Of course, we are

live as their ancestors did. before they

had any contact with

while men's refinements.

As

you are supposed

their guest

on the floor

in front of a

to

wooden

do as the Eskimos do. With them, you kneel or squat

You

platter as big as a small table top.

reach into

tiie

gravv-covered contents with both hands and come up wilh a large chunk of half-boiled reindeer meat. it

is.

Yon

lick off the gravy, with loud

Then you sink vour

The meat

is

the

still

gripping

chunk of meat

is

.Next

it

tastv

you think

it

in

And your

\our jaws.

so

jroil

cut off the

knife had better be sharp!

that

is

good

into the gravy in the platter,

and

loudly from them.

come

the roasted

marrowbones

with fingers or tongue or knife point

Eskimo

show how

gone. \ou wipe your hands on your parka

Eskimo manners! You then dip your cupped hands drink

to

probably too tough to eat without the help of your knife

mouthful, while

When

smackings

teeth into the meat.

igloo,

is

already cracked (or

J

ou.

The marrow

again with loud noises.

either a sick one or a rude one.

who

as

much

A

is

removed

silent eater in

an

as says that he doesn't like

the food.

Y'ou repeat this meal four or five limes a day. while the meat

way Eskimos

do, your appetite will be as

good

as theirs.

lasts.

And.

if

you

live the


Uave.

Mom and Dad -fake you dowh -fo

see-fhe

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Here's just one of the plastic toys

,/ IN

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many

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A sea and air combat set to test your skill against your friends or family. The "target" is a red and white plastic battleship. Your choice of "weapons": plastic atom torpedoes you fire from a submarine, or plastic bombs you drop from a B-29 model plane. Hit the target and whooah-the battleship "explodes!" lade by Thomas Manufacturing Corp.,

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colorful, unusual

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.

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to

They're beautifully designed, finely constructed to last a

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Sergeantprestonoftheyukon21