Issuu on Google+

# Horst und Edeltraut Culture, Art, Fashion, People, Berlin, Global, Online, Offline

Issue 3

€ 9, £ 7, $ 12, ¥ 950

Destruct

ion

|dɪˈst rʌ action kʃ(ə)n|. t h causin or process e g so m of to som uch da et mage longer hing that it no exists or ca be rep aired. nnot


QUIT YOUR JOB, BUY A TICKET, GET A TAN, FALL IN LOVE, NEVER RETURN. THE MOST STYLISH AND INDIVIDUAL BOUTIQUE HOTELS YOU CAN EVER IMAGINE ACROSS EUROPE‘S HIPPEST DESTINATIONS.

We‘ve Got It Covered From Rockstar Retreats To Romantic Breaks - Stockholm To Capri Luxe Ski Lodges To Dazzling Ocean Views. KEEP YOUR WIG ON AND EXPLORE OUR HAND PICKED SELECTION.

WWW.EIGHTYFOURROOMS.COM / INFO@EIGHTYFOURROOMS.COM

2 / # Horst und Edeltraut


DESTRUCTION

EDITOR’S LETTER

cont act info@h orstun www dedelt .hor raut.c stun om dede lt r a u t. c o m c/o mu # Horst u nd ehlhau smoers Edeltraut kom Invali denstr munikation aße 1 gmbh 10115 Berlin 12 Fon: + 49 30 257607 2-0 # app is com ing so on ...

Johanna Moers and Cosima Bucarelli

March and April 2011 Ideas are everywhere The new website has just gone online and is even working, hurray! As always in a hurry, before classes start again, we have to decide the topic of # H+E’s next issue. Cosima is still in Brazil. Johanna is almost in Chile. Working over Skype makes the process a lot messier. More dynamic, too, we hope. Well, we’ve been talking about what is happening in the world… the earthquake in Tohoku. How about an online ac­ tion motivating people to send images that reconstruct the country through its visu­ al complexity? Japan Special in collaboration with AATEA. The word Destruction keeps on

popping up… How it is some­ thing so powerful and nega­ tive. How this devastating process can nevertheless of­ fer the prospect of something new. How it allows objects to acquire a different meaning, not only within their space but also within their role and how, after all, destruc­ tion seems to be an inevi­ table part of life and its evolution. It is as much the end as it is the beginning of something… Oops, our topic was just set!

May until August 2011 Ideas are flowing We should be sitting in the office doing what we love in­ stead of studying for our fi­ nal exams. Frustration grows as motivation goes…

September 2011 Ideas are implemented And then the solution! Can we combine the media of the past and the present? Let’s give it a shot. With today’s worldwide 10.4 blog entries per minute we can’t but won­ der how relevant all those posts really are. In compari­ son, a print magazine still seems something so substan­ tial and concrete, destined

to live on forever. So the 3rd issue is very much linked to our online magazine (a platform for the exchange of information on art, design, events, style, travel, cul­ ture). Its content naturally evolves from the virtual ar­ chives of # H+E online, may it be the contributions, the feedback, the readers, the facebook fans… ideas and in­ spirations that emerge from our community keep on living on paper. In your hands, you currently hold what is, in some way, the synopsis of the past 365 days, during which we assembled and selected our impressions and your impres­ sions of what is happening.

its core idea, remains the same: to support young crea­ tive people by bringing their ideas and their voice to the surface.

November 2011 Ideas are everywhere Thank you! This magazine is created by each and everyone who has contributed and sup­ ported us! Johanna and Cosima

October 2011 Ideas are formatted Formats change, times change, themes change and certain­ ly contents change but the mission of the magazine, 3


DESTRUCTION

CONTENT/IMPRINT

24 52 62

The Aesthetic of Darkness

18

82

The Rodnik Band

28

42

Editors-in-Chief Johanna Moers johanna@horst­ undedeltraut.com Cosima ­ Bucarelli cosima@horst­ undedeltraut.com Contributing Editor Gabrielle Berlin gabrielle@horstundedeltraut.com

Fashion: Dark & Destructive

34

Streetstyle in Berlin

48

66

Tanzania Style

56 65

76

Florafauna

Chair 2.0

PenTales

Photographers of this issue Alexander Atwater, Victor Bergmann, Cassandra Bird, Cosima Bucarelli, Dragana Gavrilovic, Manfredi Gioacchini, Baris Guerkan, Philipp Schle­ gel, Alexandra Waldhorn, Lorenzo Wirz Castellani

Editorial Office # Horst und Edeltraut, c/o muehlhausmoers kommunikation gmbh, Invalidenstr. 112, 10115 Berlin, Fon +49 30 2576072-0, Fax +49 30 2576072-60, www.muehlhausmoers.com, info@muehlhausmoers.com Handelsregister: HRB 33622, Amtsge­ richt Köln, Ust-IdNr.: DE 209049674 ­ Creative Director Pascal Schöning Editorial Design David Dittrich, Diana Dragomirov, Marlene Herden, Jörn Plenz, Polina Pysmenna, Alicia Zens Collaborators of this issue Jürgen Jehle, Stefanie Moers, Camilla van Heumen, Elke Weidenstraß

74

Proofreading (English and Italien) Lingolinx, Keithstraße 5, 10787 Berlin, www.lingolinx.de

Teufelsberg

Exclusive: bmw Guggenheim Lab

Newcomer: Karlottas Kontraste

92

Authors of this issue Victor Bergmann, Gabrielle Berlin, Cassandra Bird, Cosima Bucarelli, Philip Colbert, Manfredi Gioacchini, Friedrich Gräfling, Louisa Löwenstein, Johanna Moers, Isabel Robles Salgado, Franziska Scheven, Izzy Weissgerber

Cover Izzy Weissgerber

Creative Destruction

Filmwatch: “Kinder der Wende”

78

Young Creatives

The Ruins of Detroit

Questionnaire: Izzy Weissgerber

4 / # Horst und Edeltraut

Publisher Hans-Jürgen Moers hans@horstundedeltraut.com

Out & About: The 12th Istanbul Biennial

Ruins Of Modernity

72

Imprint

94

Online www.horstundedeltraut.com Orders mag@horstundedeltraut.com Advertising, cooperation and press: coop@horstundedeltraut.com Print DFS Druck Brecher GmbH Rheinische Allee 5, 50858 Köln www.dfs-druck.de Lithography PurPur, Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer 67, www.purpur.com, koeln@purpur.com

Blogwatch

© # Horst und Edeltraut 2011, c/o muehlhausmoers kommunikation gmbh for all contributions. Reproduction, recording online and reproduction on media such as CD-ROM, DVD-ROM etc. only with written consent of publisher. The editor assumes no liability for unsolicited manuscripts and photos.

Image: Artwork by Gianni Politi (“One day my suffering will fly high”, graphite and paint on canvas, 190 X 190 cm, courtesy of Benedetta Lucherini, Rome 2010)

6


DESTRUCTION

CONTRIBUTERS’ PAGE

Currently the Gallery Director at DUVE in Berlin, Cassandra Bird obtained an MA in Curatorship at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. She previously lived and worked in New York at Venetia Kapernekas Gallery and in Newcastle (Australia) at von Bertouch Galleries, which she owned and operated. Her career started in the media industry as a broadcast design manager and animator.

After high school, Manfredi Gioacchini left Rome for Japan and later for the UK to study at Central Saint Martins in London. Here he had the chance to collaborate with a number of photographers as well as assisting Mario Testino. Manfredi has since been working between NYC and Europe where he recently opened a second studio in Rome and has won the PX3, Prix de la Photographie in Paris.

Dragana Gavrilovic studied Graphic Design at Belgrade’s Academy of Fine Arts. She graduated in painting with a scholarship at the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna, focusing on anatomy and the human body. Currently experimenting with mixed media, Dragana works and exhibits mostly in Berlin, her hometown for the past year. She also collaborates with fashion magazines and agencies as a photographer.

Philip Colbert graduated in Philosophy and Art History from St. Andrews University. He established himself as a designer in 2008 with The Rodnik­Band’s humorous designs as well as various high street collaborations. He has written a fashion column for the Financial Times and has been collaborating with Alain de Botton on philosophical fashion projects. He was nominated for an award at this year’s Scottish Fashion Awards.

Victor Bergmann went out to visit the abandoned places of destruction in Berlin. He is already known for capturing the # Horst und Edeltraut sticker action in our previous issue. He now lives in London and studies Strategic Marketing at Imperial College. Besides his passion for photography, 24 year old victor enjoys a humble evening with popcorn and classy porn.

Louisa Löwenstein studierte in Berlin Islamwissenschaft und Judaistik und begann währenddessen, journalistisch zu arbeiten. Heute ist sie freie Autorin und Fotografin und träumt davon, ihr eigenes Drehbuch zu verfassen. Von sich selbst sagt sie, sie habe nur zwei wirkliche Talente. Zum einen die Hochstapelei, die im Berufsleben hilfreich wäre. Zum anderen ist es die Fähigkeit, sich alle Geschichten und Beobachtungen zu merken.

Isabel Robles Salgado is a freelance journalist living in Berlin and working on political and scietific topics, at the moment mainly for the Max Planck Institute. In her free time, she loves dealing with the nice and beautiful things in life. Fashion, art, design, philosphy and whatever pretty and inspiring thing comes around.

Baris Guerkan studierte Philosophie und Filmwissenschaften in Wien. 2008 begann er das Studium der Fotografie an der Ostkreuzschule und arbeitet nebenbei als freiberuflicher Fotograf. Zum Thema „Destruction“ denkt Baris als Erstes an verschiedene psychische Konflikte. Dabei faszinieren ihn besonders die stillen Zwischenmomente, die auf den ersten Blick zwar düster wirken, oft aber sehr inspirierend und konstruktiv sein können. 5


Destruction Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

A

e

s

t

Th h

PHOTOS: ALEXANDER ATWATER 6 / / # # Horst Horst und und Edeltraut Edeltraut 6


Destruction Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

he

e of

t 希望 & あかり

i

c

Darkness

Since the earthquake in Japan in March 2011, life has changed drastically for many Japanese. The 10-metre Tsunami that swept towns and villages as far as 400km along coastline and 10km inland is reported to be the worst catastrophe for a long time. About half a million victims are living in evacuee centres, many of them are still suffering from the effects of the nuclear power stations that were destroyed. The whole nation faces the severe reality of this di­ sastrous destruction and many fear it’s future recovery. When the light was cut off to conserve power following the massive loss of production in Fukushima, the city turned not only dark, suddenly it became a ghost town. Wonderful and colorful Tokyo by day and night then faced a new life. People did and did not like it. Some appreciated Tokyo’s new beauty in the dark, others feared it. To support Japan during this difficult time, #Horst und Edeltraut decided to start a Japan Special to promote the Architectural Association Tohoku Earthquake Action (AATEA) in London. We selected different artists whose images will be printed and donated for fundraising in London. We began to publish photo diaries of professionals and others who captured Japan in its lively and beautiful days. It reminds us how multifaceted and culturally rich this country actually is. It aimed to build a picture of Japan that replaces the images of devastation that were identified during the time. By creating this photo album or documentary we tried to give support, hope and hopefully a smile. Alexander Atwater sent us the most remarkable photo diary of The Tokyo Rockabilly Club, a group that have been around since the 70s and still make an appearance in Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, every Sunday.

 ¬ Curious to discover more?   www.horstundedeltraut.com/   2011/12/atwater  7 7


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o D ia r i e s

8 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o D ia r i e s

9


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

10 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

11


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

12 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

13


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

14 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

15


Destruction Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

16 16 / / # # Horst Horst und und Edeltraut Edeltraut


Destruction Destruction

# I n A c t i o n J a p a n P h o t o - D ia r i e s

 Support AATEA http://tea.aaschool.ac.uk/   Send us your photo diary to action@horstundedeltraut.com  17 17


Fashion

designer report

Authors: philip Colbert, Cosima Bucarelli phOTOs: Courtesy of the designer

Philip Colbert is the designer and founder of The Rodnik Band. A Philosophy and Art History graduate, he translates the icons of 20th-century art, such as Du­champ, Warhol or Lichtenstein, into wearable dresses which bring together art and fashion. Andre Leon Talley referred to him as “the Godson of Andy Warhol”: in fact Philip designs exquisite and humorous art inspired clothing collections and presents them with his satirical music band. He told us a little about his brand and his band…

18 / # Horst und Edeltraut


fashion

designer report

I came into fashion in the spirit of unexpected adventure. Although I always was inspired by it, it wasn’t something I would have expected myself to work in. I tried to create a direction and way of working which inspired me and Oscar Wilde’s quote “We Should all be either a work of art or wear a work of art” surely did.

The Concept. I was less interested in the trend of fashion for fashion’s sake, the smoke and mirrors style of trendbased fashion, which is repetitive, cyclical and often devoid of meaning. I wanted to make a clear statement: a range of clothing which was “wearable art” and lay the foundations for a new way of looking at clothing. Fashion as an exciting new medium for the narrative of artistic expression. Over the last hundred years, artists have broken away from the limitations of the canvas, yet few seem to have fully explored the cross-over with fashion. YSL famously created a Mondrian dress, however I felt this line was not fully explored. The Mission. I feel the designs

are in many ways a reaction against the dominance of modern luxury brands and their lavish meaninglessness. An attempt to ground the medium with meaning and association, and in turn create a new direction of possibilities.

The Inspiration. I was inspired

to create clothing with clear artistic expression. I found good past examples of this concept in the Ballets Russes, where Picasso and De Chirico designed costumes which are unquestionably great artworks, and take their painting styles into a different and exciting dimension.

Collection “Venus in Furs”. I was in-

terested in the way pop art communicates. Unlike many art forms it is relevant and accessible to people from all walks of life, it draws inspiration from the culture we live in and is a very strong form of visual communication. It is essentially very democratic and connected with people’s lives. My dresses are a hybrid product, they stand in a no-mans land between the two genres of art and fashion. I see them as a step in establishing a new conception of looking at clothing as literally “wearable art”. Philip Colbert with model wearing The Rodnik Band.

The Style. I wanted the artwork

dresses to sparkle so they are made using intense sequin embroidery, which takes over three weeks of hand work per dress: POP art with exquisite hand crafted detail. The graphical style of the dresses is unique as I created my own artwork interpretations of each iconic inspiration. I used lino-block print to simplify and recreate the image by my own hand, allowing mistakes and giving the work my visual identity. The naive black lines create a more satirical rendition on the idea and add a sense of humor. Sequin work is then added on top to make it sparkle with craftsmanship.

The Materials. I use mostly silk,

such as duchess satin and georgette, with cashmere as a base. Then I hand sew the sequin work on top. I like to give the wearable artwork dresses a sculptural quality, so creating object artworks are more effective.

The Band. “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” My aim was to re-contextualise fashion design and give my designs a new dimension. I believe in the necessity to shake the cage, I wanted to break the mould and present fashion in a fun new way. That is the reason why I present my label as a band. Without having any singing ability, I developed a talking rap style to narrate humorous and ironic songs that echo the spirit of the brand. I create new satirical tracks for each collection. With the music I communicate the concept for the collection, often making references to inspirations such as the Velvet Underground, the Sex Pistols and The Clash.

Whats next? Developing the concept with new wearable artwork collections, further diffusion lines to take The Rodnik Band spirit to more people… and The Customers. The people who songs of course ;) have bought my dresses are confident and often have a re-  ¬ More on  bellious spirit with a pas-  www.horstundedeltraut.com/  sion for art. 70% of my recent  2011/12/rodnik-band  sales from this collection  www.notjustalabel.com/  have been from Hong Kong.  the_rodnik_band  19


Fashion

Urinal Dress, inspired by Duchamp

designer report

20 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Campell’s Soup Can Dress, inspired by Andy Warhol

fashion Fashion

designer report

21


Lobster Telephone Dress, inspired by Salvador Dali

Fashion

designer report

22 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Brush Stroke Twinset, inspired by Roy Lichtenstein

Sunflower Dress, inspired by Vincent Van Gogh

Yellow Urinal Dress, inspired by Duchamp

The Nude Dress, inspired by Tom Wesselmann

Fashion

designer report

23


The 12th Istanbul Biennial ART

OUT & ABOUT

AUThOR: Cassandra Bird PHotos:  Cosima Bucarelli, Cassandra Bird

When considering the definition of a biennial, the only certainty is that it is a large art exhibition usually held bienially, other than that there are no rules, only expectations and traditions. Biennials and large international exhibitions in the past have appeared to have a motivational function: for example, Manifesta was the reflection of restructuring post-war Berlin-wall Europe in the domain of contemporary art, the Havanna Biennial echoed the third world, the Gwangju Biennial mirrored the 24 / # Horst und Edeltraut

democratisation of South Korea and the Istanbul Biennial was an artistic reflection of Istanbul taking its place at the centre in re-shaping the landscape of post-communism. Each of these motivations directly related to the political landscape of the city in which the biennial was presented. The international art community was keen to unveil the secrecy surrounding the “Untitled” (12th Istanbul Biennial) which opened on 17 September 2011. The audience were anticipating the

disclosure of the artist list following a deliberate decision by the curators to conceal this information in an apparent attempt to prevent any possible pre-consumption and assumption of the event. The act appeared to be part of a strategy by the curators to extinguish the typical biennial model which the curators believe is turning into blatant marketing tools for major cities around the world. The “Untitled” (12th Istanbul Biennial) was realised under the curatorship of Jens Hoffmann, director of the CCA

Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, and Rio de Janeiro-born Adriano Pedrosa, co-curator of the 27th Biennial de São Paulo (2006). On presentation are the works of 110 artists, composed of five group exhibitions, and more than 50 solo shows. They were staged across three floors in two old customs warehouses known as Antrepo three and Antrepo five, alongside the Bosphorus, next door to the Istanbul Modern. Within these warehouses, the exhibition is housed inside a series of segmented display


ART

OUT & ABOUT

titled” (Ross), “Untitled” (Passport), “Untitled” (History) and “Untitled” (Death by Gun), each specifically referring to works by Gonza­ lez-Torres. None of his works are present in the biennial itself, however each work is represented by a written description as wall text at the entrance to each section. The curators aim to explore the relationship between art and politics us-

ing the artworks of Felix Gonzales-Torres as a reference point. By constructing a biennial around the works of a single artist’s oeuvre rather than a concept, the curators have opened up a now seemingly universal biennial framework. Biennials have been previously known to be inspired by the theory and concepts of authors, philosophers, literary figures or writers.

spaces fabricated from corrugated steel sheets designed by the Pritzker prize winning Japanese architect Ryue Nishizawa. The art of Cuban-U.S.A artist, Felix GonzalesTorres, who is considered to be one of the most important contemporary artists of the 20th century with his minimalist and conceptual artworks, was the inspiration for this 12th Istanbul Biennial. Each of the five themed group exhibitions are organised under theme titles, “Untitled” (Abstraction), “Un25


ART

OUT & ABOUT

However, Pedrosa states that “it’s interesting to bring an artist as a model as a starting point to think about the exhibition… We thought: who is a very fine example of an artist who articulates politics, the body and personal issues with aesthetic and visual concerns? For us, that artist is Felix Gonza­ lez-Torres”. The 12th Istanbul Biennial breaks down and reacts against the predictable and often expected structure of 26 / # Horst und Edeltraut

a biennial and its communication in the city within which it is represented. Commonly, biennials have often served as a platform to present contemporary artworks by rising young artists. However, in this case Pedrosa stated that they “scoured for older, overlooked, artists whose works may still feel revelatory… presenting works from the 20s, the 60s and 70s and even some pieces from the American Civil War”.

This ideology certainly served to create a tightly curated show that is precise, intelligent, well-structured and clear in its concept, however not dissimilar to constructs of any other museum show. One could not help raise the question, why use the Istanbul Biennial as a platform for this exhibition? It appears as if the exhibition could have been plucked up and transported to any oth-

er city and remained just as relevant in its concept. The use of title “Untitled” (12th Istanbul Biennial) suggests a certain freedom, allowing the audience a personal approach to the works and exhibition. However, the heavily text-filled walls at the entrance of the group exhibitions barely allowed for much contemplation beyond the five designed themes based specifically on the artworks of Felix Gonzales-Torres. The exhibition itself begins to


ART

OUT & ABOUT

appear at some points blatantly literal and didactic, for example the “Untitled” (Death by Guns) section features artworks representing firearms, from Chris Burden’s 1971 “Shoot” to Kris Martin’s heap of empty ammunition “Obussen II” (2010), to Mat Collishaw’s 1988 photo of a gunshot wound “Bullet Hole” through to Roy Lichtenstein’s copy of the Time “The Gun in America (TIME Magazine), 28 July 1968” (1968). The “Untitled” (Passport) sec-

tion also literally presents works depicting suitcases and boundary fences. Alongside the biennial, Istanbul played host to many events sprawled across the city, giving a strong indication of a flourishing contemporary art scene in Istanbul. The 17th ISEA, one of the world’s biggest electronic arts festivals, held a symposium that focussed on Istanbul’s multi-cultural nature. Borusan contributed to the season’s events by open-

ing the first “office museum” in contemporary art, the “Borusan Contemporary” and Istanbul Modern presented an exhibition entitled the “Imagination and Truth” – modern and contemporary artists from Turkey, including works by 80 women artists from 1900 to now, aiming to provide an alternative perspective of Turkey’s known history.

PLACE: İstiklal Caddesi 64 Beyoğlu 34435 Istanbul, Turkey

 ¬ More about our trip to Istanbul   www.horstundedeltraut.com/   ?s=Istanbul  27


Fashion

photography

PHotos: Lorenzo Wirz Castellani Styling: Laura Schusinski Model: Marie/Seeds Management

28 / # Horst und Edeltraut

c


c

fashion

photography

 Jacket: stylist’s own (16th century vintage)   Shirt: Zimmerli   Leggings: Vladimir Karaleev  29


Fashion

photography

 Fur jacket: stylist’s own   Body: stylist’s own 

 Leggings: Vladimir Karaleev   Shoes: Rick Owens 

30 / # Horst und Edeltraut


fashion

photography

 Tuelle dress: vintage Givenchy by Alexander McQueen   Body khaki: Azzedine Alaia   Leggings: Vladimir Karaleev   Shoes: Rick Owens 

31


Fashion

photography

 Golden skirt: stylist’s own   Silver top: Nicolas Andreas Taralis   Crown: stylist’s own   Army jacket: vintage   Shoes: Rick Owens 

32 / # Horst und Edeltraut


fashion

photography

 Black T-shirt: Helmut Lang   Plastic coat: Paco Rabanne vintage   Plastic belt: stylist’s own   Leggings: Vladimir Karaleev   Shoes: Rick Owens 

33


global

young creatives people

They are artists, designers, musicians; they are young and they are living around the world. Creatives from Jaipur to New York City tell us something about themselves, their aspirations and their style.

BERLIN, GERMANY. Alice von Stockhausen What is your strength? Designing and producing small series of truly different and useful products at an afford­ able price. What makes you different? I value the production pro­ cess of my products as much as the design. What does destruction mean to you? Destruction can be pollution, Who are you? Alice von Stockhausen, Berlin overconsumption and social exploitation, all of which based Product Designer. make me want to create sus­ Where are you from? I was born in Frankfurt, grew tainable products. up in a small village in North Rhine Westphalia, lived  ¬ More on  and studied in Brussels for 5  www.stockhausendesign.de  years and then worked in NYC for 1 year. I have now lived and worked in Berlin for the last 5 years. What do you do? I work as product designer under the label Stockhausen Design. Your style in 3 words? Functional, meaningful& funky. What is your weakness? Marketing. 34 / # Horst und Edeltraut


global

people

jaipur, india. Fanny Boucher

Who are you? A small town girl. Where are you from? From Lorraine, in France, of Italian-Polish descent, have lived in Jaipur, Rajasthan, for 6 years, and now based in London too. I don’t know where I am from anymore. What do you do? I design fine jewellery. Your style in 3 words? Delicate, sophisticated and thoughtful. I hope. What is your weakness? Nice lingerie.

What is your strength? Fearlessness. What makes you different? With each collection, and with each piece of jewellery, I tell a story. What does destruction mean to you? I destroy a lot of my crea­ tions, that’s the beauty of using gold: the prime - and very expensive - material is never lost.  ¬ More on   www.honorinejewels.com 

New York, USA. Folding Legs Who are you?

What is your strength?

We are Folding Legs.

Our diversity and our stub­ bornness.

Where are you from?

Vienna (Austria), Stockholm (Sweden), São Paulo (Brazil), New York (USA). But we are based in New York City.

What do you do?

What makes you different?

Come out to a show and see for yourself.

What does destruction mean to you?

Without destruction there is We blend different media of mu­ no creation. Whether negative sic and art to create a sound or positive, destruction is and image that is uniquely part of any being. Folding Legs. Your style in 3 words?  ¬ More on  Visual. Sincere. High-energy.  www.facebook.com/foldinglegs 

What is your weakness?

Our vulnerability. When you want something really bad, you wear your heart on your sleeve. 35


global

people

BERLIN, GERMANY. Tomoyuki Ueno Who are you? Tomoyuki Ueno, 28 years old, male, artist (fine art), stu­ dent at Berlin University of the Arts. Where are you from? Kobe, Japan. What do you do? At present, I’m making a sculpture from a sword’s motion of Iaido (tradition­ al Japanese martial art) with motion capture and a 3D printer. I’m also learning Iaido. Your style in 3 words? Stylish but poetic. What is your weakness? Spending too much time on the internet. What is your strength? Fussy attitude. What makes you different? Time and reflection. What does destruction mean to you? Usually it is a result of ar­ rogance. Only a person, who achieves something, can de­ stroy it successfully.  ¬ More on   www.tomoyukiueno.com 

36 / # Horst und Edeltraut


global

people

LONDON, UK. Max McElligott Who are you? My name is Max McElligott.

Where are you from?

I grew up in Scotland, but my mother is German and my fa­ ther is half Greek and half Irish. I currently live in London.

What do you do?

I write songs and them with my band.

perform

Your style in 3 words?

major labels that give them songs to sing and tell them what to wear. I wrote ev­ erything on the album, and I performed all of the instru­ mental arrangements on the recordings. I think I’ve got a strong sense of who I am and what I want to achieve, musically.

What does destruction mean to you?

I think of it in the literal sense of the act of something being destroyed. For me it’s What is your weakness? I don’t know when to say no. not a concept, an “ism” that can really divide opinion, What is your strength? I like to think I’ve got good it’s just a noun - there are manners. Good manners go a many forms of it, and they all mean something different. long way.

Melodic, upbeat, euphoric.

What makes you different?

A lot of solo musicians that  ¬ More on  you hear are the product of  www.wolf-gang.co.uk 

BERLIN, GERMANY. Nadia Boegli Who are you? Nadia Boegli. Where are you from? From Switzerland but living in Berlin now. What do you do? I have my own little jewellery label: Ringli. Your style in 3 words? Simple, hippie, glitter. What is your weakness? Well I would say Haribo and glitter. What is your strength? Empathy on both a personal and a profession­ al level. What makes you different? In the fashion world: my completely different back­ ground. I did not have anything to do with fashion before Ringli. What does destruction mean to you? It is the reason for a fresh start!  ¬ More on   www.ringli.cc  37


global

people

Lisbon, portugal. David Gonçalves Who are you? David Gonçalves, born in 1987.

Where are you from?

Porto, Portugal.

What do you do?

Study fine arts in Lisbon.

Your style in 3 words?

Fast, agressive, sensitive.

What is your weakness?

Anxiety. What is your strength? Determination.

What makes you different?

My origins.

What does destruction mean to you?

Inspiring.  ¬ More on   www.davidgoncalves.com 

38 / # Horst und Edeltraut


global

people

rome, ITALY. Jessica Harris Who are you? Jessica Harris. Fashion designer and founder of LEOPARDESSA boutique in Rome, Italy.

Where are you from?

I grew up in Chicago and af­ ter college in Boston moved to Rome. Now I live between Italy and Berlin, stopping in Paris and New York whenever possible.

What do you do?

Between scouring antique shops in remote American country­ sides and arranging instal­ lations of the ceramic ani­ mals and coloured lamps that surround my shop display in LEOPARDESSA, I spend my time designing collections for my women’s fashion label called “Jessica Harris”, often paus­ ing to float on the swing that hangs next to my sewing ta­ ble.

Your style in 3 words?

Candy, surreal, ironic.

What is your weakness?

Living the experience.

What is your strength?

The ability to see an object or idea out of an obvious context and use this as in­ spiration to design.

What makes you different?

My love for all things ri­ diculous and kitsch.

What does destruction mean to you? A chance to start again.

 ¬ More on   www.jessicaharris.net 

Photo: Federico Ciamei

39


global

people

Fairbanks, USA. R. Nelson Parrish

Who are you? R. Nelson Parrish.

Where are you from?

Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.

What do you do?

I investigate colour, motion and the contemporary land­ scape.

Your style in 3 words?

Hard. Fast. Work.

What is your weakness?

Chocolate chip fast cars.

cookies

Working chances.

and

and

What is your strength? hard

taking

What makes you different? For me, methodically paint­ ing a stripe and jumping out of an airplane at 19,000 ft results in the same emotional response. It is simultaneous­ ly relaxing and exhilarating. My goal as an artist is to evoke the same sensation and response from my viewers.

What does destruction mean to you?

Derrida coined the term “De­ construction” as a means of defining and categorising “tradition”, how it blocks our “essential human-ness”. For me, deconstruction is the action of breaking down; to the core, in order to build back up. One must understand the rules in order to break them properly.  ¬ More on   www.rnelsonparrish.com 

40 / # Horst und Edeltraut


global

people

New York, USA. Pierre Tardif Who are you? I’m Pierre cousin.

Tardif,

Marga’s

Where are you from?

I was born in Ottawa, raised in Montreal then San Diego and I’ve been living in New York for the last 9 years.

What do you do?

I recently became art direc­ tor of The Wall Street Jour­ nal Magazine. I have also designed books and other mag­ azines, such as Top.

Your style in 3 words?

Quality. Longevity. Humility.

What is your weakness?

That would have to be using denial as a defense mecha­ nism. Wait, I’m cured!

What is your strength?

Knowing when to shut up.

What makes you different?

I want to peak late in life.

What does destruction mean to you? Destruction is a point in the cycle. It’s the valley. When I’m in the valley everything feels far away. The only thing to do is pick a direction and get to work.  ¬ More on   www.topthemagazine.com 

BERLIN, GERMANY. Marlon Beatt Where are you from? Born and raised in Berlin. What do you do? I am a musician, dj & have recently started to produce my own music. At the moment I am still working at hardwax records in Kreuzberg.

Your style in 3 words?

Hightech soul music.

What is your weakness?

Concentration or laziness – take your pick. What is your strength? I think I am quite confident. That can be helpful at times. I would count my willpower too as one of my strengths. What makes you different?

I would say my relentless devotion & passion for mu­ sic. What does destruction mean to you? There are a lot of things one can associate with destruc­ tion. Stuff happening today and things that have happened in the past. In relation to mu­ sic, destruction also brings several topics to mind: e.g. the value of music nowadays. This is a topic that has been bothering me for quite a while. Not only from the perspective of the producer but also from the perspective of listener & dj. One example is digitalonly releases. I don’t think I

will ever understand musicians who can’t even be bothered to release their work on a com­ pact disc let alone press it on wax, for the sake of profit. Seeing music solely as a busi­ ness and therefore putting the main value on simplicity and on profit instead of trying to get the best possible and most appreciable outcome from your work which generations to come can listen to and enjoy. I see this as a form of destruction. It destroys the longevity of the music and also the value that people place in music. Not only that, but in my opin­ ion this has also brought with

it a drop in the quality of music being produced nowadays. This is a quite extensive sub­ ject but this is my short take on it.

 ¬ Always new creatives from around the   world on www.horstundedeltraut.com 

 Send us your portfolio to   yc@horstundedeltraut.com 

 ¬ More on   www.soundcloud.com/marlon-beatt 

41


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 Peter Bross: model   T-shirt: American Apparel   Waistcoat: handmade by Francesca Laranga   Jeans: Diesel   Shoes: Dr. Martins 

PHotos: Dragana Gavrilovic

i n be rlin

42 / # Horst und Edeltraut


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 Francesca Laranga: stylist   T-shirt and hat: 24/7, Berlin   Jacket: vintage 1976   Jeans: Acne 

43


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 GEK: DJ and producer   T-shirt: Sleep Is Commercial   Jeans: Replay   Jewellery: 25 Pieces, Berlin 

44 / # Horst und Edeltraut


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 Diana Hammers: VJ and Filmmaker   Dress: Voller   Headband: Versace   Belt: H & M   Shoes: vintage 1985 

Fotos: Dragana GAvrilovic ¬ Discover more on www.draganagavrilovic.tumblr.com 45


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 Ilaria Demartini: store manager   Jacket: Fairly   Jeans: Diesel   Shoes: vintage 

46 / # Horst und Edeltraut


FASHION

STYLESHOTS

 Sammy Dee: DJ, producer and label owner   T-shirt: vintage   Jumper: All Saints   Jeans: Replay 

47


the ruins of detroit destruction

EXHiBITION

Author: gabrielle berlin Photos: Y ves Marchand, Romain Meffre

Detroit’s end is here. It is no secret anymore that the city is suffering economically worse than any other big city in America. Its horrible decay has come to the fore during this current recession. Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre, a photographer duo that met working on the same project in 2002, document the vanishing remnants of the city in a very beautiful and fair way. Such ruins, to our modern conception, are a piece of history that tells us memories – perhaps imagined, perhaps collective – of the city’s past. The pieces of the last remaining signs of the past signify the history of the already disappeared entropy, and at the same time it offers an insight into the history of nature. The problem is that the city is still there, that the photos are real and that they are not history yet. The emergence of architectural constructions on our horizons reflects our contemporary life, which is constantly evolving and changing. Contemporary living has become highly standardised and needs people who live in a standardised way to be able to interact with its demands. Detroit has definitely failed it. Its residents left one after the other when jobs were cut short and prospects dwindled, many public buildings and entire blocks of houses stand in ruins and abandoned. Marchand and Meffre will soon show their series “The Ruins of Detroit” in the centrally-located “Kühlhaus Berlin - Seven Floors of Art” at the Gleisdreieck, which is a brand new venue and meeting point for art and communication in Berlin. We are showing you four photos of two different projects: “Theatres” & “The Ruins of Detroit”. 48 / # Horst und Edeltraut


destruction

EXhiBITION

The Ruins Of Detroit, Fabian Theatre, Paterson 49


destruction

EXhiBITION

The Ruins Of Detroit, Ballroom, Lee Plaza Hotel

50 / # Horst und Edeltraut


destruction

EXhiBITION Exhibition the ruins of detroit: 15 December 2011 till 14 January 2012 Opening Hours: Thursday till Sunday 6pm-3am location: KÜHLHAUS Luckenwalder Strasse 3 10963 Berlin www.kuehlhaus-berlin.de the Catalogue is available on: www.steidl.de or in stores ISBN: 978-3-86930-042-9 Steidl Verlag € 88,00 www.marchandmeffre.com

Theatres, RKO Keith’s Richmond Hill Theater, New York

The Ruins Of Detroit, Fabian Theatre, Paterson 51


Ruins of Modernity DESTRUCTION

C U LT U R E

52 / # Horst und Edeltraut


DESTRUCTION

C U LT U R E “Many works of the ancients have become fragments. Many works of the moderns are fragments at the time of their origin.” (Friedrich von Schlegel) Ruins. The proximity of ruins affects us not only through cultural heritage but also through their aesthetic significance. The structures of ruins or the leftovers of pieces can be identified as remnants that contain knowledge which is set free by a specific language of its body of appearance. Ruins can reflect a balanced artistic unity as its structures merge with its environment. While once these structures were part of an everyday urban environment, they now represent antique rural decay, one might argue, a return to their natural elements. The perception of ruins is an individual appreciation or ignorance that lies within the spectator himself. Often there are people who are more aware of the physicality of a place than others. Each individual’s experience of a place differs from the location and the perspective it is coming from. In order to understand a landscape, whether urban or rural, it is necessary to look at what influence, especially the urban, has on the human consciousness, then what influence history has on individuals, and then it is relevant to analyse how the people create space in their daily doings. It is interesting to see how people live and explore their urban space, and to see how the space “adjusts its senses”.

The contemporary ruin is a by-product of our constant drive for the new and better The urge to destroy and the use of fragments have become visible in our current landscape. Themes of destruction are everywhere: in popular film, in contemporary art and in architecture. Whether these representations show an intention to destroy or just a gesture towards “the creator’s” own aggressiveness, it bears examination. This urge rises out of the inherent conflict between the unobserved environment and the urban structures we have built, which isolate us from “real life”. Interesting is the stimulus and the excitement in the contemporary art world of undoing constructions from the standpoint of the modern ruins which are a part of every contemporary urban environment. There are various ways to interpret this visible change in nature, but often it is sufficient to just hold up time with photography. Although this medium will eventually expire, it can provide us with evidence and a memory of a certain period. Clemens Wolf, a Viennese artist, deals with this matter of transience. Usually, most of his motives do not exist anymore, or have already been replaced by others.

He counterpoints the eroding monuments by using a structuring combination of oil and stencil techniques, with the architecture that has been left to decay in the midst of urban spaces. His speciality is creating an abstract pattern of various forms in which the spectator is left alone to find the original structures of the place. By pushing the viewer into his works, he stresses the mere disinterest of the contemporary observer. The French artist Cyprien Gaillard works in a similar way, focussing on the static urban renewal that denies the decay, the ruin and desolation by constantly papering over it. By working in favour of nature, he emphasises the “artificial world’s” sense of fragility. With archaeological intention, he works towards the almighty power and develops this in his series, The Geographical Analogies, a collection of nine polaroids made for the consumption of nature. He provokes the observer through the display of a “harmonious” cohabitation, in which modern communal buildings as well as the beautiful landscape are exposed to the entropy of time. It is a fictive representation of the duration of the decay and thus speaks to the communicative power architecture possesses. For €90,000, one can watch these pieces fade away.

Yes, it sounds insane, but all of us are curious enough to witness destruction. Between destruction and renewal, past and future, utopia and dystopia, lies a void that signifies an intersection point of eventualities. The ruin of modernity is what lies in between. Under this notion we understand a present collapse of our contemporary history that represents the current failures of our systems, humanity and values. This concern of contemporary art, sociality and urbanity intersect nicely with the recent financial crisis, which reopened our eyes and brought us back to reality. Both artists are sensitive to the transience of time and both of them see indications of a forthcoming apocalyptical disappearance of modern structures. By being emotionally attached to certain places, they do not only try to decelerate time, they actually want to capture the ruin’s beauty, before it is lost totally. While one of the artists sells his fading work for €90,000, most of us are still in their romantic dreamland of ignorance and arrogance. AutHor: Gabrielle Berlin PHOTOS: Courtesy Of C. WOLF  ¬ More on   www.clemenswolf.com   www.spruethmagers.com/artists/   cyprien_gaillard 

Portrait: Clemens Wolf by Lukas Gansterer 53


DESTRUCTION

C U LT U R E

Painting: Plant vs. Fence, Oil on canvas, 200 cm x 140 cm, 2009 (courtesy of Galerie Ruzicska and Clemens Wolf)

54 / # Horst und Edeltraut


DESTRUCTION

C U LT U R E

Public Art (Vienna): All that glitters is not gold/Es ist nicht alles Gold was gl채nzt, 6 m x 19 m x 9 m, 2010

55


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S T U D E N T WAt C H

Flora

Gleich wird es rot – und das signalisiert bekanntlich: „Achtung, jetzt mal schön aufpassen!“ Das sollte man auch, denn die Foto- und Modeproduktion der folgenden ­Seiten sind das Ergebnis eines Kooperationsprojektes zwischen „# Horst und Edeltraut“, der Ost­ kreuzschule für Fotografie sowie der Burg Giebichenstein Kunsthochschule Halle. Unter dem Motto Destruction haben die Studenten Baris Guerkan (Ostkreuzschule), Kaur Hensel und Katharina Eichner (Kunsthochschule Halle, Fachbereich Design/Modedesign) ­ die Kollektion FLORAFAUNA frei interpretiert. Herausgekommen ist eine beeindruckende Arbeit voll Herzblut im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes. An dieser Stelle bedanken wir uns ganz herzlich bei Baris, Kaur und Katharina sowie Werner Mahler (Leiter der Ostkreuzschule), den Professoren Thomas Greis und Joachim Schielicke sowie den Designstudenten der Kunsthochschule Halle, die diese Kooperation erst ermöglichten. Fotos: Baris Guerkan STYLING: Kaur Hensel, Katharina Eichner

Fauna  ¬ Mehr Infos auf   www.ostkreuzschule.de   www.burg-halle.de   www.barisguerkan.com 

56 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S T U D E N T WAt C H

Jingyoung Lee: “Connection” 57


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S T U D E N T WAt C H

Kaur Hensel: „Sonnenblumenkerne“ (vorn), Katharina Eichner: „Ich sehe was, was Du nicht siehst“ 58 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S T U D E N T WAt C H

Jingyoung Lee: “Connection” 59


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S ST TUUDDE ENNT T W WA A tC CHH

60 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Fashion/PHOTo Fashion

S ST TUUDDE ENNT T W WA A tC CHH

Katharina Eichner: „Ich sehe was, was Du nicht siehst“ (links), Leticja Nsiama: “Born to be stalked” 61


art ART

QQ & &  A A

T h e q u e st i o n nai re :

Izzy W eissgerber

Le Cirque Mendes, acrylic on canvas

Facebook Online

If you weren’t you, who would you be?

So if you were an architect, what would you build and where?

I’m not interested in being anybody else but myself, cause you never know what it’s like being in someone else’s shoes.

I would build a glass house near the ocean, a mixture of Steve Hermann’s glass pavilion and Mark Dubois’ Santa Fe house.

And imagine you were a male artist?

Any art you hate?

My boyfriend wouldn’t be too Yes. happy about that. :D

If you were a collector with a limited budget of €50,000, what would you I have a few favourites, it’s buy now? Your favourite masterpiece? And why?

AUThORs: I zzy Weissgerber, Johanna Moers A novel mixture of pop art stylistics, graffiti elements, iconic photography and synesthetic painting. It all began 4 years ago with some digitally retouched street shots of Manhattan. Since then, Izzy has turned her artistic focus to the portrayal of people emotionally connected to her. She swapped the camera for acrylics & canvas and developed her own way of doing art: individual ornamentation, personalised colouring and – her distinctive trademark – the covering of the eyes in order to protect the souls and preserve mystery. 62 / # Horst und Edeltraut

In early 2009, after seeing Izzy’s artwork, Joe Dallesandro (Andy Warhol’s muse‚ “little Joe”) finally found the artist he was looking for to design his new T-shirt collection which is sold worldwide. Directly after, “Punk Globe Magazine” published this very same design on their May 2009 cover. Since then, Izzy has portrayed many famous faces and private people alike. In 2010, Izzy’s T-shirt art and a selection of her diverse art work were featured in the book “T-ADDICT” by art director Louis Bou – publisher Monsa/Barcelona.

hard to just pick one.

What is your favourite gallery? C/O Berlin.

Colours or lines? Both.

Last exhibition visited?

I would buy most of the pieces from Kaidan Shu’s last exhibition.

If you were an art magazine, what would be your cover? My cover would be my piece of paradise tears.

Kaidan Shu, tales of mist and Who is your favorite German contemwind, strychnin gallery. porary artist? Andreas Gursky.

Your next exhibition?

16 dec – 06 jan Gallery BOX 32 Boxhagener Straße 33 10245 Berlin

What kind of building do you most dislike?

What defines you best? My energy.

A final word? If you need a helping hand, look at the end of your arm.

One with a McDonald’s sign on  ¬ Find out more about Izzy on  it.  www.horstundedeltraut.com/   2011/12/izzy/ 


art ART

QQ & &A  A

Hendrix, acrylic on canvas 63


art

Q  &  A

Paradise Tears, acrylic on canvas 64 / # Horst und Edeltraut


PRODUCTPAGE

chair 2.0

Die Mitmachstühle sind unter uns! Seit nicht allzu langer Zeit gibt es Stühle, die uns selbst zu Designern werden lassen. Wir haben die zwei innovativsten Probe gesessen und miteinander verglichen. Auf der einen Seite den Do Hit Chair und auf der anderen Seite den sugarchair.­

Do hit! Aluminium Ein Alublock wird mit einem Hammer zu einem Stuhl geschlagen.

Motto

Do lick!

Material

Zucker

Idee

Der Konsument personalisiert sich seinen eigenen Stuhl über seinen Leckkonsum.

Wenig bis null

Kalorien

Zuckervorrat für ein Leben 

Marijn van der Poll

Designer

Pieter Brenner

Mitglieder der Leistungsgesellschaft kurz vor dem Burnout Zusätzliche Aggression Der Chef wird von den Aggressionen verschont, ­der Stuhl dient als Ventil. Leicht masochistisch (steht auf Schläge)

Zielgruppe Nebenwirkungen Eventueller psychologischer Nutzen Der Stuhl ist

Besonders Zungenromantiker, generell alle, außer Diabetiker Erinnerung an die orale Phase  Verbessert die Kuss und Leckqualitäten Sexuell erregend (steht auf Lecken) 

Je mehr Aggressionspotenzial, desto komfortabler sitzt man

Thema des Stuhles

Je mehr man konsumiert, desto weniger Rohstoff verbleibt am Stuhl. 

Kritik an der Leistungsgesellschaft

KritIk des Stuhles

Kritik an der Konsumgesellschaft 

Für 4.000 € kann man den Stuhl vom Designer zurechtschlagen lassen.

Besonderheit

P ieter Brenner besitzt etliche Identitäten. Wir haben Pieter schon als Frau getroffen.

65


Artists artists exibition

c r e atd CREATIV iv es etd ru e cs tti r ou nction

Author: Horst

66 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Artists

c r e at i v e d e s t r u c t i o n

Alexander Hankoff who: Alexander Hankoff where: Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York City what: photography and motion pictures, 3D projects clients: Apple, Scion, MasterCard, Johnson & Johnson, The Gap, international, fashion and beauty magazines

“Papercuts” is a video directed by New York-based photographer and director Alexander Hankoff. His work reflects the unabashed high energy and sophisticated environment of the city he calls home. Since starting out as a photographer/cinematographer four years ago, he has produced incredibly high quality work, acknowledged by the fashion industry world-wide. “Papercuts” is an exploration of paper and how it can be manipulated in a variety of ways. By utilising the brightly coloured paper backdrops, paired with paper accessories and styling, Alexander illustrates how such a simple, everyday material as paper can be altered to create items commonly made through other, more elaborate means. Destruction is essential when creating anything from paper: in this case, Alexander Hankoff shredded, cut, ripped, stretched and put the pieces of paper back together

to create the objects used in the film. Destruction is a fascinating aspect of reality. Out of destruction comes renewal and regeneration. Nothing in the universe is constant, things are changing all the time. Without destruction, this could not be so. “Papercuts” is part of a larger group of projects produced by Producer Carolina Pimenta and Executive Producer Ruy Sanchez Blanco. Together and with the support of B2Pro Media, Carolina and “Papercuts”, video still, 2011 Ruy are making great strides in promoting video and motion-based digital media within the fashion industry. By collaborating with various directors and photographers such as Alexander Hankoff, they are successfully expanding the boundaries of fashion and conceptual art video.  ¬ Watch “Papercuts” on   www.horstundedeltraut.com/   2011/12/hankoff 

67


Artists

c r e at i v e d e s t r u c t i o n

gianni politi who: Gianni Politi where: Rome

artist

what: DRAWING, PAINTING, SCULPTURAL WORK AND INSTALLATIONS exhibitions: a.o. “I tool U“, “A brief history of pain“, Both CO2 contemporary art, RomE

Photo: Manfredi Gioacchini

Who are you? I’m just a gigolo.

Where are you from? From Rome.

What do you do? I don’t know.

What makes you different?

When did you decide you wanted to be – first work on frustration” What does destruction mean to you? which was a very spontaneous I believe in the (Indian) an artist? I was trying to avoid working, I was avoiding it through my university years studying philosophy and the time to grow up was arriving as fast as pain… I remembered my talent in drawing and I was tenacious.

My work, fuelled by my wondering. What fascinates you about the artistic

What is your weakness?

process?

I like the moment of justifiMy work, fuelled by my won- cation. The very long process dering. that every artist bumps into at the end of a project. It is like when you build a castle What is your strength? My work, fuelled by my won- and then you build the world around it. dering.

What keeps you alive?

Some words about your work?

work. I was in my studio wondering about the next steps to take after my shows “a brief history of pain” (rome/ co2 contemporary art) and “le cose non saranno mai più come prima/things will never be the same again” (Spoleto/Palazzo Collicola arti visive). So I started painting on a blank canvas, and everything I did was such a failure. This failing process of creating and cancelling, doing images black on black, lasted 5 months. One night, in my anger I took a transparent varnish and wrote a mantra, just for me, “please let me stop having boring ideas”. The next day I found out it was my best work so far.

One pack of Marlboro Lights, No work is ever alone, I don’t two bottles of water and straw think of a single piece. I hats. always think about bigger things. A work for me is not How does destruction come into it? one but a series of works on Through smoking before even How did you discover art? One day, I was 6, my father the same argument done in dif- talking in the morning. drew a lemon and an orange in ferent media, from painting to video or performance. My my school diary. latest project is kind of ambitious and I’m experimenting with things that I’ve never done before like light installations … Everything started from the work “Untitled

68 / # Horst und Edeltraut

ancient tradition that the world will be consumed in fire after six thousand years. So destruction is a constant in my actions and in my beliefs… the fact that you could see it in my work is just the reflection of a mirror. ­

 ¬ More on   www.giannipoliti.com 


Artists

c r e at i v e d e s t r u c t i o n

“Untitled” – first work on frustration (light), 2011 (courtesy of Fabrizio Lucherini) “One day my suffering will fly high”, 2010 (courtesy of Benedetta Lucherini)

“From subject to object”, 2010 (courtesy of Palazzo Collicola Arti Visive)

69


artists

c r e at i v e d e s t r u c t i o n

DAVID BURGHARDT who: David Burghardt where: Berlin what: photography and photo editing works at: teNeues Digital Media and independently

Who are you? David Burghardt.

Where are you from?

Berlin.

What do you do? Work as photographer and photo editor.

Your style in 3 words?

Casual, design- and artinterested, workaholic. ­

What is your weakness?

Perfectionism.

What is your strength?

To see and handle the things in my own way.

What makes you different?

Everything/everyone is different, no idea.

What does destruction mean to you? Beginning of something new if you think positive.

 ¬ More on   www.db-photo.de 

70 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Artists

c r e at i v e d e s t r u c t i o n

The left-overs of a flooded cellar 71


ON SCREEN

F I L M WAT C H

“Kinder der Wende” An Untold Story

Un’introduzione Chi sei? Di dove sei? Che cosa fai?

che sociali legate ai confini, alle transizioni geopoliti­ che, alla libertà di movimen­ to. Negli anni affronta con svaria­ ti documentari a lungo tema­ tiche legate ai Balcani (Bal­ kan Junctions, 2007 – Tito Nostalgia, 2008 – Kino Svo­ boda, 2005) arrivando al lun­ gometraggio con il film Balkan Curtains nel 2010, analisi delle tematiche riguaranti libertà di movimento e tran­ sizione dei Balcani da iden­ tità nazionali a integrazione Europea, visto dal punto di vista di un viaggio ferrovia­ rio. “Kinder der Wende” è il suo ultimo lavoro come regista.

Giovanni Ferrari è nato in Italia, a Brescia, il 12 set­ tembre 1979. Dopo un periodo di studi in Brasile si lau­ rea in Economia Aziendale all’Università Bocconi di Mi­ lano nel 2004. Dopo una pri­ ma esperienza a Bangkok pres­ so l’ambasciata italiana di Thailandia, Laos e Cambogia, nel 2005 rientra in Italia e inizia la sua attività profes­ sionale nel mondo dell’edito­ ria nella casa editrice Mon­ dadori. Consegue nel 2010 una seconda laurea in Filosofia presso l’Università Statale di Milano e parallelamente al lavoro si dedica al cine­ ma producendo il documentario Il Documentario “Kinder der Wende”. Ruggero de Virgiliis, Regista di “Kinder der Wende” italia­ no, classe 1978. Al seguito della sua famiglia vive da bambino in Germania. La co­ noscenza del tedesco si rive­ lerà in seguito fondamentale per il suo percorso. Studia all’Accademia Internaziona­ le per le Arti e le Scien­ ze dell’Immagine a L’Aquila sotto la guida di docenti come Vittorio Storaro, Lucia­ no Tovoli, Franco Lazzaretti e Giovanni Tantillo e qui ha modo di approfondire il suo interesse e la sua passione per il documentario, inteso come strumento per indagare e approfondire la conoscenza del mondo. Proffessionalmente lavora dal 2000 alternando a esperien­ ze su set italiani e interna­ zionali, collaborando stabil­ mente come location manager con numerose produzioni te­ desche (Bavaria Film, TV60, Tellux). Come regista affronta temi le­ gati alla memoria dei luoghi e delle tradizioni, e temati­ 72 / # Horst und Edeltraut

Cosa racconta il documentario, in parole tue? Giovanni: Un cambiamento e i suoi

effetti dopo tanti anni. Tutto quello che è stato lasciato e obbligato a mutare, perchè ridiventasse se stesso in un tempo nuovo. Questo è per me il punto cruciale del percor­ so di “Kinder der Wende”. Ruggero: “Kinder der Wende” è il racconto di una generazio­ ne, di un’identità perduta, di molte speranze riposte nel cambiamento e forse non com­ pletamente soddisfatte. è il mio modo di ricordare quan­ do, bambino, vedevo le torri di sorveglianza della DDR dal lato ovest del confine, e di quando, in televisione, ve­ demmo la caduta del muro. è un viaggio, una conversazio­ ne, un modo di leggere la storia al tavolo di un bar o in un parco, all’ombra della Fernsehenturm.

che i confini sono diventati confusi ed indistinguibili. Ho pensato che il lieto fine non è una bellezza necessa­ ria. Al contrario: è la bel­ lezza che può rendere lieto ogni genere di finale, soprat­ tutto quando tutto torna e le mille storie un po’ per volta si chiudono. Credo che la ri­ cerca della bellezza sia la ricerca del destino natura­ le delle nostre storie, per­ ché fa male che le storie non possano chiudersi per entrare in altre storie. La bellezza non è di nessuno, ma quando va bene, ci riesce di esserne accolti e di viverci dentro.

Lo sguardo che ho attribuito a Berlino è in fondo il mio stesso sguardo. Credo di aver visto e percepito Berlino come mi vedo e percepisco. Ho ama­ to e odiato il caos estetico del naturale e dell’artificia­ le della città, il paradiso di piste ciclabili e di par­ chi pubblici, l’atmosfera in qualche modo casalinga, la nuova identità architettoni­ ca, l’infinita vita notturna. Ho vissuto Berlino come una crisalide che si contorce e si agita lentamente dentro un bozzolo, pronta a diventare una farfalla.

tro, le immagini inaspetta­ te, la sensazione di affetto e i sorrisi delle persone ogni volta che la Trabant si fer­ ma a un semaforo, si spegne, non riparte… Ogni volta che per far ripartire il film, la troupe, bisogna scendere dal­ la Trabant e darle una picco­ la spinta …

am­ bientato solo a Berlino, anche se qui ovviamente si svolge per la maggior par­ te. Berlino perché è qui che tutto sembra essersi mosso, è qui che si incontrano pez­ zi di storia, e pezzettini di storia sono venduti sui ban­ chetti dei souvenir. Berlino perché è vitale, ma sa essere sonnolenta, per la pioggia e per il currywurst, per i volti, le storie che sa custodire e svelare, e per­ ché, alla fine, quel muro ha significato qualcosa per cia­ scun europeo …

Ruggero: Il nostro film è un Ruggero: Amo molto ogni incon­ film sulla DDR, quindi non è

Un’esperienza negativa e una positiva nel corso del progetto? Ruggero: Difficile etichettare un

percorso come questo in nega­ tivo e positivo. Un film è per noi un pezzo di vita, un ri­ tratto collettivo che si com­ pone delle individualità di cia­ scuno di noi. Moltissimi aneddoti, anche scontri di personalità, ma alla fine quello che rimane sono frammenti montati di im­ magini …

Berlino Perché un documentario su Berlino? Cosa ami/odi di Berlino? Giovanni: Gran parte del documen­

tario è ambientato a Berlino La parte che ami di piu’? Giovanni: La bellezza di ogni a causa della sua storia e più

incontro. Alle distanze con in generale dalle riflessioni le persone che alcune volte che la città evoca, sul pas­ si sono ridotte a tal punto sato, presente e futuro.

Qualcosa da aggiungere? Giovanni: Cerco di essere utile.

Credo che l’arte, nelle sue diverse forme, non possa dir­ si tale se non è utile, se non è al servizio dell’uomo, deve essere in qualche modo cura­ tiva. Il mondo, il pianeta, è malato, la società e l’ar­ te devono sapersene prender­ ne cura. Mi piace pensare che viviamo in costante evoluzio­ ne, che produce cambiamenti, che ci fa espandere. Ognuno di noi è come l’universo, sem­ pre in espansione e in evolu­ zione. Il cinema è una delle modalità per portare avanti


ON SCREEN

F I L M WAT C H

questa evoluzione poetica, un continuo superarsi e andare oltre. Con “Kinder der Wende” speriamo di emozionare e di espanderci.

Ruggero: Conosco Giovanni da quando eravamo poco più che ragazzini. Ha voluto condivi­ dere con me questo percorso, ne è l’animatore e sa condur­ re il nostro gruppo con una guida sicura e calma. è una grande sfida per ciascuno di noi. Io e Giovanni vorremmo ringraziare i nostri compagni di viaggio: Daniele Trani, il direttore della fotografia, che sa tra­ durre in immagini splendide i miei appunti di viaggio. Domenico Rattenni, il diret­ tore di produzione, intrat­ tabile e dispotico, che ha scovato letteralmente tut­ ti i nostri personaggi, e ha organizzato la nostra agenda ogni giorno, fotografando­ ci e te­ stimoniando il nostro lavoro. Jessica Kennedy White, che ha offerto il suo sguardo femmi­ nile alla nostra ricerca e ha saputo coinvolgere tantissime donne nel progetto. Davide Fragomeno, il nostro amico/assistente/fotogra­ fo che ogni estate si lascia coinvolgere da noi e sa assi­ sterci come nessun altro. Maud Galacteros, Marco Tam­ bussi per le loro splendide foto di scena. Questo film è di tutti noi, e di chi in noi sta credendo. AUThOR: Cosima Bucarelli photos:  Courtesy of the producer

 ¬ Watch the trailer on   www.horstundedeltraut.com/   2011/12/filmwatch 

Info: Title: “Kinder der Wende“ Genre: Documentary Filming: 2010/2011 Release: 2012 Length: 70–100 minutes Plot: An entertaining, visual and informative “Trabi” tour through Berlin’s eastern and western reality, between the present and the past. The documentary searches the traces the German Democratic Republic has left in Berliners’ lives, especially the young generation. It explores Germany’s current situation as well as the transition process following the German reunification. Question: What remains of the GDR? On what social, political and economic basis did the reunification take place? What remains of the GDR’s cultural heritage and memory in people’s lives?

The Team: Giovanni Ferrari, producer, organiser, writer Ruggero de Virgiliis, director, editor, writer Daniele Trani, director of photography Domenico Rattenni, organisation ­(Germany), editing, still photography Jessica Kenney White, writing Davide Fragomeno, administration, still photography Maud Galacteros, still photography

Production and Partners: Ruxfilm, Italia (Design, Production, ­Management) In partnership with: Solab Produzione, Italy (design and networking as part of the project “Cities ­in Transition”) Mi.S.Fu Lab, Italy (graphics and ­post-production) Without Borders, France (documentation) 73


Berlin

places

Teufelsberg T h e e pitome o f d e st ru c t i o n i n B erl i n

74 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Berlin

places Author/Photo: Victor Bergmann Teufelsberg is an artificial hill in the very west of Berlin which curiously always played a role in the darkest chapters of the city’s recent history. In Nazi Germany, when the area was still a plane and not a hill, Albert Speer planned to build a university town as part of the lunatic “Welthauptstadt Germania” project. He actually managed to finish the shell of the military-technical college before the war broke out. Due to its sturdy structure, the Allies failed in their attempt to blow the school up after the war and it was inundated with the rubble of destroyed Berlin instead. One third of the debris from all of the city’s bombed houses now lay on top of the unfinished college, building up to Berlin’s highest elevation today. When Berlin became the epicentre of the cold war, the NSA built a massive listening station on top of Teufelsberg, enabling them to monitor any radio communication from as far as 600 km behind the iron curtain. Some say that this is the reason why the main building is shaped like a giant middle finger pointing towards Moscow. Today, the buildings are abandoned and until recently were not open to the public. Of course, no-one really cares about restrictions here, and with dilapidation and the vandalising “I don’t give a shit” generation of Berlin, Teufelsberg has yet again become a symbol of destruction in the capital. Here though, heavy vandalism, often incarnated in artistic graffiti, suits the surreal architecture quite well; with a breathtaking view over the whole city, this adds up to Teufelsberg being a devastating place of bizarre beauty.  ¬ More on   www.horstundedeltraut.com/   2011/12/teufelsberg/ 

75


ART

SOMETHING DIFFERENT

Excl

usiv

e: bm w Gu gge n heim Lab

T h e P fe ff is a u n iq u e rb e rg e u rb a n a re in th e tr e n d y d is tr ic a t of P re n z la u e r B e rg . F ir tr a n s fo rm st 1 8 ,0 0 0 m 2 e d in 1 9 9 0 , th e -l a rg e fo rm er is b e in g n ew ly re n o b rewe ry v a te d by a rc h it e c t B e rn a rd E l K h o u ry. It w il l b e c ome a ce n tr e d e d ic a te d to a rt a n d s o c io -c u lt u ra l a c ti v it ie s .

76 / # Horst und Edeltraut


ART

SOMETHING DIFFERENT

Horst und Edeltraut is not the only one that makes Confront Comfort its leitmotif. The Guggenheim Museum of New York City recently launched a project with the same intention: to challenge the familiar and to create something new.

Photo: Curator David van der Leer with Assistant Curator Maria Nicanor by Aleandra Waldhorn

Taking a vacant plot in the Lower East Side, the museum transformed the rubble-strewn space into an open, sleek, black structure made of carbon fibre designed by the Tokyo architecture firm Atelier Bow-Wow. It’s an interactive public exhibition that invites passers-by to come in and explore their ideas on social and environmental responsibility. While the idea is to ignite long-term change and discussion, the lab is ephemeral. After New York City, it will travel to Berlin, to Mumbai and then to six other major cities over the next six years. While H&E explores Confront Comfort in any creative realm, the BMW Guggenheim Lab focuses on one thing only – the city. The aim is to make urban life more comfortable and liveable.

“Some people suggested we put pillows everywhere,” said David van der Leer, one of the two curators for the Guggenheim Lab project. Together with his colleague Maria Nicanor from Spain, van der Leer heads a curatorial team that includes urbanists, graphic designers, journalists and artists. A steady stream of people trickle in from the street, unsure of what happens inside the Lab. On a recent Sunday, they played a game called Urbanology, in which they’re shown how their decisions affect transportation, affordable housing and liveability. “We have unlimited discussion here among total strangers, experts and nonexperts,” said Eric J. Henderson, the game facilitator and photographer in real life who moderates the game like a television show master. On the game board, huge tower-shaped icons represent Affordability, Liveability, Transportation, Sustainability and Wealth. As the contestants are asked to consider a series of urban conundrums, they move one of the icons depending on how they answer. “Would you allow special transport for employees of a company that moves to the city?” Henderson asks. After a lively, even sometimes charged discussion, all players cast their vote and the towers are moved. “The idea of it is that you understand the consequences of your decisions and see how the different systems are connected,” Henderson said. “I like it because it takes it from some clinical idea into disciplinary interconnectedness.” After the game, a few of the contestants linger on the life-sized checkerboard to continue a discussion on the city’s transportation system. “The subway tunnels need reno-

vation,” said Lower East Side resident Eric Sitman, 23. “And I think I am waiting a ton of time for even the most popular trains, sometimes 20 minutes. In a city like New York, there is no excuse to have a system where subways aren’t sufficient.” In the background, a yoga class takes place. The participants, seemingly unimpressed by the noise and action around them, focus on their vinyasa moves. “The thing that surprised me most was that people are participating and really getting engaged in the activities, much more than I expected,” van der Leer says. For some, the space represented a respite from the surging city. “It‘s nice to have a space that is a little bit more active, using public space to have a conversation and where people come together,” said Amanda Hickman, a San Francisco native in her mid-30s who works in media. After touring three cities, the Guggenheim’s permanent home on the Upper East Side in New York City will host an exhibition in 2013, presenting an overview of what they found. Two additional two-year cycles follow, each with a new mobile structure and theme until the project comes to an end in the autumn of 2016.

It remains to be seen whether Berlin and Mumbai will be as receptive to the Lab. But, the organisers are positive about it. “I think so because the curators are conscious of local adaptation. They look at it from a local perspective,” Henderson says. Soon, the pop-up space will head to Berlin in the Pfefferberg complex in the borough of Prenzlauer Berg. The space in the Lower East Side will become a public park, but the exhibition will continue – with an element of intrigue. “The other cities are still a secret,” van der Leer says. AutHor: Franziska Scheven PHOTOS: Alexandra Waldhorn  ¬ More on   www.bmwguggenheimlab.org   www.pfefferberg.de 

(Top right): Logo: BMW Guggenheim Lab Cycle 1 by Sulki & Min, Seoul, South Korea 77


wil

FASHION Fashion

N ewcomer EWCOMER

d Karlottas Kontraste AUTORin: Isabel Robles Salgado fotos: MIT FREUNDLICHER genehmigung des designers (lookbook-fotos von philip schlegel)

78 / # Horst und Edeltraut

e


Fashion

N ewcomer

79


Fashion

N ewcomer

So schnell kann’s gehen – vor knapp einem Jahr kannte noch keiner die Designerin Karlotta Wilde, jetzt ist sie in aller Munde. Ihre erste Kollektion hat gleich so viel Begeisterung hervorgerufen, dass sie sie im Sommer auf der Fashion Week gezeigt hat. Kein Wunder, ihr Stil ist ausgefallen, aber tragbar, edel, aber nicht überheblich. Wir haben die Wahlberlinerin in ihrem Atelier in Mitte getroffen.

Ich mag die Kontraste der Materialien und Stile.

Woher kommst du ursprünglich, und wie kamst du zum Modedesign?

Ich komme aus Hamburg, bin dort geboren und groß geworden. Als Kind wollte ich Schriftstellerin werden – brotlose Kunst, dann wollte ich Kunst studieren – brotlose Kunst. Irgendwann habe ich angefangen, mich für Mode zu interessieren. Die KombiBist du selbst modisch und stehst du lange vor dem Klei- nation aus Zeichnen und Mode hat mich fasziniert, das kam derschrank? Null, wirklich über- schleichend, aber die Enthaupt nicht. Ich bin scheidung stand bald fest. supereinfach, was das angeht. Ich hab zwar Und wie ging es dann weiter? viele Klamotten und Nach dem Abi stand nie die bekomme deswegen auch Frage im Raum, was machen. Ich immer Ärger – al- wusste, was ich wollte. Dann les quillt über und bin ich erst mal nach Berlin am Ende hab ich immer auf die Esmod, habe das aber die gleichen zehn Tei- abgebrochen und mich stattle an, meistens sogar dessen für die AMD in MünJeans und T-Shirt. chen entschieden. Dort habe ich mein Diplom gemacht. Anschließend bin ich durch die Kannst du deinen eigenen Weltgeschichte getingelt, war Stil beschreiben? Ich find’s wahnsin- zwei Jahre lang in London und nig schwierig, ich in Paris. Seit Februar 2010 will mich ungern bin ich in Berlin. festlegen.­ Aber die Farbpalette ist im- Gibt es Dinge, die dich inspirieren? mer neutral, ich mag Ich gehe nie mit einer festen keine Muster. Die Inspiration an eine KollektiMaterialien sind in on ran. Bei mir ist das alles ihrer Haptik meis- ein kreativer Prozess. Mein tens etwas Besonde- Geschmack beeinflusst mich – res. In der ersten was passiert um mich rum, Kollektion waren was tragen meine Freunde, was es vor allem Leder ist angesagt? Aber im Endefund Seide und die fekt entsteht meine KollekKombination der tion beim Machen. Ich spiele beiden, überhaupt rum, zeichne, mache Scribbspiele ich sehr ger- les. Samples entstehen, und ne mit der Beschaf- dann wird alles wieder komfenheit der Stoffe. plett umgeschmissen. Ein TIn der letzten Win- Shirt kann plötzlich zu einem terkollektion waren langen Kleid werden, wenn es es dann Wolle, Leder an der Puppe besser passt. und feste Seide. Und Für mich ist ein Teil nie die Sommerkollektion fertig, hier noch eine Falvon diesem Jahr ist te, dort noch drei Zentimevor allem viel größer ter, ein endloser Prozess. Es als die ersten beiden. ist eine Krankheit, dass ich Statt 15 bis 20, hatte nie zufrieden bin. Sogar wenn ich dafür 40 Teile. Da das Teil in die Produktion werden Stoffauswahl und geht, bin ich nicht zufrieFarbpallette natürlich­ den, ich könnte ewig rumfuchgrößer. Aber auch hier teln, Ideen entwickeln sich spiele ich wieder mit ständig weiter. Und langsam steif und fließend, ­ mit findet sich dann doch ein rohart und weich, mit ter Faden, der sich durch die durchsichtig und fest. Kollektion zieht.

80 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Fashion

N ewcomer

Warum Berlin? Das ging alles ziemlich fix, ich bin ohne Plan nach Berlin gezogen, weil es davor zwei Jahre lang nicht so lief, wie ich mir das vorgestellt hatte. Irgendwie war gerade ein Schwung von Freunden hierhergezogen und da dachte ich: Ich geb der Stadt noch mal eine Chance. Das erst Mal hatte es mir nämlich überhaupt nicht gefallen. Völlig spontan und ohne das durchdacht zu haben, habe ich mich dann im Sommer selbstständig gemacht.

Wie hast du es geschafft, so schnell von dir reden zu machen? Die erste Kollektion habe ich in Rekordzeit aus dem Ärmel geschüttelt. ­­ Es war unglaub­ lich viel Arbeit. ­

Eine Freundin, die eine PRAgentur hat, hat mir dann geholfen, die Kollektion bei den Press Days vorzustellen. Ja, und dann kam eines zum anderen. Die Kollektion kam gut an. Ich hätte nie im Leben gedacht, dass das alles so schnell gehen kann.

Hast du mit so viel Erfolg ­gerechnet? Niemals. Ich hatte natürlich auch sehr viel Glück, aber manchmal habe ich das Gefühl, wenn man nicht so viel plant und irgendetwas erwartet, sondern einfach versucht und macht, dann schreibt einem das Leben das gut. Weil man eine gewisse Gelassenheit hat, nicht so verkrampft ist. Ich bin an die Selbstständigkeit ganz entspannt rangegangen, meinte zu mir selbst: Ich guckʼ mir drei Saisons an, wie es läuft, und dann kann ich mich immer noch bewerben und um­ orientieren.

Gab es einen ausschlaggebenden Grund für den Schritt in die Selbstständigkeit? Ich habe zuvor zwei Jahre lang Praktika gemacht und gearbeitet. Zuerst war ich in London bei AnnSofie Back im Design. Das war super und hat sehr viel Spaß gemacht, aber in einer Stadt wie London keinen Cent zu verdienen, war hart. Wir waren ein kleines Team, sie hat mit einer Assistentin und acht Praktikantinnen gearbeitet. Da hab ich auch erst mal geschluckt, dachte, da siehst du mal, wieʼs läuft.

Und dann nach Paris …? Ja, in Paris hab ich tatsächlich noch mal unbezahlt ein Designpraktikum ge­ macht. Ich hab das­ alles hingenommen als Erfahrung. Danach habe ich bei Sonia ­ ­ Rykiel gearbei-

tet. Das war ein zeitlich begrenzter Vertrag, die haben damals die Kooperation mit H & M gehabt und mehr Leute gebraucht. Ich hatte sehr gehofft, dass ich danach irgendwie reinrutsch, ich hatte zwei Jahre Erfahrung und einen guten Lebenslauf. Uns wurde aber sofort der Wind aus den Segeln genommen. Da war bei mir einfach die Luft raus, ich wollte nicht mehr ohne Pers­ pektive arbeiten. Und ich dachte, das ganze Geld kann ich auch in mich investieren. Diesen Sommer war ich zum ersten Mal bei der Fashion Week dabei. Es ging wirklich schnell bergauf, seit ich in Berlin bin.

ben kann. Es geht aber alles in die richtige Richtung im Moment.

Danke für das Interview!  ¬ Discover more on   www.karlottawilde.com 

Wenn du an die Zukunft denkst, welche Träume hast du? Ins Ausland gehen. Also, das ist natürlich jetzt utopisch, aber ich würde schon gerne mal im Ausland zeigen, am liebsten natürlich in Paris. Dort würde ich übrigens auch gerne leben. Zuerst hoffe ich aber, dass sich die viele Arbeit bald auch finanziell trägt und ich davon gut le81


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Tanzania

Style AUTHOR/photos: MANFREDI GIOACCHINI

82 / # Horst und Edeltraut


TRAvEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Novanta giorni in Tanzania... Il mio viaggio incomincia a Dar Es Salaam (“casa della pace”), il più grande centro economico del paese. Rimasi solo brevemente ma abbastanza da percepire la realtà frenetica di una metropoli africana. Proseguii quindi per Zanzibar dove il lavoro mi attendeva. Un posto splendido da un punto di vista turistico, tuttavia così ricco di contraddizioni che mi ritrovai presto a scattare realtà fino a quel momento ignorate. La natura com’è vissuta in Tanzania si differenzia molto dalla nostra. Seppure il contatto con essa è forte, esistono regole prestabilite: la notte è il regno degli animali mentre il giorno dall’alba al tramonto è il tempo in cui l’uomo può avere il suo spazio. Il mio modo di vedere la natura è cambiato, viverla ora vuol dire trovarsi a stretto contatto con gli animali della savana senza alcun tipo di protezione. Durante i miei passaggi tra i villaggi della Tanzania e nel sud, mi sono imbattuto nell’eleganza e nella povertà. Donne forti e combattive con, indosso, indumenti fatti di tessuti indiani, portati con la classe e l’orgoglio che solo pochi hanno. Mentre contrariamente, degli uomini mi ha colpito la loro animalità’ e con questo intendo il loro modo di vivere alla giornata. Di tutte le persone con cui ho avuto contatto sicuramente i Masai sono quelle con cui ho legato di più. La loro semplicità e la loro sincerità, sono state la chiave del mio avvicinamento a loro e nonostante inizialmente sia stato difficile comunicare, la nostra voglia di conoscerci ci ha portato a comprendere le nostre lingue in fondo non così diverse. Con il tempo ho scoperto la storia di questo popolo che, come quella di altre tribù, è molto contorta e poco conosciuta, ma non per questo meno importante della nostra.

Stonetown, spice market omage a Cartier, June 2011

Partii per l’Africa con lo scopo di fare una pausa riflessiva dopo diversi anni passati a fotografare tra l’Europa e l’America. In Tanzania mi aspettava un amico che mi avrebbe offerto un lavoro e accompagnato per l’intero viaggio. Durante i safari ho riscontrato parecchie difficoltà sia di tipo logistico, sia  ¬ More on  di tipo umano.  www.manfredigioacchini.com 

83


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Zanzibar, sailors, June 2011

84 / # Horst und Edeltraut


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Dar es Salaam, view from the airplane, June 2011

85


TRAvEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Village, an after-school walk, July 2011

86 / # Horst und Edeltraut

Tanzania expressway, break at a gas stand, July 2011


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

In the streets of Zanzibar, Lebanon Brothers, July 2011

87


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

Village life, in good company, July 2011 Following page: Selous Reserve, a road dividing the Savanna, July 2011 88 / # Horst und Edeltraut


TRAVEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

89


TRAvEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

90 / # Horst und Edeltraut


TRAvEL SPECIAL

PHOTO DIARY

91


N e Ptales OFFLINE

M O D E R N L I T E R AT U R E

ouisa Löwenstein Autorin: L FOTOS: Stephanie Ursula Hodges zähl„Es gibt keine größere Qual, als eine uner al einm sagte n“, trage zu sich in e hicht te Gesc Um lou. Ange die amerikanische Autorin Maya keidiese Qual zu spüren, braucht es jedoch en hicht Gesc trägt uns von r Jede nen Poeten. Linin sich, kaum einer bekommt jemals die derung zu spüren, sie zu erzählen. 92 / # Horst und Edeltraut

von Gemeinschaft und dem Zusammenführen beiunterschiedlichsten Menschen saßen die dt den Freundinnen damals in ihrer Heimatsta n. mme zusa e Kaffe einem New York bei Dort entwickelte sich eine Idee, die . Mit den Grundstein für PenTales legen sollte ia Sask n dete grün r Dolla zig weniger als zwan eite weltw eine e heut was das, hanie Step und Gemeinschaft ist. r, Mille ia Sask und es Hodg hanie Seit Step Sie kauften zwanzig schlichte NotizKind sche zwei deutschstämmige amerikani Freunde, n bücher und gaben diese an zwanzig heitsfreundinnen, vor mehr als zwei Jahre n erste beiden eine die sie wiederum baten, die diese Erfahrung machten, haben sie hichte, ob Gesc ihrer sie Seiten zu füllen – mit Mission. Rund um den Globus kitzeln Waren rgt. gebo oder hlen gesto , en, real, fiktiv Menschen die Geschichten aus den Ripp Autoren das die n sollte lt, gefül n Seite zwei sie die diese schon immer in sich tragen, die die nächsten von Buch weiterreichen, auf dass oder len erzäh zu en traut nicht r bishe sich n gefüllt Seite zwei sten näch ten. und wieder die deren Existenz sie vielleicht nichts wuss en. einer würd Fasziniert von dem generellen Konzept


auf www.pentales.com und “ an. Als Ste- ten ons ssi nfe „Co auf h über Facebook und YouTube. te, hätten wir uns auc nie später unsere Beichpha Heute gibt es kaum einen Ort Saen eim geh Das Großartige an Pen­ iht dem Weg zu einem ten vorliest und ich diejen auf der Welt, an dem nic und , nen kön ist eine Idee und nicht n es nde Tal befi tanskult eren höre, ersetzt and der ht gen schon jemand kauend an eider ein Konzept. Es soll nic - ich war eher genervt von n schlechtes Gewismei h z sic nem Bleistift über einem Pen Net ein s er rau m ein kom end auf Teufel n Vorstellung, in irg es sen gegenüber meiner Mutter Tales-Buch gegrübelt, sei ­Tal Pen n. g hse nun wac Woh t er Wel erg die uzb um fremden Kre mit dem Stolz, dass dies die Herz auf den Seiten ausgesoll sich nicht als Instiken und mir Geschichten hoc n zu en sio Lüg fes con ne sei me r cri e ode mst lim e sch schüttet uhö anz tution, sondern als Gedank irgendwelcher Leute , die ich zu beichten hat, war auf Papier gebracht hätte. ist e Ide die Die n, n. den ite e bre an ren, geschweig Erleichterung ver der en Neb n, te. Die Bücher füllten sich hre ufü zusammenz ht sen meine zu offenbaren. Ich erfüllt mich außerdem eine Menschen mit Geschichten und das nic ünStimme und ein fgr e tie ein udo pse en s ihn eit ber sah m. laubliche Neugier, wel ung nur in schriftlicher For mit en. Eine gloh geb mic zu die Forum dige Hippies, che Beichte zu welchem GeSie gingen durch Hunderte von und digitale und s e tre log Sar ana zu e, g bal nun ihrer Mei Runde gehört. der in ht sic Händen. Zum Teil sind sie bebre Speakers’ Corner für die kre in Prousts Definition von Ver hr sieben Geschichten efä Ung und reits wieder prall gefüllt en Lai n, von ter e fol üss g Erg ativen l chen und Bestrafun den an diesem Abend mitNew York angekommen, zum Tei Hintergrund je- wur Profis gleichermaßen. im d ren en wäh er ubt imm sta h ver noc h che gebracht. Man wie füllen sie sic e Projekte all und elt Weitere spi e flöt Pan t, mand ger in einer Schublän on tsch und reisen durch die Wel wet afie ogr en Fot eks rnk und au Schreibr- Anwesenden an Vollko elade, andere wurden für gen und wieder andere sind spu umg s eit l ber vie d mir sin hat e erb lin e knabbern. Ber fasst. Mit- bew ver nd Abe sen idie los verschwunden. Sie all hus ent o h gegeben, aber ich habe auc tendrin springt ein Berliner setzt und genaus . legen Zeugnis darüber ab, wie den wor en omm gen astisch auf Vorsicht gelernt. stler mit wildem Rotschopf es Kün viel kreatives Potenzial, geTal Pen iwie , zwe ere den and in Wieder Wir gingen und verkündet, er habe sunder Wahnsinn und Verlan eines klassischen auf im Gefängnis oder der Heck Sto ten jezu le und wol en en, eil ieb zut chr ges hts nic gen, sich mit das mingway Room in Berlin, der Berliner Altbaus, durch teilen, in uns steckt. Künstlern und SchriftstelDiese Erkenntnis ließ lern eine kostenlose Bleibe e die beiden Freundinnen ein über ein langes Wochenend en weiteres Projekt ins Leb ste Ent der in d bietet, sin ma s rufen. Sie wählten ein The Fas ein ist es Tal Pen g. hun e und luden ihre Freunde und ohn e Ide ohne Boden, eine in en deren Freunde dazu ein, ähl erz en sch Horizont. Men doch nicht uneres ihrer Wohnung bei Wein und ou Angel Maya dem sich Geschichten, seit us, nha ppe Tre vor en wie cht zählt lassen, Bier ihre Geschi alle en, ach Spr e All t. urgib Gem sie n s angenehme ein kleines, wohlwollende mit 14 ein Fahrrad geklaut Kulturen tun es. Stumme, Tauvieler sich unterhalten- er mel unDas n. nge bri zu ischt wurde. „Es um Publik entgegen. Die hatte und erw be und Blinde schreiben sie Mitteilungsbe- der Menschen ßere Qual, als grö ne glaubliche kei t gib und gig der beginnen schon ßzü gro Wohnung war chte mit, Kin chi Ges e hlt rzä tune dürfnis der Beteiligten und e ein mit einem beschränkten Wor hell, nahezu leer geräumt und gen!“ tra zu h die erstaunlich hohe Qualider sic Kin in im g Tag ißi en dre d schatz, ihr te ließ so Platz für run diesem Abend setzte und tät der mitgebrachten Tex An en, eib er chr stl bes Kün zu en war ten gar , Menschen. Da überraschte nicht nur Saskia mich mit Stephanie zu- Alte haben ein Leben voller iker, Schriftsteller ich Mus und er ähl Erz von l die Tei und de Stephanie sammen und wur Geschichten erlebt. in und Medienleute, die ich von Seither wurden in es. selbst. Auch eine Freund Tal Pen gen tun tal ans Jeder sollte die Mögsolcher Art Ver nde Abe ser die e rer meh aus London, die als Zuhörerin lin h Ber it haben, diese zu ert kannte. Aber da waren auc gen, gu- lichke uri tra en, tig gekommen war, fuhr begeister lus mit Ärz zählen, jedem sollte der Res Consultants, Studenten, lechten Geschich, sch wieder nach Hause, voller Taden und wer t ten ach lebr Tei eng r. geg ate pekt ent te und Steuerber anstaltet. Mittlertendrang, PenTales mit in die ver ten her . Büc ren h uhö noc anz sie sie weise hatten Heimat zu bringen. le haben wir Instigators den Arm geklemmt oder wei er unt die nd Nasta ent don Lon In - in Panama, Kabul, Syrien, trugen Nadelstreifen. Nie g  ¬ Discover more on  nzi zwa amt ges ins in – erste Dependance außerhalb ia mib tz, Pla am l feh  www.horstundedeltraut.com  mand schien der USA, und heute sitzen eren Städten auf der Welt. and zu so h sic ien sch ner n und kei in mehr als zwanzig Städte Jede Stadt hat ihren Stil gea- fühlen. tig Ins e nnt n so wenig ena sog it twe wel Mädchen funden, wir möchte blondes Ein , ben. Das rei sch vor h lic tors, zu Deutsch: Anstifter mög r den Gang auf uns wie übe mt kom ns sio Ses se , das die ium g Med die regelmäßi gilt auch für das und drückt mir ein Stück . zu ren sie Geani org lt. wäh dt “ Sta ter er ibu in ihr - ein „contr in Papier in die Hand. In per ht nic h sic en ähl erz ten Im Juli 2010 war Stephanie ich h, mit leichtem sch tsc Deu tem fek wie , die ik, Mus dt, h Sta Berlin. Eine nur durch Worte. Auc d- amerikanischen Akzent stellt z sie findet, das Grundverstän bildende Kunst, Film, Tan bit und t. sich Stephanie vor en cht chi Ges n kan das nis von PenTales verkörper all uns, ein Confession ano- ... Als sie hier einen Abend tet ählen und ist bei PenTales erz rei sch zu tel Zet den nym auf r organisierte, habe ich zum willkommen. Wichtig ist, übe ben und in die Box in der gees rTal ene Pen cht von chi Ges Mal des ten st ers die Kun h Küche zu werfen. Ich nehme , hört. Eine Freundin hatte mic zählens Leute zu verbinden pPap en ein he Küc der in mir ht nic afbst sch sel ver zu mitgenommen, e Menschen Gehör es becher Rotwein und gesteh wirklich wissend, worum fen. d, Han ner mei ma dem Zettel in tatsächlich ging. Das The Um diesen Effekt in unter Mut ner mei her frü ich s das und t, men ish Pun war Crime & en Alltag zu übertragen, aus dem Geldbeutel ge- ser d Gel bei e dcht chi Ges e ein g ich tru - um nicht nur in unseren Stä , nommen habe, um mir ein lus gan den r übe n der mir, die mir viel bedeutete son nbuch zu kaufen. ten, che Tas es tig jes n, mal sei nie zu die ich jedoch zen Globus verbunden So Nun vertraue ich den Zettel mandem vorgetragen hatte. teilen wir unsere Geschicht rif sch s- der Box mit der Auf wus es Tal Pen r übe ich l vie

„E s gib t ke ine gr öß ere Qu al, als eine unerzählte Geschichte in sich zu tragen!“

93


ONLINE

B L O G WAT C H

kleine wundertüte AUTOR: Friedrich Gräfling

 ¬ Mehr Infos auf   www.kleinewundertuete.com  94 / # Horst und Edeltraut


Diese Werbefl盲che wurde brachgelegt.

www.bierbier.org 路 Geschmack braucht keinen Namen


DACHZEILE

RUBRIKTITEL

follow us daily

www.horstundedeltraut.com 97


# Horst und Edeltraut, Issue 3 - Destruction