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March 2011

Issue #39

Using Facebook to promote your Lodge

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Letter FromWelcome the Editor Don’t forget to check out the video on pg. 60

WOW!!

What can I say besides ―WOW‖. Truth be told I was really nervous about putting together a new issue and no one caring after such a long delay between issues. The amount of emails and good wishes from you was more than over whelming, it was truly touching. I had no idea if the mailing list I used was going to be current ( a lot wasn't) so I turned to Facebook to assist me with spreading the word. I want to thank all of you who sent the website link to your friends and fellow Lodge Brothers spreading the word. It really made the difference. What I learned through this is that Masons really do want to learn and are thirsty for knowledge. I hope I’m adding to that need and making good men better. This month I wanted to talk about using Facebook as a valuable tool for Lodges to help promote and communicate with the public but also within their own membership. I think you’ll find some cool new tricks to help you out. As always, if you see something of interest send it my way and I’ll be sure to include it. Until next time...

Cory Sigler PM Hawthorne Fortitude #200 Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/corysigler

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Contents

This Month’s Issue Includes:

Pg 22 Biography: Robert Burns

Pg 45

Pg 60

Using Facebook to promote your Lodge

Multimedia Special– Watch a movie in the PDF

This Issue:  Books—”The Builder Series” - Pg.9  Claudy “Old Tyler Talks” -

Pg.12

 Traveling Man’s Travels - Pg.15  Masonic Apps/Online Sources - Pg.17  Masonic News - Pg. 28  A Page Out Of History

— Pg.41

 Short Talk Bulletin - Pg.52  PhoenixMasonry Museum– Coins & Medallions - Pg.57

The Working Tools is published monthly by Corsig Publishing & Cory Sigler, It is not affiliated with any Grand Lodge. Letters or inquiries should be directed to Cory Sigler, Editor, at E-mail: Corsig3@yahoo.com All letters become the property of the Working Tools. Photographs and articles should be sent to the attention of the Editor. Every effort will be made to return photographs but this cannot be guaranteed. Please include a self-addressed stamped envelope. The Editor reserves the right to edit all materials received.

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Mailbag

Looks Great! Looking forward to digging in for the read... Brian L Estes *** I just discovered "The Working Tools" Magazine - It's great! Keep up the good work!

Bro Jeffrey Alexander Chairman, Grand Lodge Library & Museum Committee

Library @: https://www.4shared.com/dir/p98 TYexm/sharing.html

*** Greetings Bro Cory, Glad to see you're back on the saddle again with TWT. No doubt being WM and family etc. can definitely derail the best of efforts. Best Regards, Val ***

*** Congratulations on the Magazine, Glad to see it back. I love it and I know what it takes to produce. I started the ―Small Town Texas Masons E-magazine‖ two and a half years ago at http://www.mastermason.com/stt m-emag/. Please check it out. Despite the title it is not just about Texas Masonry, but does feature a small town Texas Lodge and Texas Masonic history page in each issue.

W. Bro. Cory, We are most happy to have you back. F&S, Bill P. ***

Richard L. James *** Glad to see you're back writing!!!" Steve Mullally *** Cory, Glad you are back. John Mulhall *** Brother Cory ! YIPPIE !!! Enjoy reading them and sharing with the Brethren during ―Masonic Library Corner‖ at our meetings. 4

Hi Cory, It's good to hear from you and nice to see a new edition of TWT. I have been busy myself uploading ebooks to the online library which now houses over 1,100 Masonic works. With regards to spreading the load I always find that less is generally more insofar as produce less but gain more quality; of work and of life. Kind regards Keith

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Although I did not see a copyright notice, I like to ask permission to reprint stories from other publications. I do give credit to the author and credit and links to the source for stories used. Fraternally, John ―Corky‖ Daut P.M. *** And a cracking issue it is, WBro. Chris. Good to have you back-we've missed you. RW Bro. Steve, JGW, AmericanCanadian GL within United Grand Lodges of Germany *** I am extremely happy to see you are okay. I was wondering about you the other day as I was look4


Mailbag ing through my masonic podcast and saw yours along side the Setting Maul Poscasts I have been listening to.

hard drive)! If there is any way I can support your project, please let me know. I'm so glad you are back . . . Robert G. King, PM

Nice service certificate by the way!!! Beautiful work as usual. Bro Tom Pagliaro 32° Sir Noble Knight *** Glad your well and have returned. Congrats on the PM. It's a lot of work but rewarding. Dick Tooley *** "Another great issue. Welcome back. We missed ya." Kurt Fisher *** Always love the info in it. Thanks for your time into it.

*** Greetings Worshipful!!! Welcome Back!!! We all missed you and TWT! Thanks for showcasing the Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum! You are always welcome to share our artifacts with your readers! Keep up the great work and Congratulations on serving your time in the East! S&F, Dave Lettelier, PM, Curator Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library *** Excellent, I wondered what happened to you. I'll be sure to forward this to our lodge members. Love anything by Claudy !! Fraternally, Wally

Rich Kauffman

*** ***

Brother Cory . . . Thank you . . . Thank you . . . Thank you!!!!!! You do an outstanding job. I have every copy of TWT you have published (printed and on

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It's about time you lazy &^%$. HeeeeHeeeeee : ) (This was my favorite one LOL– Cory) *** Hi Cory, I'm not a great lover of things like Facebook and Twitter but I have to admit that they work and a lot of people use them. Have you thought of opening an account for TWT? Could be a good move. Keith

Hi Keith– I‘m well ahead of you– check out the new TWTMAG Fan page on Facebook. Search for: The Working Tools Masonic Magazine (TWT) Thanks Cory

Cory, Worth the wait, thanks for an excellent magazine. Andy Churney

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This Month in History

March 3rd- On this date in 1753, George Washington received his Fellow Craft degree in Fredericksburg Lodge in Virginia 5th- On this date in 1792, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts was organized 6th- On this date in 1775, several black men, including one named Prince Hall, were initiated into Freemasonry in Boston. This marked the beginning of what became a huge movement or organization in the United States known as Prince Hall Masonry, composed mainly of African Americans. 9th- On this date in 1822, a national Masonic Congress was held in Washington DC, in the U.S. Capitol building 17th- On this date in 1856, the Grand Lodge of Kansas was formed 17th- On this date in 1848, the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Washington DC was established 18th- On this date in 1902, the Tall Cedars of Lebanon was incorporated, in Trenton, New Jersey. 23rd- On this date in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle received his 3rd degree. 25th- On this date in 1882, the Grand Lodge of Arizona was organized 25th- On this date in 1902, Sir Winston Churchill received his 3rd degree in Studholme Lodge #1591, London

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This Month in ―The Worldwide Exemplification of Freemasonry‖

March Lectures ―The Worldwide Exemplification of Freemasonry‖

03-05-11- The Grand Lodges in British Colonies, 1850-1900 Dr. Jim Daniel, PJGW, UGLE 03-12-11 - Freemasonry in India: Masonic Vedanta Dr. Guy Beck, 32º 03-19-11 - A Vast Chain Extending Round the Whole Globe: Freemasonry and Empire Prof. Jessica L. Harland Jacobs 03-26-11—The Evolution of the Ritual Christopher L. Hodapp, PM

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Brother Submitted

So Mote It Be, What it means to me. By Worshipful Brother Paul Weathers So Mote It Be. So sweet is the sound. It has such a strong meaning to the true Mason. The word ‗mote‘ is an old Anglo-Saxon word meaning ‗may‘. But the meaning of the phrase should be much more personal to the Mason. Whether at the end of one‘s prayer, at the pronouncement of the sacred union of marriage, at the blessed birth of a child, or at the solemn bidding good bye to one who is loved and respected, we say those meaningful words, So Mote It Be. When I say those words, So Mote It Be, I‘m not speaking to those mortal beings around me, I‘m speaking directly to The Supreme Deity of all existence. I‘m asking God to look into my heart and know what is there that I may not know the words to express. I‘m asking God to recognize my needs; even those I don‘t know exist and provide for them, to know my weaknesses and frailties of life, to know all that my humble existence cannot comprehend. I‘m yielding to His will and imploring His mercy. What do those words mean to you, my Fraternal Brother? So Mote It Be. Oasis Lodge #52 8

450 N. Pantano Road

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Masonic Reading Cory Recommended

I’ve had the great fortune of meeting Brother Dr. John Nagy, author of the ―Building Series‖. After reading his newest version I wanted to inform the TWT readers more about them and how to find them incase you weren’t yet aware. These aren’t the same type of Masonic books in which you are used to reading. They engage and teach us all about Mahttp://www.coach.net/BuildingJanus.htm sonry but in a whole new and exciting way. You will immediately feel comfortable with the catechism style (Question and Answer) in which Bro. Nagy writes. There are 4 books in the series (Building Hiram, Building Boaz, Building Athens, and Building Janus). Each one is designed to help us understand what we encountered in the degrees, what the symbolism and allegories mean to a Mason. As we know, there are many layers of understanding and interpretations, it takes years to even start to get a handle of what it all means. Volume 1 is for the MM level and shows the parallels in-between the degrees, Volume 2 is about the EA degree, Volume 3 the FC and Volume 4 more in depth about the MM. Each one goes into the background of what the degrees are trying to impress upon us. Approximately 1,200 Questions and Answers are used to help you decipher some of the tougher allegories. What you will find in each Volume Building Hiram  How do the Square and Compasses symbolize Stone and the Work done upon it?  What is the true relevance today of the traditional Masonic Penalties and the Pillars described in the Orders of Architecture?  How do the numbers 3-4-5 from The 47th Problem of Euclid play into Masonic Ritual and where can they be found in plan view within Ritual?  Who is the Fourth Ruffian and how is he related to the first known Artificer of every cutting instrument of brass and iron?  What is the ―Sacred Triad‖ and how does it help manifest the Master’s Word? Where in Ritual can you actually see the Master’s Word, what are his Wages and what are the origins of both?

Building Boaz  The background and Masonic significance of the location of King Solomon Temple. (Continued on page 10)

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Masonic Reading (Continued from page 9)

 How Masons actually Strengthen the connections required for all future Work to succeed and last.  Meanings behind the checkered pavement, Jacob's Ladder and other symbols used within the first Masonic degree that assist in Entered Apprentice Work.  The connection between the Square and Compasses and its significance in the Work of all Masons. The specific Work Entered Apprentices must do to Properly Prepare to be Passed to the next Degree.

Building Athens  The author of and inspiration for Fellow Craft Training.  The purpose Fellow Craft training was intended to accomplish.  The single most important word that denotes the difference between Fellow Crafts and Master Masons.  A widow’s son whose life and death redefined what it means to be heroic.  What should be known about the Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences by every Mason. What truly Raises a Fellow Craft toward Mastery.

Building Janus  Background on when and why the 3 Ruffians were inserted into the 3rd Degree Legend, why understanding     

this reveals an important message from 18th century Masonic Ritual Crafters and this message's ramification upon the Craft. The purpose behind alluding to the first known artificer and why this reference is so critical to understand when Mastery is validated. The single most important Working Tool that Master Masons will ever wrought and wield. Background on "The Widow’s Son" name and title that redefines what it means to be a Master. The Seven Foreign Lands disclosed to Masters through Ritual and Traveled by those who do the Work. Further Light on the Master's Word, how it is further revealed, what it reveals and how (and why) only Masters benefit from it.

Uncommon Catechism for Uncommon Masonic Education 12 concise chapters of uncommon Masonic catechism with over 200 pages of quality information with footnotes and additional Masonic challenges throughout the book.

See the press release on the following page for more info. For a sample chapter go to http://www.coach.net/B_J_Preview.pdf

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Masonic Reading

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Claudy- ―Old Tyler Talks‖

“Why Men Love Freemasonry” The New Brother sat near the Old Tiler in the anteroom, crossed his legs and took out his cigar case. "Have a smoke and unpuzzle me." The Old Tiler accepted the proffered cigar with a smile. "I am often puzzled, too," he sympathized. "Tell me." "I am quite crazy about Masonry. I love it. So do a lot of other men. And I don't know why. I can't find anyone who will tell me why. Old Tiler, why do men love Masonry?" The Old Tiler got up and crossed the room to a bookcase, extracted a volume and returned. "I read that question in this little book, 'The Magic of Freemasonry,' by Arthur E. Powell. Let me read to you-" The Old Tiler fluttered the pages. Finding his place he sat and began: "‘Why do men love Masonry? What lure leads them to it? What spell holds them through the long years? What strand is it that tugs at our hearts, taut when so many threads are broken by the rough ways of the world? And what is it in the wild that calls to the little wild things? What sacred secret things do the mountains whisper to the 12

hillman, so silently yet so surely that they can be heard above the din and clatter of the world? What mystery does the sea tell the sailor; the desert to the Arab; the arctic ice to the explorer; the stars to the astronomer? When we have answered these questions mayhap we may divine the magic of Masonry. Who knows what it is, or how or why, unless it be the long cable tow of God, running from heart to heart.' " The Old Tiler closed the book and waited. "The cable tow of God," repeated the New Mason. "That's a beautiful phrase." "It's more than a phrase, I think," the Old Tiler answered. "As I see it, the heart of Freemasonry by which all manner of men are attracted and held, is just that-the longing for communion with the Most High." "Oh, you must be mistaken. Men who want God go to church." "Do you go to church?" "Er, oh, well, sometimes." "Yet you never miss coming to lodge." "No, I don't, but-" "Never mind the 'but.'" The Old Tiler smiled: "A lot of Then come to the lodge who do not find heart's case in the church. The lodge is not a substitute for church. Masonry is not a religion, although it has religion. If the church fails, occasionally, it is because all human institutions must fail at times. No

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Claudy- ―Old Tyler Talks‖ (Continued from page 12)

minister or church can satisfy all men. Some men find communion with the Most High in Masonry a greater satisfaction than in a church. I think that is the real reason some men love Freemasonry so much." "You give me credit with being a lot more religious than I do," retorted the New Mason. "Men are incurably religious," asserted the Old Tiler. "Many don't know it and refuse to call it by that name, like you, for instance! In a church, men are told various things about God. In a lodge they arc allowed to tell themselves what they will. In a church you are taught a creed, a dogma. In a lodge there is neither. In a church you are quiet and respectful and whisper if you speak at all. It is kept high, unspotted from the world. A lodge is more intimate, personal. You can be jolly in a lodge, except during a degree. Here are just other men, brothers. They think as we do; they believe in the one God, as we do. They repeat the same words, think the same Masonic thoughts, do the same Masonic acts, as we do. We feel at home with them in consequence,

put it into words, God is the only syllable which seems to fit. But when we say God we mean no special deity, but all that is beautiful in life, in friendship, in charity, in brotherhood. "So, my brother, there is no reason for you to be puzzled; no man can answer your puzzle. Freemasonry is loved by men because it strikes deep into the human heart, and supplies the answer to the question, the food for the hunger, which the tongue cannot express... "Unless it is the tongue of a wise, wise Old Tiler," finished the New Brother thoughtfully. "And thank you. I am not puzzled now."

"Through years of simple, profound degrees, we weave the Mystic Tie. We cannot say of what it is composed. We cannot put a name to it. St. Augustine, asked of God, answered, 'I know until you ask me-when you ask me, I do not know.' In your heart you know, and I know, what the Mystic Tie is-what Freemasonry is. But you cannot say it, nor can I. It is too deep for words. It is the reason we use symbols, for words cannot express it. "Deep in us is something which understands what brains cannot think; something which knows what our minds cannot comprehend. Masonry speaks to that something in its own language. If we must

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Poem

―A Broken Ashlar‖

―The Eastward Facing Gate‖

by Bro. Seymour Brandes (from The New Age Magazine, Washington, D.C., April, 1915)

by Bro. Rev. James J. H. Reedy (from The New Age Magazine, Sept. 1919)

A sense of imperfection round me clings; I hear an inward voice in deep lament: Through the dark chancel of my soul there rings A boding chant, with fear and yearning blent. Thin as a specter's voice in lonely round: I cannot tell from whence it came — or why; It harrows all my thoughts with mournful sound, Like echoes of a drowning seaman's cry. The precious pearls of wasted talent thrown In isolated spots of my life's field: Its irrecoverable riches sown As worthless seed that gave a barren yield. The images of folly, sloth and sin That flecked with error all my nobler past, Troop mockingly around with leering grin; I view with shuddering doubt — I am aghast!

"Then he brought me back by the way of the gate of the outward sanctuary that looketh toward the east." — Ezekiel 44:1.

Three score years and six and more, Treading mountain, vale and shore, Wondering what the end shall be — What the future has for me. Not alone each place I go, Marked by painful step and slow, Visions bright oft seal the day, Milestones marked upon the way. One score years and ten and more, Studying Mason's golden lore; Such has been my happy lot, Gaining thence each blessed thought. Marked by the Master with His Name — Since this way Himself He came — Light from Him shall lead us straight Toward the Eastward-facing Gate. Fellow-Crafts we still must be While we sail upon life's sea; Rudder, compass, pilot He, Trust in Him our only plea. Safely landed home at last, Entrance gained to such repast As the Master shall provide Those who Him have ne'er denied.

Courtesy of: http://www.masonic-poets-society.com 14

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Travel .

Masonic Traveling Around the USA ―Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial‖ The Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial is a monument located in the annex of the Gettysburg National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Built by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, it commemorates Confederate Brigadier General Lewis Addison Armistead entrusting Union Captain Henry H. Bingham with his personal effects, most notably a pocket watch, on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, during Pickett's Charge. Pickett's Charge was an assault upon the Union Army center on the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg. The charge, the high tide of the Confederate States of America, was repulsed. Confederate general Armistead, under George Pickett's command, personally led his men up the hill to the Union position. Armistead was shot twice. Severely wounded, and fearing that his personal effects would be stolen by Union soldiers, he "gave a Masonic sign asking for assistance". Union Captain Bingham, an aide to Major General Winfield Scott Hancock, a personal friend of Armistead, then came to his aid as he lay wounded: Armistead, Bingham, and Hancock were all Freemasons. After ensuring Armistead that his possessions would be sent to his family, particularly his pocket watch, Bingham took Armistead to a field hospital, where Armistead died two days later on the George Spangler farm. The monument's sculptor was Ron Tunison of Cairo, New York, who was himself a Freemason. The sculpture is made of polychrome bronze. The statue was dedicated by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania on August 21, 1993.

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Masonic Merchants

Support your fellow Brethren

The Festiveboard Masonic Gifts and More http://tfbmasonicgifts.com/ Brethren. I’ve come across this new site that features high quality Masonic gifts. The proprietors have offered to donate 10% of the sales to charity if you make a note that you found it at ―The Working Tools‖ Right now the site has a nice collection of collectable pins, with more items being added. There are a lot of specialty hobby/special interest pins like: Golfing, Fireman, Lawyer, Amateur radio , and Holidays Some of the fun pins they offer

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Masonic Online Community

Masonic Blogs at King Solomon's Lodge http://www.kingsolomonslodge.org/en/

From the Owner Jeff Day “Welcome to King Solomon's Lodge, a Masonic Blog Aggregator and Masonic Information Site. "King Solomon's Lodge" is not an actual Lodge, but is a metaphorical title for this site, which attempts to document the life of Freemasonry's past and present by providing accurate and useful information for Masons and others who have an interest in the World's Oldest Fraternity. Because interpretations of regularity vary between jurisdictions, and these links are chosen based on informative quality alone, please check with your Grand Lodge before becoming involved with any organization listed here.�

Why you should visit this site Brother Jeff has done an amazing job aggregating many blogs into one single source. Instead of having to visit each one individually, you can visit this one stop shop approach. Besides the blogs there are many other things to find like clip art and a whole section on Masonic Information. (Continued on page 18)

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Masonic Online Community– Masonic Blogs Con’t (Continued from page 17)

Blogs that are used

Masonic Info Found

Just a Mason by JustaMason

 

Freemasons For Dummies Stone of Remembrance

What is Freemasonry? Ancient Craft Masonry

York Rite Chapter of Royal Arch Masons Council of Royal and Select Masters Commandery of Knights Templar

Daily Mason The Metaphysical Freemason The Magpie Mason The North Eastern Corner

The Millennial Freemason by millennialfreemason Charles Martin's Blog. Iraq, Afghanistan and Freemasonry Masonic Renaissance by chtirrell Gate City Lodge No.2, 2 Bowl Cain

Lodge of Perfection Chapter of Rose Croix Council of Kadosh Consistory 

Martin Faulks Blog The Setting Maul - Voices From The Clefts... [podcast] John Ratcliff's Weblog

Scottish Rite

  

Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm York Rite Allied Invitational Bodies General Allied Invitational Bodies

The Trestle Board

Research Bodies Scottish Rite Research Society The Philalethes Society The Phylaxis Society The Grand College of Rites in the United States of America The Society of Blue Friars 

The Masonic Line by PalmettoBug The Digital Freemason [podcast] X-Oriente, X-Oriente [podcast] Thai Freemason News & Events Euclid Lodge The Manthanein Chronicles Ars Latomorum On The Level, Rough Ashlar: Masonic Blog Ars Masonica The Secret Sun

Affiliated Adoptive Rites The Order of the Eastern Star The Order of the Amaranth The Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem Social Order of the Beauceant The Order of True Kindred 

Affiliated Youth Organizations The Order of DeMolay The Order of Job's Daughters The Order of the Rainbow for Girls 

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Cool Masonic App’s

California Freemason Magazine Description Enjoy the California Freemason in a format that’s as mobile as you are. California Freemason, the bimonthly member magazine for the Masons of California, delivers thought-provoking articles to inspire and educate members about the significance of Freemasonry. Each issue is guided by a theme, communicated through a feature story and several sections, including History, Masonic Education, and Around the World. Magazine Features: • Current and past issues of California Freemason • Brilliant replica format, just like the print edition • Text-formatted articled designed for maximum mobile readability • Download each issue, then return any time for offline reading • Search the archive of available issues • Bookmark you favorite articles • Share your comments with other readers This app includes issues dating back to June 2010. New issues will be available for download bi-monthly You’ll also receive updates from freemason.org. All in one app!

Why Should You Download? If you ever read the Grand Lodge of California’s publication then you wouldn’t have to ask. It is one of the best Masonic magazine put out from a Grand Lodge that I have (Continued on page 20)

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Cool Masonic App’s

(Continued from page 19)

read. They do a second to none job with every issue and it only has gotten better. I’ve downloaded it for the Ipad which of course makes it easier to read that on an Iphone based on the amount of real estate the Ipad’s screen has. This was meant for reading on the go When I get the opportunity this is what I envision The Working Tools on the Ipad to look like!

Screenshots

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/california-freemason-magazine/id392044966?mt=8#

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One Brothers Opinion– An Editorial An Editorial– by Bro. James Green With the events of the last few days in Arizona I feel the fraternity is not doing what it is suppose to do for the public, according to our ritual and beliefs. This country was founded on Masonic principals. When I joined, the public believed that Masonic teachings was the foundation of a great society which we were the leaders of. Now they believe that we are just another bunch of guys having a party and not much faith or teaching comes forth for all to believe and gain in knowledge. I know that the fraternity has in the past gathered money and goods to donate to people in need, because of a disaster. That is not what I am referring to. No I am stating we should be leading our community in doing things for all to benefit and this action starts in our Lodges. The faith, honesty and moral standards we are suppose to believe in and practice. I look at the TV, the newspaper, and other sources and a day does not go by that we find out those we thought were our leaders are being investigated for dishonesty and corruption. As each generation comes along they look at what the previous generation did, and through the years the morals, honesty and faithfulness to our fellow man. Within our own lodges and etc we find those who are doing things not for their lodge or the fraternity, but for themselves. A lot of our companions do things to make a name for themselves and not for the fraternity. Let us be the leaders for honesty, faithfulness, and teachers of our youth to be the leaders like we use to be in the community. One of the items that disturbs me is the lack of information when a person dies, both of a Brother or of a member of the Eastern Star, or any of our orders, when they have passed on to the Supreme Being. When I read the paper each day I always check when reading the obituaries to see if a deceased had belonged to our fraternity somewhere, somehow. I am aware that all that have passed were not members at all. But I have read articles about our member without any mention of his/her involvement. One of the main reasons I have found out is that the surviving members of the family did not know of it, or they had forgot when writing about the person, or they were not interested in the involvement. I also have found that a lot of the survives do not know about the apron. Another thing is now that a lot of the churches do not allow Masonic Rites or ceremonies of any of our groups during the funeral services. There are two alternatives to solve this problem. One is if the church will allow would be to have ceremonies the night before, or if that is also forbidden, then hold the ceremonies the night before or after the church service at the Masonic Temple. I know that a lot of ceremonies are at graveside, but going to the Temple is in the interest of the deceased. We then would be informed of a member passing to the Celestial Lodge. One more thing that we need to get more attention to is that our members do not want the public to know that they are members of the Masonic Fraternity. This is very true with those in the political arena. I am aware that it is not proper to wear any type of identity in the halls of Congress. But I can not understand why our members don't wear pins, rings, and other items of identity when out in the public. I was told once that it could mean a negative item for them when in a crowd. Well I would be ready to tell them what it is all about. I can remember one time I asked a very active member why he didn't have something on his car license or in the window showing he was a member of the fraternity. He said he did not want them when he was in a place of negative standings. I said then that he should be there at all then.

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Masonic Biographies

Biography: Robert Burns

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Masonic Biographies Info provided by: http://www.masonicdictionary.com/

Freemasonry has no greater name than Robert Burns. If there are those who question his investiture as Poet Laureate of the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge, owing to the absence of certain documentary evidence, no one denies that he was, and is, the greatest poet of Freemasonry, the singer alike of its faith and its friendship, its philosophy and its fun, its passion and its prophecy. Nay, more; he was the Laureate, of the hopes and dreams of the lowly of every land. Higher tribute there is none for any man than to say, justly, that the world is gentler and more joyous for his having lived; and that may be truly said of Robert Burns, whose very name is an emblem of pity, joy, and the magnetism of Brotherly Love. It is therefore that men love Burns, as much for his weakness as for his strength, and all the more because he was such an unveneered human being. It is given to but few men thus to live in the hearts of their fellows; and today, from Ayr to Sidney, from Chicago to Calcutta, the memory of Burns is not only a fragrance, but a living force uniting men of many lands into a fellowship of Liberty Justice and Charity. "The Memory of Burns!" cried Emerson, "I am afraid Heaven and earth have taken too good care of it to leave anything to say. The west winds are murmuring it. Open the windows behind you and hearken to the incoming tide, what the waves say of it. The doves perching on the eaves of a stone chapel opposite may know something about it. The Memory of Burns - every man's, every boy's, every girl's head carries snatches of his songs, and they say them by heart; and what is strangest of all, never learned them from a book, but from mouth to mouth. They are the property and the solace of mankind!" In a tiny two-roomed cottage, clay-built and

thatch-roofed, on the banks of the Doon, in the district of Kyle, two miles south of the town of Ayr, in Scotland, Robert Burns was born on January 25th, 1759. It was a peasant home, such as he afterward described in "The Cotter's Saturday Night," in which poverty was consecrated by piety, where the father was a priest of faith and the mother a guardian angel of the holy things of life. So far from as schools were concerned, his education was limited to grammar, writing and arithmetic. Later he picked up a little Latin, a smattering of French, and some knowledge of English and classic poets. But he knew the Book of Nature, leaf by leaf, and the strange scroll of the Human Heart, as only the swift insight of genius can read them. At the age of twenty-two Burns was initiated into the Mysteries of Freemasonry, in St. David's Lodge at Tarbolton, July 4th, 1781. Lockhart says that he was introduced to the Lodge by John Rankine. The minute recording his initiation reads: "Sederunt for July 4th. Robert Burns in Lochly was entered an Apprentice. Jo Norman, Master." The second and third degrees were conferred on the same evening, in the month of October following his initiation. Six years later he was made a Knights Templar as well as a Royal Arch Mason in Eyemouth, as under the old Regime the two were always given together. By this time he had won some fame as a poet, and the higher degrees were given him in token both of his fame as a poet and his enthusiasm as a Mason. On July 27th, 1784, Burns was elected Depute Master of St. James Lodge, Tarbolton, a position which he held until St. John's Day, 1788. He was made an honorary member of St. John Lodge No. 22, Kilmarnock, on October 26th, 1786. Major William Parker, the Master of St. John Lodge, became a great friend of Burns, and subscribed for thirty-five copies of the first edition of (Continued on page 24)

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Masonic Biographies him with honorary membership.

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his poems. He is the "Willie" in the song "Ye Sons of Auld Killie" (a contraction of Kilmarnock) composed and sung by Burns on the occasion of his admission as an honorary member of St. John Lodge: "Ye Sons of Auld Killie, assembled by William, To follow the noble vocation; Your thrifty old mother has scarce such another, To sit in that honored station. I've little to say, but only to pray, As praying's the ton of your fashion; A prayer from the muse, you may well excuse, "Tis seldom her favorite passion. Ye powers who preside, o're the wind and the tide, Who mark each element's border; Who formed this frame with beneficent aim, Whose sovereign statute is order; Within this dear mansion may wayward contention, Or withered envy ne're enter; May secrecy round be the mystical bound, And Brotherly Love be the center. The minutes of this meeting concluded as follows: "Robert Burns, Poet, from Mauchline, a member of St. James, Tarbolton, was made an Honorary Member of this Lodge."

Besides being a faithful and enthusiastic attendant upon the meetings of his own Lodge, Burns was a frequent visitor at Lodge when away from home. It is said that, with a very few exceptions, all his patrons and acquaintances were members of the Fraternity. Burns is described at this time as nearly five feet ten inches in height, and of a form agile as well as strong; his high forehead shaded with black, curling hair, his eyes large, dark, full of bright intelligence, his face vividly expressive. His careless dress and untaught manners gave an impression of coarseness at first, but this was forgotten in the charm of his personality, and his face in repose had a calm thoughtfulness akin to melancholy. Full of fun and fire, affable and the best of good company, his superior mind did not make him supercilious, and he loved more than all else, a festival that was half frolic and a feast where joy and good will were guests. Alas, drinking was a habit in the Scotland of those days, to a degree we can hardly imagine, as much in the Church as in the Lodge; and it made the bitter tragedy of Robert Burns. Truth obliges us to admit that his moral failure was early and pitiful, due alike to his environment and to a fatal frailty of which made him fitful, unstable, and a prey to every whim of fancy and of passion. It is an awful risk to be endowed with the genius of a Burns; it digs deep pitfalls for the man to whom it is given. Yet, if in his later years he was a degraded man of genius, he was never a man of degraded genius. The poison did not enter his song. Allan Cunningham was right when he said: "Few men had so much of the Poet in them, and few poets so much of the man; the man was probably less pure than he ought to have been, but the poet was pure and bright to the end."

"(Sgd.) Will Parker. This was the first Lodge to distinguish Burns with the designation "Poet," and to honor 24

So, and naturally so, men are willing to hide with a veil of charity the debris of character scat-

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tered along the starry path of Burns. On reading his poems Byron exclaimed: "What an antithetical mind! Tenderness, roughness, delicacy, coarseness, sentiments, sensuality; dirt and deity - all mixed up in one compound of inspired clay!" But that might pass for a description of mankind in general, and of Burns in particular. If Burns was a sinner he was in that akin to ourselves, as God knows, a little good and a little bad, a little weak and a little strong, foolish when he thought he was wise, and wise, often, when he feared he was foolish. So we may give Burns the charity which he prayed for others: Then at the balance let's be mute, We can never adjust it; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted. By the same token, no great poet whose name is linked with our Craft ever owed more to Freemasonry, or gave more to it. More intimately than any other he was identified with its life, its genius and its ideals. Its teachings moved his thought; its spirit inspired his song; its genius nurtured that love of freedom and Fraternity which he set to everlasting music. So much is this true, that it remains a marvel to this day how Shairp could have written a biography of Burns without once mentioning his membership in the Craft. In the gentle air of Freemasonry he found refuge from hardship and heaviness of spirit; and its fellowship served to shelter him from the poisoned arrows of petty bigots who were unworthy to untie his shoes - men of a kind known in every age, whose hard-heartedness was clad in unctuous hypocrisy.

Surely, if ever of any one, it can be said of Robert Burns, that his soul goes marching on. He was the harbinger of the nineteenth century, the poet of the rights and reign of the common people, whom, it has been said, God must love because he made so many of them. The earth was fresh upon the tomb of George Washington when that century was born; it discovered Lincoln and buried him with infinite regret. But its triumphant melody first found voice in the songs of Robert Burns, as the greek singer inspired Patriarch with the fire which kindled the Revival of Learning, and out of the inertia of the Middle Ages created modern times. So when Taine, the French critic, came to account for that age he found that it's spirit "Broke First in the Scotch Peasant, Robert Burns." - a man of all men most fitted to give it voice, because "scarcely ever was seen together more of misery and of talent." There are those who dream of a vague blur of cosmopolitism, in which all local loyalties, all heroic national genius shall be merged and forgotten. Not so Robert Burns. He was distinctively a national poet, striking deep roots in his native soil, and, for that reason, touching a chord so haunting that it echoes forever. This at least is true; a man who is not deeply rooted somewhere - to whom one spot on earth is not a little dearer, and the sky over it a little bluer - will not be of much use anywhere. When Burns appeared the spirit of Scotland was a low ebb. Her people were crushed and her ancient fire almost quenched. Her scholars blushed if they used her dialect. It was at such a time that a God-Endowed singer took up his harp, inspired by the history of his people, the traditions of Wallace and Bruce stirring him like a passion, (Continued on page 26)

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his soul attuned to the old ballads of love and daring, singing the simple life of his nation in its vivid and picturesque language. He struck with a delicate but strong hand the deep and noble feelings of his countrymen, and somewhere upon his variegated robe of song will be found embroidered the life, the faith, the genius of his people. No wonder the men loved a poet, and make his home at once a throne of melody and a shrine of national glory. Because he was so deeply rooted in the soil of his own land; because he was so sweetly, sadly, joyously - yea, and even sinfully - human, his spirit and appeal are universal, for the human heart beats everywhere the same, and by loyalty to the genius of our own country we best serve our race. His passion for liberty, his affirmation of the nobility of man, his sense if dignity of labor, his pictures of the pathos and the hard lot of the lowly, find response in every breast where beats the heart of a man. It is thus that all men love Burns, for it was he who taught, as few have taught since the Son of Man lodged with the fishermen by the sea, the brotherhood of man and the kinship of all breathing things. Such singers live as long as men love life, and their words become a part of the sacred scriptures of the human heart. This is no time to deal in literary criticism a dreary business at best, a dismal business at worst. It is by all agreed that Robert Burns was a lyric poet of the first order, if not the greatest 26

song writer of the world. Draw a line from Shakespeare to Browning, and he is one of the few minds tall enough to touch it. The qualities of Burns are simplicity, naturalness, vividness, fire, sweet-toned pathos, and rollicking humor qualities rare enough, and still more rarely blended. His fame rests upon verses written swiftly, as men write letters, and upon songs as spontaneous, as artless, as lovely as the songs of birds. He sang of simple things, of the joys and woes and pieties of the common life, where sin bewshadows virtue and the cup of death is pressed to the lips of love. He saw the world as God made it, woven of good and ill, of light and shadow, and his songs come home to rich and poor alike, a comfort and a consecration. No wonder Burns was the best beloved poet of Lincoln, as much for his democracy as for his humor, his pathos, and his rich humanity. With him social rank was but a guinea stamp, a bit of tawdry tinsel alongside the native nobility of manhood. He honored a man for his worth, not for his wealth. For the snob, for the fop, he had genuine contempt. If he flayed the selfish pride of the rich, it was not from envy - just as truly did he scorn the poor man who, instead of standing erect, only cringes and whines. He told the poor man that it is no sin to be poor, but that it is a sin to be ashamed of it. He taught that honest poverty is not only nobler, but happier, than indolent or il-gotten wealth. The Cotter's dog and the Laird's dog are very real dogs, as all admit, but their talk is something more than dogphilosophy. It is the old, old story of the high and the low, and it is like Burns to take the part of the under dog. Still, had the Cotter's dog given way to selfpity, Burns would have been the first to kick him. He hated fawning, as he hated sham, and he knew that if toil is tragedy, labor is an honor and joy. That which lives in Robert Burns, and will live while human nature is the same, is his love of justice, of honesty, of reality, his touch of pa-

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thos and melting sympathy, his demand for liberty, his faith in man and God - all uttered with simple speech and the golden voice of song. His poems were little jets of love and liberty and pity finding their way out through the fissures in the granite-like theology of his day. They came fresh from the heart of a man whom the death of a little bird set dreaming of the meaning of the world wherein life is woven of beauty, mystery and sorrow. A flower crushed in the budding, a field mouse turned out of his home by a plowshare, a wounded hare limping along the road to dusty death, or the memory of a tiny bird who sang for him in the days agone, touched him to tears, and made him feel the old hurt and heartache of the world. The poems of Burns did not grow; they awoke complete. He was a child of the open air, and about all his songs there is an outdoor feeling - never a smell of the lamp. He saw nature with the swift glances of a child - saw beauty in the fold of clouds, in the slant of trees, in the lilt and glint of flowing waters, in the immortal game of hide-and-seek played by sunbeams and shadows, in the mists trailing over the hills. The sigh of the wind in the forest filled him with a kind of wild, sad joy, and the tender face of a mountain daisy was like the thought of one much loved and long dead. The throb of his heart was warm in his words, and it was a heart in which he carried an alabaster box of pity. He had a sad life and soul of fire, the instincts of an angel in the midst of hard poverty; yet he lived with dash and daring, sometimes with folly, and, we must add, - else we do not know Burns - with a certain bubbling joyousness, despite his tragedy.

of manhood was in his heart, on his lips the voice of eternal melody, and in his face the light of the morning star. Long live the spirit of Robert Burns, Poet and Freeemason! May it grow and glow to the confounding of all injustice, all unkindness! He haunts his native land As an immortal youth; his hand Guides every plow. His presence haunts this room tonight, A form of mingled mist and light From that far coast. 

Source: Short Talk Bulletin - Jun. 1923

Such was the spirit of Robert Burns, a man passionate and piteous, compact of light and flame and loveliness, capable of withering scorn of wrong, quickly shifting from the ludicrous to the horrible in his fancy, poised between laughter and tears - and if by some art se could send his soul into all the dark places of the world, pity and joy would return to the common ways of man. His feet may have been in the furrow, but the nobility 27

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The Working Tools News March 2011

“Masons, other service groups fight membership declines” By Jon Ostendorff, USA TODAY

Mark Bennett, historian at a Freemasons lodge in Asheville, N.C., wants to make something clear. Despite the impression given by books such as author Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code and The Lost Symbol, and movies like National Treasure, the Masons are not a clandestine group.

By John Fletcher, Asheville Citizen-Times

"We're not a secret society," Bennett says. "We're a society with a few secrets."

The Mount Hermon Masonic Lodge in Asheville, N.C., has used outreach programs to increase its membership.

In an effort to boost flagging membership across the USA, an increasing number of Masonic lodges, like other fraternal service groups, are abandoning secretive ways and inviting the public in to see what the organization is really all about. There are fewer Masons today — by nearly a million — than there were in 1941 as the country came out of the Great Depression, says Richard Fletcher, executive secretary of the Masonic Service Association of North America. There are an estimated 3 million members worldwide and 1.5 million in the USA, he says, compared with more than 4 million members in the USA in 1959. Why? Blame the Baby Boomers, Fletcher says. "We had what I call the '60s syndrome," he says. "That was the whole concept of the generation. You turned against anything that was mainstream." In 2005, the association produced a report called "It's About Time," which encouraged lodges to invite the community in, Fletcher says. But most didn't start opening their doors until Masons in Massachusetts saw successes in 2009 with the policy, he says. Since then, a growing number have opened their doors: •In Asheville, Mount Hermon Masonic Lodge 118 allows prospective members to dine with members before official meetings to (Continued on page 29)

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learn more about Masonry. The effort has paid off. Seven years ago, the lodge was struggling with low attendance and now has about 500 members, says John Burchfield, the local district deputy grand lecturer. •In Ellwood City, Pa., three lodges in 37th Masonic District held open houses in August. •In New Hampshire, Freemasons held statewide events in March and October. "It was very well received in New Hampshire," says Nashua, N.H., Rising Sun lodge member Bob Porter. The Nashua lodge got 30 new members, Porter says.

Tough times The Mason decline is mirrored by other fraternities. Amos McCallum, a chairman of the past national presidents of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, says his group has 900,000 members, down from 1.6 million in 1980. Membership in Rotary clubs has dropped nearly 42,000 since 1995 in the USA to 360,790 last year, says Rotary spokeswoman Elizabeth Minelli. Some civic clubs say they are starting to see an uptick. Lions Club International reported 20,000 new members last year after decades of decline. It has 1.35 million worldwide, says spokesman Dane La Joye. Reaching out to women has been key, La Joye says. "Women are the fastest-growing segment of our membership today," he says. Freemasonry dates to stonemason guilds in the Middle Ages, according to the national association's website. Its exact origins are unclear. In 1717, four lodges in London formed the first Grand Lodge of England, according to the association. Women are not allowed to join, and the policy is not up for debate, Fletcher says. Masons nationally give nearly $1.5 million a day to charities, the association says. The best known is the Shriners Hospitals for Children. Freemasonry promotes individual freedom, the right of people to worship as they choose, democratic government and public education, Fletcher says.

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The Working Tools News Debunking myths Masons have long been the target of conspiracy theorists and today are tackling the myths through the service association's website and the open-door policy at local lodges, Fletcher says. The fraternity denies being part of a "one-world order" or controlling the United States government, he says. That theory has centered on the Great Seal of the United States and its "eye in the pyramid" design. The all-seeing eye icon is used in Masonry but, the organization says, the image on the seal and the back of the $1 bill have nothing to do with Masons. Masons also dispute other claims, including that every U.S. president was a Mason. President Obama is not. President Ford was the most recent president who was, according to the association. The Internet and the rise of online social networks may have something to do with a rise in membership, Fletcher says. "Freemasonry is a social network," he says. "It always has been." Ostendorff also reports for the Asheville (N.C.) Citizen-Times.

http://www.thegardeningguru.com/ The horticultural help you have been looking for is here just for the asking. I am the Gardening Guru速, here to answer your most perplexing gardening questions, and to teach you how fun and enjoyable gardening can be! Brother David Daehnke

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The Working Tools News ―Freemasonry in Egypt‖ By Chris Hodapp. Freemason for Dummies. http://freemasonsfordummies.blogspot.com/

With the turmoil currently raging in Egypt, Masons may be interested in the history of Freemasonry in that country over the years.

A Cairo Masonic lodge in the 1940s, under a portrait of King Farouk

After French troops brought Masonry to Egypt with Napoleon's invasion in 1798, the fraternity expanded there. Lodges were chartered by French and German grand lodges, and by the 1860s, there were Italian, English and Scottish lodges at work, as well. Turkish Masons also influenced the Craft there. Naturally, with that many foreign lodges in the country, schisms arose, and several competing grand lodges were formed at various times in Egypt. So called "higher" degrees brought by different rites and supreme councils created further chaos. The dominant grand lodge that seemed to survive the longest was the National Grand Orient of Egypt, and its lodges worked in Arabic, Hebrew, Greek, French, Italian and German.

Egypt's kings, from Isma'il Pasha the Magnificent in the 1860s up through King Farouk in the 1950s, were made honorary grand masters in the National Grand Orient of Egypt, although none are believed to have been actually initiated into lodges. Masonry was an important link between Egypt and Western thought After the end of WWII and Egypt's humiliating losses in Palestine to the brand new state of Israel in 1948, Freemasonry was branded as a Zionist organization (along with the B'nai B'rith, which was patterned after Masonry, and had lodges in Cairo and Alexandria). The revolution that pitched Farouk out of the country helped to raise distrust of Masonry, as both a perceived Jewish organization, as well as being a haven for entrenched government and business fat cats. Freemasonry was under great pressure to close in Egypt by 1954 under the Nationalist Movement and Gamal Abdel Nasser became Prime Minister and the British gave up control of the Suez Canal. It was officially outlawed in 1964. Masonry still gets trotted out as a boogyman periodically in Egypt, as in other Muslim countries. Rotary Clubs frequently come under fire as being nothing more than Masonry in sheep's clothing. The Islamic Jurisdictional College of El-Azhar University in Cairo is one of the most influential organizations for interpreting Islamic law. In 1978, it issued an opinion concerning the "Freemasons' Organization." Freemasonry is a clandestine organization, which conceals or reveals its system, depending on the circumstances. Its actual principles are hidden from members, except for chosen members of its higher degrees. * The members of the organization, worldwide, are drawn from men without preference for their religion, faith, or sect. * The organization attracts members on the basis of providing personal benefits. It traps men into being politically active, and its aims are unjust. * New members participate in ceremonies of different names and symbols, and are too frightened to disobey its regula31

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The Working Tools News (Continued from page 31)

tions and orders. * Members are free to practice their religion, but only members who are atheists are promoted to its higher degrees, based on how much they’re willing to serve its dangerous principles and plans. * It is a political organization. It has served all revolutions, as well as military and political transformations. In all dangerous changes, a relation to this organization appears either exposed or veiled. * It is a Jewish organization in its roots. Its secret higher international administrative board is made up of Jews, and it promotes Zionist (pro-Israel) activities. * Its primary objectives are the distraction of all religions, and it distracts Muslims from Islam. * It tries to recruit influential financial, political, social, or scientific people to utilize them. It does not consider applicants it cannot utilize. It recruits kings, prime ministers, high government officials, and similar individuals.

“There is a link death cannot sever, Love and remembrance last for ever.” Freemason James Grant (1865-1928)

* It has branches under different names as a camouflage, so people cannot trace its activities, especially if the name of Freemasonry has opposition. These hidden branches are known as Lions, Rotary, and others. They have wicked principles that completely contradict the rules of Islam. * There is a clear relationship between Freemasonry, Judaism, and international Zionism. It has controlled the activities of high Arab officials in the Palestinian conflict. * Any Muslim who affiliates with it, knowing the truth of its objectives, is an infidel to Islam. That's what the fraternity is up against in Egypt today, and why Masonry must remain underground in devoutly Islamic countries. According to Kent Henderson and Tony Pope's long out of print Freemasonry Universal, rumors have persisted that a Grand Orient of Egypt still survives secretly (or did as late as 1999), working in Egypt's biggest cities. Bulwer Lodge of Cairo, No. 1068 was the first lodge chartered by the United Grand Lodge of England in Egypt, in 1865. It moved its charter to England after being suppressed in Egypt, and has an extensive history on its website. For a detailed account of the history, from a non-Masonic point of view, see "Freemasonry in Egypt: Is It Still Around?" by Samir Raafat in Insight Magazine, March 1, 1999. Matthew Scanlan wrote "Freemasonry Serving Egypt" for Freemasonry Today in 2003. Also if you have access to a Jstore account, see "Freemasonry in Egypt 1798-1921: A Study in Cultural and Political Encounters" by Karim Wissa. And there is an excellent series of articles about the history of Egyptian Masonry in Ars Quatuor Coronatorum Volumes 81 and 82, 1969 and 1970 by W. Bro. F. D. Stevenson Drane.

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The Working Tools News “Freemasons Queensland Raise $1M for Flood Appeal” Grand Master Adrian Burton Launch of Flood Appeal Media release Queensland Freemasons $1M fundraising effort underway to help rebuild Queensland communities More than 30% of target $1M in funding already achieved through local, interstate and international support initiatives Brisbane, Qld January 31 2011, Immediate Release: Adrian Burton, Grand Master of Freemasons Queensland, today announced the launch of the ―Grand Master‘s Queensland Flood Appeal‖, a $1M fundraising effort to support the rebuilding of Queensland communities devastated by recent flooding. Lodges from throughout Queensland will work hand-in-hand with local Councils and State Government Members in flood-affected areas to raise critically-needed funds for local social infrastructure, community services and projects. A specific Flood Appeal Co-ordination Group has been appointed, led by Assistant Grand Master, Alan Townson. ―We recognize that the impact of Queensland‘s recent flooding is felt at all levels throughout the community, and the rebuilding of community infrastructure and services which help to bring some semblance of ‗life as normal‘ are critical to the social and economic recovery of the many local government areas affected,‖ Grand Master, Adrian Burton said.

―By providing direct financial support to those projects that local leaders and regional councils recognize as critical to their communities, we hope to help restore the personal and social fabric of the impacted areas in a very tangible way.‖ Initially conceived on the 7th January, the Appeal has achieved rapid momentum, with more than one third of the target $1M donation secured to date. $250 000 has been pledged by Queensland Freemason‘s Board of Benevolence (the charitable trust of the organization, which supports an array of community and charity pursuits), and the Queensland Board of General Purposes, $100 000 from Victoria‘s Grand Lodge, ₤20 000 (32 377 AUD) provided by the Grand Charity from the United Grand Lodge of England, and over $25 000 already from local lodges. ―Our members throughout Queensland will undertake a range of activities to achieve – and hopefully, surpass – our $1 million target,‖ Grand Master Adrian Burton said. ―This will include personal donations from amongst our 9,000-strong Queensland fraternity base, many of whom have witnessed the devastating results of the flooding first-hand and are eager to contribute to the restoration of their respective communities.‖ All funds received will be administered and disbursed by Queensland Freemasons within affected Communities in consultation with local Community Leaders and Regional Councils. In addition to the Grand Master‘s Queensland Flood Appeal, Freemasons Queensland is providing assistance to members and their families who have experienced personal hardship due to flooding.

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About Freemasons Queensland: Freemasons Queensland is the Queensland-based chapter of the global Freemasonry organization, and comprises 300 Lodges and over 9,000 members throughout the state. With a history spanning hundreds of years – 150 in Queensland – the mission of Freemasonry is to encourages tolerance, integrity and self-development of its members, whilst promoting service to the community. Visit www.freemasonsqld.org.au for more information.

About Grand Master Adrian Burton: Adrian Burton is current Grand Master of Freemasons Queensland and has held a range of senior positions in Queensland Freemasonry since 1990. Adrian has extensive commercial experience with State, National, and Australasian Boards, and has held senior positions including: • Group Operations Manager • State Manager • General Manager • Chief Executive Officer and • National Manager He has spent the last 36 years in the furniture industry in the retail management sector as well as the wholesale and importing sector. The position of Grand Master may be equated to that of CEO or Managing Director in commercial environments. About Assistant Grand Master and Flood Appeal Co-ordination Group leader Alan Townson: Alan Townson served in the Australian Army for 24 years attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He holds a degree in electrical engineering (Hons 1) from the University of New South Wales, a post graduate diploma in Management from the Cental Queensland University and a graduate diploma in Technology Management from the Royal Military College of Science, England. Upon leaving the Army, Alan worked for the Industry Capability Network providing engineering and procurement services to mining, mineral processing and power generation projects in Queensland.

Media Contact:: Graham Schulz Deputy Grand Secretary | United Grand Lodge of Queensland Masonic Memorial Centre |

311 Ann Street | Brisbane Q | P: GPO Box 2204Brisbane Q 4001 T: +61 7 3229 3533 | F: +61 7 3229 9288 dgsec@freemasonsqld.org.au

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The Working Tools News How the Boston rock scene grew up, got real jobs, and became — Freemasons? The all-seeing eye of rock and roll By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON http://thephoenix.com

The Masons of Amicable Lodge have tattoos curling out from under their button-down shirts. They wear giant rings and waist aprons that look like oversize satin envelopes. They wear ties and medals and amulets. They carry staffs. Each month, they gather to practice secret rituals in Porter Square. Once, they played in Boston bands like Slapshot, Crash and Burn, Sam Black Church, Victory at Sea, the Men, and Cradle the Grave. Back then, none of them would have dreamed of joining the Masons. Masonry — a fraternal society that dates back the 1700s — has not, heretofore, been associated with rock and roll.

to to

But people get older and settle down. They get married. They have kids. They get jobs. They join the Masons. In a strange way, this seems like a logical next step for veterans of the Boston rock scene. "A lot of people become involved in music because they're looking for something higher — or to get girls, which is something higher," says Ian Adams, Mason, film grip, occasional Phoenix illustrator, and member emeritus of 8 Ball Shifter and Rock City Crimewave. "It's looking for that thing that's bigger than you — the first time you hear the Ramones on the radio, it's that spiritual thing." Masonry fills that need, Adams says. "The idea that you're doing something that other people have done in the past [allows] you to step out of time," he explains. "We're born, get old, and die, but the rituals remain the same. It's a time machine. It's a connection to eternity."

TILED BEAVERS AND MASONIC COASTERS Along with other fraternal organizations — the Knights of Columbus, the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, the Elks, the Lions, the Rotarians, Kiwanis — the Masons had their heyday in the scotch-soaked early 1960s, when men brought home the bacon and women stayed home with the kids. Fred Flintstone, a man of his time, belonged to the Loyal (Continued on page 36)

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Order of the Water Buffaloes. After a hard day at the Slate Rock and Gravel Company, Flintstone would slide down the bronto crane, don a silly hat, and drink beer with his brethren before returning home to Wilma and Pebbles. Freemasonry, the first and largest of these secret societies, began with medieval stonemasons' guilds who adopted esoteric rites, rituals, and degrees of initiation, collectively known as the Craft. Today, Masons are avowedly non-denominational, though membership requires belief in a Supreme Being. Masonry came to America with the colonists. Boston is home to the nation's oldest Masonic Grand Lodge. It sits right on the Common — that building with the tiled beavers on the side. Inside are grand, lushly appointed meeting halls. In rooms smelling vaguely of stale cigar smoke, lockers made of glass and carved wood hold funny hats and cloaks. A tiled-floored, dimly-lit chamber is populated by marble figurines in cubby holes. The Masonic conference room is wallpapered in a gold square-and-compass pattern; the conference table is dotted with Masonic coasters. "I think a lot of people's misconception of the fraternity is that it's a bunch of stodgy old men," says Master Mason J.R. Roach. Roach, 41, is a big dude with black hair and a couple of tattoos that he keeps covered up. Once he was the drummer for Boston stalwarts Sam Black Church and played with KISS, Ted Nugent, Motörhead, Black Sabbath, and Dio. "There's a saying in the ceremony that basically says the organization will not regard any man for his wealth or appearance. So it's a very interesting mix of people. You go to Lodge and the reverend of your church could be sitting next to a guy with really long hair, and nobody cares. Everybody's considered equal." THE HAZING GOAT Roach is at the vanguard of the Masonic resurgence. Membership — like that of all fraternal orders — declined after the salad days of the 1960s. But something changed in the mid-2000s: young men became interested in the Masons once more. Gen-Xers settled down and needed a night away from the wife and kids, and Gen-Yers rebelled against navel-gazing, Baby Boomer parents. Or maybe they read Dan Brown's 2003 thriller, The Da Vinci Code, or saw Nicolas Cage's star turn in the 2004 film National Treasure. Both narratives placed Masons at the heart of international conspiracies upon which hinged nothing less than the fate of the world. Or maybe it was the exposure. Lead by Massachusetts lodges, the Masons began to open the doors of their temples of the public and offer guided tours of their facilities. Whatever the reason, the number of men who joined the Ma(Continued on page 37)

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sons began to increase dramatically. And with it, the number of young creatives. Nick Batzell, a 25-year-old sculptor's apprentice, got interested in Masonry when he saw a picture of Czech printmaker Alphonse Mucha in full Masonic regalia. "I studied Romanesque and Gothic architecture in [art] school," Batzell says. "William Hogarth was a Mason, and Paul Revere — he was the most famous silversmith, ever." Roach spent 18 years on the road as a musician. "Record labels, promoters, club owners — sometimes you meet the sweetest people in the world and sometimes not so much," he says. "I really wish, with all the traveling I did, that I had been a Mason." Now, as a professional Mason, Roach spends his days in the headquarters of the Supreme Council, 33rd Degree, of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. Headquarters shares a Lexington campus with the National Heritage Museum. In the high-ceilinged museum lobby, a librarian keeps watch at the information desk. In the middle of the exhibition, a horrifying contraption looms on a metal tripod, covered in wool and brown with age. It has stirrups. Large glass eyes stare out from a head with giant goat horns. The placard identifies it as a Bucking Billy Goat and says that lawsuits precluded its continued use in initiation rituals. 'I SEE THEM AS MY SONS' The hazing goat's presence in the museum shows that today's Masons don't take themselves entirely seriously. In addition to portraits by and of famous Masons, there's a glass case with Mason bobbleheads. The National Heritage Museum embraces goofiness as part of its Masonic legacy. But for all the bobbleheads, Masons are deadly serious about their values. Several members of the lodge look to the Salvation Army's Stephen Carroll, lodge chaplain, as a mentor. "He's the most gentle, kind-hearted, hard-working person I've ever [known] in my life," says Adams. Carroll, 66, has been a Mason for 27 years and has belonged to Amicable Lodge for 19. When younger, tattooed guys started going to his meetings, he didn't raise an eyebrow — in fact, he was thrilled when they joined. "I see some of them as my sons," he says. "It thrills me to see them living good, clean lives, helping other people, and doing the right thing." Through his work as a commanding officer in the Salvation Army, Carroll has encouraged a number of his fraternal brothers to help out. "He actually got me to ring the bell for the Salvation Army one year," says Adams, "which is not something I ever saw myself doing." Carroll doesn't see much difference between himself and the new breed of Masons. "Older folks join the Masons for the same reasons. There's a nice fellowship of younger people, especially those who are in the arts," he says. "These are 2011 folks. They're not 1945 folks. They're into technology, and high-tech music, and arts, and all kinds of other things that didn't even exist when I was born, but their basic values are the same. They want to be good citizens. They want to be good to their fellow man. They want to help out rather than help themselves."

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The Working Tools News Masonic apron worn by George Washington found in Shepherdstown It has been in the Mt. Nebo Lodge No. 91 A.F. & A. M. on East German Street since the early 1800s By RICHARD F. BELISLE

SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. — A Masonic apron presented to George Washington at Mount Vernon by the Marquis de Lafayette in 1784, and thought to have been lost for two centuries, has been hanging in a Masonic meeting room in downtown Shepherdstown all this time. The apron has been in the Mt. Nebo Lodge No. 91 A.F. & A. M. on East German Street since the early 1800s. Thomas Hammond, who married Mildred Washington, George Washington's niece, bought the apron from Martha Washington's estate for $6. The couple moved to Charles Town, W.Va., in 1810, and Hammond joined the local lodge. George Alwin, Mt. Nebo master, said Hammond gave the apron to the lodge before he died in 1820. When Mt. Nebo celebrates its 200th anniversary on Dec. 11, the apron will be on public display in the lodge meeting room all day, Alwin said. "It was never a secret that we've had the apron all these years," he said. Like many of the nation's Founding Fathers, Washington was a member of the free masons, and the aprons were worn by members during various rituals and public events. Lodge members, through their own research in recent years, had come to believe that Washington wore their apron when he laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol in 1793, six years before his death. "We read through 200 years of minutes," said Ed Calhoun, a former Mt. Nebo master. Alwin said the early lodge minutes were lost during the Civil War. Mount Vernon historians have always known about a second French-made apron that was given to Washington. The Watson-Cassoul Apron is named for the two men who gave it to the general — Elkanah Watson, a fellow Mason, and M. Cassoul, his French business partner. (Continued on page 39)

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The Working Tools News (Continued from page 38)

Mount Vernon curator Susan P. Schoelwer said it was that apron, not Mt. Nebo's, that Washington wore at the cornerstone-laying ceremony for the U.S. Capitol. In 1812, Washington's nephew Lawrence Lewis, donated it to the Alexandria-Washington Masonic Lodge No. 22. Schoelwer said Mount Vernon researchers determined that the Mt. Nebo apron was worn at the cornerstone ceremony for the Washington Monument in 1848. It also showed up at cornerstone ceremonies in 1850 in Richmond attended by President Zachary Taylor and in 1866 in Maryland attended by President Andrew Johnson.

'We're taking it back' In 2009, Mt. Nebo Lodge members contacted Mark Tabbert, curator of the George Washington Masonic Memorial in Alexandria, for help in authenticating their apron. "They wanted me to look at it to verify their stories," said Tabbert, who supported Mount Vernon's version of its provenance. "It's quite likely that Washington received it when Lafayette returned to the United States in 1784," he said. "Mount Vernon knew about the lost apron, and they're pretty convinced this is the second one owned by Washington." On Monday, the Mt. Nebo Masons will be at Mount Vernon for the ceremony officially unveiling their apron. It will be on display there for three months, after which, Alwin said, "We're taking it back." It's permanent home is still a question, however. Tabbert wants it in an environmentally protected and secure environment. Hanging on a wall in Shepherdstown does not provide either, he said. "Silk is protein, and it will disintegrate," he said. Tabbert said the Mt. Nebo Masons should have a reproduction made to display in their lodge and put the real apron somewhere safe. "It's one of the things we're considering," Alwin said. 39

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http://themasonicsociety.com/

ISSUE #11 Out Now

A significant group of passionate Masons have joined together to create what is now the fastest growing research society in Freemasonry. Called simply The Masonic Society, we are brothers who have a deep and abiding desire to seek knowledge, explore history, discover symbolism, debate philosophies, and in short, who are at the forefront of charting a path for the future of Freemasonry. As a student of Freemasonry, you are invited to join with us in this exciting organization. 40

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A page out of history

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A page out of history

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A page out of history

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A page out of history

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖

Using Facebook to promote your Lodge Social Media has taken the world by storm the last couple of years and if you use it right you can use it to your GROUPS Lodge’s advantage and success.

EVENTS PLACES

Background Five years ago if you looked at the medium age of Facebook users you would see a strictly 20 something year old group. In fact, you would be ridiculed if you were a 30 year old found lurking about.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Those days are way over. Now you see anyone from 15 to 80 without a shrug of your shoulder. Having your grandfather ―friend‖ you might cramp your style but its almost expected now. So why am I talking about the age group of Facebook users? Because your Lodge brothers young and old are now one of the 500,000,000 members and the other 499,999,500 are potential new Masons!!! Going forward I might use ―FB‖ in place of Facebook for ease.

Some Facebook stats:        

More than 500 million active users 50% of our active users log on to Facebook in any given day Average user has 130 friends People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook There are over 900 million objects that people interact with (pages, groups, events and community pages) Average user is connected to 80 community pages, groups and events Average user creates 90 pieces of content each month More than 30 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) shared each month.

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 45)

Functions: Profiles, Groups, Places It might be a good idea to explain what each one means and it differs from one another * Profiles A Profile is your individual page. This is where you give your status updates, chat with your friends and co-workers and ask for Farmville help from your neighbors. They are by default an open book where all can see what you say (always a good idea not to say anything you wouldn’t want your boss to see).

* Groups A group is where multiple people congregate together in a separate section outside of the profile setting . It can be closed to the public except some details explaining who you are and what you do or wide open for the public. The groups page includes Wall (general overview), Info (group details), Discussion (threaded topics), Photos, Video, and Events (calendar). Many celebrities, business, and organizations use these pages to spread the word about their activities or to keep in touch with their followers.

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 46)

My Lodges Group page

Places Places always you to ―check-in‖ somewhere and it will appear on your page so all your friends can see where you are. This allows your friends to meet up with you or to find you if allowed. Common uses are for restaurants, bars, events. This is found only on mobile devices.

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 47)

How to use FB to your advantage As I mentioned before with hundreds of million users on board using Facebook for publicity is extremely easy to do to reach so many people quickly. 1) Internal Communication/ Member Retention Internal communication refers to information you want to share with your Lodge brothers only. Start out by making a group for your Lodge and send out invites to all the brethren who are using FB. A simple mention in your tressleboard to tell everyone who isn't a member yet can be helpful to get them to join the fun. Keeping contact with your fellow brethren all month long not just during the one or two meetings makes for a healthy vibrant Lodge. FB gives you tools to use that would be expensive or difficult to maintain on a website. Use the Events tab to put in your meetings, practices, special events..etc and it will appear on the members main page that day as a reminder. Send out invites asking if they plan on attending so you can plan the meals or supplies better. We have a guest speaker coming in and I used an event to make sure we had an extra special showing of brothers for that meeting. Post pictures and videos of the brothers having a good time as a memory and reminder of fellowship. It will keep them coming back for more. 2) External Communication/ Lodge & Membership Awareness This is where FB really can help you find new members. All it takes is some self promotion and continuity. How many times has someone asked you to tell them about the Freemasons? It’s because they heard something about them or maybe saw a TV show on the History Channel. Why can’t they see you mention something about it on your status? Isn’t that as effective or perhaps even more so because it’s coming from someone they personally know.

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 48)

Almost every time I post something about my Lodge it solicits a response and that makes other people chime in. When a status has multiple responses the likelihood of another friend reading it greatly approves and so does the positivity about that subject. If I see an interesting article I will share it on my page. Even if no one responds, people have the opportunity to see and read it. If we have an installation, degree, picnic, or another even there are 10 pictures posted that night for all to see how much fun we have. It’s easy to create an album to categorize the photos. Recently, Facebook has implemented the ―Places‖ function. When I get to Lodge I check-in and say what the meeting is (Regular Communication, Degree...ect). Using the Places or Status I always mention whenever I’m going to a meeting. If any Lodge brother who is at the meeting and is also on FB you can ―tag‖ them so your status appears on their page so all their friends can see where they are (ask for permission first). The consistency with this will pay off as soon as one of your friends asks how to get a petition If your Lodge is having a special night use the ―Events‖ tab and ―create an event‖. First this will add it to their own page as a reminder but it also acts as a way to let all the other Lodges know how much your doing. This can give them ideas to follow suit. Do this for blood drives, C.H.I.P.S programs, all you can eat pancake breakfast, beefsteak dinners… Once again, make sure you check off the RSVP box so you know who’s coming.

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 49)

Benefits 1) Costs As a non-profit organization money is tight and hard to come by. Masons should be using our funds to help out our community as needed. While I think a website is very crucial to a Lodge’s exposure in the town it can be costly. Using Facebook as a compliment to your website will double your outreach and help keep costs down. 2) Privacy While Facebook is a very open platform, it gives you the option to have a closed group for select members only. Perfect for an organization that wants to talk behind ―walls‖. Group names will show up in Google searches making your even more noticeable. 3) Simple to use No programming is necessary at all. Unlike website building, all you need to do with FB is click a couple buttons and have the time to add to it. 4) Mobility With Smartphone technology you can instantaneously update your status wherever and whenever you want. Use your phones built in camera to take pictures and upload them right away to your profile page.

Conclusion While there are other options, like Twitter for example, Facebook has proven to be the frontrunner for getting together with other people on the net who want to share more than just 140 character messages. Now that I gave you some ideas, take some time to see how others are using this medium. Don’t overload your friends with constant hourly updates, that might turn them off. Pace yourself but be on top of it if you want to remain on their minds. I would love to hear from you on whether your Lodge has a page and any success you’ve seen from using FB—Cory (Continued on page 51)

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Cover – ―Using Facebook to promote your Lodge ‖ (Continued from page 50)

INTRODUCING THE NEW “TWT MAG” FAN PAGE ON FACEBOOK

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Short Talk Bulletin

WELL INFORMED BRETHREN March 1941 In the Charge of the first degree of Freemasonry as printed in the manual in many Grand Jurisdictions is the phrase "At your leisure hours, that you may improve in Masonic knowledge, you are to converse with wellinformed brethren, who will always be as ready to give, as you will be ready to receive, instruction." Taking this seriously a candidate requested information after receiving his third degree; "What is a cable tow, and how long is it? What is the difference between a cowan and an eavesdropper? Tell me what a hecatomb is. What is the difference between ample form and due form, and what is a pilaster?' Not a brother in Lodge could answer all the questions! Here are the answers to forty common questions. Perhaps they will be of use to others than initiates: Allegory. "Freemasonry is a system of morality, veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols."Allegory is an extended simile; metaphors is an abbreviated simile. Allegory is a parable, fable, fiction. It tells its story as if true, leaving the hearer to discover that it is fiction and from the discovery, learn the lesson. The fictitious character of the allegory is not deceptive; the fiction is used to teach just as the Great Teacher used parables to instruct. Ample form; due form; form; designate the particular variety of ritual used. Ample form refers to what is done by a Grand Master or the Grand Lodge. Due form, or form as "The Lodge opened in due form "refers to a correct manner, all that is necessary, appropriate, usual, required by law or ancient usage. Due and ancient form; due form; form; used in different Jurisdictions, means the same. Artificer. Differs from mechanic, workman, craftsman, in that the artificer uses skill and art combined; the sculptor is an artificer, the bricklayer an artisan. Tubal Cain, worker in brass and iron, was an artisan; Hiram was an artificer. Ashlar. A building stone. They are "rough" and "perfect" in a Masonic Lodge. the "rough" stone being but partially cut, while the "perfect ashlar" is truly squared. Cable tow. Probably from the German "Kable tau." Originally the term was "cable rope." Symbolically, like the umbilical cord which attaches infant to mother, it attaches the initiate to his Lodge. It is removed as soon as the spiritual bond of the obligation takes the place of physical restraint. The Baltimore Masonic Convention of 1 843 defined the length of the cable tow as "the scope of a brother's reasonable ability." Half a mile might be beyond the length of a cable tow for a lame man and a hundred miles within its length for one with a car and a good road. Calendar. Masonic Calendars differ from civil calendars. Four thousand years are added to civil dates to (Continued on page 53)

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get Masonic dates; thus, this is the year 5941, A.L.-standing for Anno Lucis. (After Light). Each Rite of Freemasonry-Royal Arch, Royal and Select Masters, Knights Templar, Scottish Rite, has its own Calendar. Caviling. Frivolous argument; raising hypercritical objections; asserting untruths to gain an end. Those who cavil attempt to persuade by means they know are not true; those who argue may present what they believe to be facts. The man who argues may be wholly sincere. He who cavils is not. Chapiter. Often confused with Chapter. Chapiter is the capital of a pillar. Chapter is a division, usually of a book or treatise. In the church the Chapter is the body of the clergy connected with a cathedral. In Freemasonry the Chapter is a body of Masons, usually of the Royal Arch or the Scottish Rite. Circumambulation. Walking around a central object, as an Altar. The Rite of Circumambulation was practiced by the most ancient sun worshipers. Masonic circumambulation is from East to West by way of the South, an imitation of the apparent course of the sun in this hemisphere. Anciently circumambulation from East to West by way of the North was symbolic of death. Originally such reversed circumambulation was used in Freemasonry but "ritual tinkers" and well intentioned but ignorant Custodians of the, Work have here and there sanctioned reverse circumambulation in Masonic degrees with no significance beyond that of convenience. Clandestine. That Mason or Masonry who or which is not recognized, without authority. Often used carelessly as a synonym for irregular. A clandestine Mason is one made in a clandestine Lodge; one not holden under a regular Grand Lodge. An irregular Mason may be one raised in a regular Lodge without compliance with Masonic law; as on a Sunday, without due notice, without waiting statutory time between degrees and lacking a dispensation, etc. Irregularity can be ", healed". The only way a clandestine Mason can become a real Mason is by application, investigation, ballot and initiation, passing and raising in a regular Lodge. Clothed. A Mason is properly clothed when wearing a white apron and gloves. By common consent, gloves are usually omitted except at funerals and corner-stone layings. A candidate is properly clothed when prepared according to ritual and law. Confer. Used advisedly for the giving of degrees. The dictionary definition is "to grant a gift or benefitbestow powers or honors." A degree is a gift, a benefit, a power, an honor. Degrees cannot be bought. Initiation fees help pay the overhead costs which all must share of Temple, Grand Lodge, necessary Masonic expenses. A man receives the degrees as a bestowal; he does not purchase or receive them as a right. Congregate. Primarily, to congregate is to bring together in a crowd, to assemble. Secondarily, to congregate is to focus, to concentrate. Brethren waiting for Lodge to open in the primary sense are actually congregated. In the Masonic sense the Master "congregates the Lodge" when he raps brethren to attention, when the officers are clothed and seated, the door closed and the ceremony of opening begins. Cowan. Is not synonymous with eavesdropper (see below.) The Cowan, (old Scotch term, obsolete except in Freemasonry) is an uninstructed Mason; a Mason without the word; a self taught workman who builds walls without mortar; an amateur stonecutter and setter. In modern times a Cowan is an Apprentice or Fellowcraft who attempts to sit in a Masters' Lodge. (Continued on page 54)

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Dimit. (also spelled demit). Paper which gives permission to leave the Lodge as a member and seek a new Masonic home; writ certifying that all dues and assessments are paid, no charges preferred or about to be preferred, that the holder is in good standing. The dimit is a Masonic right of any Mason in good standing who complies with the laws (differing in different Jurisdictions) regarding the holding or deposit of the dimit. In some jurisdictions a 'letter of transfer" is issued in place of a dimit, which keeps the holder a member of his Lodge until he is elected a member of another Lodge; such letters are usually for a three month period. Discalceation. The Rite of Discalceation is very old; plucking off the shoe was testimony in ancient Israel. Apparently it came from the thought that when making a covenant, a man who removed his shoe could not easily run away. When "a man plucked off his shoe and gave it to his neighbor" (see Ruth) he put in his neighbor's hands his method of escape, thus assuring that he was honest in his testimony or covenant. Dotage. Does not refer to any specified number of years, as does nonage (see below) but to mental condition. A man may be in his dotage at fifty and in full possession of his faculties at ninety. Dotage is that age at which a man is senile, regardless of his years. Due examination. The word "due" here refers to the manner, not the matter of the examination. The necessary preliminaries, proper caution, the regulations of the Grand Lodge being properly observed, all enter into "due examination." (See Strict trial, below). Due form. (see Ample form, above). Due guard. Mackey states: "A mode of recognition, which derives its name from its object, which is to duly guard the person using it." Some students believe it comes from the French expression "Dieu Garde"God guard. Its proper use in a Lodge is a constant reminder of the obligation, the penalties for infraction, the necessity of Masonic duty. Edict. A proclamation of authority. Between meetings of Grand Lodge, the Grand Master has all the authority of that body. A Grand Master's edict has the force of the law until Grand Lodge passes upon it; in some Grand Jurisdictions the Grand Lodge does not pass upon the edict and it stands until repealed by Grand Master or Grand Iodge. Eavesdropper. Not to be confused with cowan, although the two are usually mentioned together. The eavesdropper tries to hear what is private; he is the man who listens at keyholes or conceals himself in a room where Masonic work is being done. The word comes from a time in England when the eaves of thatched roofs were raised above the walls for ventilation. Climbing up the wall to listen through the opening the spy on privacy received the droppings from the eaves-hence "eavesdropper". In modern times the Masonic eavesdropper is the imposter,. the profane who attempts to pass himself off as a Mason when he is not. Freeborn. Masonically used in the old Roman sense of being born without slave ancestry. Probably no human being alive has not some slave ancestor. In twenty generations, five hundred years, every man has had nearly two million, two hundred thousand ancestors; carry it back a thousand, two thousand years and the ancestors exceed the population of the earth. In the Masonic sense, Freeborn means without traceable slave ancestry. (Continued on page 55)

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Hecatomb. A hundred head of cattle. Used in the lecture regarding Pythagoras; as he was a vegetarian and poor it seems unlikely that he would possess cattle; certainly not a hundred head. As his philosophy reverenced life, it is less likely that he would have killed a hundred cattle. The expression is intended to emphasize his pleasure in the "erection" of the Forty-Seventh problem of Euclid. Holden. Ancient form of the word "held." It is good Masonic language to speak of a Lodge as "holden" under its Grand Lodge, or of the Feast of St. John as "holden" on St. john's Day in winter. Hoodwink. Commonly used to denote deception, to delude. Masonically it denotes covering, concealing. Supposedly it comes from the days of falconry, when the birds were hooded to keep them quiet until let loose after prey. On being brought into the daylight, the birds winked-as indeed a man does after taking off a bandage long over the eyes. From this, the expression came to mean a covering for the eyes. Indicating deception is an obvious analogy to the ease with which a blind person may be fooled. Jurisdiction. The territory and the Craft within it over which a Grand Lodge is sovereign. The Jurisdiction of Massachusetts, the Jurisdiction of Washington, means not only those States but all the Masons of Massachusetts in China, Chile, the Canal Zone, the Masons of Washington and Alaska. The word also means the territorial boundaries from within which a Lodge may accept petitions. Just and legally or lawfully. Just-complete in all its parts-refers to a Lodge having the necessary furniture and the required number of brethren to open and transact business. Legally or lawfully constituted is a Lodge opened and at work under the laws of its Grand Lodge and its own by-laws. A Master who assembled the constitutional number of brethren - and opened a Lodge without notifying all local members of a special meeting would not have a "legally or lawfully constituted Lodge." Libertine. In modern usage a sexually profligate man. Masonically it goes back to the days when the word meant a free thinker in matters of religion; hence the Masonic expression "irreligious libertine". The Libertines were also a sect of the sixteenth century who held that as all men came from God, man could not sin; therefore, profligacy was not sin. Doubtless from this use of the word came the modern definition "rake". Masonically it connotes non-conformity to religious beliefs. Nonage. Under the age of manhood; universally in this country, twenty-one years for a male. No boy can be made a Mason; in almost all Jurisdictions he must have passed his nonage before he can apply for Freemasonry, on the theory that a boy is yet under the control of his parents; only a man can ask for Freemasonry "of his own free will and accord." Pilaster. A right-angled columnar projection; a square engaged pillar. Is not a synonym for column. Profane. Masonically does not refer to blasphemy, but to non-membership. A profane is one without the Temple, not initiated; from the Latin pro, without, and fanum, Temple. The "profane world" then, is the non-Masonic world. Purge. Means neither destruction of life or results of strong medicine. Masonically, to "purge the Lodge" means only to ascertain by proper Masonic means if all present are Masons and entitled to sit within the tiled doors. (Continued on page 56)

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Rite. A solemn ceremony performed in a prescribed manner. Masonically it means not only the form of degrees, but in a larger sense, the whole system; as the York, Rite, the Scottish Rite. The word also refers to small parts of larger ceremonies, as the Rite of Discalceation (see above) the Rite of Destitution; in the Scottish Rite, the Rite of Lustration. Strict trial. Refers to the matter, not the manner of an examination. A trial is strict when it satisfies a committee that the one being examined is what he purports to be. Summonses. Commands issued by a Master to his members to appear at a special meeting, or as a witness in a Masonic trial; commands issued by the Grand Master to appear before him or Grand Lodge. Tenet. Any truth held to be self -evident; differs from doctrine as truth differs from theory. Truth demonstrates that the circle cannot be squared. According to theory it should be possible. The tenet is believed without proof; theories demand proof. Tesselated. Mosaic, composed of small cubes of varicolored stone, marble or other hard material, inlaid to form designs. Not to be confused with Tressel or Tarsel, old names for tracing board. Vouching, Avouching. The process of informing another that a third is a Master Mason. Cannot legally be done except in the presence of three; the avoucher, the one vouched to, the person vouched for. No avouchment by telephone, letter or messenger is Masonically legal. Properly to vouch for any one, the avoucher must have legal Masonic knowledge, i. e., either have sat in Lodge with the person vouched for, have had him vouched for by one who has, or be present at a properly appointed Masonic committee for examination. Zodiac. Not to be confused with all the heavens. An imaginary belt of about eight degrees on either side of the ecliptic, containing the larger plants and the "signs of the zodiac" or principal constellations. Masonic Service Association of North America ##

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Phoenixmasonry Museum The Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/ The Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library is an ever growing collection of Masonic History second to none. One of the most fascinating sections is their artifact & collections page. I thought it would be fun to put a spotlight of some of the items that caught me eye.

This Month:

Coins & Medallions

George Washington Bicentennial Medal 1732 - 1932

Remarkable Portrait Engraving on 1884 Morgan

This beautiful medallion commemorates the 200th Anniversary of the birth of George Washington. He is pictured as Worshipful Master at the Altar of Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 holding his gavel of authority. It measures 32mm in diameter (25.4mm = 1 inch). It was issued as a commemorative piece for the dedication of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial in 1932.

Pictured above is an 1884 Morgan Silver Dollar. he distinguished looking gentleman was the Grand Master of New York in 1885, J. Edward Simmons (GM 1883-1885). He distinguished looking gentleman was the Grand Master of New York in 1885, J. Edward Simmons (GM 1883-1885).

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"Great Seal of the United States" Paperweight / Medallion

This medallion pictures the early version (1887) Great Seal of the United States. It is wonderfully minted and signed by its designer "Barber". It measures 3 inches in diameter and is heavy enough to be a suitable paperweight.

Robert Burns Lodge No. 464 Medallion

This wonderful bronze medallion commemorates Robert Burns Lodge No. 464 in Harrisburg, Pa. It was minted during the 1988-89 tenure of Grand Master Arthur J. Kurtz of Pennsylvania. It measures 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

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1997 Grand Master of Florida Paperweight/Medallion

This is the most beautiful of medallions and was presented in 1997 by Florida Grand Master Most Worshipful Samuel E. Cowan to raise money for his Grand Master's Charity. It pictures the working tools of Freemasonry along with the seven liberal arts and sciences. The banner under the Square and Compasses list the three great tenants of Freemasonry; "Faith, Hope and Charity." Grand Master Cowan's theme for 1997 was "Quality Before Quantity". This medallion measures a whopping 3 inches in diameter and heavy enough to be suitable for a good paperweight.

Benjamin Franklin - Freemason - Medallion

This beautiful bronze medallion commemorates an early Grand Master of Pennsylvania Benjamin Franklin. It was minted in 1978-79 during the tenure of Grand Master Walter Pierre Wells also of Pennsylvania. It celebrates Franklin as a Freemason - Philosopher - Scientist Statesman - Diplomat and bears a likeness of his signature. A high quality medallion that measures 1 1/2 inches in diameter

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Masonic Video’s

I CT RA

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This month’s feature film is titled “York Rite Freemasonry”

Run time– 9 minutes

Click on the picture below to start the video

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Video also will be posted on our Facebook fan page

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The Independent Masonic Magazine – Bringing the best information to Mason’s worldwide.

Keep on Traveling

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The Working Tools March 2011