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82nd

Ute Mountain Roundup

June 7-9

Montezuma County Fairgrounds • Cortez

2012 • A complimentary publication of the Cortez Journal


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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

It’s rodeo time

As his saddle bronc puts on the brakes, Chase Bennett could have used a seat belt as he went flying forward last year at the Ute Mountain Rodeo.

Journal/ Sam Green

By Kimberly Benedict Cortez Journal Spurs, chaps and cowboy hats will fill Bob Banks Memorial Arena once again as the Montezuma County Fairgrounds plays host to the 82nd annual Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo. The rodeo, the largest in the Four Corners region, will run Thursday, June 7, through Saturday, June 9, and will provide

the staging grounds for hundreds of cowboys and cowgirls to prove their mettle against some of the toughest bulls and broncs in the business. Outgoing Ute Mountain Roundup chairman Slim McWilliams, of Lewis, said more than 400 participants are expected at the event, including some of the top members of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. “This is a sanctioned rodeo,”

McWilliams said. “It is really the only professional event we have in Cortez so we are seeing professional cowboys come and be part of this rodeo.” Among the impressive cowboys who will be showing off their skills at the rodeo will be Jake Barnes, of Scottsdale, Ariz. Barnes, 52, is a seventime PRCA team roper world champion who rarely misses the local rodeo since his sister lives in Cortez. Local son

Cody Samora will also be at the event. The 23-year-old bull rider has found plenty of success in his sport and currently sits at No. 3 in the world standings. “It is just great to be able to come to our local stadium and see guys like Barnes and Samora ride,” McWilliams said. “Theses guys are the best in the world and we get to have a piece of that. It is exciting.”

See Rodeo on Page 7


Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Back row from left to right are: Emma Reim Jr. Queen Attendant

Brittany Featherman Queen Attendant

Bailey Schurr Queen

Cammie Maxwell Jr. Queen

Front row: Jessa Springer Princess Photo courtesy of R.D. Prideaux Photography


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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Local bull rider ranked No. 3 in the world By Slim McWilliams Special to the Journal Northwest of Cortez there is an area that locals know as “Samoraville.” In 1929, Jose Samora and his family traded land they owned in “Pagosa Junction” to other family members for the land here. They have lived there and raised their families there ever since. Jose’s great grandson, Cody Samora, is now making a name for himself as a professional bull rider. Cody, son of Peggy and Tommy Samora, is currently the No. 3 ranked bull rider in the world standings of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. “There was never any doubt in Cody’s mind about what he wanted to be,” said Cody’s mother. “He started out by tying one stuffed animal astride another and pretending it was riding a bull. By age 2, Cody would wrap a cord around a sleeping bag that he placed behind a door of their entertainment center. He

See rider on Page 10

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Terms of the Rodeo Trade Box: in a timed event, the area a horse and rider back into Left (or Right) Delivery: many bucking animals prebefore they make a roping run. fer to stand in the chute facing a particular direction, so they can leave the chute in the direction they prefer. Breaking the barrier: in the timed events, if the rider leaves the box too soon — failing to give the animal enough of Mark out: in the bareback and saddle bronc riding, a a head start — he is assessed a 10-second penalty. cowboy’s feet must be above the point of the horse’s shoulders when the horse makes its first move out of the chute — if so, he Bulldogger: a steer wrestler. “marked the horse out,” but if not, he “missed him out” and the ride is disqualified. Calf roper: a tie-down roper. Penalty: in timed events, common penalties include 10 Chute: a pen that holds an animal safely in position. seconds for breaking the barrier and, in team roping, five seconds for a one-leg catch. Covering: staying on for at least the minimum time, eight seconds; “He covered all three broncs.” Pickup men: two mounted cowboys who help riders dismount, release the bucking horse’s soft flank strap, and escort Drop: in roughstock events, the way an animal — especially bucking horses and bulls to the exit gate after a ride. a bull — may lower his front end suddenly; in timed events, the way a calf or steer may lower its head to avoid a catch. Piggin’ string: in tie-down roping, the small rope used to tie a calf’s legs together. Gold Card member, life member: A 10-year, duespaying member of the PRCA who has reached his 50th birthRank: an adjective of praise and respect used to describe day, or a 20-year dues-paying member of any age. especially challenging roughstock. Hazer: in steer wrestling, a cowboy who helps the contesRoughstock: the bucking horses and bulls used for baretant be making sure the steer runs straight. back riding, saddle bronc riding and bull riding.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

rodeo

Rodeo is part of the history here From Page 2 Along with bull riding and team roping, the rodeo will feature bareback riding, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping and barrel racing. The rodeo also provides an opportunity to watch toprate stock. Honeycutt Rodeo Stock Contractors have provided stock for the Ute Mountain Roundup since 1960, and promise excellent, competitive stock for another year. The local rodeo, which is the longest-standing rodeo in the region, is built on a proud tradition of cowboying in the region, which is one of the reasons for the continued success of the event, according to McWilliams. Each year, more than 1,300 people a night pack the grand-

stands at the fairgrounds to witness the power of the animals and the skill of the riders, and the crowd that attends rodeos in Cortez tends to be more educated about the sport than at some of the larger rodeos in the United States. “Rodeo is part of the history here and it has continued to today,” McWilliams said. “One of the reasons we have success with this event is because rodeo is a part of this community. We have high school rodeo teams. We have kids here who ride, and adults who ride. You have people in the stands at this rodeo that know more about this than at rodeos in the big cities. It makes it more fun.” One way to honor that history and tradition, McWilliams said, it to make the rodeo a family-friendly event with a

community feel. The atmosphere is lively with carnival rides and games provided by Frazier Shows, a community chuckwagon supper at Cortez City Park on Friday, and a Main Street Parade sponsored by the Cortez Chamber of Commerce on Saturday. Local youths are also invited to test their rodeo skills in the mutton bustin’ and stick horse competition each night at the rodeo. Sign-ups for the children’s events will take place from 9 to noon on Saturday, June 2, at IFA Country Store, 10501 U.S. Highway 491. Space for participants is limited. Saturday night, everyone from the announcer to the riders to the stock handlers will acknowledge the fight against breast cancer with a “Tough Enough to Wear Pink,” theme.

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Entertainment each night will be provided by PRCA barrel man Troy Lerwill, “The Wild Child,” six-time PRCA comedy act of the year. Ticket prices for Thursday family night four-packs are $25 and $27 at the gate. Advanced two-packs are $16 and $17 at the gate. Single tickets are $9 in advance and $10 at the gate. Parking is $5 for all three days. Friday and Saturday ticket prices are $12 for an adult in advance and $14 at the gate. Children’s tickets (12 and under) are $8 in advance and $9 at the gate. Advance tickets can be bought online at www.utemountainroundup.org, or purchased at Citizens State Bank, 77 W. Main St and the Walmart branch, First National Bank, 2258 E. Main St, at IFA Country Store, 10501 Highway 491.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Officials train for judging Standing or crouching along the edges of the arenas may not be the most glamorous way to make a living, but rodeo’s credibility hinges on the jobs of the Wrangler Pro Officials. When it comes down to a call that can mean thousands of dollars and maybe a world title, contestants depend on the fair and consistent judging from rodeo’s “referees.” In fact, it was the absence of such fair and objective officiating that helped provoke a major protest in 1936 that led to the formation of the Cowboy’s Turtle Association, the organization that eventually evolved into the PRCA. Since 1981, the Wrangler Pro Officials Program has provided the PRCA with competent and accurate judging. All PRCA events must be officiated by trained judges. The

six full-time Wrangler Pro Officials and more than 150 reserve officials must undergo rigorous training before they are permitted to judge PRCAsanctioned events. PRCA-sanctioned rodeos use a minimum of two officials who are responsible for scoring and timing each roughstock ride and flagging each timed-event run. The judges also watch for infractions such as broken barriers, illegal head catches and roping only one leg in team roping, knocking over barrels in barrel racing and failing to “mark out” a horse in bareback and saddle bronc riding. Rodeo judges also inspect all rodeo livestock prior to every performance to make sure it is healthy and fit for competition. Most officials are former rodeo competitors.

Courtesy photo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

rider

Cody has had his share of injuries From Page 4 would then get down on his “bull,” swing the “gate” open, and come out riding. When asked what he wanted to be, his reply was always “I’m going to be a bull rider” Cody started out on live animals riding sheep in “mutton busting” events, then calves and steers. By the time he was 11. Cody was Samora riding bulls. He competed in junior rodeos and in the Colorado High School Rodeo Association. He was Reserve Champion at the state high school finals as a senior at Montezuma-Cortez High School. Cody graduated from MCHS in 2007 and accepted a rodeo scholarship to Howard College in Big Spring, Texas. In 2008, he took out his Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) permit, which is a required first step toward full membership as a Professional Rodeo Cowboy. He “filled his permit,” meaning he won enough as a contes-

tant to earn his card as a fullfledged member, in less than two years. Cody broke his wrist in 2009 while competing in National Intercollegiate Rodeo Finals, and was hampered by injuries for the past two years. In 2011, Cody won enough money to qualify for the Mountain States Circuit Finals that year. He also qualified to enter the big winter rodeos this year; the National Western Stock Show in Denver and the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo. His first big success this year was in Denver in January. Cody placed fifth in the first round, winning $931. In the second go-around he didn’t score high enough to place, but he made up for it by scoring 90 points (a perfect ride is 100) on a bull named Alligator Roll, winning $1,650. His total score on three bulls was 252, which placed him second in the average and earned him an additional $4,688 for a personal best of $7,269 at a single rodeo. But personal records are made to be broken. The PRCA Extreme Bulls event in Fort Worth starts before the Stock Show in Denver is finished. Cody was entered and in the first round he ended up in a four-way tie for second place,

winning $1,308. He bucked off his second bull, but his score in round one was high enough for him to place fifth in the average for an additional $714. But Cody was only getting started. The Fort Worth Stock Show starts the day after the Extreme Bulls competition. Cody rode his first bull in Fort Worth but was out of the money. Then he tied for first place in the second goaround with an 85 point ride, winning $4,311 and placed third in the finals winning $900 with another 85 point ride. This put him second in the average for an additional $6,155 in winnings. His total winnings for that rodeo were $11,366 and his total for the two Fort Worth events was $13,388! Cody came up with another 90 point ride and a big win at the La Fiesta de los Vaqueros in February. That ride put him in first place for the go around and first in the average for total winnings of $6,552 at that rodeo. Cody started down the road in his pearl white 1996 Cadillac Sedan de Ville Convertible, but he has recently traded in his Caddy for a Dodge diesel with a camper. He usually travels with at least one other contestant as

they crisscross the west from rodeo to rodeo. The PRCA rodeo season runs from Oct. 1 of one year through Sept. 30 of the following year and then the National Finals Rodeo is held in the first two weeks of December. With rodeo contestants competing literally year around, the mental and physical demands are substantial. Cody has had his share of injuries, but he has his sights set on making the National Finals in December 2012. Winning the Ute Mountain Roundup is on his bucket list, but this year his fans in Montezuma County will be rooting for him to win in two back-to-back PRCA Extreme Bulls events followed by the rodeo in Sisters, Ore., which are all same week as the Ute Mountain Roundup this year. The Ute Mountain Roundup will be June 7, 8 and 9 in the Bob Banks Memorial Arena at the Montezuma County Fairgrounds. Tickets are available at First National Bank, Citizens State Bank and IFA Country Store, or you can buy them online at utemountainroundup.com. Thanks to the PRCA and the ProRodeo Sports News, both of whom contributed to this article.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Livestock welfare The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) is deeply committed to the proper care and treatment of the livestock used in rodeo. As an association, the PRCA has: • Established rules and regulations governing livestock welfare, created an animal welfare committee to assist in the association’s efforts to ensure proper care of livestock, • Conducts regular livestock welfare surveys to identify successful practices and areas for improvement, • Educates its membership regarding best practices for livestock handling, • Monitors compliance with its animal welfare rules and regulations, • Educates the public and elected officials about the care provided to rodeo livestock, • Networks with other organizations about best livestock practices and policies, • Employs a director of livestock welfare to coordinate all efforts relating to care and handling of livestock at PRCA-sanctioned events, and

• Employs a livestock welfare field representative to proactively work with rodeo committees, stock contractors, contestants and veterinarians to ensure all livestock at PRCA rodeo are being handled properly.

See livestock on Page 25

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Comic relief from ‘The Wild Child’ Troy Lerwill loves to entertain the rodeo crowd By Kimberly Benedict Cortez Journal

Courtesy

Troy Lerwill loves to make people smile. He also loves the rush of adrenaline that accompanies what most would consider high-risk activities. Those two characteristics combined make Lerwill the perfect entertainer for the rodeo scene. Six-time Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Comedy Act of the Year, Lerwill, also known as “The Wild Child,” will bring his unique brand of rodeo clown to the Ute Mountain Roundup, June 7-9 at the Montezuma County Fairgrounds. This is the second year in a row Lerwill’s act will be featured at the rodeo, and organizers are thrilled to have landed one of the most sought after acts on the rodeo circuit.

photo

See wild on Page 14

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

wild

Troy was never really a horse person From Page 13 “We are so excited to have Troy back this year,” said Ute Mountain Roundup chairman Slim McWilliams. “His act is just so different that what you see anywhere else and he is just a born entertainer. People loved him last year and it will be great to have him in the Lerwill arena again this year.” Born into a rodeo family, his father is still a team roper and his mother was a rodeo queen, Lerwill grew up around the broncs and bulls of the rodeo world. But it wasn’t until he sat on his

first motorcycle, purchased against his father’s wishes, that he found his natural ability in the ring. “I really never was a horse person,” Lerwill said. “When I got my motorcycle I found my natural talent.” Lerwill’s talents on the dirt bike have led him around the world, entraining rodeo audiences with his daring feats, jumping trucks and trailers and teams of Percheron’s pulling wagons. The stunts are breathtaking in their audacity and bring a new dimension to a sport based on staying in the saddle as long as possible. “If just feels natural to me,” Lerwill said. “When I get on the bike it is really like walking. It is where I belong.” In addition to the entertainment he provides on his

bike, Lerwill takes on one of the most important roles in the rodeo, that of barrel man. In the ring, it is the barrel man’s responsibility to protect fallen cowboys, drawing the bull’s attention from the rider to the clown. A padded barrel offers protection from the fierce horns of the bull, though often not without drama. “It can get pretty rough in the barrel,” Lerwill said. “I was in Ft. Worth, (Texas), this year and we did 34 shows in 18 days and the bulls just wore me out. My arms were black and blue from hanging on inside that barrel.” However, a role that is hard to fathom for most observers is simply run of the mill for Lerwill. “It is really just like another day at the office,” Lerwill said.

“It is like someone else sitting in a cubical all day. You learn the art of the barrel and you know what and how to handle situations. I really wouldn’t trade it for anything.” Lerwill’s entire goal for rodeo performances is to lighten the load of those in attendance, and provide moments of light-hearted fun. “I really enjoy being able to do something where all ages and all walks of life and come and I can make them smile and take away some of the worries and negative things in their lives, if just for a little while,” Lerwill said. “It is just such a great atmosphere at rodeos and if I am able to make people laugh and smile and maybe when they are still talking about it days later, that is the biggest thing for me.”


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de la Cruz, Cesar ..........................................Tucson, AZ Abplanalp, R.D. ......................................... Plain City, UT Anderson, Jade ............................................ Payson, UT Anding, Steven .............................................Crossroads, Angland, Cody .................................... New South Wales Antone, Jacob ................................................. Chinle, AZ Arballo, Pepe ............................................... Wittman, AZ Avaritte, Celia .................................................Austin, CO Baeza, Tyler ......................................................Mesquite Baize, Bobby .............................................. Anthony, NM Banister, Shea ...............................................Clovis , NM Barhite, Justin ............................................. Penrose, CO Barnes, Chance Gunter .......................... Flora Vista, NM Barnes, Jake .............................................Scottsdale, AZ Barta, Wacey ................................................Phoenix, AZ Bates Jr., Ben ........................................Mexican Springs Bates Jr., Michael ..................................Mexican Springs Bates, Brandon ......................................Mexican Springs Baze, Lea ..................................................... Midland, TX Begay, Craig ................................................ Rough Rock Begay, Derrick ..............................................Seba Dalkai Begay, Marvin .............................................. Rough Rock Begay, Roy ......................................... Window Rock, AZ Biebelle, Brandon ................................ San Lorenzo, NM Blackwell, Noah ...............................................Parlin, CO Blasdel, Jason .................................................Fruita, CO Blasingame, Ty ............................................. Ramah, CO Booco, Jake ................................................. Hayden, CO Boore, Allen ......................................................Axtell, UT Boore, Ben ........................................................Axtell, UT Borrego, J.W. ....................................... Pueblo West, CO Bounds, Hank ............................................. Palisade, CO Bounds, Travis ................................. Grand Junction, CO Broce, Kyle .................................................La Junta, CO Brockman, Seth ...................................... Wheatland, WY Cadwallader, Jenna ......................................Phoenix, AZ Campbell, Lynn ................................................Loma, CO Cannon, Clint .................................................. Waller, TX Carper, Kelli .....................................................Jamul, CA Carroll, Shay ...............................................La Junta, CO Carter, Larry ....................................................Nucla, CO Castillo, Estevan .......................................... Veguita, NM Chambliss, Denise ............................... Albuquerque, NM Champion, Richie ................................... The Woodlands Clark, Jesse ................................................ Portales, NM Claunch, Bill ...........................................Monte Vista, CO Claunch, Bucky .............................................La Jara, CO Colletti, Casey ...............................................Pueblo, CO Cooper, Cole ................................... Grand Junction, CO Cretti, Justin ................................................. Bennett, CO Crook, Brad ..................................................... Nephi, UT Culpepper, Brad ............................................Poulan, GA Curtin, Dan ...............................................Show Low, AZ Curtis, K.C. ................................................... Monroe, UT Curtis, Tyrel .................................................... Salina, UT Dale, Falena .................................................. Cortez, CO Delp, Zale .................................................. Wittmann, AZ Duhon, Trevor ...............................................Phoenix, AZ Dumas, Dalton L ....................................................... Lehi Dutton, Kyle ..................................................Mesilla Park Eagles, Kris .......................................................... Center Edwards, Branden ........................... Grand Junction, CO Edwards, Kent ................................. Grand Junction, CO

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Edwards, Shank ............................................ Tatum, NM Egusquiza Jr., Manny ................................. Madison, GA Elder, Forrest ............................................ Athens, Texas Ellis, Justin Andrew ..................................... Thermopolis Farias, Robby ...................................................... Kilauea Faulkner, Shane ................................................ Los Ojos Fillmore, Josh .............................................Florence, CO Fillmore, Lance ..................................................... Pueblo Finch, Jessica .............................................. Springerville Freeland, Jake ............................................. Palmyra, UT Frost, Daylan ............................................Show Low, AZ Frost, Joe ............................................................Randlett Garza, Matt .................................................... Las Cruces Gerard, Cody ...................................................Eagle, CO Getzwiller, Tyler ........................................Scottsdale, AZ Gibson, Shon ...................................................Taylor, AZ Glasses, Shandell ................................. Many Farms, AZ Glover, Cody ................................................. Marana, AZ Gonzales, Brandon ................................... Seboyeta, NM Gosney, Nikkie .........................................Scottsdale, AZ Gosney, Ross ..................................................... Bayfield Granger, Terrance ............................................Tuba City Gravatt, Clay .............................................. Riverside, CA Green, Jared .........................................................Socoro Griffin, Jake ...........................................................Powell Gurney, Seth ...........................................Lost Creek, UT Haddock-Seng, Shyann ............................Bosque Famrs Hagler, Lee ............................................ Fort Lupton, CO Hall, Seth ............................................. Albuquerque, NM Hardwick, Seth ........................................... Laramie, WY Harrison, Cody ...............................................Tucson, AZ Hawkes, Gerald ..................................... Las Cruces, NM Hawkins II, Buddy ..................................... Columbus, KS Hensley, Hayley ........................................... Dolores, CO Hofstetter, Jerrad ........................................ Portales, NM Holcomb, Clint ...............................................Tucson, AZ Holgate, Raynell ............................................... Page, AZ Honeyfield, Kendra ...................................Bosque Farms Honeyfield, Kyle ........................................Bosque Farms Houston, Tanner ............................................Tucson, AZ Hupp, Joshua .......................................... Cheyenne, WY Irwin, Shiann .............................................Bosque Farms Jackson, Cole Keith ......................................Animas, NM Jackson, John ............................................... Ignacio, CO James Jr, J.B. .............................................. Bennett, CO James, Teri ....................................................Payson, AZ Jankee, Carrie ...........................................Litchfield Park Jarvis, Jake ................................................... Payson, UT Jessop, Britt .................................................. Calhan, CO Jodie, Hollis ..................................................Crown Point Johnson, Darnell ............................................Pueblo, CO Johnson, Tom Bill .........................................Kirkland, AZ Jones, Blair ............................................Monte Vista, CO Kaye, Delvecchio ...................................Round Rock, AZ Kenner, Rebecca .................................... Flora Vista, NM Kibbe, J.D. .................................................. Portales, NM Kieckhefer, Rick ........................................... Prescott, AZ Kieckhefer, Sarah ........................................ Prescott, AZ Kiehne, Chance ........................................... Springerville Kiehne, Lee ..................................................Lemitar, NM

See CONTESTANTS on Page 18


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Ute MoUntain RoUndUp Rodeo contestants

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Kirby, Chauncey ......................................... Ft. McDowell Kirchenschlager, Tate ..................................... Yuma, CO Koontz, Kory ................................................... Sudan, TX Kreutzer, Wade ............................................ La Veta, CO Lance, Steven ............................................ Lafayette, CO Larsen, Kane ................................................... Inglis, MB Larson, Jake .................................................Garland, UT Lewis, Levi .............................................Apache Junction Lewis, Lori ....................................................Waddell, AZ Lewis, Travis ................................................ Lubbock, TX Linaweaver, Blaine .......................................... Irvine, CA Lindsay, Jeff .................................................Phoenix, AZ Lindsey, Rankin ................................................. Hillsboro Love, Trenton .......................................... Cheyenne, WY Loveless, Jesse ........................................ Santaquin, UT Loya, Justin .............................................Los Lunas, NM Maez, Kyle ..................................................... Center, CO Mahoney, Casey .....................................College Station, Mann, McKay ..................................................Lindon, UT Marsh, Bobby ...............................................Cont. Divide Marshall, Beau ..................................... Truth or Consequ Martin, Chad .............................................Scottsdale, AZ Martin, Rhodi ................................................Folsom, NM Massengill, Chase ...........................Santa Fe, NM SW Masters, Wade ........................................... Durango, CO McAllister, Jordan .......................................... Gering, NE McConnel, Wesley ...................................Bloomfield, NM McConnell, Anne Marie ........................... Morristown, AZ McFadden, Puke ......................................... Wiggins, CO McIntyre, Dean .......................................Wickenburg, AZ McKinley, J.D. ........................................ Las Cruces, NM McWhorter, Lisa .......................................Bosque Farms Menge, Brady ..................................................Fruita, CO Mirabal, JoDan ..............................................Grants, NM Morgan, C.L. ..................................................... Avondale Morrow, Kyle ........................................................Midland Morse, Dusty ............................................. Randolph, UT Mosher, Wade ................................................. Hugo, CO Mullins, Camo ...............................................Phoenix, AZ Muncy, Taos .................................................Corona, NM Norell, Clay K ................................................... Delta, CO Odenbach, Shane ................................................ Francis Padilla, Damian ...........................................Rio Rico, AZ Paintin, Kyle ..................................................... Yeso, NM Pedro, Riley ..................................................... Nunn, CO Petersen, Rick ................................................Clifton, CO Petersen, Trudy ..............................................Clifton, CO Peterson, Cody .......................................................Yoder Poulsen, Pistol Pete ........................................ Nephi, UT Pratt, Cody .....................................................Pueblo, CO Pratt, Dustin ...................................................Pueblo, CO Price, Justin ................................................. La Veta, CO Pullara, Nick ...............................................Fountain, CO Riggs, Chris .................................................Flagstaff, AZ Robinson, Kelson ........................................... Salina, UT Rogers, Erich ............................................... Round Rock Rogers, Will ...................................................Laveen, AZ Roundy, Brian ..............................................Richfield, UT Runyan, Cody .......................................... Silver City, NM

183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244

Runyan, Tyson ........................................ Silver City, NM Saiz, Kooper ........................................... Flora Vista, NM Salvo, Johnny ........................................... Horse Springs Saulsberry, Todd ....................................Magdalena, NM Sayer, Kyon ................................................ Glendale, AZ Scales, Tyler ............................................Severance, CO Scarbrough, Justin John ....................... Chino Valley, AZ Schnaufer, Tyler ............................................Pueblo, CO Schulze, Kim ................................................... Elbert, CO Sherwood, Matt ....................................................... Pima Shiner, Chenae ......................................... Roosevelt, UT Shiozawa, Matt .......................................... Chubbuck, ID Siddoway, Colby ............................................Hooper, UT Siggins, Lane ...................................Ruidoso Downs, NC Simpson, Marisa .............................................. Eagar, AZ Singletary, Nate ........................................... Surprise, AZ Slotterback, Zach ......................................... Wiggins, CO Smith, Cindy .................................................. Hobbs, NM Smith, Kyle ...........................................Crown Point, NM Smith, Taylor ................................................. Hobbs, NM Smith, Tommy ............................................... Hobbs, NM Snare, Justin Wayne .......................................Florissant, Sterkel, Jacob ............................................. Brighton, CO Sterkel, Talon ............................................. Brighton, CO Stirling, Shawn ........................................Wickenburg, AZ Suazo, Jessie .............................................. Bayfield, CO Sullivan, Brian ............................................... Peralta, NM Sumpter, Wade .............................................. Fowler, CO Sweeney, Sami Jo ................................. Fort Lupton, CO Teller, Cullen ..............................................Maricopa, AZ Terry, Shelby ........................................... Bear River, UT Thomas, Leander ...........................................Steamboat Thomas, Tadd ..........................................St George, UT Tittel, Jay Wesley ..........................................Pueblo, CO Tittel, Ryon ....................................................Pueblo, CO Tonozzi, Garrett ...............................................Fruita, CO Triplett, Darrell ..........................................Waterflow, NM Truman, Brock ......................................... Huntington, UT Truman, Justin ......................................... Huntington, UT Tryon, Brent ......................................... Queen Creek, AZ Tsinigine, Aaron ................................................Tuba City Turner, Jay .................................................... Aurora, CO Walker, Luke ................................................... Como, CO Walker, Mary ....................................................Ennis, TX Wall, Kimmie ............................................. Roosevelt, UT Walraven, Kelsi ................................................. Datil, NM Walraven, Rodee ................................... Las Cruces, NM Walraven, Wacey ..................................................... Datil Watts, T.J. ........................................................Eads, CO Watts, Trice ......................................................Eads, CO Wells, Andrew Wayde .................................. Gillette, WY White, Nick .................................................... Preston, ID Wilkerson, Byron .................................................Duncan Williams, Austin ....................................... Granstville, UT Wilson, Cole ...........................................Lake Shore, UT Wilson, TW ..................................................... Limon, CO Winn, Brian ............................................... Annabella, UT Winn, Brock ....................................................Ferron, UT Winn, Kenneth ................................................. Nephi, UT Wood Gates, Terri ................................ West Jordan, UT Wood, Norma ....................................... West Jordan, UT Younger, Pake ................................. Grand Junction, CO


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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Are you tough?

“Tough Enough To Wear Pink” was founded in 2004 by Terry Wheatley, a breast cancer survivor, rodeo wife, mom and a California entrepreneur who owns her own wine company. Five years ago, Terry inspired the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (NFR) contestants to don pink at the professional rodeo’s biggest event to bring attention to the need for breast cancer, early detection and a cure. The cowboys and cowgirls created a sensation when they galloped into the championship arena ablaze in pink. As the industry showed a groundswell of support, rodeo fans began asking how they could put on TETWP events at their own hometown rodeos. TETWP was created to support grassroots fundraising, one rodeo at a time by Terry Wheatley along with Karl Stressman, former director of special events for Wrangler and now current Commissioner of the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PRCA).

events to do this greatly needed community service. The club has raised over $25,000 and paid for over 60 mammograms. Wranglers 4-H Club’s members range in age from 8 to 18, and you know that all of these kids have been affected by cancer in one form or another. Most of them know someone, here in our community, who has had or is battling breast cancer. It is a tragic disease and we are dedicated to making a difference in Cortez women’s lives.

Wranglers 4-H Club, since 2007, has been raising money for women of Cortez to receive the proper screening needed to prevent Breast Cancer. The club has sold T-shirts, snow cones, breast cancer ribbons among other fundraising

Wranglers 4-H Club appreciates the founders of this great awareness campaign and YOU the rodeo fan for all of your continued support of “Tough Enough To Wear Pink” and Wranglers 4-H Club!

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

The Events SADDLE BRONC RIDING Rodeo’s “classic” event, saddle bronc riding, has roots that run deep in the history of the Old West. Ranch hands would often gather and compete among themselves to see who could display the best style while riding untrained horses. It was from this early competition that today’s event was born. Each rider must begin his ride with his feet over the bronc’s shoulders to give the horse the advantage. A rider who synchronizes his spurring action with the animal’s bucking efforts will receive a high score. Other factors considered in the scoring are the cowboy’s con-

trol throughout the ride, the length of his spurring stroke and how hard the horse bucks. Disqualification results if, prior to the buzzer which sounds after eight seconds, the rider touches the animal, himself or his equipment with his free hand; if either foot slips out of a stirrup; if he drops the bronc rein; he fails to have his feet in the proper “mark out” position at the beginning of the ride; or he bucks off. BAREBACK RIDING Bareback riding, developed in the rodeo arena many years ago, consistently produces some of the wildest action in the sport. A bareback rider begins his ride with his feet placed above the break of the horse’s shoulder. If the

cowboy’s feet are not in the correct position when the horse hits the ground on its first jump out of the chute, the cowboy has failed to “mark out” the horse properly and is disqualified. Throughout the eight second ride, the cowboy must grasp the rigging (a handhold made of leather and rawhide) with only one hand. A rider is disqualified if he touches his equipment, himself or the animal with his free hand or bucks off. The rider is judged on his control during the ride and on his spurring technique. The score also is based on the rider’s “exposure” to the strength of the horse. In addition, the horse’s performance accounts for half the potential score. BULL RIDING Unlike the other roughstock contestants, bull riders are not required to spur. No won-

See events on Page 21

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

e vents

Events continued From Page 20 der. It’s usually impressive enough just to remain seated for eight seconds on an animal that may weigh more than a ton and is as quick as he is big. Upper body control and strong legs are essential to riding bulls. The rider tries to remain forward, or “over his hand,” at all times. Leaning back could cause him to be whipped forward when the bull bucks. Judges watch for good body position and other factors, including use of the free arm and spurring action. Although not required, spurring will add points to a rider’s score. As in all the riding events, half of the score in bull riding is determined by the contestant’s performance and the other half is based on the animal’s efforts. A bull rider will be disqualified for touching the animal, himself or his equipment with his free hand or bucking off . TIE DOWN ROPING Like bronc riding, tie down roping is an event born on the ranches of the Old

West. Sick calves were roped and tied down for medical treatment. Today, success in tie down roping depends largely on the teamwork between a cowboy and his horse. After the calf is given a head start, horse and rider give chase. The contestant ropes the calf, then dismounts and runs to the animal. After catching and flanking the calf, the cowboy ties any three of the animal’s legs together using a “pigging string” he carries in his teeth until needed. If the calf is not standing when the contestant reaches it, the cowboy must allow the animal to stand. When the cowboy completes his tie, he throws his hands in the air as a signal to the judge. He then remounts and allows the rope to become

slack. The run is declared invalid if the calf kicks free within six seconds. As with any timed event, a 10-second penalty is added if the roper does not allow the calf the proper head start — this is known as “breaking the barrier.”

STEER WRESTLING Wrestling a steer requires more than brute strength. The successful steer wrestler, or bulldogger, is strong, to be sure,

See events on Page 23

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Jake Barnes Events: Team Roping (Headers) Born: 4/4/1959 Huntsville, Texas Joined PRCA: 1980 PRCA Career Earnings: $2,102,535.00 World Titles Won: 7 (1985-89, 1992, 1994) WNFR Qualifications: 25 (1980-95, 1998-99, 2002-05, 2007-08, 2011)

Barnes

Current Residence: Scottsdale, Ariz. Professional 2012 Highlights n Won the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo, with Jhett Johnson n Won the Parada del Sol (Scottsdale, Ariz.), with Paul Eaves n Won the Lakeside (Calif.) Rodeo, with Tyler Getzwller Career Highlights n 2011 (Partner Walt Woodard): Placed in four rounds of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo; won the 115th Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days Rodeo; the Rooftop Rodeo (Estes Park, Colo.); the Red Desert Roundup (Rock Springs, Wyo.); co-champion at the Larimer County Fair & Rodeo (Loveland, Colo.); won the Pioneer Days Rodeo (Clovis, N.M.), with Anthony Calmelat; the Ramona (Calif.) Rodeo, with Anthony Calmelat; co-champion at the Roots ‘N’ Boots ProRodeo (Queen Creek, Ariz.), with Anthony Calmelat n 2010: Finished 116th in the world standings with $7,857 n 2009: Finished 71st in the world standings with $12,337 n 2008: Placed third in Rounds 5 and 10 of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, with Clay O’Brien Cooper.

Finished 14th in the world standings with earnings of $86,272. Won the Flagstaff (Ariz.) Pine Country Pro Rodeo, with Kyon Sayer n 2007: (Partner Clay O’Brien Cooper) Won the Clark County Fair and Rodeo (Logandale, Nev.); the Canyonlands PRCA Rodeo (Moab, Utah); the Snake River Stampede (Nampa, Idaho) and the Puyallup (Wash.) Pro Rodeo (second round, Tour Playoffs) n 2006: Won the Puyallup (Wash.) Pro Rodeo and the Eastern Oregon Livestock Show & Rodeo (Union), with Dean Tuftin n 2005: (Partner Kory Koontz) Won the Summer Tour Finale (Omaha, Neb.); the Dodge City (Kan.) Roundup Rodeo and California Rodeo Salinas; qualified for the Tour Championships after finishing third at the Winter Tour Finale. Won the Tour Round at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo. Co-champion at the Ellensburg (Wash.) Rodeo. During the fifth performance of the 2005 Wrangler NFR, he suffered a right thumb amputation that occurred at the top joint of the thumb, forcing him out of the competition; doctors were unable to reattach his thumb. Won $17,921

through Round 5 at the Wrangler NFR; finished eighth in the world standings for the year with $106,017 n 2004: (Partner Allen Bach) Finished fifth in the world with $134,685 and was 14th in the Wrangler NFR average, picking up $60,779; co-champion at La Fiesta de los Vaqueros (Tucson, Ariz.); semifinalist at the Winter Tour Finale (Las Vegas, Nev.); finished second at the Summer Tour Finale (Omaha, Neb.) and third at the Tour Championships (Dallas). Won Round 3 at the Wrangler NFR with a time of 5.5 seconds and tied for the win in Round 10 with a time of 4.0 n 2003: Won the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo (Colorado Springs, Colo.); the Puyallup (Wash.) Rodeo and the Pendleton (Ore.) Round-up, with partner Boogie Ray; was high-point winner on the Summer Tour. Won Round 6 of the Wrangler NFR with a 3.9-second run and Round 9 with a 4.2, with partner Allen Bach; finished second in the average and earned $81,079 in Las Vegas. Finished second in the world standings with $144,768 n 2002: (Partner Clay O’Brien Cooper) Won the Prescott (Ariz.) Frontier Days Rodeo and the Cheyenne (Wyo.)

Frontier Days Rodeo n 1999: (Partner Clay O’Brien Cooper) Won the National Western Stock Show & Rodeo (Denver) n 1998: (Partner John Paul Lucero) Won the Turquoise Circuit Finals Rodeo n 1994: (Partner Clay O’Brien Cooper) Set National Finals Rodeo team roping average record with a time of 59.1 seconds on 10 head n Set PRCA record with Clay O’Brien Cooper for most team roping world titles with seven, which was surpassed in 2004 n Won Wrangler NFR team roping average championship with Clay O’Brien Cooper in 1985, 1994 and 2007 n Won Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo (Pocatello, Idaho) with Clay O’Brien Cooper in 1987, 1989, and 1995-96 n Won Turquoise Circuit yearend title in 1985-89, 1992, 1994-95 and 1997 Awards Horse Heza Gray Moon “Barney” finished second in the PRCA/AQHA Team Roping Head Horse of the Year race, 2004. Barnes was honored with the inaugural Legends of ProRodeo Award given by the PRCA and Athletes in Action, 2006


23

Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

e vents

Skill, strength, timing From Page 21 but he also understands the principles of leverage. The steer wrestler on horseback starts behind a barrier, and begins his chase after the steer has been given a head start. If the bulldogger leaves too soon and breaks the barrier, he receives a 10 second penalty. The steer wrestler is assisted by a hazer, another cowboy on horseback tasked with keeping the steer running in a straight line. When the bulldogger’s horse pulls even with the steer, he eases down the right side of the horse and reaches for the steer’s horns. After grasping the horns, he digs his heels into the dirt. As the steer slows, the cowboy turns the animal, lifts up on its right horn and pushes down with his left hand in an effort to tip the steer over. After the catch, the steer wrestler must either bring the steer to a stop or change the direction of the animal’s body before the throw or is disqualified. The clock stops when the steer is on his side with all four legs pointing the same direction.

June 7th, 8th & 9th A Weekend Filled With Events

manages one hind foot, the team receives a five-second penalty. Time is stopped when both cowboys’ horses are facing each other. BARREL RACING

TEAM ROPING Team roping is unique in that two cowboys work together for a shared time. The first cowboy, known as the “header,” ropes the steer either by the horns, around the neck, or “half head,” which is one horn and the neck. After this catch is made, the header wraps his rope around the saddle horn, commonly known as dallying, and turns the steer in a wide arc to the left. The second cowboy is known as the “heeler.” He trails along beside the steer until the header turns the steer, then moves in behind the steer and attempts to rope the back feet. If he only

In barrel racing, the contestant and her horse enter the arena at full speed. As they start the pattern, the horse and rider trigger an electronic eye that starts the clock. Then the racer rides a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels positioned in the arena, and sprints back out of the arena, tripping the eye and stopping the clock as she leaves. The contestant can touch or even move the barrels, but receives a five second penalty for each barrel that is overturned. With the margin of victory measured in hundredths of seconds, knocking over one barrel spells disaster.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Bucked off

Stick horses throw two of their riders off as the children race last year at the Ute Mountain Roundup.

Journal/ Sam Green

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Livestock

What to know about the PRCA From Page 11 PRCA Rules The PRCA first began implementing rules to ensure proper care and treatment of rodeo livestock in 1947. Today, the PRCA enforces 60 rules that govern the care and treatment of the livestock participating in PRCA-sanctioned events ­— the strongest rules employed by any rodeo association. The PRCA continuously encourages all rodeo associations to adopt similar rules. The rules are enforced by professional judges who attend each PRCAsanctioned rodeo performance. Punishments range from fines to disqualification. Specific rules protecting the animals govern use of the cattle prod, require a conveyance to transport injured animals, require the facilities to be free of hazards to the animals and require the animals to be inspected before each performance; any animals not in top condition will not perform. Additional rules cover how long an animal can remain in transit before a rest, how many times an animal can perform in a specified period of time, and require that a veterinarian be on site for all rodeo performances and sections of slack at all PRCA-sanctioned rodeos. PRCA rules are recognized as the most comprehensive in the rodeo industry and its rules are used as a model for most other rodeo associations. Survey update Among the most valuable tools used by the PRCA Livestock Welfare department are the periodic surveys it receives from independent veterinarians who are on site at PRCA rodeos, assisting the local rodeo committees with all livestock-related issues while serving as the rodeo veterinarians. Many of these veterinar-

ians also assist the PRCA by participating in the survey, reporting to the PRCA the condition of the rodeo livestock and facilities. These surveys have continued to show a very low rate of injury to the livestock. The latest survey, conducted at PRCA rodeos during the 2008 season, included 148 rodeo performances and 55 sections of slack. Veterinarians reported 27 injuries to animals during 55,656 exposures, calculating to a rate of injury of .00046 – less than five hundredths of one percent. Outreach The PRCA leads the way in creating animal welfare procedures, rules and standards for American rodeo, and regularly networks with other rodeo associations to encourage them to adopt similar standards, which most have done. The PRCA has successfully built up its animal welfare program to serve as a model to all rodeo associations. All PRCA sanctioned rodeos have rules governing the care and handling of the livestock, and the PRCA regularly meets with other associations to network about rules, handling policies and other livestock welfare initiatives. Reaching beyond the rodeo world to other agricultural and animal use organizations is another important component of the PRCA livestock welfare program. By networking with other organizations, the PRCA shares its program and learns from other organizations about successful livestock welfare policies and procedures. Education The PRCA livestock welfare education program works with not only the PRCA membership, but also the public, media, fans and elected officials. The internal education

program focuses on informing members about animal health issues and advances in livestock welfare practices. Externally, the program distributes factual information regarding the care and handling of rodeo livestock and answers inquiries from any interested people or organizations. What you should know about the PRCA and rodeo livestock: The average bucking horse or bucking bull works less than five minutes a year in the arena. Rodeo livestock have long and healthy lives: Many of today’s top bucking horses are 20 years old, and many bulls are active buckers at 15 years of age. Veterinarians attribute these long, healthy life spans to good care, quality feed and adequate exercise. PRCA rules prohibit the use of sharpened spurs and other implements that could harm an animal. Stock contractors invest a great deal of money in their breeding and purchase programs; many contractors pay up to five figures for a toprated bucking animal. Naturally, they are very motivated to take care of these investments. Both bulls and horses have natural bucking tendencies; many do so while playing together in pastures, just as horses naturally race each other. What makes an animal a candidate for rodeo livestock is the absolute determination to buck if something is on its back — often an inherited characteristic, which breeders now work carefully to bring out in “Born to Buck” programs. PRCA rules require flank straps to be lined with fleece in the flank area (similar to a human waist); flank straps are tightened just enough to

encourage the animal to buck behind itself instead of hopping around the arena. Overtightening would result in the animal’s refusal to move at all, much less buck. Flank straps do not contact an animal’s genitals. The PRCA prohibits the use of electric prods in competition except for horses known to be “chute stallers” — that is, they sometimes hesitate coming out of the chute and then start bucking in the chute, creating risk to themselves and possibly to contestants. The prod may be used in this case if, and only if, the judge, stock contractor and contestant agree that it is necessary to protect the safety of the animal and/or contestant. What a veterinarian says: Rodeo committees and stock contractors do an excellent job of caring for their livestock and keeping them in top condition, says Doug Corey, DVM. “Many of these animals become a part of (the stock contractors’) families. In ProRodeo, I have never seen a malnourished animal or even one in need of changes in their feed program. While hauling, the contractors provide the best care available. Most stock contractors have large ranches where the stock can exercise and run when they are not at rodeos. Being turned out (to pasture) is important for muscle development, stamina and their attitude. Animals that are not in top condition and receiving the best of care will not perform to the top of their ability. And committees start preparing the arena long before the rodeo begins, making sure that the ground is level and free of rocks, and that fences have no sharp protrusions that could injure an animal. I’m proud of the PRCA’s commitment to animal welfare.”


26

Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Cloverleaf corner

Local cowgirl Falena Dale rounds a barrel last year at the Ute Mountain Roundup.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

A brief history of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Legend has it that rodeo was born on July 4, 1869, when two groups of cowboys from neighboring ranches met in Deer Trail, Colo., to settle an argument over who was the best at performing everyday ranching tasks. That competition is considered to be the first rodeo which evolved into rodeo as we know it today. Today’s professional rodeo cowboy is a bit different from his 1800s predecessor, but the ideals and showmanship and hard work are still valued by today’s competitors. A cowboy’s standing in the rodeo community is still dependent on his skill with a rope or his ability to ride a bucking animal. The cowboy code still dictates that a cowboy ought to help his fellow competitors, even though they might be competing for the same paycheck.

e Court

While some things have changed since the last century, most of the changes have been for the better.

to sy Pho

Now the cowboy travels much of the time in custom-made rigs or flies from one rodeo to another either by commercial airline or charter plane. Marketing and business acumen have become as crucial as roping, wrestling or riding skills. Cowboys are competing for more money then ever before. Even if a PRCA member doesn’t have the inclination to spend more than 200 days a year on the road in search of a berth in the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — the sport’s championship — he can participate in one of many rodeos close to home each year. Over 600 are held throughout the country year-round, from small town venues to arenas in Las Vegas. The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) was created almost by accident in 1936 when a group of cowboys walked out of a rodeo at the Boston Gardens to protest the actions of rodeo promoter W.T. Johnson, who refused to add the cowboys’ entry fees to the rodeo’s total purse. Johnson finally gave in to the cowboys’ demands, and the successful “strike’’ led to the formation of the Cowboys’ Turtle Association. The cowboys chose that name because, while they were slow to organize, when push finally came to shove, they weren’t afraid to stick their necks out to get what they wanted.

s Courte

y Photo

In 1945, the Turtles changed their name to the Rodeo Cowboys Association, and in 1975, the organization became the PRCA. The PRCA staff consists of about 70 full-time employees, but grows to nearly 100 during the peak rodeo season. The PRCA headquarters, established in 1979 in Colorado Springs also houses the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame and Museum of the American Cowboy.


30

Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

Yates takes the reins Rob Yates is the new Chairman of the Board of Ute Mountain Roundup, Inc. Yates took over the position from outgoing Chair Slim McWilliams at the end of 2011. “This rodeo isn’t about any one person,” said McWilliams. “Our committee and our board both have very competent and dedicated people serving on them. We will strengthen and deepen our leadership through this change.” Rob Yates has strong ties to rodeo and ranch life. He was born to Bob and Sherri Yates. Bob was working on the Seven Lakes ranch near Grants, N.M., at the time. The family moved to the Ball Ranch for a time, but because the family lived to far from the nearest town, Rob wasn’t able to attend kindergarten. Putting family first, Bob gave up working on ranches and took a job in the oil field at Hospah so that Rob could attend first grade in Crown Point, which was only 35 miles of dirt road from their home. The family then decided to move to Montezuma County where Rob started second grade at Lewis-Arriola Elementary School. Rob graduated from MCHS in 1985, and attended Northeastern Junior College in Sterling on a rodeo scholarship. After deciding college wasn’t for him, Rob joined the U.S. Army and after completing his training, he served the balance of his three years as a helicopter crew chief. Shortly after returning home in

1991, Rob married Tonya Duran. The two had known each other since fourth grade and have now been married over 20 years. Their son, Bradey, was born in 1993 and graduated from MCHS in 2011. Rob has worked for Williams Gas and its affiliate, Northwest Pipeline, for 17 years. He is currently the Area Chief of Construction for Williams Gas, responsible for pipeline construction throughout the western U.S. Rob won his first rodeo event when he was 4 years old. He started roping as soon as he was big enough to hold a rope. His parents would haul him and his brother, Ellis Yates, to Wee Waddie rodeos in Farmington, N.M. Rob competed in the Colorado High School Rodeo Association rodeos all four years of high school and currently holds a USTRC card and competes as a team roper when time allows. Both Rob and his dad have been part of Ute Mountain Roundup, Inc. since its inception in 2005. In December of that year the American Legion sold their rodeo grounds and was looking for another organization to carry on the 74 year tradition of the Ute Mountain Roundup rodeo. Ute Mountain Roundup, Inc. was formed in December of 2005 as a non-profit corporation for that purpose and the rodeo was moved to the Bob Banks Memorial Arena at the Montezuma County Fairgrounds for the 75th Ute Mountain Roundup rodeo in

CORTEZ MILLING CO. 309 N. Market, Cortez, CO

565-3119 Welcomes You!

2006. The corporation borrowed the money to put on that rodeo, but was able to pay the loan off in two C years. Since then, any R ob and T ourtesy Photo money raised in exonya Yat es cess of the cost of putting grandstand, on the rodeo has been reinvest- a n d sufficient pered into the fairgrounds to im- manent horse stalls to equip the prove the facility. Ute Mountain facility to host larger events, such Roundup, Inc. has replaced the as concerts, horse shows and cutroping chute, added a top rail to ting competitions that will bring the arena fence to make it safer, a large number of visitors to the contributed to the new elevated area. grandstands, rebuilt the anThis year’s Ute Mountain nouncer’s stand, added addition- Roundup rodeo will be June 7, al livestock pens and a catwalk to 8 and 9 at 7 p.m. Tickets can the announcer’s stand and buck- be purchased at First National ing chutes. This year, a new fence Bank, IFA Country Store or Citiwas added around the back of the zens State Bank. They can also be grandstands. purchased online at utemounFuture plans call for a roof over tainroundup.org. You save at the grandstand, restrooms and least $1 per ticket by buying in concessions stands beneath the advance.

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo & Carnival *Midway by FRAZIER SHOWS*

Carnival Hours: Wednesday 6/6/12 * 5pm-11pm $20 ($17 w/coupon) *Ride All Rides Wristband* 5pm-9pm Thursday 6/7/12 * 5pm-11pm Friday 6/8/12 * 5pm-12am Saturday 6/9/12 * 5pm-12am Sunday 6/10/12 * 1pm-6pm $20 ($17 w/coupon) *Ride All Rides Wristband* 1pm-5pm

SAVE $3

Unlimited Rides $17

Wed 5-9 pm & Sun 1-5 pm

Present this coupon and $17 per person at midway coupon box and receive a wristband that entitles wearer to ride unlimited rides on above dates and times only. Coupon good for 1 ride session only. One coupon per person.


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Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo

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2012 Rodeo Guide