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CORTEZ CROSBY Yale University School of Architecture Master of Architecture candidate, 2013


CORTEZ CROSBY 11 University Place, New Haven, CT 06511 phone: 864.706.1208 e-mail: cortezcrosby@gmail.com


CONTENTS GRADUATE WORK Interface

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Urban Soundbox

18

Fold.Unfold.Fold

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Musician’s Hostel

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Carve & Cast

36

Split House

40

Visualization 2

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Visualization 4

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Formal Analysis

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456 Orchard Street

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PROFESSIONAL WORK Pueblo County Judicial Center

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Bledsoe County Correctional Complex

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United States Courthouse: Billings, MT

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Graphic Design

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GRADUATE WORK Yale University School of Architecture New Haven, CT Master of Architecture candidate, 2013

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INTERFACE

COURSE: Architectural Design | DATE: Fall 2011 | CRITIC: Joel Sanders published in Retrospecta

Concept diagram

Formal studies

This project stemmed from two parallel interests. At the scale of the site, there was a desire to create a relationship between the existing fabric of the Brooklyn Navy Yards and the Kunsthalle in which both entities would benefit from the presence and activity of the other.

gallery

public

back of house

Within the building itself, there is an aim to create a world in which the traditional boundaries between public circulation, gallery space, and back of house program are blurred and, at times, completely dissolved. These relationships are formalized by a continuous ‘public surface’ that acts as an interface between these two worlds and organizes the circulation sequence.

gallery

back of house

public

belvedere Circulation & program gallery offices artists education cafe / media lounge lobby / multipurpose / shop

sculpture yard


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N SITE PLAN 1. sculpture yard 2. event plaza 3. public green 4. waterscape 5. restaurant 6. ferry ticketing 7. lobby / multipurpose / shop 8. gallery 9. cafe / media lounge

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Conceived of as an extension of the fabric of the Navy Yards, this surface first appears outside of the building as a hybrid public park and event space. It then flows into the Kunsthalle’s interior to create a series of platforms as it spirals upwards towards a public belvedere.


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PLANS & SECTION 1. gallery 2. artists’ studios 3. storage 4. education center 5. museum offices 6. lobby / multipurpose / shop 7. cafe / media lounge 8. belvedere 9. event plaza

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These platforms hold ‘open’ program such as lobby, multipurpose space, museum shop, media lounge and café. They also hold traditionally back-of-house program including the education center, artists’ studios, and museum offices. This organization encourages overlap and interaction between separate user groups.

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West elevation


Tectonic diagram

membrane

The ‘public surface’ is intersected by a ‘gallery volume’ which contains a series of stacked whitecube gallery spaces. This volume is wrapped by a glazed membrane that negotiates the boundary between formal gallery space and the ‘open’ program of the ‘public surface’. As the circulation sequence spirals upwards, it occupies the space between the gallery volume and the membrane.

gallery volume

roof

public surface

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 Flexible gallery spaces

Closed configuration

Configuration ‘A’

A series of operable panels in the membrane allow the galleries to operate in various configurations, ranging from ‘closed’ to ‘open’. The goal is to create a series of reconfigurable spaces that gives curators freedom to regulate degrees of publicity and privacy between galleries and other museum program. They can have orthodox white-cube spaces or not, depending on their needs.

Configuration ‘B’

Open configuration


Gallery volume intersected by circulation ramp

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View from media lounge into main gallery

This flexibility establishes a dynamic spatial and visual relationship between formal exhibit space and the surrounding ‘open’ program, allowing opportunities for the two constituents to blend into one another and for gallery space to bleed outside of its formal boundary.


Daylighting studies

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URBAN SOUNDBOX

COURSE: Architectural Design | DATE: Fall 2010 | CRITIC: Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen published in Retrospecta

Site Plan


PLANS 1. soundscape 2. courtyard 3. performance space 4. covered plaza 5. gallery 6. atrium 7. performance space (below)

Gallery level

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The project began with an interest in transforming musical performance from a primarily aural experience into one that is also visual and physical for both the performer and the viewer. Referencing musical notation, the project uses line and symbol to convey character, hierarchy and relationship. In addition, a 10’ spatial lattice into which architectural elements could be “transcribed” was introduced to organize this notation. A series of acoustic vessels at various scales are suspended within this lattice.

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Approach from soundscape

SECTION 1. soundscape 2. covered plaza 3. performance space 4. gallery 5. rehearsal space 6. offices 7. lobby / atrium

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The two primary vessels are indoor performance spaces that project outwards towards the city. They are enveloped by a perforated wrapper that negotiates their relationship to the context. At moments, this wrapper becomes operable through a series of louvers that allow occupants and performers to “tune” the building’s relationship to sound, light, and sight. Secondary acoustic vessels are embedded into the ground, resulting in a pedestrian ‘soundscape’ that extends beyond the existing walls of the tobacco warehouse.

Rehearsal room typologies

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Covered plaza

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Internal components of the soundbox

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SECTION 1. soundscape 2. covered plaza 3. performance space 4. gallery 5. rehearsal space 6. offices 7. lobby / atrium

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ocess]

UNFOLD

FOLD.UNFOLD.FOLD [process]

COURSE: Visualization 3 - Fabrication and Assembly | DATE: Spring 2011 | CRITICS: John Eberhart & Ben Pell in collaboration with Derek Brown, Tal Liu & Eric Gronstal Digital Weave, Lisa Iwamoto

published in Retrospecta

California : Stage Set for John Jaspere, AEDS/Ammar Eloueini

Digital Weave, Lisa Iwamoto

The initial interest that drove the development of the project was to create an installation that explored movement via human interaction and fabrication methods. The team started the exploration with a series of small-scale origami and tiling studies, developing the project into a field that acts as both fabric and as : Stage Set for John Jaspere, AEDS/Ammar Eloueini interactive mechanism. California : Stage Set for John Jaspere, AEDS/Ammar Eloueini

Material studies

California : Stage Set for John Jaspere, AEDS/Ammar Eloueini


System assembly diagram

[assembly]

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The design limitations were bracketed by two perimeters: the hybridization of the folding and tiling process and the mass production of only three distinct units. The team proposed to embed the unit-to-unit connection within the base corrugated cardboard tile itself. This allowed for the construction of a fabric that solved the tectonic issues of a hung unitized system and maintained a level of flexibility in the overall installation.

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MUSICIAN’S HOSTEL

Organizational Concepts

COURSE: Architectural Design | DATE: Spring 2011 | CRITIC: Trattie Davies

Site strategy

Site Concept (approx. 1/16” = 1’)


Organization Diagram Organization Diagram

Organizational Concepts

Organizational sections

gather dwell rehearse public rehearse

Site Concept (approx. 1/16” = 1’)

This project inserts a hostel for itinerant musicians into a narrow lot located in New Haven, Connecticut’s 9th Ward. Positioned adjacent to an existing public park, the 17’-wide site presented a challenge in accommodating the required program which includes multiple musical performance and rehearsal spaces, eight temporary dwelling units and various interior and exterior communal spaces.

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The design solution takes form as a series of nested surfaces that articulate at various scales to respond to human occupation. The first surfaces organize the primary program: the public zone, two rehearsal zones, a dwelling zone and a communal zone.


SECTION 1. communal space 2. terrace 3. dwelling unit 4. small rehearsal 5. covered passageway 6. performance space 7. large rehearsal

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PLANS 1. covered passageway 2. lobby 3. performance space 4. small rehearsal 5. storage 6. dwelling unit 7. communal space 8. terrace

Interior circulation

While these primary surfaces define a series of stacked spaces (in section), they simultaneously define two parallel bars (in plan). The northern bar contains program, which capitalizes on views of the park and maximizes natural daylight. The southern bar contains circulation and receives borrowed light from the first bar through the use of translucent internal partitions.

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store Store

work Work

eat Eat

sleep Sleep

Dwelling unit detail section


eat

sleep

A second set of surfaces defines a series of modules within the rehearsal and dwelling zones. Lastly, a third set of surfaces operates within each dwelling unit, enabling the units to transform from working to living spaces. Organized as a set of eight, the units can be occupied individually or opened up to create continuous suites, allowing for flexible room arrangements.

Dwelling Unit Section

(3/4” = 1’)

store Store

eat Eat

work Work

eat

Sleep sleep sleep

Dwelling unit detail plan

Dwelling Unit Detail

(3/4” = 1’)

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CARVE & CAST

COURSE: Visualization 3 - Fabrication and Assembly | DATE: Spring 2011 | CRITICS: John Eberhart & Ben Pell in collaboration with Derek Brown


Unit prototypes

Unit assembly diagram

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Cast unit

Casting mold - before


Visualization 3 provides an introduction to the key relationships that exist among methods of drawing, physical materials, technologies of construction and three-dimensional form making. The generation of form through both manual and digital methods is tested through material studies and technologies of fabrication.

Casting process

Casting mold - after

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SPLIT HOUSE

COURSE: Vlock Building Project | DATE: Spring 2011 | CRITICS: Adam Hopfner & Paul Brouard in collaboration with Christina Argyros, Linda Lee, Hao Li, Talitha Liu, Altair Peterson, Jordan Pierce, Teo Quintana, Amrita Raja, Aaron Schiller & Lexi Tsien-Shiang

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ORCHARD ST.

Orchard St.


Garden Street Access Two Floors Entryway Street Access Patio Sunlight Flexible Space Privacy Garden Two Floors Flexible Space

PLANS 1. owner’s unit 2. tenant’s unit 3. entry 4. kitchen 5. living / dining 6. bedroom 7. bath 8. deck 9. flex-space 10. sun porch

Sunlight Privacy

Storage

Storage

Entryway

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

Concept diagram

Split House investigates the desire for a sense of ownership held by both owner and tenant in a multi-family home. Elements that are characteristic of single-family homes include access to a yard, multilevel occupation, and varied volumes of space. Rather than simply scale down the owner’s unit to generate the tenant’s space, Split House creates two userspecific units that share a common envelope.

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Ground floor

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Second floor

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East elevation


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Owner living / dining space

OWNER LIVING + DINING


TENANT LIVING + DINING

TENANT FLEX SPACE + PATIO

7:50 AM

7:30 AM

The owner’s unit is designed to grow with the firsttime home buyer. It features a large, flexible living space which spills on to a backyard. A bedroom suite on the ground floor makes the house adaptable to changing family dynamics. A flex-space, designed to address the multitasking needs of today’s family, functions as laundry room, home office and study space. It engages the main living space below via a balcony.

Owner flex-space

OWNER ENTRY HALL

OWNER FLEX SPACE

OW

9:00 AM

1:00 PM

4:30 P

Tenant flex-space

TENANT LIVING + DINING

TENANT FLEX SPACE + PATIO

7:50 AM

7:30 AM

Section at owner flex-space SECTION A SCALE: 1/4” = 1’-0”

OWNER ENTRY HALL

OWNER FLEX SPACE

9:00 AM

1:00 PM

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OW

4:30


In turn, the tenant’s unit is afforded a range of comparable features, including an entry deck, access to the front lawn, a flex-space and a sun porch. Lastly, Split House employs a thickened parti-wall loaded with service program and storage spaces to provide each unit with the acoustic privacy associated with single-family residences.


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VISUALIZATION 2

COURSE: Visualization 2 - Form and Representation | DATE: Fall 2010 | CRITICS: Sunil Bald & Kent Bloomer

This course investigates drawing as a means of architectural communication and as a generative instrument of formal, spatial and tectonic discovery. Principles of two and three-dimensional geometry are extensively studied through a series of exercies that employ freehand and constructive techniques.


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VISUALIZATION 4

COURSE: Visualization 4 - Processing and Presentation | DATE: Summer 2011 | CRITICS: John Eberhart & George Knight


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FORMAL ANALYSIS

COURSE: Formal Analysis | DATE: Fall 2010 | CRITIC: Peter Eisenman

This course studies the object of architecture canonical buldings in the history of architecture - not through the lens of reaction or nostalgia but through a filter of contemporary thought. The emphasis is on learning how to see and to think about architecture.

Piranesi’s Campo Marzio


Borromini’s Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza and San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane

Cortez Crosby

Rainaldi’s Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria in Montesanto

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Zlotnicki. Christopher Parkinson. Benjamin Sachs. Daria Solomon.

456 ORCHARD STREET

COURSE: Vlock Building Project | DATE: Spring/Summer 2011 | CRITICS: Adam Hopfner in collaboration with YSOA Class of 2013 Project Manager & Summer Intern

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Since 1967, the Yale School of Architecture has offered its students the unique opportunity to design and build a structure as part of their graduate education. This year’s design brief called for a 2,500 sq. ft. 2-family home, including a 900 sq. ft. rental unit, to be built in a low-income neighborhood in New Haven, CT.

4. Owner Living Room, Rendering 5. Tenant Living/Dining, Rendering 6. Four Square Transformation 7. Diagram: Program follows roof skew.

Working with Neighborhood Housing Services, a local non-profit organization, the class of 2013 designed and built the home on a challengingly narrow lot. Construction began in May 2011 and continued until the home’s completion in August 2011.

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Exterior canopies

Along with fellow classmates Sarah Gill and Benjamin Sachs, I designed and produced fabrication drawings for the exterior stair which leads to the renter’s unit. We then assembled and installed the pre-cut and predrilled steel stringer and treads on site. I was also responsible for the design and detailing of the three exterior canopies which are located at the front and rear porches and the side renter’s entry. Stair tread construction detail

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PROFESSIONAL WORK DLR Group Orlando, FL Architectural Intern, 2007 - 2010

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PUEBLO COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER SCHEMATIC DESIGN

in collaboration with Michael LeBoeuf (Lead Designer), Chris Getz, and Mark Wunderlin of DLR Group

Chris Getz

PROJECT ROLES: Exterior elevation and massing development, Digital modeling and rendering, Schematic Design and Design Development package submittal, Presentation graphics

The design seeks to create an architecture that not only ties the building to its place in time, but also to the layers of history and culture associated with Pueblo. With this in mind, the design team delved into ideas of regional materiality, imagery, and culture. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Pueblo County Judicial Building will be approx. 171,000 sq. ft., with five stories above grade and a partial basement. Initially, the courthouse will house 14 completed courtrooms, with shell space for an additional two. The building will also house the Clerk of Courts, Court Records, the Probation department, Court Administration, Training and Operations offices, and 16 judges with their attendant clerks. SITE ORGANIZATION AND URBAN DESIGN With a north-south orientation, the building seeks to engage its context at a broad scale. This orientation seeks to attain two goals: firstly, to anchor the west end of the 5th St. axis, using the rotunda as a termination point, and secondly, to recognize a diagonal axis that cuts across the site. The latter, which is the remnant of a rail line, could potentially become a pedestrian walk, linking the courthouse site with a public plaza to the south-east.


Mark Wunderlin

MASSING The curved courts tower seeks to connect the building abstractly to the historic courthouse and public library, creating a “bracketing” of the Pueblo downtown area. The bent bar also reflects the termination of the 5th Street axis into the site. courts tower

The second component of the building is the plinth that grounds the courts tower. Extending from the east where the public entry is located, it moves under the tower and turns up on the west side to become a tower of judges’ chambers.

rotunda

chambers

public entry

entry plinth

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3

SPATIAL ORGANIZATION

5 2

A key organizational element of the interior spaces is an extension of the 5th Street axis. This axis extends into the rotunda, through the public elevators, and into the entry of the judicial chambers. This interior connection links the public and private realms on each floor and reinforces the building massing as an interior spatial experience. This axis also bisects the main public circulation, which runs the entire length of the courts tower.

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REFERENTIAL SPACES 3

The rotunda uses the kiva, a ceremonial space typical of most Pueblo Indian cultures, as a unique precedent. The design interprets this idea of outer enclosure and inner sanctum, suspending a wood-framed pavilion within a glass cylinder. The form of this structure is reminiscent of the coke ovens sprinkled throughout this region of the country.

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5 PLANS 1. entry 2. rotunda 3. elevator lobby 4. sallyport 5. judge’s chamber 6. jury assembly 7. first appearance center 8. clerk of courts 9. courtroom

Plans and section: Chris Getz, Mark Wunderlin

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Third floor

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East elevation

West elevation

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BLEDSOE COUNTY CORRECTIONAL COMPLEX SCHEMATIC DESIGN - CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION

in collaboration with Tim Gibson (Lead Designer), Moses Benson, and Jose Jordan of DLR Group PROJECT ROLES: Exterior elevation and massing development, Digital modeling and rendering, Schematic Design, Design Development & Construction Documentaion, Presentation graphics


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UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE: BILLINGS, MT DESIGN COMPETITION

in collaboration with Michael LeBoeuf (Lead Designer), Steve McKay, Mike Lindsey, Mark Parrish, and Margot van Swearingen of DLR Group PROJECT ROLES: Project coordinator, Exterior elevation and massing development, Site design, Digital modeling, Plan development and department layout, Exterior materials selection, Consultant liaison, and Presentation graphics

DE.PO.SI.TION

noun 1. The geological process whereby material is added to a landform. This is the process by which wind, water, or ice create a sediment deposit through the laying down of granular material that has been eroded and transported from another geographical location.

DEPOSITION While rooted in the principles of modern courthouse design and planning, the architectural language for this new courthouse is derived from the local context and geological conditions that are prevalent in and around Billings, Montana. Using geology as a catalyst allowed exploration towards an organic response for the building’s massing and visual organization. Deposition, the stratification of earth over a period of time, became a driving concept. This idea of layering began to inform decisions in the development of the architectural idea. As each layer of earth tells a story about its relative place in time, each building component has a relation to the one before and following. The inner layer is a skin of glass and metal that reacts to the programmatic elements within it. Clear glass is used to delineate significant public spaces, while more private spaces receive a treatment of glass mixed with copper panel. A folded, limestone enclosure reveals portions of this inner skin through a series of horizontal bands, providing daylight and views to interior spaces.

context map: mark parrish, model: chris getz


1. enclosure

2. courts volume

3. atrium

4. office volume

5. plinth

6. foundation

Building organization

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LEVEL 4 1. District Chambers 2. District Courtrooms 3. U.S. Attorneys

LEVEL 3 4. Magistrate Chambers 5. Magistrate Courtroom 6. U.S. Attorneys

LEVEL 2 7. U.S. Marshals

LEVEL 1 8. Atrium 9. Office Building Core 10. Probation 11. U.S. District Clerk

BASEMENT 12. Secure Parking

TRANSPARENCY The proposed project site spans 26th Street, a major north-south artery through downtown Billings. Once built, the courthouse will interrupt this axis. To prevent a complete break in the urban fabric, the design addresses the interruption of 26th Street by maintaining transparency through the building along the axis. This solution suggests an implied connection from the termination of the axis, into the site, through the building’s atrium, and to the city beyond. The building’s 4-story glazed atrium sits along the axis. Citizens arriving at the courthouse enter the building at this point and transition from the scale of the city to that of the atrium. The atrium’s transparency allows the public to reference the city and context beyond as they move vertically through the building.

Program organization

Atrium - east elevation

Atrium - west elevation


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Atrium sections and rendering: Mike Lindsey


First level - Entry

Fourth level - Courts

CONNECTION TO COMMUNITY

Plans: Margot van Swearingen, Site plan: Mark Parrish

With so few opportunities for people to gather in downtown Billings, it was imperative that this project address the neighboring park. Unique to the building massing is the expression of the courtrooms. Although a physical connection to the park couldn’t be established, the cantilevered courts volume gestures towards the park, visually and spatially linking the two. The articulated ground plane creates a natural buffer between the courthouse and the street edge. Through a series of linear site elements and terraces, this green space allows the park to feel as if it extends onto the courthouse site. This sequence defines a public realm that participates with the city and identifies the courthouse as a civic destination.

South elevation


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GRAPHIC DESIGN

ARCHITRAVE STUDENT MAGAZINE and DLR GROUP MARKETING MATERIAL In collaboration with Michael LeBoeuf, Janice Poley, Lisa Rambo and Mark Wunderlin of DLR Group

DLR Group

Ar c hi tr a ve

PRIMARY ROLES: Graphic design conceptualization and execution


K-12 PROTOTYPE

SCHOOL DESIGN CHARETTE O C T O B E R 1 0 TH, 2 0 0 8

DLR Group

listen.DESIGN.deliver

The following work is a representation of graphic material created as an editor for Architrave, an independent student design magazine at the University of Florida. Also featured are pieces created while employed at DLR Group. Working within a framework of branding standards, each piece was crafted to convey the intended message, address the appropriate audience, and reflect DLR Group’s commitment to design excellence.

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e-mail: cortezcrosby@gmail.com phone: 864.706.1208


Cortez Crosby - 2012 Yale portfolio