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Diploma & Advanced Diploma Courses Directory Select a discipline

»Further Education

Select a Further Education course below:

»Diploma of Professional Writing and Editing

»Engineering »Building and

Construction

»Hospitality, Tourism

and Personal Services

»Business »Arts and Social Sciences

»Earth Sciences

Further Education

Engineering

Building and Construction

Hospitality, Tourism and Personal Services

Arts and Social Sciences

Business

Diploma of Professional Writing and Editing

Earth Sciences

Previous course

21675viC

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Total Cost for Students Eligible for a Government Subsidised Place: Up to a maximum of $750.00 Total Cost for Students Ineligible for a Government Subsidised Place: Up to a maximum of $6,750.00

SuBJECT CoDE

SuBJECT NAmE

VPRAD02A VPADM03A VPCOR10B VPCOR04A VPVBP553 VPCOR13A VPADM07A VPDES05A VPCRS16A

Conduct research manage a project manage own work and learning originate concept for own work and conduct critical discourse refine writing and editing techniques research and critically analyse history and theory to inform artistic practice Establish and maintain work/contractual relationships interpret and respond to a brief Prepare text and graphic files for print processing (Qualification is attained by successful completion of 584hrs) interpret and respond to a brief use a 35mm Slr camera or digital equivalent Establish business and legal requirements manage finances Promote products and services Participate in negotiations (extra elective subjects that can replace subjects or be added to the subjects required to qualify with the Diploma. Any replacement subject needs to be in lots of 73 hours)

VPDES05A VPPHI05A VPSBM401A VPSBM406A VPMAR01A VPGEN04A

HourS

24 39 6 45 270 54 73 13 60 584 13 60 40 40 73 33 843

FEES – EligiBlE For A govT SuBSiDiSED PlACE $

Next course Exit

FEES – iNEligiBlE rPl FEES EligiBlE rPl FEES iNEligiBlE CAmPuS For A govT For govT SuBSiDiSED For govT SuBSiDiSED SuBSiDiSED PlACE $ PlACE $ PlACE $

52.80 85.80 13.20 99.00 594.00 118.80 160.60 28.60 132.00

278.00 451.00 69.00 520.00 3,121.00 624.00 844.00 150.00 693.00

5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

24.00 39.00 6.00 45.00 270.00 54.00 73.00 13.00 60.00

G G G G G G G G G

28.60 132.00 88.00 88.00 160.60 72.60

150.00 693.00 462.00 462.00 844.00 381.00

5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

13.00 60.00 40.00 40.00 73.00 33.00

G G G G G G

Print this course All courses commence on 1 July 2009 and finish on 11 December 2009.

Census date for all courses is 11 September 2009.

For more information go to www.nmit.vic.edu.au

Diploma & Advanced Diploma Courses Directory Select a discipline

»Further Education »Engineering »Building and

Construction

»Hospitality, Tourism

and Personal Services

»Business »Arts and Social Sciences

»Earth Sciences

Select an Engineering course below:

»Advanced Diploma of Computer Systems Engineering »Advanced Diploma of Electrical Technology »Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology (Jewellery) »Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology (mechanical) »Diploma of Electronics and Communications Engineering »Diploma of Engineering Technology (Jewellery) »Diploma of Engineering Technology (mechanical) »Diploma of Engineering Technology (Security) »Diploma of ESi – Power Systems »Advanced Diploma of ESi – Power Systems


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University of Melbourne Faculty of Arts, Articulation online newsletter

articulation. News and views from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne

The Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences In September the Faculty of Arts launched the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences. The Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences will offer a new and unique experience to students who have elected to specialise in Arts at the graduate level. It has been developed to create leaders with the knowledge, skills and passion to make a positive contribution to the world, while keeping ethics and the community in mind. Contemporary programs provide professional skills and training for careers in the public, private and community sectors. Its programs will foster

social, political and cultural understanding, critical and creative thinking, and allow students to apply their skills and knowledge to real world situations.

Old Arts in 2010 This summer, when students have finished their exams and handed in their final essays, builders will move in to start the Old Arts building’s first major construction project in 50 years. While being considerate of the buildings heritage listing, they will to create the physical site of the new Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences. This will include purpose-built facilities and flexible learning environments to reflect the graduate school’s contemporary approach to teaching and learning.

Located in the historic Old Arts building at the heart of the University of Melbourne’s Parkville campus, the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences will provide a study environment to encourage collegiality and debate.

The Faculty of Arts looks forward to seeing graduate students occupying the centre and engaging in active debate.

Collaborative work and social spaces will allow students to network, exchange ideas, and socialise with fellow students. The Faculty hopes this will foster a strong cohort experience. Dedicated professional staff will provide high-level support and enrichment services to graduate students.

Top right: An artist’s impression of the interior of the new Graduate School. Bottom - from left to right: concepts for new interior decor, the Old Arts clock tower, the new student reception area in the new Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences - to be completed in February of 2010.

www.arts.unimelb.edu.au

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articulation. News and views from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne

Focus on Journalism The Centre for Advanced Journalism at the Faculty of Arts commenced operation in 2009 John Howard lecture – Politics and the media: The good, the bad and the ugly. www.caj.unimelb.edu.au Former prime minister John Howard presented a public lecture for the Faculty’s Centre for Advanced Journalism on Tuesday 4 August. A packed theatre heard Mr Howard speak about the close relationship between journalists and politicians and his personal experiences with the media during his political career. He outlined his personal passion and interests in the media and said if he had not succeeded in politics he might have been a journalist.

In fact, I would argue, and no doubt somebody will do the analysis, I would argue that measured by regular news conferences, I have probably been the most accountable Prime Minister that Australia has had.”

“In my final year at Canterbury Boys High School in Sydney, I was invited to write down the careers I might be interested in. And after writing down law, because at that stage I didn’t see politics as a career - in those days, the want was that people actually practised a profession, ran a business, did something else before they went into politics - that I wrote down journalism as one of the three things that I might well be interested in doing,” he said.

Mr Howard spoke about his relationship with the media during his political career and how he enjoyed writing columns for newspapers such as The Australian and engaging with the public through news conferences and talkback radio. He said the media had been unfair to Pauline Hanson and had not represented her views correctly. “I felt that the media misunderstood what was happening with Pauline Hanson. I think the media trivialised and therefore did a disservice to our longer term national interest in suggesting that Pauline Hanson was all about racism and nothing else,” he said. Mr Howard spoke about changes he had witnessed in the media over the last 40 years and how important it will remain in Australia’s future. “It is a very, very important part of our society, and we have an obligation to hold the media to account, just as the media has an obligation to hold us to account,” he said.

Media’s response to the John Howard lecture On Tuesday 11 August, one week after the John Howard lecture, a panel of prominent representatives from Australia’s media took part in a public panel discussion titled ‘Politicians and Journalists: Adversaries or Bedfellows?’.

The panel discussed topics raised by Mr Howard during his public lecture and other issues related to the relationship between politics and the media.

The panelists were: presenter of Lateline, Leigh Sales; writer for The Australian, Paul Kelly; former editor of The Age and the Australian Financial Review, Alan Kohler; and senior political writer from The Australian, George Megalogenis. The event was hosted by the Director of the Centre for Advanced Journalism and former editor of The Age, Michael Gawenda.

“I think that a journalist needs to be sceptical not just about

“I think that Mr Howard’s analysis is superficial, but in line with the sort of journalism that he prefers.” Alan Kohler

These included how John Howard would have approached the role of being a journalist, the scepticism of journalists and the Australian public, and how panellists had personally approached reporting politics.

everything around him or her and the stories they’re reporting on, but also about him or herself and about their own opinions and what they’re bringing into stories that they’re covering,” said Leigh Sales. To view the full discussion panel and the John Howard lecture, visit

http://live.unimelb.edu.au.

Top left: ABC’s Leigh Sales. Opposite page and top right: former Prime Minister John Howard. Bottom: Media panelists Paul Kelly, Leigh Sales, George Megalogenis and Alan Kohler.

www.arts.unimelb.edu.au

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articulation. News and views from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne

Focus on Asia 2009 Conference on China In July, the Asia Institute hosted the two-day 2009 Melbourne Conference on China. The topic for the conference was 60 Year’s of the People’s Republic: Transformations and Challenges. Over 200 guests from around the world converged on the institute for wide-ranging discussions on the history and future of China. The Faculty welcomed a number of special guests to the University for the conference. These included Professor Cheng Li, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and a Director of the National Committee on US-China Relations, who spoke about the future of Chinese government. Professor Shaoguang Wang, former teacher at Yale University, presented a keynote address about the history and development of socialism in China.

To view or download these speeches, visit

India Mission

29 October

www.live.unimelb.edu.au.

Professor Mark Considine, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, and Ms Carlie Blake, Manager of Graduate Marketing for the Faculty, joined other representatives from the University of Melbourne to visit India in October to talk with partner institutions, catch up with Alumni and conduct information sessions about the new Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Visit the new website for the Graduate School to learn about these courses.

Darwin, John Gould and Australian Birds

Extracts from papers presented at the conference can be found at

www.chinastudies.unimelb.edu. au/conferences/2009

Asia Week In August, students from across the university and Melbourne took part in Asia Week, organised by the Asia Institute. A range of events took place during the week-long event which showcased Asian culture and the talents of locally based students. These events included public seminars about current issues affecting Asia; Indian, Japanese and Chinese music concerts; Asian film showings; and social events for students and alumni. The Asia Institute will host more events for those who have an interest or passion for Asia in 2009-10. www.asiainstitute.unimelb.edu. au.

www.arts.unimelb.edu.au/ graduate/

Upcoming Public Lectures 21 October Responding to Hate Crime

Professor Jonathon Smith University of Michigan A list of all upcoming University of Melbourne public lectures can be found at

www.unimelb.edu.au/public_ lectures. The Faculty of Arts is organising reunions for our Alumni. In October, we are holding a reunion for Alumni who studied History between 1970 and 1989, but we will be organising more reunions for those who studied other disciplines over the next twelve months. If you would like to receive an invite to your reunion, please ensure we have your current contact details. Find out what’s happening right now in the Faculty of Arts with the ARTiculation news feed –

http://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/ artsnews

“The most likely scenario for China in the middle term future, in my view, is neither decay nor resilient authoritarianism, but a transition to democracy.” Professor Cheng Li, July 2009.

Associate Professor Gail Mason University of Sydney

Are your contact details up to date? www.arts.unimelb.edu.au

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Stay connected and benefit from being a member of the global University of Melbourne Alumni community - www.unimelb.edu.au/alumni/details/updatedetails.html


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About UniSA | Support Services | Research at UniSA | Menu

South Australia | Accommodation | Metropolitan Campuses | How to Apply | Index of Priority Academic Areas for Study | Program Directory

Ten places to visit quickly and cheaply

1.

2.

3.

5.

7.

8.

Adelaide Central Market.

North Terrace, CBD.

Glenelg Beach.

Adelaide Zoo.

Barossa Valley.

Adelaide Hills.

Sprawled between Grote Street and Gouger Street in the CBD, the Adelaide Central Market has a huge range of fresh fruit and vegetables grown within an hour’s drive of the city.

Wander along Adelaide’s cultural boulevard and enjoy the grand old sandstone buildings that house the Art Gallery of South Australia, the South Australian Museum, the State Library and Parliament House.

It’s Adelaide’s most popular beach and the tram goes straight there from the city.

Considered one of the world’s best intimate zoos, the Adelaide Zoo has more than 1,800 animals and almost 300 species of exotic and native mammals, birds, reptiles and fish exhibited in magnificent botanic surroundings.

Further afield – 70km northeast of Adelaide ‑ but still great value for students. Students can take a bus to Tanunda in the Barossa Valley early on a Saturday morning, wander around the town and local wineries until mid‑afternoon and take the bus back to the city for $17.90 round trip.

Around 20 minutes from Adelaide’s city centre, the Adelaide Hills is renowned for its towns and villages, famous wineries, native wildlife parks and a feast of local produce. Discover towns like Aldgate, Birdwood, Bridgewater and Lobethal where you’ll find the first Lutheran seminary in Australia, and an annual display of Christmas lights that brings people from all over the city.

4. Adelaide Oval. Widely regarded as the most picturesque test cricket ground in the world, daily tours will show you the Sir Donald Bradman Stand, the Victor Richardson and Clarrie Grimett Gates and Bradman Room.

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6. The Parklands. Adelaide is surrounded by parklands, each with its own character. There are formal rose gardens, wide spaces with grand native and exotic trees, playgrounds and lakes and sporting fields for football and cricket to petanque and archery.

And even further afield

9.

The Flinders Ranges. More than 800 million years old, the Flinders Ranges skirt the edge of South Australia’s outback and includes towns like Coober Pedy where half of Australia’s opals are mined, and William Creek, South Australia’s smallest town but home to the world’s largest working cattle station.

10. Kangaroo Island. Just 15km from the shores of South Australia lies the nation’s third largest island, a haven of native forests, pristine beaches, wildlife sanctuaries and a history of shipwrecks. Kangaroo Island is a 45‑minute sea ferry journey from Cape Jervis on the tip of the Fleurieu Peninsula.

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Accommodation | Metropolitan Campuses | How to Apply | Index of Priority Academic Areas for Study | Program Directory

Accommodation Please select a topic by clicking an arrow below.

› Arriving in Adelaide

UniSA Accommodation Services helps you find safe, affordable and quality accommodation. A number of options are available for newly arrived students, offering a range of facilities and services with prices varying accordingly.

› Long Term Accommodation

Bambang Eko Nugroho and Manik Mutiara Sadewa AusAID scholarship recipients

Read more…

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About UniSA | Support Services | Research at UniSA | South Australia | Menu

Profile › Bambang Eko Nugroho

› Manik Mutiara Sadewa

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“I think living in Adelaide is perfect for a student. This is because Adelaide is a nice calm city and a good place to study. Besides, compared to any other capital city in Australia, Adelaide has the lowest rental prices. How good is that!” Bambang Eko Nugroho Master of Business (Accountancy) AusAID scholarship recipient

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Accommodation | Metropolitan Campuses | How to Apply | Index of Priority Academic Areas for Study | Program Directory

“I found that the courses I am studying link to real world situations. The topics delivered and the assignments given focus on something happening in the real world. So I do not feel so much like a student, but as a professional. This kind of learning is very beneficial form my future career and my current profession as a teacher.” Manik Mutiara Sadewa Master of Business (Accountancy) AusAID scholarship recipient

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University of Melbourne Create Your Carer Touchscreen interactive pdf CAREER

areas & student

PRofilEs

The University of Melbourne Bachelor of Arts degree gives students the skills and knowledge to become leaders in a wide range of fields and industries.

FaCulty oF arts

A Melbourne Arts graduate has the flexibility, breadth and mobility in their education that allows them to follow their passions and strengths into positions of influence and leadership.

JoBs By industry

emPloyaBility

Graduate Pathways

Shawn Low

ƒ Advanced problem solving abilities ƒ Independent research skills ƒ Refined written and verbal communication skills ƒ Strong teamwork and collaboration skills.

For over 150 years the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne has led engagements with Australia’s leading cultural, social and economic institutions. The Faculty has aimed to share expertise and knowledge with the community, and to continually develop teaching in line with diverse fields of learning. The Faculty holds strategic alliances with leading universities and eminent research bodies around the world. A strong research base and

Community

www.ba.unimelb.edu.au eduCation commitment to world-class teaching ensures students graduate with skills and knowledge relevant to their chosen fields. In 2009, the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne was ranked: ƒ 17 in the world for Humanities

emPloyaBility

Government

international Careers

ƒ 19 in the world for Social Sciences (World University rankings published by the Times Higher Education supplement, 2009.)

www.arts.unimelb.edu.au

where are arts graduates now?

JoBs By industry

Creative industries

ƒ Active global citizens.

more inFo

FaCulty oF arts

Business

ƒ Attuned to cultural diversity

Faculty of arts

ƒ Effective critical and analytical skills

Graduate sChool oF humanities & soCial sCienCes

ƒ Academically excellent

ƒ Leaders in communities

ƒ Knowledgeable across disciplines

Through the Melbourne Bachelor of Arts degree you can gain:

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications) Commissioning Editor, South-East Asia, Lonely Planet

The Melbourne Bachelor of Arts has been developed to help our students become:

media & PuBlishinG other Careers

CAREER

areas & student

Melbourne Bachelor of Arts graduates have diverse skills which enable them to work in a wide range of occupations, depending on where their passions, experience and opportunities take them.

PRofilEs

Business

arts graduates available for full-time employment

Creative industries

100

From 2004–2008, between 40–46% of Bachelor of Arts graduates surveyed were seeking full-time work after graduation (other graduates had gone on to further study or other opportunities). The following graph shows how many of these graduates had been successful in finding full-time work at the time of the survey.

Community 80

eduCation 60

Graduate Pathways

Government

workinG Full-time workinG Part-time seekinG Full-time work

Graduate sChool oF humanities & soCial sCienCes

40

international Careers

not workinG, seekinG work Please note that some career paths require study following a Bachelor of Arts degree.

20

media & PuBlishinG

0

more inFo

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

other Careers

touch to start again

CAREER

examples of job titles:

areas & student

Arts Administrator Assistant Director FaCulty oF arts

JoBs By industry

Assistant Manager

5.5% Other 5.5% Other Government Administration, Justice, Corrections

Assistant Paintings Conservator

13.2% Legal Services

Business Consultant

1.8% Manufacturing 2.6% Professional Association Services, Other Interest Groups 2.6% Engineering Services

8.8% Wholesale, Retail

Clinical Psychologist Communications Officer

8.4% Education

Community Corrections Officer

2.6% Scientific Research

emPloyaBility

2.9% Hospitality, Accommodation 3.3% Media, Publishing 4.0% Other Professional Services

Graduate Pathways

Graduate sChool oF humanities & soCial sCienCes

8.1% Accounting Services

6.2% Banking, Finance, Insurance

4.4% Health Care, Social Assistance Services 4.4% Advertising, Market Research, Statistical Services 4.8% Management, Consulting Services

5.9% Federal Government Administration

5.1% State Government Administration

Project Manager

Community

Research Assistant

Senior Business Development Manager

Editor

Senior Industrial Development Officer

IT & Communications Manager

Creative industries

Policy Officer

Secondary Teacher

International Programs Officer

touch to start again

Policy Advisor

Research Officer

Executive Officer

Base: Respondents who completed an Arts undergraduate bachelor degree (pass, honours, graduate entry) by coursework in 2007 and were working full-time at the census date. These may include those who completed a combined degree in Law, Commerce or Engineering.

Museum Director

Director of Strategic Planning

Publisher

Business

Media Advisor

Creative Director

Electronic & Desktop

Data source: University of Melbourne Graduate Destination Survey, 2008.

Lecturer

Conservator

General Manager more inFo

PRofilEs

Lawyer

Senior Policy & Research Advisor Social Worker

eduCation

Government

international Careers media & PuBlishinG

Student Advisor Teacher Technical Writer Training Coordinator

other Careers


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University of South Australia Global Experience eNewsletter

Please click here if you cannot view this email.

GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

HIGHLIGHT Global Experience Orientation DATE:

Wednesday 14th October 2009

TIME:

10am to 3pm

VENUE:

Bradley Forum, City West

REGISTER:

Please click here to register

Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t attended Global Experience Orientation as yet? The next Global Experience Orientation will be held on Wednesday 14th October 2009 from 10am to 3pm in the Bradley Forum, City West. Orientation is an excellent opportunity to learn how to tailor your program as well as provide valuable information on networking and intercultural communication. Participation in Orientation is a compulsory component of the program and can reward you with 5 points towards the total of 120 required to complete the Global Experience Program. You can register your attendance online on the Global Experience Website.

WANT TO

STAND OUT?

Find out more or register at: www.unisa.edu.au/ globalexperience

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La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance interactive pdf

ContEnts Please select a section to read more… Link to print friendly version

tHe lA trobe experience

AccommodAtion

underStAnding Your letter of offer

How to Accept Your offer

ApplYing for A Student ViSA

noteS And contActS

Congratulations! Congratulations on receiving an offer of a place at La Trobe University, one of Australia’s top 10 universities (Shanghai Jiao Tong University Index, 2006). Our students benefit from teaching that is informed by the latest research and from an excellent staff‑to‑student ratio. Our graduates experience excellent employment outcomes, in companies, government, and community organisations all over the world.

We look forward to welcoming you to the La Trobe community and making your study experience at La Trobe University a rewarding one.

Section oVeRView Please select a topic to read more…

Student ViSaS

PeRmiSSion to woRk

aSSeSSment LeVeLS

StudentS undeR 18 YeaRS of age

Renewing YouR Student ViSa Link to print friendly version

International students must apply for a student visa to study in Australia. Students on a student visa are subject to Australian government regulations. Student ViSaS

you can then use to apply for a student visa.

Most students must obtain a student visa before they travel to Australia. It is your responsibility to ensure you obtain a valid passport and student visa before you enter Australia for study purposes. Only those who fall into Assessment Level 1 (see Assessment Levels) can be granted their initial student visa whilst onshore.

The process of applying for a student visa varies from country to country, therefore it is advisable to contact your closest Australian diplomatic post for more information. A comprehensive list of diplomatic posts is available from the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) website: www.immi.gov.au/contacts/ overseas

Please note that student visas are issued for full‑time study only. Holders of student visas cannot choose to study part‑time.

Up‑to‑date information on student visa regulations, application procedures and Assessment Levels is also available from the DIAC website: www.immi.gov. au/students

Once you have accepted your offer of a place at La Trobe University and forwarded your Pre‑Visa Assessment (if required), you will be issued with an electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCOE) form which

Information about visa requirements for students with families is available at:

Assistance with visa applications is available from La Trobe University’s overseas representatives: www.latrobe. edu.au/international/agents

aSSeSSment LeVeLS The Australian Government has assigned countries an Assessment Level (1–4). Each level has particular visa criteria that must be met in order to receive a student visa. There may also be different criteria according to the level and type of study you intend to undertake in Australia.

La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

applying for a student visa

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This guide will provide valuable information on studying at La Trobe University and in Australia, how to accept your offer, and applying for a student visa.

If you are unsure which Assessment Level and subclass applies to you, please refer to form 1219i on the DIAC website: www.immi.gov.au/ allforms/pdf/1219i.pdf

www.latrobe.edu.au/ international/predeparture

Applying for a Student Visa

Applying for a Student Visa

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The La Trobe Experience

Accommodation

Understanding your Letter of Offer

“I have had many opportunities at my disposal since coming to La Trobe University and the diploma I obtain here will serve me in many countries. Studying in another country has shown me just how adaptable I am in many different situations.”

Applying for a Student Visa

Notes and Contacts

However, if you have condition 8534 or 8535 (“No Further Stay”) on your student visa you will not be able to renew your student visa in Australia. Please contact DIAC for more information.

on permission to work (PTW) will be provided upon your arrival to La Trobe University during the Welcome Festival (orientation). Applications can be lodged after you commence classes.

If you are returning home temporarily and would like to renew your visa at an Australian diplomatic post in your home country, you must indicate this on your Offer Acceptance Form.

StudentS under 18 YeArS of Age

University will assist students in organising guardianship. Most students will be instructed to defer the commencement date of their course until after they turn 18. More information about visa requirements for students under 18 is available at the following government website: www.immi.gov.au/students

permiSSion to work Students and their family members must not work without permission. Information

Country assessment levels 1 and 2

Please note that if you are an Assessment Level 1 student applying for a student visa from outside Australia, you may be able to apply for your visa online via the DIAC website. Some

your electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCOE).You can then lodge your eCOE with your nearest Australian diplomatic post.

Country assessment levels 3 and 4

Please note that we are unable to issue you with an eCOE until we receive your PVA.

Students from Assessment Levels 3 and 4 must apply for a Pre‑Visa Assessment (PVA) by lodging their formal letter of offer with their nearest Australian diplomatic post. The PVA process normally takes 6–16 weeks. When the unconditional PVA is approved, you are then able to formally accept your offer and receive

Students who are under 18 years of age when they apply for a student visa must show the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) that they will be living with a parent, legal guardian or relative in Australia. Under exceptional circumstances La Trobe

renewing Your Student ViSA If you have previously studied in Australia and need to renew your student visa for a new course at La Trobe University, in most cases you can apply for your visa renewal at a DIAC office in Australia, or online.

Applying for a Student Visa

Applying for a Student Visa

Students from Assessment Levels 1 and 2 do not need to provide the University with a Pre‑Visa Assessment (PVA). Once we have received your acceptance of the offer, you will receive an electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCOE) which you can lodge with your nearest Australian diplomatic post.

applicants from Assessment Level 2 may also be eligible to apply online through an agent. See: www.immi.gov.au/e_visa/ students.htm

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La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

La Trobe University Offer and Acceptance Information 2008

micHelle brAdleY – cAnAdA graduate diploma of education

How to Accept your Offer

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The La Trobe Experience

Accommodation

Understanding your Letter of Offer

How to Accept your Offer

Applying for a Student Visa

Notes and Contacts

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Monash University Victorian College of Pharmacy eNewsletter

Please click here if you cannot view this email.

Postgraduate study: opens opportunities for pharmacists Coursework information session Tuesday 7 October 2008, 7pm–8pm

“Not only have I improved my knowledge base, but I am directly applying new skills to my pharmacy practice enhancing

The Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences offers a range of quality postgraduate coursework degrees designed to give you a professional edge.

both my community and

• Master of Clinical Pharmacy

consultancy roles.”

• Wound Care (Graduate Certificate, Diploma and Masters)

Caroline Beischer Community and consultant pharmacist and Graduate Certificate in Pharmacy Practice student (Top image)

• Master of Pharmacy Practice • Graduate Certificate in Pharmacy Practice Find out more at our postgraduate coursework information session Tuesday 7 October 2008, 7pm–8pm. Register by telephone 03 9903 9635 or www.pharm.monash.edu.au/futurestudents

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

1 3 Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Monash University (Parkville campus) 381 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052 Melways ref: 29, G12

2

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Learning Showcase » Development of workplace skills – “Cyberbullying”

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