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OCTOBER 2019

EST. 1913

From the Commodore

H

appy October! I cannot believe that this is my second to last article as my year as Commodore. I have enjoyed my year as Commodore, and I truly appreciate each and every one of our members, staff, and the great Corinthian community in which we live. From our original Coronado Yacht Club Boathouse location in 1913 to know, we still are an amazing club, 106 years later.

Commodore Tom Lyons

On September 14th, we put on “A Night in Spain” event with Sangria, Cava, Spanish Reds, Tapas, Paella, with live Flamenco Dancers and Flamenco Guitar. We had around 150 people attend and had a great time relaxing under the stars on the back lawn while being transported to Spain. Lindsey and I are excited about the rest of the year! We will have the following events planned for the rest of the year: an Octoberfest with live entertainment on October 12th, as well as a wine pairing dinner and Scotch and Cigar nightcap event on November 16th. Cathy Cellar will be providing some amazing wines from around the world and Flag Member Keith James will be donating some cigars from Crown City Cigars. This year, after much consideration and debate, the Board made a decision to add “No Swimming” signage along the docks. Although I was personally bummed out by the idea of this, as it was tradition and a rite of passage when I grew up as a youngster at the club in the late 70’s and early 80’s, I understood the reasoning. The no swimming off the docks rule has existed for a long time in our Slip Rules for boater-swimmer collision safety reasons, however we have never really advertised this rule because there had not been an incident, although the reasoning makes a lot of sense. Please see article by Director Steve Schelkun outlining our reasoning in this month’s Whisker Pole. If you have not already, check out some of the new Ship Store Merch. The Committee is doing some awesome stuff! The Junior Sailing Program has been knocking it out of the park and the club’s Junior Program is very active and continues to grow. Strong work Jill Powell and Jon Rogers! We really appreciate everything you do and how amazing you make the program! I have always believed that the Junior Program is the key to attracting future membership generations. Staff Commodore and Lipton Cup Chair Shawn Powell has been promoting and organizing our participation in the Lipton Cup, and was excited to announce that the Lipton Cup will take place in the south bay for the first time in years, a bay in which our members are comfortable sailing. Shawn has also been promoting other Regattas such as the International Master’s Regatta. We may discuss Regatta funding at the Annual Meeting to promote participation in more regattas throughout the year, and one idea that I have is to hold an annual “Regatta Gala” to fundraise, in addition to our efforts to revitalize the Coronado Maritime Foundation and its fundraising efforts. The first annual “Floatopia” event was amazing! I want to thank the Cruise Fleet and Jackie Busch, Rainer Busch, Jill Powell, Shawn Powell, Curtis Milioti, and Emmy Grimes for organizing this event! And in other related news and fun activities surrounding our active membership, Flag Member Scott Darnell speared a massive Bluefin freediving somewhere in the Pacific Ocean…

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1631 Strand Way Coronado, CA 92118 www.coronadoyc.org

In This Issue... Commodore’s Report .................. Front Page Upcoming Events ...................................... 2 Restaurant and Bar Hours ......................... 2 General Manager’s Report ......................... 3 Membership Summary .............................. 4 Lipton Cup 2019/Masters 2019 ............... 4 Waves and Words ...................................... 4

P: (619) 435-1848 F: (619) 435-2480 coryclub@coronadoyc.org VHF Radio Channel 69

Bar: (619) 435-0572 Jr. Office: (619) 567-2625 Chaplain: (619) 261-5476 Security: (619) 933-1011

Rod & Reel Report .....................................5 Finance Committee Report ......................... 6 From the Entertainment Committee ............7 Port Captain’s Report .................................7 From the Jr. Clubhouse ...............................8 Reasons for CYC’s No Swimming Rule.........9 Race Committee Report .......................... 10 In the Offing ............................................ 10 Cruiser Navigation Report ....................... 11

Memory Lane ...........................................12 October Wednesday Dinner Nights ...........13 Amazing Race ..........................................14 Classifieds and Ads ........................... 14-18 October & November Calendars ...............19 New Year’s Eve Speakeasy ........... Back Page

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

STAFF

Commodore Tom Lyons

General Manager Lou Milioti lmilioti@coronadoyc.org

commodore@coronadoyc.org Vice Commodore Scott Grimes

vicecommodore@coronadoyc.org Rear Commodore Chris DeNardi

Director of Facilities Fabian Arreola dockmasterarreola@coronadoyc.org

Treasurer Harper Hatheway

Assistant Manager Victoria Engan vengan@coronadoyc.org

Secretary Robin MacCartee

Accounting Manager Mark Leopold mleopold@coronadoyc.org

rearcommodore@coronadoyc.org treasurer@coronadoyc.org

secretary@coronadoyc.org

DIRECTORS Janet Paulovich Steve Schelkun Joe Warren Ken Wilson

FLAG OFFICERS Port Captain Dave Flint Fleet Captain Curtis Milioti Chaplain Gary Boggs Judge Advocate Steve Berman

EDITORS Judy Longfellow Megan Mayall

OFFICE Mon., Tues., Thurs. ....................... 9 AM—5 PM Wednesday .................................. 9 AM—7 PM Friday ........................................ 10 AM—7 PM Saturday ...................................... 9 AM—5 PM Sunday ........................................ 9 AM—5 PM

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Accounting Clerk Ivana Gonzalez igonzalez@coronadoyc.org Receptionist Neil Hara nhara@coronadoyc.org Membership & Communications Coordinator DeLaine Bennett dbennett@coronadoyc.org

UPCOMING EVENTS IN OCTOBER 3 3 5-6 7 10 12 16

Membership Committee Meeting DEADLINE FOR MOTIONS! CYC Fall Small Boat Regatta Finance Committee Meeting Board Meeting CYC Oktoberfest Trivia Night (on Wednesdays)

UPCOMING EVENTS IN NOVEMBER 7 9 11 14 17 19 26

Membership Committee Meeting Commodore’s Thank You Reception Finance Committee Meeting Board Meeting Junior Trophy Dinner Annual Meeting CMF Meeting

All events are subject to change. Check page 19 for detailed two-month calendars

Jr. Sailing Director Jill Powell jroffice@coronadoyc.org Head Sailing Coach Jon Rogers jrogers@coronadoyc.org

BAR HOURS (WINTER HOURS) Monday ........................................ 4 PM—9 PM Tuesday ……….…………………………..…..Closed Wednesday..…………………………...4 PM—9 PM Thursday ……………………………………….Closed Friday.........................................4 PM—10 PM Saturday ....................................10 AM—9 PM Sunday ......................................10 AM—8 PM

CYC RESTAURANT DINNER Wed. & Fri. ............... 5:00 —8:30 PM

WEEKEND MENU Sat. & Sun…………9:00 AM—5:30 PM


From the Crow’s Nest By General Manager Lou Milioti

I

want to thank the membership for another great season at the club as we set records for member activity and have a waiting list now to join the club. Member participation in events, member dining, and member private events have all been very well attended, including our recent Night in Spain event. I appreciate the support that the membership has shown in your participation in club activities. My staff and I take great pride while watching you, the membership enjoy the programming that the creative visions that the entertainment committee are providing for you so that you can have the best membership experience available within our budgeted goals. Speaking of budgeted goals, the 2020 operating budget has been approved by the Finance Committee and CYC Board of Directors. The 2020 budget requires $1.00 dues increase per Flag Membership per month. The modest dues increase will provide an additional $7,716.00 annually which doesn’t cover the $40,000.00 in operating increases from 2019. The Finance committee in conjunction with CYC management were able to identify approximately $33,000.00 in payroll, vendor and operating efficiencies requiring only a modest increase in dues for the 2020 budget. Where do your dues go? Currently dues are $130.00 per month. ($28.60) is allocated to the Capital Improvement fund to support the Clubs Capital Improvements. ($26.03) is allocated to the Junior Program to help run the best Jr program on the West coast. ($8.00) per month is allocated to the Replacement Reserve Fund to replace or repair items as needed. $67.37 is the remainder which is used to operate the club; including payroll costs, insurance, utilities, regattas, opening day celebration, Fourth of July and our Port Rent. Now back to the fun stuff: Oktoberfest at CYC returns on Saturday October 12 th, complete with an Authentic Bavarian Band, Great German Beers, ice chilled Jagermeister and authentic German Wursts. To assure your Oktoberfest meal experience is the best you can preorder food when you sign up at a discount. Food will also be available the evening of OKTOBERFEST, however it will be in limited quantities. Tickets & seating will be limited so sign up at the CYC office soon so you are not left out of the fun. Speaking of great food, even though Beer can races have ended, Chef Benito and the culinary CYC team will continue to be of service for your dining needs on Wednesday evenings. A special Lobster Tail Night will be offered on October9th, a Prime Rib Night on October 23 and a Special Dia De Los Muertos Mexican Buffet on October 30 th. Please note, the regular menu will not be available on October 30 th only the buffet. We will also be premiering our Fall menu in October featuring seasonal favorites with an emphasis on fresh local and sustainable ingredients. As always if there is anything our staff or I can do to improve your membership experience please do not hesitate to contact me lmilioti@coronadoyc.org. PROST Manager Lou

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Lipton Cup 2019/Masters 2019 By Lipton Cup Chair & Staff Commodore Shawn Powell

Membership Status The Numbers

Flag Jr. Flag 50% Jr. Flag 100% Social

620 16 12 3

Flag Member Total

651

Absent Flag 25% Absent Flag 50% Junior Paying Jr. Non-Paying Life Flag Senior Flag Deferred Total

15 4 91 33 3 33 71 901

New Members William & Katie Carinder—Flag Andrew & Courtney Castiglione—Flag Judith & Timothy Delaney—Flag Barbara & Michael Kelly—Flag

Changes Jack Hilinski Non-Paying Jr. to Paying Jr. Brian Deline Paying Jr. to Jr. Flag 50% Bethany Windle Flag to Absent Flag 25%

Resigned David & Michaeli Hansen Social

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ark your calendar October 25th -27 for the Lipton Cup. One of the San Diego Yacht Club’s most coveted trophies is back up for grabs, going home with the winning team of the Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Cup. Eleven yacht clubs that battled for the title in 2018 return to South San Diego Bay for a rematch. In the running are: San Diego Yacht Club (2018 winners), Balboa Yacht Club, California Yacht Club, Chicago Yacht Club, Coronado Yacht Club, Long Beach Yacht Club, Newport Harbor Yacht Club, Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, San Francisco Yacht Club, St. Francis Yacht Club, and Southwestern Yacht Club. The Lipton Cup is sailed in a fleet of J/105s, graciously loaned from local J/105 owners, with rotating boats between each race allowing for fair, even racing. The first warning signal is scheduled for 1125 each day. The San Diego Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Cup dates back to the early days of yachting on the Pacific Ocean, circa 1900. Sir Thomas Lipton, the famous yachtsman and tea baron, requested that a trophy be created in his name for West Coast yacht racing excellence. This exchange soon ushered in a new, prestigious yachting event – the San Diego Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Cup. Our team this year includes Skipper Scott Harris and crew Pike Harris, Chuck Eaton, Patrick Powell, Sterling Henken and Dave Hochart. One old guy and five young guns. Please come out and support our team. It’s a 15-minute boat ride from your slip. The Masters 2019 regatta will be held the weekend before October 18 th-20th same format as the Lipton Cup with the exception the skipper has to be 60 years of age or older and crew members have to be at least 45 years of age, get the ibuprofen ready now. This year’s crew will consist of Skipper Scott Harris joined by Chuck Furey (yes, we got him out of retirement) Mark Surber, Jon Rogers, Doug Campbell and a surprise guest. This is funded completely on member donations, so if you would like to help please make a donation through Coronado Maritime Foundation through the office.

Mary Frese Flag Michael Frese Paying Jr. Jake Frese Paying Jr.

Applicants Peter & Christine Kuhns—Flag Jim & Merrie Mebust, Melissa Cook Sunny Irvine & Doris Franyutti—Flag Jackie Wendt, Kraig Nicolls Sharon Lewis—Social Dr. John Schmidt

Approved, Awaiting Vacancy Ian Fagan Jr. Flag #4 Chris Eckert & Kimberly Carlson Social #8 Page 4

Submit this to the Front Office to Donate via Member Charge to the 2019 Lipton Cup/International Masters Regatta! Name ____________________________________________ Member # _______________________________________ Signature ________________________________________ Donate by Check: Please write your check out to Coronado Maritime Foundation


Rod and Reel Report By Rod and Reel Chairman S/C Paul Dodson

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he CYC Rod and Reel fishing season runs from October 1st through September 30th, thus enabling trophies to be awarded at the regular trophy dinner each year or the November Rod and Reel Meeting, thereby leaving the month of October for analysis of all the recorded fish for the past 12 months. Currently, an overview of the current recordings reveals the following: The largest legal fish caught and properly recorded during the fishing season by a CYC Angler onboard a CYC Boat within the designated competition waters is a 28 lb. Blue Fin Tuna caught by Flag Member Russell Nevitt on June 28th, 2019. The largest legal fish caught and properly recorded during the fishing season by a CYC Angler onboard a CYC Boat outside the designated competition waters = none recorded. The largest legal fish caught and properly recorded during the fishing season by a CYC Angler onboard a non-member boat, including commercial boats, and documented to a CYC Rod and Reel Form, including the fish species and weight attested to by the boat captain and attached to a photo of the angler with the fish is a 59 lb. Blue Fin Tuna caught by Flag Member Tom Christiansen on May 11th, 2019 (caught off the commercial boat “Intrepid�). The largest legal fish caught and properly recorded for each month by a CYC Angler onboard a CYC Boat within the designated competition waters is as follows: MONTH October November December January February March April May June July August September

MEMBER Tom Christiansen Michael Copp

WEIGHT 9 lb. 12 oz. 7 lb.

Dave Campbell 12.5 lb. Dave Campbell 12.1 lb. Al Thomas 18.5 lb. Russell Nevitt 28 lb. Tom Christiansen 20.5 lb. Tom Christiansen 20 lb. *Pending until end of the month

TYPE Skipjack Bonita None Recorded None Recorded None Recorded Yellowtail Yellowtail Halibut Blue Fin Tuna Yellow Fin Tuna Yellow Fin Tuna

The largest legal fish (of each species) caught and properly recorded during the fishing season by a CYC Angler onboard a CYC Boat within the designated competition waters is as follows: MEMBER Mason Copp Russell Nevitt Jim Welty Mason Copp Al Thomas Kyle Dodson Al Thomas Al Thomas Al Thomas Michael Copp Rose Ann Krock Mason Copp Tom Christiansen Russell Nevitt

WEIGHT 8.5 lb. 28 lb. 3.4 lb. 10.5 lb. 3 lb. 6.2 lb. 4 lb. 18.5 lb. 2.5 lb. 2.2 lb. 7 lb. 8 oz. 2.5 lb. 20.5 lb. 18.6 lb.

TYPE Barracuda Blue Fin Tuna Bocaccio Bonita Calico Bass Canary Rock Fish Corvina Halibut Sand Bass Spotted Bay Bass Skip Jack Trigger Fish Yellow Fin Tuna Yellow Tail

No species of Shark may be considered for any category. Additional Categories: 80.2 lb. Blue Fin Tuna taken by Spear Gun by Scott Darnell. 3 lb. Lobster taken by Hand by Mark Jennings. Please note that the above recorded fish are as of September 11th, with the remainder of September still open for consideration if caught and properly recorded. It should also be noted that competition waters are bordered by Point Conception to the North and Santo Tomas Point to the South. Remember, as of October 1st, we will begin the 2020 Fishing Season. Good luck, have fun, and be safe!

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Finance Committee Report By Vice Commodore Scott Grimes

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reetings fellow Coronado Yacht Club members,

I hope you all have had a great summer and you have had the opportunity to enjoy the air-conditioned club during the hot days we’ve had in Coronado. The Club has performed well this year, membership has remained near full and there has been a lot of activity at CYC. Planning is already in the works for entertainment in 2020 with some exciting events planned by Bridget and the Entertainment Committee. Most of the committee chairs have committed to serving next year with Race Management and Lipton Cup still vacant. If you are a racer and have time to volunteer, please get in touch with me! As chair of the Finance Committee, I would like to thank the Finance Committee Members who volunteer their time and expertise in making sure Coronado Yacht Club remains on a solid financial foundation and have been incredible stewards of your money. The Finance Committee takes their responsibility seriously and every decision has had considerable thought, dialog and consideration of the future of the club, it’s impact on the membership and the club experience. We now have 9 months of marina electrical usage data and the monthly variance in usage has remained very close to last year’s prediction of slip electrical usage and marina operational electrical usage. The 2018 Finance Committee did an incredible job with the marina electrical separation from marina costs. The club started the year out with a number of projects to keep the club operational and in repair. The Finance Committee and your Board of Directors approved $74,741.57 in capital and replacement reserve funds. Project and management has only spend $58,490.45 of the approved amount to date with most projects complete. Projects have included sewer pump repair and replacement, new seating for the side lawn, a new dishwasher for the galley, bar table chairs, new starboard patio canvas, major roof repairs after this year’s heavy rain, several hoist & crane repairs, new junior clubhouse flooring and of course the new six tap draft beer dispenser in the bar. Overall, the club has performed well, but there are still challenges ahead. There is almost a $40,000 increase in operating costs from 2019 to the 2020 budget. General Manager Lou Milioti, Accounting Manager Mark Leopold and the Finance Committee have done a great job finding areas to control cost in the 2020 budget. Each year the club operates on a razor thin margin that does not allow for much of a variance in operating expenses. It is never the desire of the Finance Committee to raise membership dues and fees and it is not taken lightly, however, operating cost continue to rise, our membership is at capacity, club activities are full which has indirect cost to the club, such as maintenance and utilities. These are a areas that will increase next year • • • • • • • •

Minimum wage will increase in January 2020 to $13.00 per hour in California $19,000.00 in direct payroll cost increases in 2020 (Payroll bar +$5,000.00, Payroll galley +$9,000.00, Payroll maintenance +$5,000.00, Admin $0) $3,000.00—Annual increase for quarterly review by CPA $3,000.00—Credit card and bank fees $5,000.00—Clubhouse electricity for air conditioning, 2018 and prior the air-conditioning system was not operational $7,000.00—Workers comp insurance. $2,000.00 to host Challenged sailor KMAC regatta

To help meet the budget increases, finance committee has recommended the following increases in membership dues in addition to cutting the budget in certain areas and projecting increased revenue. • • • •

$1.00 Flag Member dues increase $0.50 50% Paying Junior dues increase $1.00 Junior Flag @100% dues increase $1.00 Social Member Dues Increase

= $620.00 per month $7,440.00 annually = $8.00 per month $96.00 annually = $12.00 per month $144.00 annually = $3.00 per month $36.00 annually

The finance committee approved the 2020 budget that keeps cost in control and have included increases for the areas outlined above. The Finance Committee sent the budget to the Board of Directors and it was approved at the September 12 Board of Directors meeting.

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From the Entertainment Committee By Entertainment Chair Lindsey Lyons

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eptember at Coronado Yacht Club included two “first time” events that were both loved by all in attendance.. The first annual “Floatopia” at Stingray Point was planned by the Cruise Fleet and spearheaded by Jackie and Rainer Busch, Shawn and Jill Powell, and Curtis Milioti and Emmy Grimes. Our family attended this very fun event and we hope it will be an annual thing. Thank you to those who planned and helped to facilitate the day. On September 14th, members came down to the club to enjoy “A Night In Spain”. This event was a huge success! Thank you to Kara Mann Flamenco for providing such a spectacular Flamenco Show for our guests. The guitarist, singer and two dancers did a fabulous job performing and even welcomed a few brave volunteers to dance at the end of the show. If anyone is in need of their services in the future you can contact Kara at (619) 577-2364 or karatmann@gmail.com. From the Sangria to the Paella and Tapas, all the food was delicious. The Spanish Wine selections were also very delicious and provided an authentic sensory experience for the evening. The kids in attendance enjoyed some jumpy time before the flamenco show and the movie “Ferdinand” on the back lawn. Thank you to all who came to this event. Coming up in October, the club will be throwing an Oktoberfest on October 12th. There will be traditional German cuisine and a variety of October beers including a specially brewed beer from Coronado Brewing Company. I am looking forward to the giant soft pretzels and the live German themed entertainment. This event is for ages 21 and up so leave the little ones at home for this one. To sign up for Oktoberfest you can email coryclub@coronadoyc.org, call the office at 619.435.1848, or stop by the front desk and sign up in the book.

Live Bands Bar Bar

Friday, October 18, 7-10p Friday, November 15, 7-10p

Jackson Pactrick Duo Show Uplift Band

Port Captain’s Report By Port Captain Dave Flint

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everal months ago, I let Scott Grimes our Vice-Commodore know 2019 would be my 15th and final year as Port Captain of the Coronado Yacht Club. 15 years is a very long time and filled with many outstanding memories and accomplishments for our exceptional yacht club. Those of us who have visited other yacht clubs realize how extra special our own yacht club really is and how extremely fortunate we are to be members. THANK YOU very much to the following Commodores and their Boards for allowing me the privilege of serving them of and our membership: Starting in 2002 with Kathleen Baldwin, Bruce Young, Shawn Powell, Paul Dodson, Tom Garrett , Dick Townsend, Mark Warner, Wayne Strickland, Rick Odiorne, Greg Walker, Mike Yeakle, Penny Boggs, Bill Sandke, Dean Eckenroth and Tom Lyons. What a fantastic group of people and leaders.! And another sincere Thank You to the paid staff, volunteers and members who have helped me tremendously with my Port Captain responsibilities over all these years. The first half of this year has produced an incredible surge of wet and dry slip new assignments. This really high number has diminished to a trickle over the last few months. Go figure. As of the writing of this report there are ZERO members on the 30’ Ready Wait List. New Slips Assigned: XB-31

25’

Andrea Dodson

Dry Slip List

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From the Jr. Clubhouse By Jr. Sailing Director Jill Powell when I was thinking summer is busy, our sailors and coaches have not stopped this month! Every J ust weekend in September and October we have regattas. We have sailors sailing different boats each weekend. Four boats to the Perry regattas in Long Beach and maybe more in December. Both the laser and Bic fleets are growing fast too! Fall after school sailors are enjoying the last few weeks of day light saving. The water is still warm, and all seventy-five sailors are having a good time. I will have the winter schedule out by December 1 st and the spring schedule out by January 1st, 2020. WOW! 2020 already where did the time go? Junior trophy dinner will be on Sunday, November 17 th 5:00pm. I hope you will come out and see what juniors have accomplished this last year. Juniors are hosting Perry regatta #2 the weekend of December 14th & 15th. If you would like to help on the water this weekend please let me know by emailing jroffice@coronadoyc.org CONGRATULATIONS... …to CorYC Sabot Squad C1 sailors Madi Anderson, Tyler Werth and A Fleeter’s Max Olson, Preston Miller and Bella Loiselle for their performance at the Sabot Fall Gold Cup hosted by Newport Harbor Club. …to CorYC C420 Team Stella Taherian/Sophia Shaffer, Lina Carper (MBYC)/Isabella Loiselle, Tommy Rudowicz/Preston Miller and Trey Summers/Mercy Tangredi for their performance at the SCYYRA (Dave) Perry Series Regatta #1 hosted by Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club. …to CorYC Sabot Squader Max Olson for his performance at the RS Tera North Americans where he placed 6 th out of 32 boats at Dana Point Yacht Club ….to CHS Sailing Team sailors Sophia Shaffer, Mercy Tangredi and Trey Summers for their performance at the PCISA High School Laser Conference Championship sailed at Santa Barbara. …to Aitana Mendiguren, George Washington Univ ’20 for making MAISA Academic All-American for the 2018-19 Season and for her performance at the Navy Women’s Regatta at the Naval Academy and the Susan Rogers ’75 Regatta hosted by Cornell. …to Owen Schafer, Harvard ’21 for his performance at the Harvard Invitational and his regular Race Committee work at his University …to Crew Fritsch, MIT ’23 in his first collegiate event and another former CorYC Sabot Squader Charles Lindsay MIT ‘21 for their performance at the Harvard Invitational in Mid-September. Also, congrats to Crew Fritsch, MIT ’23 for his performance at the Sherman Hoyt Trophy at Brown U, and the Tufts Invite Regatta. …to PJ Eaton, College of Charleston ’21 for his performance at SAISA North points #2 Regatta hosted by Clemson U. …to Brock Paquin, Cal Maritime Academy ‘ 22 for his performance at the Shields Trophy hosted by Naval Academy where CMI finished 2nd. …to Ansgar Jordan, Tufts ’22 for his performance at the Harmin Regatta hosted by Maine Maritime Academy in Colgate 26’ Sailboats, the Hatch Brown Memorial Trophy at Brown University, where he was first place skipper in B Division and at the Sherman Hoyt Trophy at Brown University. …to Soenke Jordan, GWU ’21 for his performance at the MAISA Laser Conference Championship and the Carl Van Duyne Laser Regatta both hosted by the Naval Academy. ….to Sydney Zoerher, Yale ’23 for her performance in her first collegiate regatta at the Yale Invite along with CorYC Sabot Squader Catherine “B” Lindsay, Yale ’23 who have reunited at college. REGATTA DATES

Small Boat Regatta PCISA Sea Otter Fj’s SDAYC Luff-in– Sabots/lasers/420’s/Bic’s PCISA Girls Regatta Fj’s PCISA Keelboat Regatta J22’s

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10/5-10/6 10/12-10/13 10/12-10/13 10/19-10/20 10/19-10/20

CorYC Monterey MBYC SDYC SDYC


Reasons for the No Swimming Rule in the CYC Marina By Director Steven Schelkun

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he Coronado Yacht Club has had a long-standing rule about No Swimming in the Marina. There are two very good reasons for this policy.

#1 is that our Club is a busy marina with many motorized watercrafts with propellers that come and go around the docks. The fact is that a swimmer in the water is hard to see and is at risk of serious injury if struck by a boat. As an orthopedic surgeon, I lived and practiced in Florida along the Intercoastal Waterway and saw several propeller injuries. They are horrendous injuries that result in significant disability, if not death. Secondly, there is a silent risk around marinas that is not well known. It is called Electric Shock Drowning or ESD. Most of our boats are connected to an electrical supply on the dock by a shore power cable. Our boats routinely require 120 to 240 volts and 30 to 50 Amperes of current. If some of this current leaks out of a faulty electrical device on any boat, perhaps from a shorted out bilge pump wire, a corroded shore power cable plug, or a ground fault in an electrical appliance on a boat that is not correctly wired, the current cannot return through the shore power cable to the transformer and must find an alternate path back to the electrical source from which it came (Transformer), it usually tries to get back to the transformer through the water. If a swimmer is in the vicinity, even a small amount of current (15 milli-Amperes) can produce severe pain and paralyze the swimmers muscles so that they cannot swim away, paralyze the diaphragm so that they cannot breathe, and paralyze the chest muscles and vocal cords so that the victim cannot scream. Drowning is a result. Granted, Electric Shock Drowning is much more common in fresh water since salt water is much more conductive of electrical current than fresh water, and the human body salinity (salt concentration) is slightly less than salt water, so the current usually passes around a human body rather than through it, except in certain conditions. There are a number of factors such as water temperature, air temperature, tidal fluctuations, depth of water, fresh water run-off in the marina from washing boats, rain and storm drain run-off, the level of electric current, distance from the source of electrical current, the swimmer’s body mass and body fat content, presence of any cuts or abrasions all of which increase the risk of ESD, even in salt water. As a result, every marina that I know of has a standing rule of no swimming in the marina or from boats that are attached to shore electrical power. Every safety organization in the boating community supports this such as the Electric Shock Drowning Prevention Association, Electric Safety Foundation International, National Electric Code (505) and National Fire Protection Association. This is a CYC rule. Signs are posted and hopefully, now that you all know the reasons, you will not place yourself or your children at risk by swimming in the Marina. You may want to consider anchoring off Stingray Point and swimming from there. One caveat; we were all taught in Lifesaving and Water Safety classes to “Reach, Row, Throw and Go” when we are faced with a person in the water that appears to be struggling or shocked and may not be able to talk. However, in this case, if you have any suspicion that the victim may have been shocked and unresponsive, DO NOT ENTER THE WATER, since you will be exposed to the same electrical current and may end us a second victim. Even though the risk is small, the consequences are dire and even though we would all love to swim off the back of our boats at dock on a hot day, I would not want to expose my family and loved ones to this risk. Steven R. Schelkun, MD

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Race Committee Report By Race Committee Chair Glenn Welch

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he Neil McGuinness series was sailed Friday, September 6th. Results are as follows:

CLASS ONE First Place Second Place

BOAT Island Surf Salty Tango

SKIPPER Manny Granillo JF Poupeau

1 3

1 3

1 3

1 3

CLASS THREE First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Sarayu Isle Run Shibui Aurora Bonejour

Mike Lewis Dave Flint Shawn Powell Curtis Milioti Steven Schelkun

1 3 2 4 5

1 2 4 3 6

4 1 2 3 6

4 3 2 1 7

FUTURE RACES: Small Boat Regatta SBC Championship

Sat/Sun Sunday

October 5/6 October 13

In the Offing By Cruise Fleet Chair Jackie Busch

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hat a summer for Cruise Fleet! The official launch of our first ever “Floatopia” was a huge success. I would like to thank all of our cruise fleet regulars and an extra thank you to the large group of “newbies” that joined us on that beautiful day at String Ray Point. Sometimes the simplest of plans prove to be the best. Just add sun, warm water, hot dogs, beer, private local beach, huge water floats and an epic beach party is born. So successful that we have added it to the club calendar as a yearly event, the first Saturday following Labor Day each year. Please take a look at the Cruise Fleet website to see our photos. * SAVE THE DATE 9-12-2020 * It's been the committee’s pleasure planning the events so far this year and we look forward to much of the same next summer. We are available for planning assistance if anyone would like to plan an outing during our lovely fall weather and I'll keep you posted for any “Frost Bite” raft up dates. Always Nauti, Jackie

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Cruiser Navigation Report By Cruiser Navigation Chair Dave Weimer

O

ur last near shore ocean contest was planned for Saturday, September 28. Unfortunately, our Whisker Pole deadline prevented reporting on the results of this contest. But for those interested in pursuing this fun sport, I’ll take you through some steps to illustrate our contest planning. We’ll report on the results of both the September contest as well as the October contest in next month’s Whisker Pole. The final ocean contest is sponsored by the San Diego Cruiser Association, and hosted by the Southwestern Yacht Club. In preparation for this on the water rally, Southwestern provided all contestants with a Contest Announcement, Instructions for all Course Waypoints, a designated Finish Time for each contestant, and a printout of the predicted currents at five minute intervals for the San Diego Base Current Station (In the channel between channel buoys “11” and “12). Our first task is to plot the course, using either paper charts or our charting software. The instructions stipulated a Start abeam of red channel buoy “16” on the north east side of the entrance channel. The course led south, leaving red channel buoy “14” to port (avoiding a restricted passage area), and south out the channel to red channel buoy “8” near the end of the Zuniga Jetty, for the first timed “Mark.” The next leg was specified to be run on a 140-degree magnetic heading south east, until we intersect with a range formed by red channel buoy “3” and green channel buoy “4” for the second “Mark.” The third leg was then to the east to Navy mooring buoy “TG-1” for the third “Mark.” The next legs included a timed run for a distance of 0.875 NM toward the Seal Training Tower on the beach. This was followed by a south run paralleling the shore until abeam of the Life Guard tower close to the entrance to Coronado Cays for the fourth “Mark.” The next two timed legs consist of a long north western run back to the north side of the channel entrance at green channel buoy “7” and a final leg to the Finish at green channel buoy “15” not far from the bait barges. This course presented several challenges: The first challenge is to accurately pilot our vessel on our planned course to the range between the two buoys, beginning at red channel buoy “8.” If there was no wind or current impacting our track, no problem. However, this unrealistic scenario is not anticipated, so we will have to see if we can find a rear range to keep on course, or use our hand-held compass to align our boat with the red channel buoy “8.” Hopefully visibility will not be an issue finding the range. The second challenge is to accurately call the “Mark” abeam of the Life Guard tower heading south along the silver strand shoreline. Often, a shore hugging haze restricts our visibility for this landmark, or sea conditions prevents an accurate 90-degree compass bearing on the tower. Finally, there are the channel current effects on our boat speed. Our analysis illustrates that a peak flood current will occur during our initial outbound channel transit. And to make it more challenging, September 28 is the day of the “new moon” leap tide, with greater currents predicted than usual. Upon our return to the channel, the flood tide is now dying, with a slack tide, or even a small ebb tide expected somewhere during our transit to the Finish. Each contestant is given a specific finish time three minutes apart (to prevent vessels being trapped in one another’s wake). After we plot our 16 NM course at our baseline speed, we will have an estimated watch time for each leg, or portions thereof. We then can turn to the predicted currents along our path, and using our best “guesses,” factor the current impacts on our baseline boat speed. In the ocean, we must go on experience as to what the ground swell might be, and the impact of wind driven currents. Some corrections to our speed must wait until we are on the water, depending upon the actual wind and wave conditions. Combining all these variables with our planned course, we now predict our time to the “Marks,” and are able to calculate our Start Time. How well our predictions pan out and any adjustments we make on the water will determine our final errors and score for the contest. This is part of the fun and challenge of participating in our sport. There is much more. If you own and cruise a mid-sized power boat, consider learning about cruiser navigation contests by joining one of us on board for a “test” run. To get started, I will be more than willing to guide you step by step as you enter into this entertaining and fascinating sport. Welcome Aboard!

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TransPac 2019 Stories by Charlie Allen, Long Time Flag Member & Staff Commodore

average wind. Instead of the typical 15 knot trades, we experienced extended periods of high teens and low twenties. The only slow day we had was the last full day. However, even that ended quickly with the return of the high teen, low/mid-twenties sailing to the finish. Great time, but super wet. Wearing foulies until the last day is atypical, but worth the trade off! Eight days to Hawaii on a 40 footer was crazy!

Did you experience any crew injuries or breakdowns? Only damage was to our egos. We had four J 125s in the race and were This is the second article of this series and it was written by Mark beat by two (who finished 1st and 2nd overall). One was very close Surber. I expect to have the story from Heather Furey for next until near the end, but the other had something special we could month. not match. Gotta love sailing. Just when you think you have figured it out, there is still more to learn! Boat Name: “Snoopy” Type of boat: J 125 Most dicey times? We had typical squalls with high pressure Skipper: Mark Surber and rain. We had some power boat traffic to navigate around. However, none of these were as scary as a midnight crossing with Here is Mark’s story: another J125 (“Velvet Hammer”). At sunset, we were both on starboard jibe, with them about 3 miles to weather and forward. Was the race well managed? TransPac Yacht Club ran a great We could see them clearly. After dark we did not see any running event, from the pre-race parties all the way through trophies. lights and assumed they had either sailed a higher angle putting Professional and helpful. them out of sight or otherwise sailed away from us. At the time of the incident, we had two crew on deck with one just waking up for What was your crew’s reaction to the early loss and recovery a shift change. Our navigator was at the computer analyzing the of the EOS Crew? OEX (old Orient Express; turbo charged Santa latest weather. It was pitch black on deck. Suddenly, out of Cruz 70) was lost only a few hundred miles into the race. We nowhere, VH de-cloaked about 20 boat lengths to weather of us on learned at roll-call the following AM, but with only limited details port jibe (we were watching for them throughout our shift and did saying ~2:00AM that morning OEX suffered “catastrophic rudder not see any running lights until suddenly we did!) We were both failure”, that the crew had to abandon, were rescued by moving very fast at about 15-18 knots. I yelled down to the “Pyewacket” (Disney’s boat ) and currently returning to the navigator to learn who they were and reach out via VHF. His mainland. No other details were provided. Upon arrival in Hawaii response was that it was VH and they were hailing us to give way. we learned that a one-meter hole surrounding the lower rudder Given their surprise arrival, our lack of hands on deck and to be bearing had opened. It is unclear if they hit something or if this perfectly clear in our response we told them we were NOT was a simple structural failure. All they knew is that steering altering course. Anything else could have been catastrophic. In failed and upon inspection they saw the entire rudder, bearing response, VH turned hard upwind, wiping out their boat and assembly, post and surrounding section of the hull slamming clearing our transom by about 2 boat lengths. Needless to say, around in an enormous hole. They tried to stabilize, only to have a there was a lot of yelling. They later told us that they could read crew member temporarily pinned (with open ocean flowing in, our instruments. Scary close! Turns out they knew we were there this must have been pretty scary). After freeing himself, they cut well in advance of their communication, but thought the courses the entire assembly free and shoved it out the hole. Despite being would not intersect. When it was clear we would collide, they got chest-deep in water, they attempted to block the hole, but with no on the VHF. Lesson learned is to reach out early and negotiate a success. Meanwhile on deck, the crew had launched the rafts and clear and agreed upon crossing plan. At that speed, at night, and the decision was made to abandon ship. From what we that far from help, communication and safety well exceed trying to understand, “Pyewacket” was in view as they stepped up into life establish and enforce racing right away. rafts. What was your finish position? “Snoopy” finished 4th in class Did you feel comfortable in view of the strong winds with and 4th overall out of 87 boats. Despite being beat by two other J your boats ability to compete? Absolutely! Snoopy has been 125s and a Rogers 46 (who by the way got to Hawaii faster than structurally reinforced, sails optimized, and new rigging to match. Merlin’s 1977 record which stood for 20 years!), we are super The only issues we had were with chaff and our short circuited happy with our result. Yes, we have more to learn about TransPac engine electrical panel (constantly submerged in cockpit water). and the boat, but 4th overall is nothing to shake a stick at! Nothing required us to slow down. The crew was equally up for the task. Great guys! Any personal comments? TransPac is a great and super hard race. That said, TransPac is Were the winds stronger and lasted longer than previously great because it is hard. “Snoopy” is fast, but mentally challenging encountered? The forecast was for two high pressure zones on as you are always wet. On deck, down below, everywhere! There the northerly side of the course to merge over the first days of the is no escape. Even on the head you have a constant drip on your race. This resulted in an oblong high pressure region that back. You just have to suck it up, try and get as much sleep as flattened the trades and provided a more direct path to Hawaii possible and when on deck, sail as hard and as fast as possible. than in previous years. This combined with close southerly low Knowing you have three sister-ships for which to measure your pressure, compressed the course wind resulting in more than effort, it was always on! ...To be continued in November! Page 12


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Classifieds/For Sale For Sale: Avon 10' Dinghy 1983 but no holes or leaks. Call me see it. Has 1. Floor boards, 2. Two seats, 3. Oars, 4. Foot pump. Comes with a Mercury 2.2 horse power motor. 619-435-8227. CATALINA 38 - We have purchased a new sailboat and don't want to be a two-boat family! Over the past six years we have made many upgrades, including: new lifelines, standing rigging, ProMariner charging system, furler (all in 2017), running rigging; new water pump, macerator, batteries, and more (2015). This is the vessel that was previously owned by Frank and Dudley Rockwell; it sails beautifully and the engine purrs like a kitten. Will consider all reasonable offers. Bruce and Cathy Liese—bliese@kumc.edu or 913-579-5039.

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FOR SALE—Classic 1970 whaler with rebuilt and refinished wooden console and 90HP 2010 Yamaha engine. Very few hours of engine use. Comes with Aros trailer. Call: Marylee Goyan - 619-972-5158 Dear fellow CYC member, My wife Teresa and I are CYC flag members since 2016. We wish to partner with another member with a 18-26 ft power boat in a wet slip so that we can start creating family boating memories at CYC. We are happy to supply generous funds to defray overhead costs in accordance with CYC guidelines for the opportunity. We are good and honest people who just want a chance to enjoy the most important amenity any yacht club has to offer… access to the water. Sincerely, Martin and Teresa Bastuba, Sons: Alex, Ryan and Ben, 1502 Glorietta Blvd, Coronado, 619889-1199

FOR SALE: FLOATING RAFT: Great as a dock for kayaks or paddle board, excellent for swimming and snorkeling. Not a toy, heavy-duty to be used as a work platform for yacht cleaning or maintenance. Made of same heavy-duty materials and can be carried by 1-2 persons or rolled on a folding hand cart for easy transportation. Place beach chairs or loungers and enjoy your own private island on the water. Great as a fun activity platform for yachts. Top surface all covered with large non-skid patch. Also can be used as a dock for a Jet Ski and small boats. Contact Flag member Scott Kaye. $375 negotiable. Long time Flag Member looking for 1 Bedroom Apartment. Willing to house-sit. Form of Income: Social Security. 82 years old. Call Jim: (760) 6138100 or email: jpgintry5000@gmail.com


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BARBARA WAMHOFF REALTOR

DRE#01225350 (619) 517-8880 barbara.wamhoff@pacificsir.com Pacific Sotheby’s International Realty 1200 Orange Avenue Coronado, CA 92118

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October 2019 SUN

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8:30A Private Event 5P Dinner

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HAPPY THANKSGIVING! CLUBHOUSE CLOSED

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Coronado Yacht Club 1631 Strand Way Coronado, CA 92118

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Presorted Standard U. S. Postage PAID San Diego, Calif. Permit No. 1865

Profile for Coronado Yacht Club

Whisker Pole October 2019  

Whisker Pole October 2019  

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