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The consequences of budget cuts are critical to dance companies and the quality of work they are able to produce. “Audiences can expect to see more bare spaces, to hear more taped music, and to make choices among fewer productions” (Kaufman) says Jonathon Katz, director of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies. When sharing her first hand experience in her interview, Kristin Lewis for a publication in Dance Teacher magazine, Ailey’s executive director, Sharon Gersten Luckman says that while companies searched for solutions to the lack of federal and state funding, they even found that grants from foundations decreased when the stock market went down (Lewis). The National Endowment of the Art’s budget was raised to $148 million after an increase in 2016, and despite current President Trump’s threat to eliminate all funding for this endowment, a House Bill was passed ensuring a 2018 fiscal budget of $145 million on July 2017 (Bowley). Sarah Kaufman concludes, “Government funding is not the largest component of income for dance companies. But when you have government support for the arts, that’s a statement about where arts fits into your culture, in your world, in your society” (Kaufman). In evaluating the success of nonprofit dance companies we must also consider the functionality of the system from the inside out. As Sally Banes writes, “Behind every dance performance is a network of institutions and support systems,” (Banes 1). The traditional format of a nonprofit organization is hierarchical, an authoritative food chain in the following order: the Board, the Executive/Artistic Director, the artists, and lastly the community. The financial stability of a nonprofit arts organization depends largely on the success of their Board of Trustees. Kaiser points out that along with economic turmoil, Trustees are becoming financially unsure and therefore feel pressured to “economize” the organizations they support (Kaiser 55). The rich and privileged donors who make up majority of Boards are primarily influenced and driven by “corporate success” often leading them to a different vision for the organization than that of the Artistic Directors (Kaiser 55). If there are not clearly outlined roles between the Board of Trustees versus the Executive Director, boundaries are often inappropriately crossed, consequently affecting the overall success of the company negatively. According to the authors of the Harvard Business Review article, “The New Work of the Nonprofit Board”, “Effective governance by the board of a nonprofit organization is a rare and unnatural act. Only the most uncommon of nonprofit boards functions as it should by harnessing the collective efforts of accomplished individuals to advance the institution's mission and long-term welfare” (Taylor, Chait, Holland). The hierarchical model of nonprofit organizations is now being questioned due to the many dysfunctionalities of the structure, and the new and improved “partnership model” is causing a revolution in the way we think about nonprofit governance. This substantially more flexible model puts the Board on equal authority level as the rest of the organization’s stakeholders. Anne Derieux, who served as 3

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Profile for Cornish College of the Arts

n Other Words Side A  

In April 2018, the Cornish College of the Arts Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Committee launched an inaugural two-week exhibition, In...

n Other Words Side A  

In April 2018, the Cornish College of the Arts Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Committee launched an inaugural two-week exhibition, In...

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