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The Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan

November 2010 Draft

Credit: Hargreaves and Associates from California State Parks Future Image of Los Angeles State Parks.

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Table of Contents 2008-09-23 5

Acknowledgements

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SECTIONS

S-01

Overview

S-02

Districts

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Massing and Street Wall

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Architectural Details

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Parks and Open Space

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Parking and Access

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Conservation

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Performance Standards

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Signage

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Street Designations

APPENDICES

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Reference

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LEED-ND Stage I Certification

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Stormwater Guidelines

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Street Standards

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Acknowledgements

MAYOR Antonio Villaraigosa CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT ONE Ed P. Reyes, Councilperson Jill Sourial, Environmental Deputy Susan Wong, Planning Deputy Michael Fong, Former Field Deputy DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING (DCP) Executive Office Michael LoGrande, Director S. Gail Goldberg, AICP, (Retired) Director Jane Blumenfeld, (Retired) Acting Deputy Director Vincent P. Bertoni, AICP, Deputy Director Eva Yuan-McDaniel, Deputy Director City Planning Commission William Roschen, President Regina M. Freer, Vice President Barbara Romero Diego Cardoso Fr. Spencer T. Kezios Michael Woo Sean Burton Yolanda Orozco Project Staff Ken Bernstein, Principal Planner John Butcher, GIS Chief Kevin Keller, Senior City Planner Ly Lam, Senior Management Analyst I Elvia Hernandez, Graphics Designer III Michael Uhlenkott, (Retired) Graphic Designer III Claire Bowin, AICP, City Planner Patricia Diefenderfer, City Planner Simon Pastucha, City Planner Maria Ortiz, Management Analyst II Nekpen Aimiuwu, Management Analyst

Joyce Odell, (Retired) Cartographer Shakeh Boghoskhanian, Graphic Designer II Louisa Ranick, Graphic Designer II Interns Alex Campbell Diana Fox Pangetsu Laura Kwak Brian Lobel Kyung Mi Park Avani Sheth Alycia Witzling Jennifer Wong CONSULTANT TEAM Arup, Inc. Jim Jordan, Project Director Mark Shorett, Project Manager Mayra Madriz, Deputy Project Manager Angus Deuchars, Senior Acoustical Consultant Joseph Digerness, Acoustical Consultant Jake Levitas, LEED® AP, Graduate Sustainability Consultant Yolanda Owens, Project Administrator Rowan Roderick-Jones, Senior Consultant Michael Whiteman,Acoustical Consultant Fehr and Peers John Muggridge, Associate Kevin Johnson, Associate COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (CRA) Cecilia Estolano, Former Chief Executive Officer Christine Essel, Chief Executive Officer Don Spivack, Deputy Chief of Operations and Policy David Riccitiello, Regional Administrator Lillian Burkenheim, Project Manager Karen Yamamoto, Senior Planner Ed Huang, Senior Planner Bibiana Yung, Assistant Project Manager Isabel Rivero, Development Control Manager Jason Neville, Associate Planner DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) Jay Kim, Principal Transportation Engineer Tomas Carranza, Senior Transportation Engineer Michelle Mowery, Bikeways Coordinator DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS (DPW) Bureau of Engineering’s (BOE) River Project Office Deborah Weintraub, Deputy City Engineer II Carol Armstrong, Environmental Supervisor II Lawrence Hsu, Senior Civil Engineer

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Green Streets Committee Paula Daniels- Board of Public Works Commissioner Jane Adrian- DPW/BOE Melinda Bartlett- DPW/Bureau of Sanitation (BOS) Michael Brown- DPW/BOE Tomas Carranza- DOT Johanna Chang- Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) Steven Chen-DPW/BOE Robert Espinoza-CRA Jose Gutierrez- DPW/BOS Robert Gutierrez- DPW/Bureau of Street Services (BSS) Eric Yoshida- LADWP Edward Huang- CRA Steven Naikaido-DPW/BOSS Andy Niknafs- LADWP Lance Oishi- DPW/BSS Ron Olive-DPW/BSS Jeong Park- DPW/BOE Simon Pastucha-DCP Majid Sadeghi-DPW/BOS J. Shih-CRA Susan Shu-DPW/BOE Wing Tam-DPW/BOS Aldo Ubau- Department of Building and Safety (DBS) Bureau of Street Lighting Kerney Marine Bureau of Urban Forestry Ron Lorenzen, Street Tree Superintendent I DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER Tom Erb, Director of Water Resources David Pettijohn, Managing Water Utility Engineer Natali Kassis, Civil Engineering Associate Terrence McCarthy, Civil Engineering Associate Imudiase Aimiuwu, Operations & Statistical Research Analyst CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS Ruth Coleman, Director Jeff Brown, Sr. Landscape Architect Ron Schafer, Superintendent - Los Angeles District Sean Woods, Superintendent – Los Angeles Sector Randy Novack, Project Manager Stephanie Campbell, Associate Park & Recreation Specialist NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS Arroyo Seco Neighborhood Council Chinatown-Alpine Hill Neighborhood Association Eagle Rock Neighborhood Council

Elysian Valley Riverside Neighborhood Council Glassell Park Neighborhood Council Greater Cypress Park Neighborhood Council Historic Cultural Neighborhood Council Lincoln Heights Neighborhood Council Silver Lake Neighborhood Council Solano Canyon Neighborhood Council BUSINESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS Alpine Recreation Center American Institute for Architects Arroyo Seco Foundation Audubon Society California Endowment’s Center for Healthy Communities Center for Sustainable Cities Chinatown Adivisory Committee Chinatown Redevelopment Commission Chinatown Service Center Chinese American Citizens Alliance Chinese Chamber of Commerce Creative Environments Cypress Park Recreation Cypress Park Youth & Family Center Downey Recreation Center El Pueblo de Los Angeles Farm Lab Friends of Los Angeles River (FoLAR) Goodwill Industries Homeboys Industries Lincoln Park Recreation Center Los Angeles & San Gabriel Watershed Council Natural Resources Defense Council North East Trees Puerta del Sol San Antonio Winery Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy The City Project Tree People Tujunga Watershed Stakeholders William Mead Residents Association Young Nak Church SCHOOLS Albion Street Elementary Ann Street Elementary School Cal State University, Northridge Cathedral High School Cal Poly Pomona Franklin High School Occidental College- Urban Environmental Policy Institute University of California, Los Angeles University of Southern California

Woodbury University NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Barbara Rice Ann Cole Patrick Johnston

Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan

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PURPOSE • • • • • • • •

To increase access to open space. To promote a mixed of uses. To provide economic growth opportunities for existing and emerging clean technologies. To re-connect historic communities. To reduce energy and water consumption. To promote a healthy watershed. To facilitate pedestrian and bicycle mobility. To provide access to a variety of transit options including frequent light rail and bus connections, shared vehicles and bicycles, and taxis.

The Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan (Plan) is the result of several years of planning and community engagement that involved community workshops, meetings and conversations with residents, employers, property owners, and community, business and environmental organizations, as well as staff input from numerous city, county, State, and federal departments. The Plan incorporates an approximately 660 acre area that today is largely characterized by low-density light industrial buildings and publicly owned maintenance, utility and railway yards. The area is bounded by Chinatown and downtown Los Angeles to the southeast, Elysian Park and Cypress and Glassell Park to the north, and Lincoln Heights to the east. The Los Angeles River and Golden State Freeway both run north-south through the longitudinal center of the Plan while the Arroyo Seco and Pasadena Freeway run east-west through the northernmost section of the Plan area. Completing the infrastructure network is the Gold Line, a light rail line that cuts diagonally across the Plan area. While this abundance of infrastructure is largely responsible for the auto-centric and industrial character of the area it does provide residents and employees with access to multiple transportation options The need for, and initial vision of, the Plan arose from a variety of planning and infrastructure activities that have occurred within the Plan area over the past six years. The primary activity that set the

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stage for the Plan was the Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan (LARRMP) that was adopted by the City Council in 2007. The LARRMP re-imagined thirty-two miles of the Los Angeles River as a public amenity complete with continuous pedestrian and bicycle trails, mixed-use projects, parks and watershed management features. The LARRMP also identified much of the Plan area as an ideal location to showcase land use, watershed, open space and multi-modal connectivity innovations. While the LARRMP established an early vision for the area, two major infrastructure projects were beginning to encourage unplanned redevelopment in the Plan area. The opening of the light rail Gold Line in 2004 and the promise of the new Los Angeles State Historic Park, on the parcel commonly known as the “Cornfield,” spurred the development of 900 residential units on what had been industrially zoned properties. While residential uses are not an unwelcome attribute adjacent to either transit or park land the area had not been previously planned to accommodate residential uses and many community amenities and support services were lacking. The City had also recently completed an industrial land use study that highlighted the negative economic impacts of industrial land conversions to residential uses and was therefore particularly sensitive to the impact of the potential loss of additional industrially zoned properties. The various zone changes did however highlight the area’s vulnerability to change and illustrated the need for a comprehensive development plan to leverage the transit and park infrastructure improvements. Fortunately, the City’s Framework Element, adopted in 1995 and the Transportation Element, adopted in 1999, which make up part of the City’s General Plan, set forth a variety of policies to encourage the very mix of uses that was beginning to occur in an ad-hoc fashion within the Plan area. In particular, the General Plan encouraged the development of transit-oriented districts (TODs) in and around transit stations. These TODs were often envisioned as higher density places with a mix of land uses designed to accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists. The General Plan policies, combined with the vision established in the LARRMP, set the stage for a model planning opportunity whereby transitoriented strategies could be blended with the interests of watershed enhancements, open space and connectivity. In addition, during the initial months of the Plan’s conception, the US Green Building Council (USGBC)

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LEED-ND Due to the timetable of the pilot program the draft Plan was submitted and accepted by the USGBC at the Pre-Approval stage as a Certified LEED-ND Plan in the Spring of 2010. The Plan achieved 31 of a possible 106 points. Because of the preliminary nature of the Plan a number of points were not yet able to be documented fully and therefore were not accepted. The Certified designation confirms that the Plan’s numerous goals and objectives will reduce energy and potable water consumption, reduce ambient air temperature, increase pedestrian, bicycle, and transit mobility, encourage stormwater management, and promote a diversity of land uses and housing types. For a copy of the Plan’s LEED-ND checklist and the Certification Letter from USGBC please refer to Appendix 02.

initiated a pilot phase of its newest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system: LEED-Neighborhood Development (ND). The goal of the USGBC in developing the LEED-ND program was to expand the benefits of green building energy and conservation strategies to the neighborhood scale. The goals of LEED-ND seemed a perfect complement to the initial concepts for the Plan. The City, with the assistance of the Department of Water and Power, the Community Redevelopment Agency, and the non-profit Global Green, applied for and was accepted into the LEEDND pilot program. The LEED-ND program proved a useful guide throughout the development of the Plan as a means to evaluate and set implementation standards for various conservation strategies. With the vision and goals of the LARRMP in mind, coupled with the enthusiasm to remake this area as a sustainable model for the City, the desire to balance the needs of housing and jobs, a rich transit infrastructure, and the promise of an exciting new urban state park, the community got to work. From the beginning, at the first workshop in September 2007 that was led by volunteer facilitators from the Western Justice Center, the community articulated a keen interest in seeing the Plan provide for safe and accessible passageways for pedestrians and bicyclists, additional open space, and access to the Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco. The community also stressed the importance of providing for a mix of uses, especially near the transit stations and the State Park, that included affordable housing, along with community and employment uses. They also identified key industrial quarters that they wanted to protect, primarily along Main Street and the area currently defined as the Lincoln Heights Industrial Business Improvement District. Due to the area’s proximity to downtown, several universities, as well as transit and freeway infrastructure these industrial properties, along with the City’s own vehicle storage and maintenance yards are well suited to attract and retain a portion of the existing light industrial sector as well as the emerging clean technology industry. While the City requires many of the yards to remain within easy access to the downtown area and surrounding communities a number of the properties are obsolete or dysfunctional. Redevelopment of these sites could attract key industrial employers, showcase examples of public private partnerships, increase site efficiencies, and demonstrate principles of sustainable development.

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Merging the goals and objectives of the community with those of the General Plan and the LARRMP the Plan establishes zoning strategies and standards to transform the area into a collection of vibrant and mixed-use neighborhoods that will be a magnet for new jobs, residents, visitors, and a 24-7 vitality. Four new Districts replace the current segregated industrial and public facility zoning types. The new Districts will encourage living, working, shopping, education, open space, and recreational activities all within a short distance of each other. And, the new mixed-use Districts will appeal to employers and employees alike that are attracted to the nearby mix of living and playing options. In meeting these goals the Plan will lessen dependence on automobiles, and thereby reducee vehicle emissions, while enhancing the personal health of residents, employees, and visitors and creating a safe and stable community. The Plan will also establish standards that will reduce the use of energy and potable water, capture stormwater, improve the ecology and hydrology of the Los Angeles River Watershed and Arroyo Seco, create connections from the community to the River and Arroyo Seco, and support the LARRMP. The open space requirements established in the Plan will provide places for people to socialize, including parks, sidewalks, courtyards, and plazas that are combined with shops and services as well as provide adequate public recreational open space within walking distance of residents and employees. As the Plan area’s population and employment increase, many more trips will begin and end within the Plan area. Walking to work or to a store, bicycling to the Los Angeles State Historic Park or the Los Angeles River, or taking transit from home to work will become an integral part of the Plan’s lifestyle. The Plan’s land use pattern will be intense and diverse, allowing many destinations to be reached within a short walk or bike ride and closely integrated with the transportation system. Trips outside of the Plan area will be facilitated by easy access to the Gold Line, one of the numerous bus lines, hailing a taxi, or borrowing a car or bicycle through “car or bike share” programs.

High Speed Rail During the development of the Plan, California voters supported a statewide effort to plan and develop a high-speed train system to connect major urban destinations. The Union Station location on the periphery of downtown Los Angeles is expected to be the central hub of the new system. While there is no high speed station planned for the Plan area all trains between Union Station and Northern California will pass through the Plan area. The recently established HighSpeed Rail Authority (HSRA) is currently studying several alignment options in the Plan area and a final decision on the preferred alignment is not expected until 2011. The HSRA is aware of the goals of the Plan and the City will continue to provide input and mitigation suggestions. When a final alignment is selected the high-speed rail plan will be subject to environmental review to comply with federal and State law.

Five-Sub Areas The Plan area is divided into five sub-areas, which serve as an organizational tool for referencing the distinct geographical areas. Existing barriers and infrastructure elements such as the Los Angeles River, Arroyo Seco, major street corridors and freeways were utilized to establish the boundaries of the five areas. While these boundaries currently divide the Plan area, implementation of the Plan over time will begin to erase the boundaries and transform the subareas into connected viable public places. The images and text on the following pages provides descriptive and illustrative concepts for each of these five sub-areas. The numbers on each block of the map are for reference purposes only.

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AREA ONE Sub-Area One links downtown and Chinatown to the River, the Los Angeles State Historic Park (Park) and Lincoln Heights. Much of the area will experience a transformation from a low intensity light industrial area to a mix of uses that includes new residences, intimate public spaces, and commercial space for light industrial, research and development, and creative industry. The southwest portion of this sub-area, including the Department of Water and Power property and the properties along the north side of Main Street, will become an Urban Innovation district that will facilitate the development of light industrial uses. The blocks on the southern side of Spring Street will act as a “front porch� for the Los Angeles State Historic Park (Park). The redesign of Spring Street will include a landscaped median, bicycle lanes, wide sidewalks and other pedestrian scaled street improvements. These improvements along with the introduction of retail shops and restaurants will reinforce active engagement between the Park and Spring Street. Sotello Street will link the Park and Spring Street with Main Street and the Urban Innovation district and the River to the south.

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AREA TWO Area Two extends from the eastern edge of the River to Interstate 5, linking the southern portion of the Plan area to both Lincoln Heights and the industrial area to the south. The vast majority of this area is currently made up of single family and duplex style homes which will not be rezoned. Relative to the four other subareas of the Plan, area Two will experience minimal change. An Urban Innovation district will line Main Street, providing a buffer from the sharp industrial edge south of Main Street and continuing the cluster of light industrial activity from west of the River. Downey and Albion Dairy Parks, the existing community, and the new Urban Innovation district will be linked into a stronger open space network that connects to the River. Pocket parks that treat stormwater during peak rain events will also provide new space for passive recreation and informal gatherings. Enhanced streets with wider sidewalks and trees will provide a pathway to the edge of the River and regional recreation networks. At the northern edge of area Two, Broadway will be transformed, through new urban design and streetscape standards, into a public room, offering well-shaded places to sit, talk, shop, and wait for public transit. Beyond Broadway, public realm improvements along Avenue 19 and San Fernando Road will provide current residents with greater, more comfortable access to the opportunities and amenities that emerge as Area Two evolves.

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AREA THREE Area Three, informally dubbed “Rivertown” sits between Broadway, the River, Interstate 5, and the Arroyo Seco. What is currently a fragmented area with poor connections to surrounding districts and communities will become an attractive series of streets, parks, and waterfronts woven into the broader fabric of the Plan area and the City. The central and northern portions of Area Three will become a hub for light industrial and research and development space—a combination of existing and future businesses that together form the critical mass of a successful urban district. The high volume of daytime activity created by the employment uses will be complemented by the evening and weekend activity generated by residents and visitors to institutions such as Young Nak Church. A future new park on the existing Fire Department property is envisioned for the area. This new park will be within walking distance of every employee and resident within this area and will provide a central space for active and passive recreation, a place that will remain vibrant throughout the day and into the early evening. The sidewalks surrounding the park will become an extended “public room” accommodating a wide range of activities and gatherings for multiple generations.

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AREA FOUR Area Four is home to the Lincoln Heights/Cypress Park Gold Line Station and adjacent to the Heritage Square Station that sits just outside of the northeastern portion of this Area. New parks surrounded by a mix of light industrial and research and development uses, as well as existing residences, will create an anchor for the Urban Center, Urban Village and Urban Innovation districts surrounding the station. To the northeast of Avenue 26 will be an Urban Innovation district with a mix of existing industrial tenants and companies engaged in the research, development, and production of clean technologies. This area will remain primarily industrial in character, but will become more hospitable to pedestrians and bicyclists. Formal and informal spaces for active and passive recreation will serve residents of surrounding neighborhoods as well as people working and living in Area Four. The pedestrian overpass “gauntlet,� that currently links sub-area four to Cypress Street across the Arroyo Seco Parkway, will become a welcoming pathway as a result of a redesign of the overpass itself and the creation of defensible open spaces at its northern and southern entrances on either side of the freeway.

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AREA FIVE Area Five is framed by the Arroyo Seco and the River to the southeast, the River Center to the northwest, and Cypress Avenue to the east. The core of the area is Figueroa Street, which will evolve from an automobile-oriented arterial into a comfortable place to walk, sit, or wait for public transit. An Urban Center District will define Area Five in the future, providing a range of office, research and development, and light industrial jobs while enhancing the quality of the public realm through pocket parks, trees, bike lanes, and other features. New development and redevelopment will support the existing community and strengthen connections to Areas Three and Four to the south. The River Center will remain an anchor for the northwest portion of Sub-Area Five, but will be connected to new employment opportunities made up of small blocks that provide a new link to Figueroa Street and the high concentration of transit travelers boarding and alighting at its intersection with Avenue 26. Shaded streets with wide sidewalks will seamlessly join this new development with Confluence Park and the River to the east and the western portion of Figueroa Street which will be a range of small to medium sized shops and offices, with occasional places for informal gathering and sitting.

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Overview

PURPOSE • To transform an under served and neglected vehicular-oriented industrial and public facility area into a cluster of mixed-use pedestrian oriented and aesthetically pleasing neighborhoods. • Increase access to open space. • Provide economic growth opportunities for emerging clean technologies, • Re-connect historical communities. • To maintain and enhance the concentration of jobs, in both the public and private sectors. • To provide a range of housing types and price levels that offer a full range of choices, including home ownership, for people of diverse ages, ethnicity, household sizes, and incomes. • To provide shops and services for everyday needs, including groceries, day care, cafes and restaurants, banks and drug stores within an easy walk from home or work. • To facilitate pedestrian mobility, encourage bicycle use, provide shared and unbundled parking spaces, and provide access to a variety of transit options including frequent light rail and bus connections, shared vehicles and bicycles, and taxis. • To lessen dependence on automobiles, and thereby reducing vehicle emissions, while enhancing the personal health of residents, employees, and visitors. • Provide “eyes on the street” to create a safe and stable community and to encourage interaction and identity. • To respect historically significant buildings, including massing and scale while at the same time, encouraging innovative architectural design that expresses the identity of contemporary urban Los Angeles. • To reduce the use of energy and potable water, capture stormwater, improve the ecology and hydrology of the Los Angeles River Watershed and Arroyo Seco, create connections from the community to the River and Arroyo Seco, and support the LARRMP. • To provide places for people to socialize, including parks, sidewalks, courtyards, and plazas that are combined with shops and services. • To provide adequate public recreational open space within walking distance of residents and employees, and to integrate public art and contribute to the civic and cultural life of the City.

Overview 01

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ESTABLISHMENT

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1.1.1. The City Council hereby establishes the Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan applicable to that area of the City of Los Angeles shown within the solid line on the Plan Boundary and Block Numbers Map.

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1.2.1. The regulations of this Specific Plan are in addition to those set forth in the planning and zoning provisions of the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) Chapter 1, as amended, and any other relevant ordinance, and do not convey any rights not otherwise granted under the provisions and procedures contained in that Chapter, except as specifically provided for herein.

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An ordinance establishing a Specific Plan, known as the Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan, for a portion of the Central City North, Northeast, and Silverlake-Echo Park Community Plan areas.

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1.2.2. Wherever this Specific Plan contains provisions which require lesser or greater restrictions or limitations on development than would be allowed or required pursuant to the provisions contained in Chapter 1 of the LAMC, the Specific Plan shall prevail and supersede the applicable provisions of that Code. 1.2.3. Site Plan Review Ordinance. Compliance with the provisions of this Specific Plan shall be considered compliance with the requirements of LAMC Section 16.05. 1.2.4. Los Angeles River Improvement Overlay (LA-RIO). Compliance with the provisions of this Specific Plan shall be considered with compliance with the requirements of LAMC Sections ___. 1.2.5. Landscape Ordinance. Compliance with the provisions of this Specific Plan shall be considered compliance with the requirements of LAMC Sections 12.40, 12.41, 12.42, and 12.43. 1.2.6. The procedures for the granting of adjustments, exceptions, and/or amendments to the requirements of this Specific Plan are set forth in LAMC Sections 11.5.7. E, F, and G. Application 1.3.1. The provisions of this Specific Plan shall apply to all Projects located on any lot located in whole or in part within this Specific Plan area.

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Exceptions The provisions of this Specific Plan shall not apply to: 1.4.1. Any Project that has obtained a still-valid discretionary land use approval from the City prior to the operative date of this Specific Plan. 1.4.2. Demolitions. 1.4.3. Any Project where plans were accepted by the Department of Building and Safety for plan check prior to the operative date of this Specific Plan. 1.4.4. Any Project complying with an order issued by the Department of Building and Safety for the repair of an unsafe or substandard condition. 1.4.5. The restoration, repair, or remodeling of an existing building provided that the cost of the modification, in any one 24-month period, does not exceed 50 percent of the replacement value of the building or structure before the alterations or addition as determined by the Department of Building and Safety and does not increase the height, floor area, or occupant load of the original building; or, 1.4.6. The Interior remodeling of any other existing building, except for interior alterations to the ground floor that will result in the alteration of windows, display windows, entrances, storefronts or otherwise minimize ground floor transparency. Exceptions for identified Historic Resources 1.4.7. The following provisions of this Specific Plan shall not apply to projects for buildings identified as Historic Resources: 4.3.1, 4.4.1, 4.7.2, 4.7.7, 5.1.2, 5.4.1, 5.4.3. 6.8.6, 7.5.1, and 7.5.2 Prohibitions 1.5.1. No grading permit, foundation permit, building permit, or use of land permit shall be issued for any Project that requests a Bonus Transfer of Floor Area, includes a Public Paseo, or is greater than 25,000 square feet on any lot located in whole or in part within this Specific Plan area, unless the Project complies with all applicable provisions of this Specific Plan and has received an Administrative Clearance from the Director of Planning. Procedures 1.6.1. Applications for an Administrative Clearance from the Specific Plan shall be filed at any public counter of the Department of City Planning, on a form provided by the Department, and include all information required by the instruction on the application and any additional submission requirements. The Director shall determine if the application qualifies for Administrative Clearance and whether the Project complies with all applicable Plan regulations.

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Fees 1.7.1. The application fee for an Administrative Clearance shall be as set forth in LAMC Section 19.01 E or 19.01 I. The fee in Section 19.01 E shall be charged for administrative clearance for new construction permits only. The fee in Section 19.01 I shall be charged for all other building permit sign-offs. 1.7.2. The application fee for a Transfer of Floor Area Rights of 50,000 or more than 50,000 square feet under either the Bonus or Transfer Programs shall be as set forth in Section 19.___ for the Approval of Transfer of Floor Area Plan. 1.7.3. The application fee for a Transfer of Floor Area Rights of less than 50,000 square feet under either the Bonus or Transfer Programs shall be as set forth in Section 19.___ . 1.8.1. Definitions Accessory Use. A use that is customarily incidental to that of the main building/use of the land; and on the same lot with a main building or main use. Active Street. A street where retail, cultural, office, and/or residential uses are encouraged at the ground floor level where adjacent to street frontage. Active Industrial Street. A street where retail, office, lobby, meeting rooms or sales areas are encouraged at the ground floor level where adjacent to street frontage. Adult Entertainment. Uses associated with “specified sexual activity” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and/or “specified anatomical areas.” Ancillary. A permitted use that is limited to 10 percent of the on-site principal use. May be located in a stand-alone building or structure separate from the principal use. More than one ancillary use may be permitted on a single site but in no case shall the combined maximum floor area of all ancillary uses exceed a floor area ratio of 1.0. Uses designated as Ancillary are intended specifically for the use and benefit of the employees and families, residents, or patrons of the nearby industrial/ commercial/recreational/transit/residential/ educational facilities such as food and beverage stores, health and personal care, recreational facilities, book stores, or similar uses. Animal Clinic / Kennels. Uses where animals or pets are given medical or surgical treatment by an authorized licensing agent to treat injuries, illnesses and diseases of animals, including uses where small, domesticated animals and pets are cared for and boarded overnight for a limited amount of time.

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Architectural Feature. Those purely aesthetic elements of the building, designed internal to the overall style of architecture, that are not habitable or otherwise to be counted toward floor area.

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01 Overview

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automobile Fueling and Service Stations. Uses for fueling stations and car washes. Back of House. Support and service areas usually not visible from the street. Base FAR. The base floor area ratio (FAR) established for each district within the Plan area. Block. A block is a tract of land bounded on all sides by streets or by a combination of streets, public parks, railroad rights-of-way, pier head lines or airport boundaries. ...............

Building Frontage Facade. Those portions of the exterior of a building or structure that are closest to the frontage of the property. Building Height. The height of a building shall be measured vertically from grade to the highest point of roof. Brownfield. Abandoned or under used industrial or commercial facilities (including older gas stations and auto repair yards located on smaller sites adjacent to residential neighborhoods) that may be contaminated by low concentrations of hazardous waste or pollution and have the potential to be redeveloped into other uses once environmental remediation has been performed. Central Parking Structure. A parking structure or surface lot accessible and available for use by the public.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commercial Office. Uses that provide office space for professional services. Community Serving Uses. Uses may include but are not limited to child care and other educational services, public library, fire station, medical services, or non-profit whose services directly benefit the community. Covenant. A written document entered into by any and all owners of the property regarding the use or development of one or more lots, approved by the Director of Planning, and executed and recorded by such property owners in the Los Angeles County Recorder’s Office. The covenant shall be in form to run with the land and shall be binding on any subsequent owners, heirs, successors (including but not limited to beneficiaries) or assignerss. After recordation, a copy bearing the Recorder’s number and date shall be furnished to the City Planning Department for its records. Curb Cut. An inclined cut in the edge of a sidewalk to permit vehicular access to a driveway, garage, parking lot, or loading dock.

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Decibel A-Weighted Scale. The common measurement of environmental and industrial noise. Designated Historical Resource. A building, structure, landscape element, or natural feature listed in or formally determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, Calfornia Register of Historical Resources, or the City’s list of Historic-Cultural Monuments , or a Contributing Element in a City Historic Preservation Overlay Zone. Dual Pipe. A system of plumbing installations used to supply both potable and reclaimed water to a home or business through separate pipes. Under this system, two completely separate water piping systems are used to deliver water to the user. Donor Site. A site from which Floor Area Rights are transferred pursuant to the provisions of this Plan. Eligible Historic Resource. A building, structure, landscape element, or natural feature identified through SurveyLA (the Los Angeles Historic Resources Survey Project) to be eligible for recognition as historically or architecturally significant either individually or as part of a district at the local, State, or national level. Entertainment and Multi-Purpose Cultural Facilities. Uses designed to host public or private gatherings for cultural activities or entertainment.

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Floor Area. The sum of the gross area of each floor of the building, excluding mechanical space, cellar space, floor space in open balconies, elevators or stair bulkheads and, floor space used for accessory parking that is located less than 23 feet above curb level. Floor Area Ratio. The floor area ratio (FAR) is the principal bulk regulation controlling the size of buildings. FAR is the ratio of total building floor area to the area of its zoning lot (prior to any dedications). Floor Area Rights means the right to construct additional floor area within a Project, pursuant to an approved Transfer Plan, in excess of the amount of floor area such Project would be allowed based on its lot area. Free-Standing Fast Food Establishment. A single or multiple tenant free-standing structure designed solely for restaurant use which dispenses prepared food over a counter or by way of drive through service for consumption on or off the premises. This definition does not include cafeterias. Fully Shielded Fixture. Outdoor lighting fixture shielded or constructed so that no light is emitted above the horizontal plane, and light rays are only emitted by the installed fixtures in such a manner

06

01 Overview

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that do not direct light or light trespass onto adjacent property, on any other property within the line of sight (direct or reflected) of the light source, or to any member of the public who may be traveling on adjacent roadways or rights-of-way. Green Roof. A roof of a building that is partially or completely covered with vegetation and soil, or a growing medium, planted over a waterproofing membrane. Greenway. A new zoning district established by this Plan that provides for open space. The allowable uses are limited in this District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heavy Manufacturing. Uses that fabricate, assemble, process, extract, or treat predominantly raw materials; uses that require explosive or petroleum materials; or uses that produce noise, odor, dust, hazardous materials or other pollutants/nuisances that cannot be contained on site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hospitals, Nursing and Residential Care Facilities. Uses involved in providing medical, surgical, or assisted living care to patients and offering short and long-term overnight care. Holiday Lighting. Seasonal displays of 60 days or less within one calendar year, using multiple low wattage bulbs (approximately 15 lumens or less) provided they do not constitute a fire hazard, create a nuisance, and are maintained in a safe condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hotels. Housing built to accommodate the general and traveling public for a typical fee, generally limited to stays of less than 31 days. Idenfication Sign. A wall sign that is limited to a company logo, generic type of business, or the name of a business or building. Illuminated Architectural Canopy Sign. An exposed illuminated structure that is attached to the wall of a building with the face of the sign approximately parallel to the wall and with the message integrated into its surface. Inflatable Device. A sign that is a cold air inflated object, which may be of various shapes, made of flexible fabric, resting on the ground or structure and equipped with a portable blower motor that provides a constant flow of air into the device. Inflatable devices are restrained, attached, or held in place by a cord, rope, cable, or similar method. The term inflatable device shall not include any object that contains helium, hot air, or a lighter-than-air substance. Information Sign. A sign that is limited to a message giving directions, instructions, menus, or selections. Lamp. The generic term for an artificial light source installed in the socket portion of a fixture, to be distinguished from the whole

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assembly. Commonly referred to as a “bulb”. LEED©. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™ is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. See the official website www.usgbc.org for more information. Light Manufacturing and Assembly. Uses that process, fabricate, assemble, treat, or package finished parts or products and/or whose noise, odor, dust, hazardous materials or other pollutants/nuisances capable of harming or disrupting adjacent uses can be contained on site.

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Light Trespass. Light from any outdoor lighting onto neighboring property or property that is within a direct line from the light source that interferes with viewing of night sky, eliminates the ability to have darkness on the property, or shines on any area on these properties or structures. Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan (LARRMP). Plan approved in May 2007 by the Los Angeles City Council, which describes a vision for the revitalization of the 32 miles of the Los Angeles River that are within the City boundaries of the City of Los Angeles.

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Lot Area. The total horizontal area (in square feet) within the lot lines of a lot. (prior to any dedications) Lot Coverage. Lot coverage is that portion of a zoning lot which, when viewed from above, is covered by a building. Lot Depth. Lot depth is the mean horizontal distance between the front lot line and rear lot line of a zoning lot. Lot Line. Any lot boundary line. Maximum FAR. The maximum floor area ration (FAR) established for each district withiin the Plan area. Monument Sign. A sign that is erected directly upon the existing or artificially created grade, or that is raised no more than 12 inches from the existing or artificially created grade to the bottom of the sign. Mural Sign. A sign that is painted on or applied to and integral with a wall, the written message of which does not exceed three percent of the total area of the wall. North Facade. North facades are defined as those facades between -22.5 and +22.50N. Off-Site Sign. A sign that displays any message directing attention to a business, product, service, profession, commodity, activity,

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01 Overview

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event, person, institution or any other commercial message, which is generally conducted, sold, manufactured, produced, offered or occurs elsewhere other than on the premises where the sign is located. On-Site Sign. A sign that is other than an off-site sign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parking. Facilities and sites that provide free-standing, fee parking, as distinguished from parking provided on-site by a business or residential complex for its customers, employees, or residents on or adjacent to the business location or residential complex. This facility can be either a surface lot or a parking structure. Parkway Zone. Sidewalk area reserved for street furniture, landscaping and access to parked cars. Partially Shielded Fixture. A fixture employing a top shield to reduce upward light, but otherwise does not shield the lamp from view. Paseo or Pedestrian Walkway. Walkway that is typically open to the sky and that provides pedestrian passage between structures, or through landscaping, or parking lots, which is distinguished by ground surface treatments that provide for pedestrian safety and ease of movement. Pedestrian Amenities. Uses, services, or features typically available within, or adjacent to, a public right-of-way that assist and enhance the pedestrian experience. Amenities may include but are not limited to street furniture, wayfinding signage, kiosks, street lighting, street trees, coffee shops, and bookstores. Pedestrian Lighting. Freestanding lighting fixtures not exceeding a height of thirty-six (36) inches from ground grade level. ..............

Personal Services. Uses involved in personal service-oriented sales to the general public. Plan. The Cornfield/Arroyo Seco Specific Plan. Pole Sign. A freestanding sign that is erected or affixed to one or more poles or posts and that does not meet the requirements of a monument sign. Project. The construction, erection, or addition to any building or structure, on a lot located in whole or in part within the areas shown in the map on page 2 of this Sectioin which requires the issuance of a grading permit, foundation permit, building permit, or use of land permit. Projecting Sign. A sign, other than a wall sign, that is attached to a building and projects outward from the building with one or more sign faces approximately perpendicular to the face of the building.

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Projection. The distance by which a sign extends beyond the building line. Publishing, Motion Picture, and Broadcasting Industries. Uses engaged in film, video, audio, and other media production; but excluding movie houses and theatres.

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Publicly Accessible Open Space. Active or passive open space that is accessible to the public for a minimum of 10 hours per day or during all daylight hours whichever is more. Public Service Facilities. Uses that provide government services to the public (except health-related services; See Hospitals, Nursing and Residential Care Facilities).

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Purple Pipe. Pipes that are for the exclusive use of recycled water. Pipes are typically painted purple to distinguish them from pipes carrying potable water. Receiver Site. A Receiver Site is a site that receives additional Floor Area Rights from a Donor Site pursuant to the provisions of this Plan. Repair and Maintenance Facilities. Uses engaged in the repair or servicing of industrial, business or consumer machinery, equipment, products or by-products. Repair and service of consumer goods falls into the Personal Services category. Research and Development. Uses engaged in scientific and technical research leading to the development of new products and processes, including development/testing activities and prototype fabrication.

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Retail Street. A street where retail and community serving uses are encouraged at the ground floor level where adjacent to street frontage. Recreation Facilities. Uses engaged with both indoor and outdoor recreational activity for the general public.

Religious and Social Service Organizations. Uses characterized by religious and sectarian activities as well as uses involved with ongoing social services. Residential-Multi-Family. Structures containing more than one dwelling unit located on a single lot. A structure that provides multiple living units that may have separate sleeping areas and some combination of shared bath or toilet facilities. In addition, the structure may or may not have separate cooking facilities for each unit. Single Room Occupancy (SRO) residential structures, residential hotels and rooming houses are also included in this category.

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01 Overview

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Residential-Single Family. Dwelling units where no more than one dwelling unit is located on a lot. These units are usually detached, and occupied by a single household. An accessory unit (“granny flat”) or servant quarters may also be provided. Restaurants and Bars. Uses involved in food, beverage and entertainment-oriented retail sales to the general public. Adult entertainment is not included in this category.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Retail. Uses involved with the sale or lease of new or used products to the general public. River Buffer Area. A 300 feet buffer area adjacent to the Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco. The 300 liner foot distance is calculated horizontally from the bottom of the channel perimeter. River Public Benefits means amenities provided to the public such as affordable housing; public open space; historic preservation; recreational, cultural, community, and public facilities; storm water management; watershed protection and preservation; habitat restoration; flood control; streetscape improvements; public arts programs; or public transportation improvements with a demonstrable connection to improvements to the Los Angeles River and its environs. River Public Benefit Payment means that dollar sum established by the application of the formula set forth in Section 2 of this Plan. River Public Benefit Trust Fund means that certain interest-bearing Trust Account administered by the City Clerk’s Office designated as River Public Benefit Program Fund XXXX, from which funds may be distributed as set forth in of Section 2 of this Plan. Roof Sign. A sign erected upon a roof of a building. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schools, Colleges, Tutoring, and Technical Training Programs. Uses that includes public and private schools as well as institutions offering courses of general or specialized study leading to a degree or certificate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Server Farms. Centers established for the exclusive purpose of storing computer and internet data. Setback/Street Line. A setback is the portion of a building that is set back above the base height (or street wall or perimeter wall) before

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11

the total height of the building is achieved. The position of a building setback in height factor districts is controlled by sky exposure planes and, in contextual districts, by specified distances from street walls. Sign. A whole or part of a display board, wall, screen, or object used to announce, declare, demonstrate, display, or otherwise present a message and attract the attention of the public. Sign Area. An area circumscribed by the smallest geographic shape created with a maximum of eight straight lines, which will enclose all words, letters, figures, symbols, designs, and pictures, together with all framing, background material, colored or illuminated areas, and attention-attracting devices, forming an integral part of an individual message except that: 1. Wall signs having no discernible boundary shall have the areas between letters or words intended to be read together included in any computation of surface area. 2. For spherical, cylindrical, or other three-dimensional signs the area of the sign shall be computed from the smallest twodimensional geometrical shape or shapes, which will best approximate the greatest actual surface are visible from any one direction. 3. Sign support structures are excluded. Sign Face. The surface upon which the sign message is placed. Specific Plan Area. That area shown within the heavy lines on Map titled Plan Boundary and Block Numbers Map on page 2 of section 1. Stormwater. Describes water that originates during precipitation events. Street Frontage. The length of a lot line separating a lot from one street. Streetwall (or street edge). The vertical face of one or more buildings adjacent within setback area and parallel to the public right of way. Supergraphic Sign. A sign, consisting of an image projected onto a wall or printed on vinyl, or mesh or other material with or without written text, supported and attached to a wall by an adhesive and/ or by using stranded cable and eye-bolts and/or other materials or methods, and which does not comply with the following provisions of L.A.M.C. Sections: 14.4.10, 14.4.16, 14.4.17, 14.4.18; and/or 14.4.20. Transfer. Means the conveyance of unused allowable Floor Area of a lot from a Donor Site to a Receiver Site, which is approved in accordance with the requirements of this Plan. Transfer Plan means a plan which identifies and describes the Donor Site(s), Receiver Site(s), amount of Floor Area Rights to be

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01 Overview

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transferred, and the River Public Benefit Payment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trucking and Transportation Terminals. Uses engaged in the dispatching, maintenance and long-term or short-term storage of large vehicles such as tractor-trailers, catering trucks, shipping vessels, helicopters, locomotives, and airplanes, among others. Urban Center. A new zoning district established by this Plan that permits the integration of residential and employment uses within a single site. The inclusion of residential activities is limited as a proportion of the overall employment areas. Unused FAR. FAR that a Donor Site does not need and has elected to transfer to a Receiver Site. An example might be an historic building that the property owner has elected to preserve and in which case the historic building is located within a district that allows a 3.0 FAR but the existing building utilizes only a 1.0 FAR. The difference of 2.0 FAR is considered Unused and may be transferred to a Project within the same district. Urban Agriculture. Uses that engage in the growing of fresh produce and foods. Large-scale agriculture and animal husbandry are not allowed and are not included in this category. Urban Village. A new zoning district established by this Plan that permits the integration of commercial, residential and industrial uses within a single site. Urban Innovation. A new zoning district established by this Plan that permits a variety of industrial employment uses. The inclusion of commercial and residential activities are limited as a proportion of the overall employment area. Use. Any activity, occupation, business or operation, listed in the Uses Table in Section 2, which is conducted in a building or on a tract of land. ...............

Utilities. Uses that provide the transfer or delivery of power, water, natural gas, sewerage, stormwater runoff, telephone and related communication services. Wall Sign. Any sign attached to, painted on, or erected against the wall of a building or structure, with the exposed face of the sign in a plane approximately parallel to the plane of the wall.

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Warehousing and Storage. Uses that provide, hold, and distribute goods in large quantities, especially to retail sales establishments. Long-term and short-term storage of commercial goods and personal items are included.

Overview 01

13

Waste Management and Remediation Services. Uses that receive solid or liquid wastes (including hazardous waste) for on-site disposal, recycling, or transfer to another location, including uses that manufacture or produce goods or energy from the biological decomposition of organic material.

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Wholesale. Uses engaged in the sale, lease, or rental of products primarily intended for industrial, institutional, or commercial businesses (not individual consumers). The uses emphasize on-site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sales or order taking and often include display areas. Businesses may or may not be open to the general public, but sales to the general public are limited. Window Sign. Any sign, except for a supergraphic sign, that is attached to, affixed to, leaning against, or otherwise placed within six feet of a window or door in a manner so that the sign is visible from the outside of the building. Zoning Code. The planning and zoning provisions of the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC), Chapter 1 as amended. SEVERABILITY If any provision of this Specific Plan or its application to any person or circumstances is held to be unconstitutional or otherwise invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, that invalidity shall not affect other Specific Plan provisions, clauses or application which can be implemented without the invalid provisions, clause or application, and to this end, the provisions and clauses of this Specific Plan are declared to be severable.

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01 Overview

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Overview 01

15

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2

Districts

PURPOSE • • • •

To protect existing light industrial areas from residential encroachment. To provide areas where residential, commercial, and light industrial uses can co-locate both horizontally and/or vertically. To provide residents, visitors, and employees with easy access to increased recreational opportunities. To facilitate the development of mixed-use and affordable housing projects.

Districts 02

01

DISTRICTS 2.1.1 The following four new districts are established by this Plan and are applied to property shown on the Land Use Districts Map.

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Greenway. The Greenway District designates land primarily for recreation or open space. Limited development is permitted within this district if it provides for recreational, arts, educational, and/or community related activities.

Urban Village. The Urban Village District is a mixture of residential and non-residential land uses. The non-residential uses are expected to include a combination of supportive community retail services such as grocers and small scale along with industrial, creative and cognitive production, and crafts and artisan activities. The residential and community amenities are expected to encourage increased employment in the Urban Village and the surrounding districts.

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Urban Innovation. The Urban Innovation District provides for a flexible range of light industrial job uses and research and development activities that benefit from close proximity to community, entertainment, and recreational activities.

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Urban Center. The Urban Center Districts are located immediately adjacent to each of the three transit stations and provide for a wide range of land uses including retail, offices, restaurants, light industrial, and to a limited extent residential. Lodging, entertainment, and civic uses are also encouraged.

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02

02 Districts

DRAFT

73 60C 72

65

60B

71

68

70 65

60A

55

55

62

Urban Center

54B

58

53

51

Urban Village

48

44

46

n Fer

47

and

45

42

43

d o R

Metro Gold Line & Station

57 56

49 52

San

RD1.5-1 (no change)

iver geles R Los An

21C

RD2-1 (no change)

61

74

50

Greenway

67

58

55

Urban Innovation

66 63

55

55

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa

68

64 64

Land Use Districts

69

75

41 39 40

38 37 36

33 32

21B

31

20

22

30C

18 19A

ing

pr

NS

16

St

30B 17

30A

24 23

15

14

76 34

ro

NB

35 19B

ay adw

25

29A

29B

29C

27

28

26

t

S ain

NM

13 12

8

7

11 6 10

9

7

7 7

9

3

5 4

7

7

0

400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by Los Angeles Department of City Planning Graphic Services Section, June 2008

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03

USES 2.2.1. Uses in each District are either permitted, prohibited, permitted up to a specified limit, permitted under certain conditions, or permitted with a Conditional Use Permit as described in the Uses Table below. 2.2.2. Accessory Uses that are customarily incidental to that of the main building/use of the land; and on the same lot with a main building or main use are implicitly allowed although not directly identified as permitted in the table.

Uses Table Use Classifications Heavy Manufacturing

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

No

No

No

No

Light Manufacturing and Assembly

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Repair and Maintenance Facilities

No

Yes2

Yes

Yes

Research and Development

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Publishing, Motion Picture, and Broadcasting Industries

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Trucking and Transportation Terminals

No

No

No

No

Urban Agriculture

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Utilities

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Warehousing and Storage

No

Ancillary4

Ancillary4

Ancillary4

Waste Management and Remediation Services

No

Yes9

Yes9

Yes9

Wholesale

No

Ancillary

Ancillary

Ancillary

Automobile Fueling and Service Station

No

Yes9

Yes9

Yes9

Commercial Office

No

Yes

1

Ancillary

Yes

Parking

No

Yes

6

Yes

Yes6

Restaurants and Bars

Yes

Ancillary

Retail

1,3

6

Ancillary

1,3

Ancillary1,3

Ancillary

Ancillary1

Ancillary1

Ancillary1

Personal Services

No

Ancillary

Ancillary

Ancillary

Server Farms

No

Ancillary

No

Ancillary

Residential-Multi-Family

No

Yes

Yes

Residential-Single Family

No

No

No

No

Hospitals, and Nursing and Residential Care Facilities

No

Yes

No

No

04

02 Districts

1

1

Yes1

DRAFT

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

Hotels

No

Yes1,7

Yes1,8

Yes1,7

Entertainment and Multi-Purpose Cultural Facilities

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Recreation Facilities and Spectator Sports

Yes

Yes

Ancillary

Yes

Religious and Social Service Organizations

No

Yes

No

Ancillary

Schools, Colleges, and Technical Training Programs

No

Yes

Yes5

Yes

Use Classifications

Public Service Facilities

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

See Table 2.2.3 for limits on FAR or square footage. Excludes truck repair. Free-Standing Fast Food establishments permitted with a Conditional Use Permit. Excludes personal storage. Limited to Technical Training Schools or Programs. Subject to area Parking Cap -See Section 6. Residential hotels or rooming houses permitted with a Conditional Use Permit. Residential hotels or rooming houses not permitted. Permitted with a Conditional Use Permit.

2.2.3. The Limits Table provides further details as to the proportion of use that will be allowed. Limits Table Use Classifications Commercial Office

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

N/A

65%1

10%1

65%1

Retail/Restaurants/Bars

1,200 sf

20,000 sf

Residential Multi-Family

N/A

90%3

15%3

15%3

Hotels

N/A

150 rooms

100 rooms

200 rooms

2

2

5,000 sf

2

100,0002

1 - Floor area of Commercial Office shall not exceed the allowable percentage of the total gross floor area of all principal and ancillary uses combined. 2 - Limited square footage permitted for each establishment. 3 - Floor area of Residential Multi-Family shall not exceed the allowable percentage of the total gross floor area of all principal and ancillary uses combined. Construction shall only be permitted if built after or concurrent with on-site non-residential uses.

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05

FLOOR AREA RATIO 2.3.1. A Base FAR (Base FAR) and Maximum FAR (Max FAR) is established for each parcel as set forth in the FAR Table below. 2.3.2. Additional FAR, up to the Max FAR, can be added to the Base FAR through either the Bonus FAR and/or Transfer of Floor Area (TFAR) Programs. 2.3.3. The proportion of uses established in Sections 2.2.1 to 2.2.3. shall remain applicable regardless of the projects resulting FAR.

FAR Table Density

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

Base FAR

1.5

3

3

3

Base FAR within River Buffer Areas

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

Max FAR

1.5

5

4

6

Max FAR within River Buffer Areas

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

06

02 Districts

DRAFT

73 60C 72

65

60B

71

68

70 65

60A

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco

55

55

62 54B

Maximum 6:1 FAR

58

53

51

52

48

44

46

n Fer

45

42

River Buffer Area

43

d o R

and

47

s River

1:1.5 Base and Maximum FAR

57 56

49

San

gele Los An

21C

3:1 Base FAR*

61

74

50

Maximum 4:1 FAR Maximum 3:1 FAR

67

58

55

Maximum 5:1 FAR

66 63

55

55

68

64 64

Base and Maximum FAR

69

75

41

Metro Gold Line & Station

39 40

38

* Additional density available through Transfer or Bonus FAR Programs up to allowed maximum.

37

y wa oad

36

76 34

r

NB

35 19B

33 32

21B

31

20

22

30C

18 19A

g rin

16

St

30B 17

p

NS

23

15

14

30A

24 25

29A

29B

29C

27

28

26

t

S ain

NM

13 12

8

7

11 6 10

9

7

7 7

9

3

5 4

7

7

0

400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by Los Angeles Department of City Planning Graphic Services Section, September 2010:055

DRAFT

Districts 02

07

ADDITIONAL FLOOR AREA RATIO Additional FAR in excess of the Base FAR shall be permitted by complying with the Bonus FAR and/or Transfer FAR (TFAR) strategies described below. Bonus FAR Program 2.4.1. A Project with a Base FAR of 3.0 may add up to an additional 1.0 FAR (limited to the Max FAR) by providing one of the following public benefits and submitting, as part of the Administrative Clearance Application, a Bonus FAR Plan on a form prescribed by the Director of Planning. a. A Project may add 10 square feet of floor area (limited to the Max FAR) for each square foot of additional publicly accessible open space in excess of the required15 percent. b. A Project may add 20 square feet of floor area for each square foot of area provided for a community facility (including access and loading/unloading). c. Public benefits may be provided on the same site as the Project or on a site within the Specific Plan Area. d. The owner or owners of the property which is the recipient of the Bonus FAR area shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide said public benefit (or a substitute benefit approved by the Director) so long as the building or use the public benefit is intended to serve is maintained. 2.4.2. Receiving Sites that participate in the Bonus FAR program may also participate in the TFAR Program. Transfer of FAR (TFAR) Program 2.5.1. An existing parcel which has a total FAR that is less than the Base FAR may transfer its Unused FAR to a Receiver Site that is located within the same district. 2.5.2. An existing parcel within the Greenway District which has a total FAR that is less than the Base FAR may transfer its Unused FAR to a Receiver Site that is located within the Specific Plan. 2.5.3. Properties within the River Buffer Area may transfer any portion of their Unused FAR to another property within the same district but may not be a Receiver Site. 2.5.4. Any Project that participates in the TFAR Program shall submit, as part of the Administrative Clearance Application, a TFAR Plan on a form prescribed by the Director of Planning.

08

02 Districts

DRAFT

2.5.5 The value of the TFAR shall be determined between the participants of the transfer unless the Donor Site is owned by either the City of Los Angeles or the Los Angeles River Revitalization Corporation (Corporation) in which case the River Public Benefit Payment described below will be used to establish the value and payment method.

Unused FAR of the area within 360 Degrees from the River or Arroyo Seco can be trasfered to the area beyond 300 feet

Property Line

30 0’ 50 ’

2.5.6. Any transfer approved pursuant to this Section shall be evidenced by a recorded document, signed by the owner of the Donor Site and the owner of the Receiver Site and in a form designed to run with the land and satisfactory to the City Attorney. This document shall clearly set forth the amount of Floor Area Rights transferred, restrict the allowable floor area remaining on the Donor Site, and transfer the Floor Area Rights to the Receiver Site.

A*

2.5.7. A River Public Benefit Payment (Payment) shall be provided when a Project receives density from a site owned either by the City of Los Angeles or the Corporation. a. A Payment may be provided by any combination of the payment of monies to the River Public Benefit Trust Fund or by the direct provision of River Public Benefits by the Applicant; provided, at least 50 percent of such Payment consists of cash. b. The Payment shall equal (a) the sale price of the Receiver Site, if it has been purchased through an unrelated third-party transaction within 18 months of the date of submission of the request for approval of the Transfer, or an Appraisal, if it has not, (b) divided by the Lot Area (prior to any dedications) of the Receiver Site, (c) further divided by the Base Floor Area Ratio Factor, (d) multiplied by 40 percent, and (e) further multiplied by the number of square feet of Floor Area Rights to be transferred to the Receiver Site. Example: If Receiver Site with a Lot Area of 50,000 square feet (before any dedications) was purchased for $2,500,000 (through an unrelated third-party transaction within 18 months of the date of submission of the request for approval of the Transfer), the River Public Benefit Payment under a Transfer Plan transferring 25,000 square feet of Floor Area Rights would equal: (a) $2,500,000 (the purchase price), (b) divided by 50,000 (the Lot Area of the Receiver Site), (c) divided by the base FAR, for example, 3 (the Floor Area Ratio Factor), (d) multiplied by 40 percent, and (e) multiplied by 25,000 (the number of square feet of Floor Area Rights to be transferred) equals $166,666.67 (or $6.66 for each square foot of transferred Floor Area Rights).

DRAFT

(a)

Sale Price of Receiver Site (or appraisal)

$2,500,000

$2,500,000

(b)

Divided by Lot Area of Receiver Site

50,000

$50 / SF

(c)

Divided by Floor Area Ratio

3.0

$16.66 / SF

(d)

Multiplied by 40%

.40

$6.66 / SF

(e)

Multiplied by SF of transferred FAR

25,000

$166,666.67

Districts 02

09

c. For sites owned by the Corporation, the Corporation shall receive 100 percent of the cash portion of the Payment, and for sites owned by the City of Los Angeles, the Corporation shall receive 50 percent of the cash portion of the Payment. The Payment may be used by the Corporation for any purpose which the Corporation is authorized to undertake. The cash payment may be used to fund the operating costs of the Corporation. d. The non-cash portion of the Payment, which shall not exceed 50 percent of the overall Payment, shall be provided as set forth in the Transfer Plan to the satisfaction of the Director. Payments. Any Payment shall be provided as set forth in the Transfer Plan and as set forth below in this Subsection: 2.6.1. If the Transfer Plan specifies a single-phase Project on the Receiver Site, then the owner of the Receiver Site shall pay the Payment on or before the earlier of (a) the issuance of the building permit for the Project or (b) 24 months after the final approval of the Transfer and the expiration of any appeals or appeals periods. 2.6.2. If the approved Transfer Plan specifies a multi-phased Project on the Receiver Site, then the owner of the Receiver Site may elect to pay the Payment in any one of the three manners set forth below: a. In total for all phases of the Project, on or before the earlier of (i) the issuance of the building permit for the first phase of the Project or (ii) 24 months after the final approval of the Transfer and the expiration of any appeals or appeals period for all phases of the Project; b. Incrementally by each phase of the Project, proportionate to the Floor Area Rights utilized in each such phase, on or before the issuance of the building permit for each such phase, with the amount of each payment being subject to payment indexing in accordance with an executed agreement between the owner of the Receiver Site and the Corporation; or c. Incrementally by each phase of the Project, proportionate to the Floor Area Rights utilized in each such phase, on or before the issuance of the building permit for each such phase, with the amount of each payment being recalculated as of the date that the building permit for each phase is issued in accordance with an Appraisal establishing the fair market value of the Receiver Site within six months prior to the issuance of the building permit for such phase. River Public Benefit Trust Fund 2.7.1. Except as set forth below, funds held in the River Public Benefit Trust Fund (exclusive of funds paid to the Corporation) shall be disbursed: a. As determined by a committee comprised of one representative from each of the following: the City Council Office for the City Council District in which the Receiver Site is located, and the Chair of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Los Angeles River (unless they are the same), the City Engineer, the Mayor’s Office, the Chief Administrative Officer, the Chief Legislative Analyst, the Department of City Planning, the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA/LA), and the Corporation in accordance with the procedure previously established for the Public

10

02 Districts

DRAFT

Benefit Trust Fund, b. Within five years after receipt, and c. For use on projects or programs providing a Public Benefit, as set forth in this Section, and consistent with the Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan. The above notwithstanding, the Corporation shall, as noted above, receive 50 percent of cash contributions to the River Benefit Trust Fund as set forth in Section 2.5.8, which funds may be used for any purpose the Corporation may legally perform. 2.7.2. The City shall establish an accounting of all River Public Benefit Payments. The accountings shall be transmitted annually to the Corporation, CRA/LA, and Commission for their review. 2.7.3. The records shall be available for public inspection.

DRAFT

Districts 02

11

DRAFT

3

Massing and Street Wall PURPOSE • • •

To provide spatial and proportional standards that reinforce the street as “a large public outdoor room.” To emphasize the public realm-streets and public spaces-more so than individual buildings. To ensure that development is designed with a pedestrian orientation.

Massing and Street Wall 03

01

03

SIDEWALKS AND SETBACKS

Figure 3-2 Sidewalk treatment varies with ground floor treatment.

GUIDELINES The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall have no bearing towards a projects compliance with this Plan. Ground Floor Retailupon the Treatment of the required setback area will vary depending at back of sidewalk use for which the ground floor is primarilyFacade designed: SIDEWALKS AND SETBACKS 03 Blade sign G.3.1.a. Adjacent to retail, the setback, if Awnings any, shall be primarily hardscape and may used for outdoor dining and otherwindows commercial Storefront / Display SIDEWALKS AND be SETBACKS 03 activities. No visible security grills Outdoor dining or commercial activity

t.

dt.floor space (as defined dthe floor space required (as defined the required ings shall et.a buffer ings shall d space e flaoor buffer (asfunction defined ng the required ng function he use for ings shall use for ehe a buffer pe and may

Continuous landscaped parkway

SIDEWALKS AND SETBACKS

03

Zero setback with ground floor retail.

Zero setback with ground-floor retail. Zero setback with ground-fl oor retail. G.3.1.b. Adjacent to live-work, office, or industrial space, the setback area shall include a little landscaping, which may be in pots or raised planters.

Ground Floor Live Work Zero setback with ground-floor retail.

d floor m average ided.

Some transparency Doors at sidewalk

pe may ng and function all include a

all heinclude use fora tries on the be primarily tries on the pe and may nters, other be primarily nsparent nters, ght of 5other feet all include a nsparent ght of 5 feet d floor tries on the m average primarily dbe floor ided. nters, other m average nsparent ided. ght of 5 feet

Landscaped Walkway Dining and Parkway Display

Continuous landscaped parkway

Landscaped Walkway Setback with a little landscaping Parkway

A small setback with a little landscaping next to professional A small setback with a little landscaping next to offi ce or live-work space. A small setback with a little professional office or live-work space. landscaping next to professional offi ce or live-work space.

G.3.1.c. Adjacent to ground-floor residential units with individual entries on the street the setback area should be primarily landscaped and may include walkways, porches, raised planters, other solid A small setback with a little walls up to 3 feet above sidewalk elevation, and transparent fences Ground Floor Residential landscaping next to professional (e.g. wrought iron, tubular steel, glass) up to a height of 5 feet above with Individual Entries offi ce or live-work space. sidewalk elevation. Planting in front Fence or low wall

Housing with front yards and secondary entrances along the sidewalk. Housing with front yards and secondary entrances along the sidewalk. 16

Stormwater Treatment Planter (4% of Impervious surface) Continuous landscaped parkway

Landscaped Walkway Landscaped Buffer Parkway with Unit Entry

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

Housing with front yards and secondary entrances

Housing with front yards and secondary along the sidewalk. entrances along the sidewalk.

02

03 Massing and Street Wall

DRAFT

REGULATIONS Setbacks 3.1.1 The building setback along any lot line that abuts a street, flood control channel, rail corridor, or an adjacent side rear lot shall be as defined in the Building Setback Table below. The setback area for the building portion adjacent to the front lot line shall be further governed by the building’s ground floor use. Building Setback Table

SIDE WA LKS A ND SE TBACKS

Setback

Greenways

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center SIDE WA LKS

A ND SE TBACK

Front Yard/Ground Floor Table 3-1 Use Permitted Street Wall Setbacks From Back of Required Sidewalk 1 - Retail

N/A

0’-5’ max

(Minimum Average/Minimum-Maximum Range)

0’-10’ max

Table 3-1 Permitted Street Wall Setbacks From Back of Required Sidewalk

0’-3’ max

1

- Professional Office/Live Work N/A 0’-10’ max ADJACENT 0’-15’ max FLOOR USE 0’-5’ max GROUND (Minimum Average/Minimum-Maximum Range) - Industrial

N/A

DISTRICT / NEIGHBORHOOD

N/A

- Residential with Individual Entries on Street DISTRICT /

Civic CenterNEIGHBORHOOD Alley, Side or Rear Yard

RETAIL

2

0’ min0’/0-10’

Civic CenterCivic South River or Arroyo Seco Center

50’ min0’/0-5’

Rail Tracks

30’ min

5 Historic Downtown Civic Center South

Little Tokyo Historic Downtown Bunker Hill Little Tokyo Bunker Hill Financial Core Rear Yard Setback

South Park Financial Core South Park City Markets

5

0’-10’ max 0’-15’ max RETAIL

2

0’ min

50’ min 0’/0-10’

0’

0’/0-5’ 30’ min

0’/0-3’

0’

0’/0-5’

0’/0-3’

River or Arroyo Seco

0’/0-3’

0’/0-5’

0’/0-3’ 0’/0-5’50’ min. Setback

0’/0-3’

0’/0-5’

0’-15’ max OFFICE /0’-10’ maxRESIDENTIAL WITH PROFESSIONAL ADJACENT GROUND FLOOR USEINDIVIDUAL ENTRIES LIVE WORK 3 N/A 0’-10’ max ONRESIDENTIAL STREET 4 WIT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE /

0’5’/0-15’ min LIVE WORK 3 0’ min 50’3’/0-10’ min 5’/0-15’

50’ min

0’ 30’ min

30’ min

3’/0-10’

2’/0-5’

INDIVIDUAL ENTRI 5’/5-20’ ON STREET 4

5’/3-15’ 5’/5-20’ 0’ 5’/3-15’ 5’/3-15’ 0’

0’

3’/0-15’2’/0-5’

6’/4-16’ 5’/3-15’

3’/0-15’ 2’/0-5’ Lot Line

6’/4-16’ 6’/4-12’

2’/0-5’ 2’/0-5’

6’/4-12’ 6’/4-12’

2’/0-10’2’/0-5’

6’/4-12’ 5’/4-16’

City Markets 0’/0-3’ 2’/0-10’ Required sidewalk is as defined by the Downtown Street Standards. In some cases, the required sidewalk width is a combination of public right-of-way (dedication) and 1 Required sidewalk is as defined by the Downtown Street Standards. In some cases, a sidewalk easement. the required sidewalk width is a combination of public right-of-way (dedication) and 2 No setback a issidewalk requiredeasement. adjacent to ground-floor retail; however, max. Setback Line a project may set back within thesetback specified range. adjacent to ground-floor retail; however, a project may set 2 No is required backinclude within the specifi ed range. 3-15’ 3 Setback should some landscaping, which beArea in pots or planters. max.may Setback 3should Setback should include some landscaping, which may be in pots or planters. 4 Setback include at least 50% landscaping. Front Yard Setback Lot Line 4 prevailing Setback should include atappropriate. least 50% landscaping. 5 Match the setback where

5’/4-16’

1

5

Sidewalkappropriate. Match the prevailing setback where

Street Notes: If at least 50% of the building frontage along a block face is occupied by one Notes: IfHistoric at least Resources, 50% of the building frontage alongof a any block face is occupied or more designated the average setback new building shall by one or more designated Historic Resources, the average setback of any new building shall match the average setback of the Historic Resources.

match the average setback of the Historic Resources.

The ground floor street wall (primarily entries and display windows) may set back farther The ground floor street wall (primarily entries and display windows) may set back farther specifi edthe range, provided that structural columns and building walls above the than specifi ed range, provided that structural columns andset building walls above thethe groundthan floorthe street wall (including entries and display windows) may be back farther than ground floor ground are located within the specifi ed range, as range, illustrated below. below. floor are located within the specified as illustrated

3.1.2 The specified range, provided that structural columns and building walls above the ground floor are located within the specified range, as illustrated in the photographs below.

The Bradbury Building’s columns and The Bradbury Building’s columns and upper story walls The Bradbury Building’s columns within and a foot of Similarly, are within a footupper of thestory back walls of the are required sidewalk, while upper story walls are of within a foot ofsidewalk, while while the the back the required entrances and display windows are setback a few feet.

the back of the required sidewalk, while entrances and display windows are set entrances and display are set back a fewwindows feet. back a few feet.

DRAFT

Similarly, columnsare areatat the property line, Similarly, columns the property line, while theWhere the ground floor is designed

columns are at the property line, Where the ground oor designed for a while façade live-work or fl offi ceisspace, a small facadethe is set backisa set few back feet. a few feet. façade is set back a few feet. live-work or office space, a small setback with landscaping isaverag approp setback with landscaping is appropriate

03 Downtown Design Gu Massing and Street Wall 03 6.15.09 6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide

Street Wall. Design Street Walls to define the street and to provide a comfortable scale for pedestrians. Breaks in the street wall should be limited to those necessary to accommodate pedestrian passthroughs, public plazas, entry forecourts, permitted vehicular access driveways, and hotel drop-offs. 3.2.1. A minimum percentage of the Street Wall shall be set along the setback line pursuant to the Building Street Wall at Setback Line Table and as illustrated in the Building Frontage Requirement Figure.

Building Street Wall at Setback Line D1 Greenways

D4 Urban Village

D5 Urban Innovation

D6 Urban Center

Facing River or Arroyo Seco

NA

0%

0%

0%

Secondary Modified Street

NA

85%

80%

90%

Collector Modified Street

NA

75%

70%

80%

Local Modified Street

NA

65%

60%

70%

Minimum Percent of Building Street Wall at Setback

06

MASSING AND STREET WALL

Building Frontage Requirement Figure.

A. MASSING

The street is The ability to by the primary mass is distri overall appea

Breaking dow creation of sm large projects can also help than variety. I shadow, light built environm

The street wall is largely defined by individual The street wall is largely defined by building massing

individual building massing.

Buildings gen Low-rise mass 7 - 20 stories more than 20 height limit Do section.

Design buildin or structures

04

03 Massing and Street Wall

Large half- to full-block projects should be massed to form a collection of DRAFT appropriately scaled buildings that provide cohesion on a block.

1.

Break lar no buildin 20 feet w

2.

Generally street fro a building

3.

Monolithi surround

Block Length. Break up long blocks to facilitate mobility. See the Block Length Map below for identification of blocks that are known to exceed the block length. 3.3.1. The block length in the three urban districts shall not exceed: a. Urban Village 450 linear feet. b. Urban Innovation 600 linear feet. c. Urban Center 500 feet.

Maximum Block Length (Public Access) Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa Urban Center Urban Innovation Urban Village

RD2-1 (no change)

and

n Fer

Exceeds Allowable Block Length

d o R

s River

RD1.5-1 (no change)

San

gele Los An

Greenway

Recommended New Accessways Metro Gold Line & Station

ay adw

ro NB

ng

N

ri Sp

St

ain

NM

St

0

400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by Los Angeles Department of City Planning Graphic Services Section, June 2008

DRAFT

Massing and Street Wall 03

05

3.3.2. A Projects that is in a block that is longer than the allowable block distances as defined on the previous page in 3.3.1 and that includes a lot with more than 300 feet of street frontage shall provide a through passageway that extends from the street to the nearest public right-of-way. a. The owner or owners of said lot on which a passageway shall be provided shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide said paseo as a publicly accessible pedestrian passageway so long as the building or use of the passageway is intended is maintained. b. Such a passageway shall permit unlimited 24 hour public access to pedestrians, bicyclists, and emergency vehicles. c. Design standards for the passageway can be found in Chapter 05 On-Site Open Space. d. The land area designated for the passageway may contribute to the 15 percent open space requirement defined in Chapter 05. Maximum Lot Coverage. Design the building to provide for light, air, open space and stormwater infiltration. 3.4.1. Projects shall limit the percentage of building footprint relative to the overall site area as defined in Maximum Lot Coverage Table. Maximum Lot Coverage Table Greenways

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

Maximum Buildable Lot Coverage

25%

85%

85%

85%

Maximum Buildable Lot Coverage for projects within 300 linear feet of the bottom of adjacent edge of the River or Arroyo (River Buffer Area)

25%

50%

50%

50%

Max Lot Coverage

50% Lot Coverage

80% Lot Coverage Examples of Lot Coverage (in gray) illustrating 50% and 80% lot coverage.

06

03 Massing and Street Wall

DRAFT

03

SIDEWALKS AND SETBACKS A. MASSING

The street is often described by urban designers as “a large outd The ability to shape this room exists on every street, and its walls by the façades its buildings, create Massing andprimary Projections. Designof building massing towhich reinforce the a street wall. H A. SIDEWALKS mass is distributed on a site usually has the greatest impact on a street wall with well-scaled elements or structures that are sensitive Downtown Street Standards establish sidewalk to theThe neighborhood context. Sculpting building’s massing can street overall appearance and on athe strength of required the wall. width also all helpDowntown avoid big bulky structures, provide more visual variety streets. Onand many streets, the required sidewalk widt Breaking large floor plates varying a building’s heightfor th than amonotony. Itdown is the of well-balanced variety ofand building massing combination public right-of-way (dedication) and easement and textures of shadow, light,structures and materialsorthat in total adds the creation of smaller façades is a to valuable concept whe sidewalk purposes. richness of the environment. large projects that consume half a block or more. Sculpting a building On mostbig north-south streets,which an average easement fo cansegments also help of avoid bulky structures, provide more visua 3.5.1.purposes Break the facade of large projects into a series of appropriately is required. The average easement flexibility and in b than variety. It is the well-balanced variety of provides building massing scaled buildings so that no building shall be more than 300 feet in design and at the same time provides space for sidewalk activity. light and materials that in total adds to the richness of DA lengthshadow, at the base. average easement may range from 0’ to 3 times the average, provide built environment. total area of the easement divided by above the length ofofthe property fronta 3.5.2. A building may cantilever over the sidewalk a height Buildings generally fall within three types of massing as shown in the required average. 40 feet in order to accommodate street trees at ground level. Low-rise massing is generally less than 6-story structures. Mid-rise Design sidewalks are walkable and accommodate a variety of 7 - 20 stories and that typically 12-20 stories. High-rise pertains to tow The street wall is largely defined by more than 20 may stories. Anyover portion a building that iseasement above 150’, th individual building massing. 1. A building project the of required sidewalk abov Examples of building overhang that does not interfere with street tree Example ofgrowth. building overhang that does not height limitand Downtown, is subject tower standards guide of 40’ below a depth of 5’to tothe accommodate streetand trees. Pr interfere with street tree growth. section. which are permitted in the public ROW by the Municipal Code, signs, canopies and awnings, are permitted over the required e subject to the same approvals. Design building massing to reinforce the street wall with well-scale or structures are sensitive to thepath neighborhood 2. Provide a that minimum 6’ continuous of travel. context.

3. an 18-24” wide access zoneofnext to the curb,scaled which buildi includ 1. Provide Break large projects into a series appropriately Example showing the parkway along the curb, the clear path of travel and use of the remaining sidewalk for outdoor dining. Large half to full block projects should be massed to form Large halfto full-block projects should a collection of appropriately scaled buildings that provide cohesion on a block be massed to form a collection of appropriately scaled buildings that provide cohesion on a block.

curb and 12”iswide or brick band Provide adjacenta to the bac no building moregranite than 300 feetedge in length. passagew 20 feet wide between buildings. 4. Outdoor dining may occur on any portion of the paved sidewalk p wide continuous path of travel is maintained. 2. minimum Generally,6’buildings should maintain a consistent street wall a street frontages. While variety in massing can occur through ste a building ascends upward, it is not required. 3.

Monolithic slab-like structures that wall off views and oversha surrounding neighborhood are discouraged.

4.

To assist staff in understanding the proposed massing of a pro projects shall provide a 3-D digital model in Google Earth Sketc

All projects shall submit a 3-D model like the Downtown model shown above.

OUTDOOR DINING, ETC. Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09 26 DRAFT

PATH OF TRAVEL 07

Massing and Street Wall 03

PAR

MASSING AND STREE T WALL

06 Street Wall. Examples showing various street wall heights. Street Wall. Examples showing various street wall heights. Street Wall. Examples showing various street wall heights. Height 3.6.1. 90 percent of a Street Wall shall comply with the minimum height as defined in the Building Height Map. 3.6.2. The Street Wall shall not exceed the maximum height established in the Building Height Map. 3.6.3. That portion of a building that exceeds the maximum Street Wall height, shall be located no closer than 20 feet from the Street Wall line.

3-story street wall 3-story street wall 3 - story street wall

3-story street wall

3.6.4. There is no overall maximum height limit although height may be constrained by other conditions described herein. 3.6.5. Parapet walls and other guard rails utilized to enclose roof terraces, gardens, or green roofs shall be permitted to exceed the maximum allowable height by no more than 42 inches.

4-story street wall 4 - story street wall

B. ST

On Re B. ST define On Re B. 1. ST St define sp On Re 1. St defi 2. ne 90 sp 1. sp St 15 2. 90 sp st sp 2. 90 15 3. sp Bu st he 15 to 3. Bu st he 4. 3. Br Bu to ac he pe 4. Br to ac 5. 4. An Br pe (g ac Th 5. An pe si (g 5. An Th See (g S si Th See si S

4-story street wall

See S 4-story street wall

6 - and 7 - story street wall 6- and 7-story street wall Walls above the ground floor that step back less than 15 feet from the ground floor street wall are part of the street wall, as illustrated above.

6- and 7-story street wall 6- and 7-story street wall

OR HIGH

OR HIGH

OR HIGH MINIMUM wall heig

MINIMUM wall heig

MINIMUM wall heig

Bunker Hill. Minimum 3-story street wall. Bunker Hill. Minimum 3-story street wall.

08

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09 28 Bunker Hill. Minimum 3-story street wall.

DRAFT

03 Massing and Street Wall

28

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

28

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

Building Heights Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa Specific Plan Areas Minimum 45’/Maximum 110’

d o R

Metro Gold Line & Station

and

Open Space

n Fer

Minimum 25’/Maximum 45’

San

iver geles R Los An

Minimum 35’/Maximum 75’

ay adw

ro NB

g

n pri

NS

St

t

in S

a NM

0

400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by Los Angeles Department of City Planning Graphic Services Section, June 2008

DRAFT

Massing and Street Wall 03

09

3.6.6. Building height and massing shall be designed such that there is no more than 1.5 hours of shadow projection on any parks, open spaces, and/or rooftop areas of abutting properties between 10am and 2pm on December 21.

Buffers. Respect the smaller scale of adjacent low-density buildings. 3.71 Projects located adjacent to the RD 1.5 and 2 zones in SubArea 2 or other low-density residential uses outside but immediately abutting the CASP boundaries shall: a. Provide an open space buffer of no less than 30 feet between the edge of the building and the property line of the low density use; and, b. At the buffer line and for a distance of 20 feet back from the buffer line, no building shall exceed a height of 125 percent of the buffer distance plus the side or rear yard setback (B) required by the zoning of the abutting property as illustrated below. c. Additional height is permitted within a 50 degree envelope as illustrated below.

side or rear yard setback

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Architectural Detail PURPOSE •

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Maximize the advantage of the area’s moderate climate by emphasizing the public realm-streets and public spaces-more so than individual buildings. Promote pedestrian-scaled architecture along the street. Promote fine-grained and well-articulated development while enabling desired development intensities to be achieved.

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GUIDELINES The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall have no bearing towards a projects compliance with this Plan. Materials After establishing a building’s overall massing and vertical and horizontal variation, it is important to develop a building’s visual character at the level of material choices and detailing. The interplay of materials, windows, and other elements should support the larger design objectives articulated by the architect. G.4.1.a. Buildings shall aim for a “timeless design” and employ sustainable materials and careful detailing that have proven longevity.

ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL

08

G.4.1.b. The material palette should provide variety and reinforce massing and changes in the horizontal or vertical plane.

G.4.1.c. reinforce skin the architect’s design a ide visual variety and Building depth,details layer should the building and provide intentions and help set a standard of quality to guide the built results. of textures that bear a direct relationship to the building’s massing ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL 08 uctural elements. The skin should reinforce the integrity of the G.4.1.d Reflective materials or other sources of glare (like polished concept and the building’s elements, and to not as metal surfaces)structural shall be designed or screened notappear impact views e pastiche. nor result in measurable heat gain upon surrounding windows either within or adjacent to a project.

g can also be achieved through extension of two adjacent building that are extended from the primary façade to provide a modern Layers ral composition. To provide visual variety and depth, layer the building skin and

C. MATERIALS After establishing a building’s overall massing and vertical and horizontal variation, it is important to develop a building’s visual character at the level of material choices and detailing. The interplay of materials, windows and other elements should support the larger design objectives as articulated by the architect. Buildings shall aim for a “timeless design” and employ sustainable materials and careful detailing that have proven longevity. 1.

Feature long-lived and sustainable materials. The material palette should provide variety, reinforce massing and changes in the horizontal or vertical plane.

2.

Use especially durable materials on ground floor façades.

3.

Generally, stucco is not permitted.

4.

Detail buildings with rigor and clarity to reinforce the architect’s design intentions and to help set a standard of quality to guide the built results.

provide a variety of textures that bear a direct relationship to the

lding’s skin, especially for towers, should elements be primarily transparent. building’s massing and structural

s (often used toG.4.2.a. createThe skyskin gardens) shouldthe beintegrity an appropriate scale should reinforce of the design concept ovide a comfortable, usable outdoor space. and the building’s structural elements, and not appear as surface pastiche.

curtain walls with detail and texture, while employing the highest materials. G.4.2.b. Layering can also be achieved through extension of two

adjacent building planes that are extended from the primary façade to palette for aa modern building to reinforce building identity and provide sculptural composition.

the color ment changes in the horizontal or vertical plane.

Color. G.4.3.a. Design the color palette for a building to reinforce building identity and complement changes in the horizontal or vertical plane.

Layering with two adjacent planes that extend from the

Layering. A building’s skin should be layered and bear a direct relationship to the building’s primary facade forming a modern composition. structural elements.

Layering with two adjacent planes that extend from the primary façade forming a Color change is related to floor plate and massing changes modern composition. Inset windows and sill detail Transparency at inset corners capture views and provide another visual layer Change of building detail and materials at base

of a building with poor variation, materials and detail choices.

ge without any wall surface

that aren’t ted and nal

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ARCHITECTURAL AL DE DETAIL TAIL ARCHITECTUR

ARCHITECTUR AL DE TAIL

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D. WINDOWS WINDOWS AND AND DOORS DOORS D.

Windows and high-performance, Doors Provide high-performance,well-detailed well-detailedwindows windowsand anddoors doorsthat thataa Provide Provide high-performance, well-detailed windows and doors that add depth and scale of the building’s façade. depth and scale of the building’s façade. to the depth and scale of the building’s façade. 1. Window Windowplacement, placement,size, size,material materialand andstyle styleshould shouldhelp helpdefi define ne 1. architectural style and integrity. architectural style integrity. G.4.4.a. Window placement, size, and material, and style should help define a building’s architectural style and integrity. 2. In Inbuildings buildingsother otherthan thancurtain curtainwall wallbuildings, buildings,windows windowsshall shallbb 2.

ual order ian lower floors of shes a y building to create

(set back) from the exterior building wall, except where inapp

back) from exterior building wall, shall except where inappr G.4.4.b. In(set buildings other thanthe curtain wall buildings, windows the building’s architectural style. Generally, therequired requiredrecess recess the building’s architectural style. Generally, the be recessed (set back) from the exterior building wall, except where accomplished by the use of plant-ons around the window. accomplished by the use of plant-ons around the window. inappropriate to the building’s architectural style. Generally, the required may not be accomplished by use of plant-ons 3. recess Windows and doorsshall shallbe bethe well-detailed wherethey theymeet meetthe thee 3. Windows and doors well-detailed where around the to window. provide adequate weather protection and to create a shado

to provide adequate weather protection and to create a shadow

s uses how the

ade than e, texture

reatment estration, order sual and ian lower floors of and upper shes a in yhange building to create

line of ew uses how the , surface efits and ade than e, texture

reatment stration, s and

and upper hange in

line of ew

, surface efits and

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G.4.4.c. Windows and doors shall be well-detailed where they meet the exterior wall to provide adequate weather protection and to create E. GLAZING GLAZING E. a shadow line.

Incorporateglazing glazingthat thatcontributes contributesto toaawarm, warm,inviting invitingenvironme environme Incorporate

G.4.4.d. Buildings with multiple uses shall provide a main entrance 1. Ground-fl Ground-floor oorwindow windowand anddoor doorglazing glazingshall shall be transparent and no 1. that reads differently from an entrance to a retail storefront, be transparent and no restaurant, commercial, and industrial use. 2. Above Above theground ground oor, bothcurtain curtainwall walland andwindow/door window/doorgla gla 2. the flfloor, both

Good examples of vertical variation from havethe theminimum minimumrefl reflectivity ectivityneeded neededto toachieve achieveenergy energyeffi efficic Windows should be well-detailed and have a recessed have Windows should bewell-detailed well-detailed have Windows be have aa depth. the streetshould level base of lofts, to the middle, G.4.4.e. Entries shall be highly visible, well litcoating and avoidornooks, standards. Non-refl ective tints are preferred. standards. Non-refl ective coating or tints are preferred. recessed depth. recessed depth. and at the top where the building meets alcoves, and insets to reduce places where individuals might hide and the sky with a thin overhang. 3. AAlimited limited amountof oftranslucent translucentglazing glazingmay maybe beused usedto toprovid provi limit potential security amount concerns. 3.

G.4.4.f. Pedestrian entries shall include overhead protection that is F. toLIGHTING LIGHTING integral the architecture of the building such as canopies, awnings, F. or overhangs.

Providewell-designed well-designedarchitectural architecturaland andlandscape landscapelighting. lighting. Provide

Vertical 1. Articulation Allexterior exteriorlighting lighting(building (buildingand andlandscape) landscape)should shouldbe beintegr integ 1. All Both classical and modern buildings can exhibit basic principles of the building design, create a sense of safety, encourage pe the building design, create a sense of safety, encourage ped visual order in the vertical plane often with a distinct base (street activity after dark, and support Downtown’s vital nightlife. activity after dark, and support Downtown’s vital nightlife. and pedestrian lower levels), a middle (core mid-section, and often 2. Each Eachproject project should develop system or family oflighting lightingwith with consistent multiple floors ofshould a mid-todevelop high rise building), andor a top (the of 2. aasystem family contribute tothe the night-time experience, includingfacade facadeuplig upli upper levelcontribute that distinguishes a building and defines how it “meets to night-time experience, including anddisplay display windowbuilding illumination, landscape, andstreetscape streetscap the sky”). Modern or contemporary designs often layer this and and window illumination, landscape, Good example street wall Lighting shouldof beadesigned designed towith enhance principle with more variation and syncopation to create interesting Lighting should be to enhance 3. Architectural Architectural lightingshould shouldrelate relateto tothe thepedestrian pedestrianand andaccen accen balconies and varied windows that create a architectural the identity of a project with appropriate 3. the a project with compositions. lighting Goodidentity examples of of vertical variation fromappropriate the street level pattern ofto projections character and scale. architecturalfeatures. features. Good examples of vertical variation base of lofts, the scale. middle, and and at the recesses. top where thefrom character and architectural building meetslevel the skybase with aof thinlofts, overhang. the street to the middle, G.4.5.a. An identifiable break should be provided between the 4. Landscape Landscapelighting lightingshould shouldbe beof ofaacharacter characterand andscale scalethat thatrel re 4. and at the top where the building meets building’s ground floors and upper floors designed for office, pedestrian and highlights special landscape features. the sky with a thin overhang. pedestrian and highlights special landscape features. residential, or other uses. This break may include a change in material, in fenestration pattern, similar means. 5. change Exterior lightingshall shall beor shielded toreduce reduceglare glareand andeliminate eliminat 5. Exterior lighting be shielded to

castinto intothe thenight nightsky. sky. cast

G.4.5.b. Ground floors of buildings should have a different architectural treatment than the upper floors, and feature high quality materials that add scale, texture, and variety at the pedestrian level. Security lighting Security lighting

6. Street Integrate security lighting intothe architectural andlandscape landscap 6. Integrate security lighting into architectural and G.4.5.c. facing facades should incorporate athe minimum of two system. Security lighting should not be distinguishable fromth t lighting not be distinguishable from continuoussystem. horizontal Security details refined to the should scale of 24 inches or less overall lighting system. within the first 10 feet of the building wall, measured vertically from overall lighting system. Good examples of an identifiable break between ground Landscape lighting, combined with facade Good of an identifiable break Landscape lighting, combined with facade level andexamples the upper floors. street level. lighting,can can enhance thepedestrian pedestrian between ground level the retail and the Illuminatealleys alleysfor forboth bothvehicles vehiclesand andpedestrians. pedestrians. lighting, enhance 7.7. Illuminate environment. upper floors. environment. Good example of a street wall with 03 Architectural Details 04 DRAFT balconies and varied windows that create a pattern of projections and recesses. DowntownDesign DesignGuide Guide 6.15.09 6.15.09 42 Downtown 42

REGULATIONS Entrance Orient buildings to the street to promote sidewalk activity and reinforce the pedestrian environment along the sidewalk. 4.1.1. Primary entrances shall be located on a public street or on a courtyard, plaza, or paseo that is connected to and visible from a public street. 4.1.2. At least one functional pedestrian building entrance, which may be either a building or tenant/resident entrance, shall be provided every 75 feet, on average along all street frontages except on Local Industrial Modified Streets. 4.1.3. The primary entrance to each street or sidewalk-level tenant space that has its frontage along a public street shall be provided from that street. 4.1.4. The primary entrance to each street-level tenant that does not have its frontage along a public street shall be provided from a pedestrian paseo, courtyard, or plaza, which is connected to a public street. 4.1.5. Primary entrances shall not be permitted from a parking area.

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GROUND F LOOR TRE ATMEN T

B. GROUND FLOOR TREATMENT ALONG OTHER STREET

Residential Entries

Design ground floor space facing other streets to accommod

4.2.1. If space a residential individual entry walls along the street is the parking. andunit’s to avoid blank and visible unit’s primary entry, it must be located at the same elevation as the 1. Along other streets, at least 75% of the ground floor str sidewalk.

shall be designed to accommodate the following uses: r professional office, live/work units with i 4.2.2. If a residential unit’s individual entry along the units, street isresidential a along the street, and/or other active space such as recr secondary entry, the entry and any private outdoor space for the common rooms. unit may be several (but not more than 5) steps above the sidewalk elevation. 2.

The ground floor treatment of those uses, except residen individual entries, should be similar to that of retail space 4.2.3. Groundopenings floor residential units with individual shall comprise at entries least shall 50% of the street level

include windows on the ground floor that look out onto the street. 3. Residential units with individual entries should include w

ground floor that look out onto the street. 4. Good example of individual unit entry several feet above the sidewalk with porch windows that look entry onto the Good example ofand individual unit street.

If a residential unit’s individual entry along the street is th entry, it must be accessible, that is, at the same elevation

If a residential unit’s individual entry along the street is a the entry and any private outdoor space for the unit may several feet above the sidewalk with porch Ground Floornot Frontage moreUses than 4 or 5) steps above the sidewalk elevation and windows that look onto the street. open space for the unit must be directly accessible from th 4.3.1. At leastthe 75 percent the ground floor frontage of a building sameofelevation. 5.

located on a Retail Street identified on the Active Streets Map shall be designed specifically for and occupied by retail and community serving uses.

4.3.2. At least 50 percent of the ground floor frontage of a building located on an Active Street shall be designed to accommodate the following uses: retail, cultural, professional office, live/work units, residential units with individual entries along the street, and/or other active space such as recreation and meeting rooms, lobby or sales areas, or common rooms. Common areas or recreation rooms with transparent windows can also line the 4.3.3. At least 25 percent of the ground floor frontage of a ground floor of residential buildings. building located on an Active Industrial Street shall be designed

to accommodate the following uses: lobby or sales areas, retail, professional office, and/or other active space such as meeting rooms. 4.3.4. The owner or owners of said lot on which the ground-floor uses are to be provided shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide said ground-floor uses as long as the building or use the ground-floor uses are intended to serve is maintained. 4.3.5. All Projects shall provide information about local transit service at a primary entry point to the site or building. The information shall be prominently displayed and shall include phone numbers for transit, Where blank walls are unavoidable, they para transit, and taxis as well as brochures and maps for local bus can be set back with landscaping. and rail service.

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Ground Floor Transparency 4.4.1. Along Retail Streets transparent wall openings, such as storefront windows and doors, shall comprise at least 50 percent of a building’s street level façade that is between 2 feet to 8 feet from the ground. 4.4.2. Along Active Streets and Paseos, transparent wall openings, such as storefront windows and doors shall comprise at least 35 percent of the street level façade that is between 2 feet to 8 feet from the ground. 4.4.3. An exception shall be made for older structures that are being renovated if the transparency requirement would render the building structurally infeasible or would compromise the historical integrity or original character of the building.

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ARCHITECTUR DETAIL

Ground Floor Facade. Vary the horizontal plane of a building to provide visual interest and enrich the pedestrian experience, while contributing to the quality and definition of the Street Wall.

Once a b details, in a building materials or at the

4.5.1. To avoid blank walls that would detract from the experience and appearance of an active streetscape there shall be no blank walls (without doors or windows) longer than 50 feet along sidewalks on Active or Retail Streets. Walls with public art installations such as murals shall be exempt.

Ground Floor Retail 4.6.1. Any and all ground floor retail space shall be located either along the Street Wall or along a courtyard or plaza, provided the retail frontage is not more than 60 feet from the back of sidewalk and is visible from the sidewalk.

A.

Vary the h pedestria street wa Bad examples of building facades that provide little to no visual and tooof much blank surface. Bad relief example building façades that provides little to no visual relief and too much blank surface.

1.

Avoid appe

2.

Horiz in th

3.

Vary dime

4.

While for in inter be a in its diffe mass stree

5.

Provi entra treat store

4.6.2. Ground floor retail space shall be provided to a depth of at least 25 feet from the front façade and shall include an average 14 feet - 20 feet floor to ceiling height. 4.6.3. Where Retail Streets intersect other streets, the ground floor retail space shall wrap the corner onto the other streets. Good example of a break in the street wall to provide pedestrian access to an open space.

Good example of horizontal variation along a façade.

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Active Streets Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco Metro Gold Line & stations Specific Plan Areas Active Streets Retail Streets Active Industrial Streets

San d o R

River

and

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Open Space

ay dw

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400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by the City of Los Angeles Planning Department • Graphics Services Section • Fall 2010 • 58

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Renewable Energy RE-1

PV Mandate Aggressive (FAR 3 Basis) Every roof is required to cover a ratio of it’s surface with PV panels. This ratio is determined in the following manner: Total Roof Surface / 3 = Equivalent Roof Surface; Equivalent Roof Surface * 0.5 =PV Total PV Area to be Installed Renewable Energy Mandate

Windows RE-1 Window design can further contribute to the energy efficiency of a building. 4.7.1. To reduce interior heat gain and improve energy performance the window to wall ratio (exclusive of the ground floor) shall not exceed 40 percent on the E, W, SW, NW, SE, and NE facades unless an alternative façade design can demonstrate through building specific analysis that it provides the same or greater reduction in cooling loads of the building.

Aggressive (FAR 3 Basis) Every roof is required to cover a ratio of it’s surf determined in the following manner: Total Roof Surface / 3 = Equivalent Roof Su Equivalent Roof Surface * 0.5 = Total PV Ar

4.7.2. All windows on the aforementioned facades shall be shaded by 1’ fins or overhangs or other architectural feature that provides the equivalent shading value unless an alternative design solution can be demonstrated through building specific analysis that it provides the same or greater reduction in cooling loads of the building.

Glazing Incorporate glazing that contributes to a warm, inviting environment while also reducing bird collisions by minimizing the reflection of surrounding habitat or sky. 4.8.1. All ground-floor window and door glazing shall be transparent and have a 0-10 percent reflectivity rating. 4.8.2. Glazing on the upper floors shall include one or more of the following: 0-10 percent reflectivity, etching, sandblasted patterns, fretting, or low-e patterning, shading devices, screen and other barriers to reduce birds’ access to glass, and/or angle the glass between 20-40 degrees from vertical.

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Exterior Lighting Provide well-designed, energy efficient, architectural and landscape lighting that contributes to a safe and inviting atmosphere without casting light into the night sky, adjacent properties, or sensitive habitat areas. All exterior lighting (building, landscape, and security) shall be integrated with the building design and should be of a character and scale that relates to the pedestrian and accentuates major architectural and special landscape features. Light levels shall be measured with a photoelectric photometer, following the standard spectral luminous efficiency curve adopted by the International Commission on Illumination. 4.9.1. All projects in the Urban Center, Innovation, and Village Districts shall design all site and building mounted lighting such that it produces a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.20 horizontal and vertical foot candles at the site boundary and no greater than 0.01 horizontal foot candles 15 feet beyond the site. No more than 5.0 percent of the total initial designed lumens shall be emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

4.9.2. All projects in the Greenway District shall design all site and building mounted lighting such that it produces a maximum initial illuminance value no greater than 0.01 horizontal and vertical foot candles at the site boundary and beyond. None of the total initial designed lumens shall be emitted at an angle of 90 degrees or higher from nadir (straight down).

4.9.3. Provide lighting along all vehicular access ways and pedestrian walkways.

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4.9.4. All low pressure sodium, high pressure sodium, metal halide, fluorescent, quartz, incandescent greater than 60 watts, mercury vapor, and halogen fixtures shall be fully shielded in such a manner as to preclude light pollution or light trespass on any of the following; an abutting residential land use district; a lot zoned for residential use; and public right of way, park, or open space. 4.9.5. Lighting (exterior building and landscape) shall be directed away from properties and roadways, and shielded as necessary. In particular no lighting shall be directed at the window of a residential unit either within or adjacent to a project.

     



   

     

       

  



10

04 Architectural Details



 The cinema complex in Branford, Connecticut, before and after its lights were fitted with full cutoff shields to comply with the town’s new regulations. The charge kept the ground well lit while dramatically reducing glare and light  trespass onto neighboring property.

DRAFT

4.9.6. Exemptions The following outdoor lighting fixtures and activities are exempt from the requirements of this section: a. Fixtures producing light directly by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as kerosene lanterns or gas lamps. b. All neon, argon or krypton outdoor lighting fixtures. c. Emergency lighting operated by a public utility or agency during the course of repairing or replacing damaged facilities. d. Emergency lighting and fixtures necessary to conduct rescue operations, provide emergency medical treatment, or address any other emergency situation. e. Lighting fixtures within five feet of an entrance or exit door and/or alcove of a dwelling unit, not exceeding a height of eight feet and a wattage not exceeding 75 watts provided there is no light pollution, or light trespass, or when the lighting fixtures are regulated by a motion detector. f. Internally illuminated signs. g. Holiday lighting fixtures or displays. h. Architectural lighting whether it is freestanding or attached to a building which does not exceed an intensity of 60 watts. i. Pedestrian lighting which does not have an intensity greater than 60 watts. j. Vertical lighting for property displayed U.S. And State of California flags which does not exceed an intensity of 140 watts.

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Architectural Details 04

11

Minimizing Impacts on Neighbors In an urban setting such as the Plan area where many projects are viewed directly from adjacent properties where visitors, residents, and employees have clear site lines to roof and back-of house functions, it is important that new projects respect neighboring properties, and that the major mechanical systems, trash and recycling, antennas, glare lighting, and reflective materials are designed to limit adverse impacts. 4.10.1. Mechanical units shall be either screened from public view or the equipment itself shall be integrated into the architectural design of the building. 4.10.2. Ventilation intakes/exhausts shall be located at least 20 feet vertically and horizontally from a sidewalk and air flow shall be directed away from the public realm. 4.10.3. Recycling and trash facilities shall be screened from public view. 4.10.4. Exterior trash enclosures shall: a. be designed to complement the primary building with a wall height that exceeds the disposal unit it is designed to contain by 18 inches, b. have a solid roof to deter birds and to block views from adjacent properties, c. shall be comprised of solid metal doors that accommodate a lock and shall remain closed when not in use, and d. shall not be constructed of chain link or wood.

12

04 Architectural Details

DRAFT

g the street.

8. Electrical transformers, mechanical equipment and other equipment should notretail be located along the ground floor street wall. ures that reinforce the character of the ground rilles r help and define the pedestrian environment along the 9. and Electrical transformers, mechanical equipment, other equipment, enclosed are awnings, sthey canopies, overhangs, are encouraged and Good examples of buildings that not promote stairs, storage spaces, walls, and other elements that are Interior that are more than blank 75% open al to the architecture of grills the building. sidewalk activity with overhangs, awnings are less visible during non-business hours pedestrian-oriented shall not be located with 100 feet of the corner on northand other transitional elements integrated opies shall be fabricated oftowoven glass, metal and easier screenfabric, from within view during south streets and 50 feet of theinto corner on east-west streets. the architecture. ent material compatible with the building architecture. business hours. ated, vinyl awnings are not permitted.

Examples of poor equipmen erties choices. A primary opening t Ground Floor Utilitarian Uses -of-house street frontage on "back of house" uses. Do not locate utilitarian uses along valuable street frontagegarden areas. is walled off with ele rties, and (left) and irrigation equipme mers, mechanical equipment and other equipment should view near a building entranc signed to

4.11.1. “Back of house” uses shall not be located within the first 20 feetdepth of the ground floor Street Wall.

ong the ground floor street wall.

mers, mechanical equipment, other equipment, enclosed aces, blank walls, and other elements that are not quipment ed shall not be located with 100 feet of the corner on north- 4.11.2. Electrical transformers, mechanical equipment, water meters within 50 feet of the corner on east-west streets. and other equipment shall not be located along the ground floor

ew or design

, and not e.

Street Wall unless screened from public view. Awnings can be used to conceal existing exterior roll-down doors during business hours. Left: overall view of the storefront. Right: detail of the grill housing.

Examples of poor equipment location choices. A primary opening to a courtyard 4.11.3. Electrical transformers, mechanical equipment, other garden is walled off with electric meters 6.15.09 Downtown Design equipment, enclosed stairs, storageisspaces, (left) and irrigation equipment in plainblank walls, and other view that nearare a building entrance (right). shall not be located within elements not pedestrian-oriented

100 feet of a corner.

effects on more than flow away Examples of poor equipment location choices. A primary opening to the courtyard garden is walled off with electric meters and irrigation equipment in plain view mear a building entrance.

ARCHITECTUR AL DE TAIL

08

y from SIn ial unit create an

surfaces) cept as easurable a project. doors S tdesigned 75% create an from view

erties of-house rties, and signed to erties

Security Grills and Roll-Down Doors and Windows Balance the need for security doors and windows with the need to create an attractive, inviting environment.

A R C H I T EC T U R A L D E TA I L

08

There are always exceptions: this security grill is not retractable, but could be approved given its aesthetic contribution.

4.12.2. Any ground-level retail storefront windows must be kept open and visible (unshuttered) at night. A covenant shall be recorded There are always exceptions: this security binding future owners to comply with this provision. grill is not retractable, but could be approved given its aesthetic contribution.

rilles and

rilles and they are

19

4.12.1. Exterior roll-down doors and security grills are not permitted unless they are designed to be 75 percent transparent (open), or retractable and designed to be fully screened from view during business hours.

cept as

they are doors t 75% from view

6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide

6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide 43 Interior grills that are more than 75% open are less visible during non-business hours and easier to screen from view during business hours.

4.12.3. Windows with security features shall not block out more than 30 percent of the natural light to the interior, and shall be designed as an architectural feature compatible with the building’s style.

Interior grills that are more than 75% open are less visible during non grills business hours and easierthan to screen from view Interior that are more 75% open during business hours. are less visible during non-business hours and easier to screen from view during business hours.

-of-house rties, and signed to

quipment

quipment

ew or ew or design

design

, and not e. e.

effects on effects on more than flow away more than

flow away

Awnings can be used to conceal existing exteriors Awnings can be business used tohours. conceal existing rolldown doors during

Awnings can be used to conceal existing

exterior exterior roll-down roll-down doors doors during during business business hours. Left: overall view of the storefront. Right: detail detail of of the the grill grill housing. housing. Right:

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Architectural Details 04

13

DRAFT

5

Parks and Open Space PURPOSE • •

• •

• • •

• • •

• •

Provide inviting, safe, and permanently accessible public open space. Provide a park, green plaza, or square at least 1/6 acre in area within 1/6 mile walking distance of all dwelling units and business entrances. Increase recreational opportunities for residents, employees, and visitors. Provide an active open space facility (e.g. general playfields, soccer, baseball, basketball, and other sports fields) of at least one acre within 1/2 mile walk distance of all dwelling units and business entrances. Provide publicly accessible open spaces that may be shared and that provide pedestrian linkages throughout the Plan area. Provide parks and open space that minimize demand for potable water resources. Provide areas for community-based and local food production to minimize the environmental impacts from transporting food long distances and increase direct access to fresh foods. Provide a location for the establishment of a weekly farmer’s market. Provide open space areas that provide for native habitat and facilitate the movement of local species. Establish a clear hierarchy of common open spaces distinguished by design and function to create a connected pedestrian realm conducive to both active and passive uses. Provide adequate lighting to create a park environment where residents feel safe. Generate visual interest by creating focal points and meeting places to enhance the area’s image.

Parks and Open Space 05

01

OPEN SPACE TYPOLOGIES Alleys. Alleys provide access to service activities and while not typically the most visible of public spaces they can facilitate physical connections between traditional open spaces.

07

ON - SITE OPEN SPACE

Provide publicl linkages throu 1.

Community Gardens. Community Gardens provide community members with local opportunities to tend individual plots and grow their own food.

A 50% red open spac •

Locate

Open t

At leas

Lined w that in its fron

At leas

Biddy Mason Park is a paseo connecting Broadway and Spring Street.

and include

2. Where blo

most Dow pathway o project tha middle of

Courtyards. Courtyards are common open space areas of a scale and enclosure that is conducive to social interaction at a smaller scale. A courtyard is typically contained on three sides by building and/or architectural features.

3.

On-site open space should be designed to serve ato On-site open space should be designed serve a residents. building’s residents. building’s

Entry forecourts. Entry forecourts announce the function and importance of primary building entrances. They should provide a clear comfortable transition between exterior and interior space. An entry forecourt is typically contained on two sides by building and/or architectural features.

Parks. Parks provide a wide range of passive, active recreational, and picnic opportunities for multiple users.

Have a or foca

Be at l

Be line restau

Include

4.

Site landsc Section 12

5.

At least 50 spaces, si

6.

Variances required tr that they c the followin private pro

Projects that provide publicly accessible open space at-grade may receive a reduction in the on-site open space requirement .

07

ON -SITE OPEN SPACE

Downtown Design Guide

6.15.09

Provide publicl linkages throu

Paseos. Paseos are extensions of the street grid located on private property. As outdoor passages devoted exclusively to pedestrians, they establish clear connections between streets, plazas and courtyards, building entrances, parking, and transit facilities. A paseo is typically contained on two sides by building and/or architectural features.

1.

A 50% red open spac •

Biddy ParkPark is a paseo connecting Broadway BiddyMason Mason is a paseo connecting and Spring Street. Broadway and Spring Street.

05 Parks and Open Space

Be at

Provide adequa

34

02

A paseo s •

DRAFT

Locate

Open t

At leas

Lined w that in its fron

At leas

and include

2. Where blo

most Dow pathway o

Plazas. Plazas are common open space areas typically amenable to larger public gatherings. They are readily accessible from the street, as well as active building uses. A courtyard is typically contained on only one side by building and/or architectural features.

Promenade. A public area set aside as a pedestrian walkway.

Residential Setbacks. Building setbacks adjacent to residential buildings provide a transition between the public and private realm, allowing residents to have private spaces with visual access to the public realm.

Roof Terrace. Roof terraces and gardens can augment open space and are especially encouraged in conjunction with hotels or residential uses.

Streets. Streets are the most public of all open spaces. Streets communicate the quality of the public environment and the care a city has for its residents.

Trails. Trails provide opportunities for walking and hiking without the interruption of vehicular traffic.

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Parks and Open Space 05

03

11

PUBLIC ART

DESIGN GUIDELINES The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall have no bearing towards a projects compliance with this Plan.

B. GENERAL GUIDELINES

PUBLIC ART to 11 Useerected landscape provide otherbe functional 1. AllG.5.1. artwork in orelements placed upon City shade propertyandmust approved

and aesthetic objectives.

PUBLIC ART 11

Historically, cities embrace the arts of their time, an and spirit of the city is often conveyed most vividly t Downtown stakeholders have a proven commitmen significant role in cultivating livable neighborhoods. popular destination to experience public art, art galle and to celebrate cultural in enhanced urb PUBLIC ARTtraditions 11 reasons, public art in Downtown should aspire to m guidelines:

by the Department of Cultural Affairs, and in some cases may require amenities that facilitate outdoor activities such as aG.5.2. specialIncorporate maintenance agreement with the appropriate BID or similar standing, sitting, strolling, conversing, recreation, window-shopping, PUBLIC ART and dining;organization. provide seating for comfort; and landscaping for shade community

approved ay require or similar

11

and aesthetics.

in privatelyelements owned developments should beand fullyreinforce integrated into G.5.3. Landscape should establish scale RAL gratedGUIDELINES into 2. Artwork

e locations. work priate erected

continuity between indoor and outdoor space. Icons and emblems. Large-scale signature

theordevelopment’s design, in the mostmust accessible and visible locations. in placed upon City property be approved sculptural statements and gateway Department of Cultural Affairs, andtop inshould some cases may require G.5.4. Landscape elements provide scale, color. first markers cantexture, create aand dramatic Enclosed lobbies and roof gardens are considered appropriate Parks, Paseos and with Courtyards. ewed in A rich, coordinated palette ofappropriate landscape impression elements that enhances the ial maintenance agreement the BID or similar of a neighborhood. These spaces allow for closer, quieter locations. Project’s site identity is encouraged. unity organization. contemplation of art, and can provide playful sequential elements.

st

G.5.5. developments Open Space areasshould assist with integrated the Project’s Stormwater k in privately owned be fully 3. design, Artwork in retail streets andshould developments will need to beinto viewed in requirements. velopment’s in the most accessible and visible locations. orks may be ed lobbies andrelation roof top gardens are considered appropriate to existing signage and shop frontage. G.5.6. Projects should integrate artwork into the Project’s design. ns. Icons and emblems. Large-scale signature

A. GOALS

Integrate public artembrace in the overall vision of the projec Historically, cities the arts of their time, an and spirit of the city is often conveyed most vividly and open space design by incorporating the artist int Downtown stakeholders have a proven commitmen the process. The goals are as follows: signifi cant role in cultivating livable neighborhoods. popular destination to experience public art, art galle to celebrate culturalAim traditions enhanced urb •and Artistic excellence. for the in highest aesthet reasons, public art in Downtown should aspire to m artists to create original and sustainable artwo guidelines:

Parks, Paseos and Courtyards. PUBLIC ART design, materials, These spaces allow for closer,construction, quieter11 and location, a maintenance A. practices GOALS contemplation of art,in and can provide and conservation. Artwork should be placed it in the most accessible and visible and courtyards. These allow for vision of the projec sculptural statements and gateway Parks, paseos,Integrate public artspaces in the overall •contemplation Image. Generate visual interest by creating foc playful sequential B. GENERAL GUIDELINES quieter of elements. art, and can provide Parks, Paseos and space Courtyards. locations. markers can create a dramatic first closer, 4. Attention must be paid to how the artwork will appear amidst and open design by incorporating the artist in k“heart” in retail be viewed in withstreets and developments will need to playful sequential elements. modifiers or definers that will enhance Downtown impression of a neighborhood.

1. All artwork erected in or placed upon City property must be approved These spaces allow for closer, quieter boundary, nd to existing signage and shopoffrontage. mature landscape. by the Department Cultural Affairs, and in some cases may require nationally and internationally.

the process. The goals are as follows:

efines the n Trail.” This on must be covery using

G.5.7. Planting within 100 feet of the top of bank of either the contemplation of art, excellence. and can provide • Artistic Aim for the highest aesthet aRiver special maintenance agreement with the appropriate BID or similar and/or the Arroyo Seco should be established in a natural playful sequential elements. artists to create original and sustainable artwo paid to howorganization. the artwork will appear amidst community • design, Authentic sense ofconstruction, place. Enlivenand and enhance materials, location, a arrangement.

Special care should be made to avoid locations where artworks may be Artwork in privately owned developments should be fully integrated into Civic Buildings. facilities require the development’s most accessible and Public visible locations. Façades. An artist’s design, sculpted in or the surface such asand the vehicular right ofare way. l care should damaged, be madelobbies tobecome avoid locations where artworks may be the agency’s Enclosed top gardens considered appropriate public art that can embody treatment can aroof visual showcase

5. e landscape. 2.

that complements the architecture. locations. ed, such as the vehicular right of way.

3.

mission while providing a more human and

welcoming faceto to be visitors. Artwork in retail streets and developments will need viewed in relation to existing signage and shop frontage. Civic Buildings. Public facilities require

4. Attention must be how the artwork will public artappear that canamidst embody the agency’s RIBUTING C. TO CONTRIBUTING AN URBAN TRAIL TOpaid ANtoURBAN TRAIL mission while providing a more human and

mature landscape.

welcoming face to visitors. h Downtown neighborhood would develop an aesthetic “heart” with 5. Special care should be made to avoid locations where artworks may be Ideally, each Downtown neighborhood would an aesthetic “heart” with racteristics. Itdamaged, could besuch represented by aright neighborhood boundary, as the vehicular ofdevelop way. vard, business or culturalIt could corridor. The art that nes the boundary, uniquecore characteristics. be represented by adefi neighborhood TO AN URBAN TRAIL also branchC.outCONTRIBUTING to offer connections that form an “Urban Trail.” This main boulevard, business core or cultural corridor. The art thatusing defi nes the provide physical connections, path of discovery Ideally, and each visible Downtown neighborhood a would develop an aesthetic “heart” with unique characteristics. It could be represented by a neighborhood boundary, ke: heart can also branch out to offer connections that form an “Urban Trail.” This

practices in maintenance Downtown’s diverse visualand andconservation. cultural environ

Image. Generate visual interesttobyparticipate creating foc opportunities for communities in modifiers or definers that will enhance Downtown means for citizens to identify with each other t nationally and internationally.

common areas.

Parks, Paseos and Courtyards. • Authentic sense of place. Enliven and enhance These spaces allow for closer, quieter Downtown’s diverse visual and cultural environ contemplation of art, and can provide opportunities for communities to participate in playful sequential elements.

• Cultural literacy. Foster common currency for s means forbetween citizens to identify with exchange residents, and each attractother visitot common areas. have access to visual ‘clues’ that will help the • Cultural literacy. Foster common currency for s aexchange potentially unfamiliar environment. This can between residents, and attract visito promotional and tours well asthe art have access materials to visual ‘clues’ thatas will help a potentially unfamiliar environment. This can

materials and tours ascuratorial well as art • promotional Style. Artworks must demonstrate ri the city’s collection public art andcuratorial shall illus • Style. Artworks mustofdemonstrate ri the city’s collection of public art and shall illus sophistication that are appropriate for their loc sophistication that are appropriate for their loc

main boulevard, business core or cultural corridor. The art that defines the heart can also branch out to offer connections that form an “Urban Trail.” This Façades. An artist’s sculpted or surface and emblems trail could provide physical and visible connections, a path of discovery using • Responsiveness. Without formally formally injecting injecting art art treatment •canResponsiveness. become a visualWithout showcase elements like: planning process for each new development, it planning process forwith each new development, it uildings that complements theout architecture. appear of sync the overall growth of th Façades. artist’s sculpted or surface Plazas.Plazas Plazas should be activated with Transit Hubs. Strategically located artworks Plazas. should be activated with more Facades. AnAn artist’s sculpted or surface Transit Hubs. Strategically located • Icons and emblems

trail could provide physical and visible connections, a path of discovery using elements like:

furnishings•

can serve as beacons people artworks can serve to asattract beacons to to

Civic buildings transit, and to make a commuter’s wait morea attract people to transit, and to make

interesting. •• Street Icons and emblems commuter’s wait more interesting. furnishings

Plazas

Façades

paseos and •• courtyards Civic Parks,buildings paseos and courtyards

6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide

es hubs.

57

• Street Transit furnishings 04 hubs. 05 Parks and Open Space

prominent, dynamic artwork as largewith more prominent, enigmatic artwork such Plazas. Plazas should besuch activated sculptures, arbors, lighting, or water features as large sculptures, arbors, lighting or more prominent, enigmatic artwork which adequate for adequate people such to water include features which space include gather and amenities make itand inviting space forsculptures, people totogather amenities as large arbors, lighting or to make it inviting.

water features which include adequate space for people to gather and amenities to make it inviting.

56

• Plazas

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

appear out of sync with the overall growth of th

treatment can become a visual showcase that treatment can become a visual showcase complements the architecture that complements the architecture.

Façades. An artist’s sculpted or surface treatment can become a visual showcase that complements the architecture. DRAFT

REGULATIONS Quantity 5.1.1. All Projects in the Greenway District shall provide 85 percent of the lot area as publicly accessible open space. 5.1.2. All projects in the Urban Village, Urban Center, and Urban Innovation Districts shall provide 15 percent of the lot area as open space. a. Projects on a lot size equal to or greater than 15,000 square feet shall develop and maintain the 15 percent open space areas as publicly accessible open space. b. Projects on a lot size less than 15,000 square feet shall develop and maintain the 15 percent open space area as usable outdoor space for the Project’s residents and employees. 5.1.3. Projects occupying more than one lot and/or block may combine the individual open space requirement of each parcel into a single open space area equal to no less than the sum of the requirement of each parcel. 5.1.4. In the case of a Transfer of Floor Area Rights, a Project may comply with the provisions of this section by providing the required open space on either the Recipient or the Donor Site. 5.1.5. Parking areas, including access aisles, and driveways shall not qualify as usable open space. 5.1.6. Interior passive or active recreational spaces that are directly adjacent to the outdoors have a direct physical and visual connection to the nearest public right of way and are available for use by the public shall qualify as publicly accessible open space at a rate of 2:1. (1 square foot of interior space shall contribute to 2 square feet of publicly accessible open space) 5.1.7. Public alleyways, paseos, or new streets that are added to a project site may contribute to the 15 percent open space requirement. 5.1.8. Abandoned railway right of ways included within a redeveloped site shall be integrated as outdoor space and shall contribute towards the 15 percent public open space requirement.

DRAFT

Parks and Open Space 05

05

Uses 5.2.1. Publicly Accessible Open Spaces shall be designed to serve at least one functional use listed below that includes but is not limited to: Basketball Courts Bicycle Rental Center Community amenities Community garden space Farmers’ Market Information or newstand kiosk (as long as it does not exceed 1.5 percent of the open space area). Off-leash Dog Park Open air cafe (as long as it occupies no more than 20 percent of the open space). Picnic Seating Soccer Field Softball Field Tennis Courts Trails, Alleys, Streets, Paseos for walking and bicycling Transit Hub Amenities Exercise Areas, Yoga, Pilates, and Tai Chi

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Access. Landscape elements should support an easy transition between indoors and outdoors. Building entrances, well-sited and comfortable steps, shading devices, and/or planters shall delineate these traditional spaces. 5.3.1. All paths of travel shall conform to the standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 5.3.2. The relationship between open space and the adjacent street as well as the public access requirements for different types of open space are defined in the table below.

Connections and Public Access Requirements Table

Public Access

Contributes to 15% open space requirement

Direct connection required

Required

Yes

Street Level

Direct connection required

Required for garden members

Yes

Street Level or Above Grade

Not required

Not Required

No, unless public access is permitted.

Entry Forecourt

Street Level

Direct connection required

Not Required

No, unless public access is permitted

Parks

Street Level

Direct connection required

Required

Yes

Paseo

Street level

Direct connection required

Required

Yes

Open Space Typology Alley Community Garden Courtyard

Plaza Promenade Residential Setback Roof Terrace

Location

Connection to Street and Los Angeles State Park (when adjacent).

Street Level

Street Level

Direct connection required

Required

Yes

Street Level, Below or Above Grade

Direct connections required

Required

Yes

Street level

Private with visual access

Not Required

No

Rooftop

Not required

Not Required

No

5.3.4. When Public Access and Direct Connection are required as described in the table above the open space shall: a. Be at the same level as the public sidewalk for at least one half of its frontage and a depth of 10 feet, and may not be more than three feet above or below the street curb level. b. Be visible from an adjoining street(s) or adjecent parks.

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Dimensions and Boundaries. Design urban open space areas so as to create the character of outdoor rooms contained by buildings.

07

ON - SITE OPEN SPACE

07

ON - SITE OPEN SPACE

07

O N - S I T E O P EN S PAC E

5.4.1. All open space shall have a minimum area of 1,350 square feet with no horizontal dimension less than 15 feet when measured perpendicular from any point on each of the boundaries. 5.4.2. Blank walls longer than 100 feet are not permitted adjacent to the open space areas.

Incorpo strollin and lan

Pro Pla Incorpo thi strollin and lan Incorpo 8.

Seating. Open space should include permanent and temporary seating that is placed with consideration to sun and shade, and other factors contributing to human comfort.

strollin Table 7 8. lan Pro and

5.5.1 Provide one linear foot of seating for every 500 square feet of open space area. The flat top of walls and ledges may count as seating as long as they are no less than 15 inches in depth, between 15 inches and 20 inches in height, and have smooth surfaces to ensure comfort.

8.

Pla

Pro

thi OPEN Pla

thi

Paseo

Table 7 7 Table

Courty

OPEN

Plazas OPEN

Paseo

Roof T

Paseo Cour ty

Courty *Plazas sea Roof T hou

Plazas

*

sea

hou Roof T

Pla the Pla 9. * sea the to hou to co co pla pla Pla 9. su su the to Use lan aesthe Use lan co 10. On aesthe pla tem su 10. to On pla tem to to Use La lan 11. pla an aesthe sh to 10. On 12. La 11. be La tem pro an to se sh pla to 12. La 9.

Seating is an essential element in most open spaces.

Seating is an essential element in most open spaces.

Seating is an essential element in most open spaces.

Seating is an essential element in most open spaces.

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05 Parks and Open Space

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11. be La

pro an se sh

12. La

Landscape. Areas with vegetation shall offer relief from the urban hardscape. 5.6.1. A minimum proportion of all open space areas shall be landscaped as described in the table below.

Landscaped Area Table Open Space Type

Min. Planted Area

Community Gardens

90%

Courtyards

25%

Entry Forecourt

10%

Parks

90%

Paseos

10%

Plazas

25%

Promenade

0%

Residential Setbacks

50%

Roof Terraces

25%

Trees. Deciduous trees should be planted as the most effective means of providing comfortable access to sun and shade. 5.7.1. Install trees at a minimum of one tree per 600 square feet of open space area. 5.7.2.Trees must have a minimum caliper size of 4 inches at planting and have a canopy of at least 10 feet at maturity. 5.7.3. A permeable surface shall be maintained below each tree for a distance of 2 feet from the trunk for every 1 inch of caliper. A tree with an expected 10 inches caliper at maturity would be required to have a 20 feet radial permeable surface below it.

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Plants and Shrubs. Design landscaped areas to reflect the Los Angeles’ area Mediterranean climate. Plants that provide habitat for native bird and butterfly species are encouraged. See the Plant Selection Appendix for guidance. 5.8.1 75 percent of the landscaped area shall be planted with indigenous native plants and shrubs. As identified in the County’s Los Angeles River Master Plan Landscaping Guidelines and Plant Palettes. 5.8.2. 25 percent of the landscaped area shall be planted with drought tolerant plants. 5.8.3. Plants with similar water requirements shall be grouped together by common Hydro-zones. 5.8.4. All existing exotic weedy plants identified by the California Invasive Plant Council (CAL-IPC) shall be removed. Examples include the Mexican fan palm (Washingtonia robusta) and fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum). See www.cal-ipc for additional information on invasive plant species and management techniques.

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Irrigation 5.9.1. Irrigation systems shall be equipped with a Weather Based Irrigation Controller such that the system does not turn on during a storm event or when the soil has moisture level sufficient to support the plant species. 5.9.2. Irrigation systems shall be designed to the water needs of different parts of the landscape. This is referred to as Zoned Irrigation. 5.9.3. Any irrigation system shall be plumbed with a purple pipe to enable a connection to a recycled or gray water system once it is available. 5.9.4. All irrigation systems shall be either drip or subsurface. Hardscape and Materials 5.10.1. Hardscape materials shall have a Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of at least 29. 5.10.2. No spikes, pointed railings, or other sharp objects shall be permitted. Operations and Maintenance Property owners are encouraged to work together to retain maintenance providers that can service contiguous properties. A number of non-profit organizations and for-profit companies either specialize in or have developed a specialized unit knowledgeable in the maintenance of native landscaping. 5.11.1. Open space areas shall be maintained by pruning, weeding, and the use of supplemental irrigation and supplemental mulch as necessary. See instructions and guidelines in the book, Care and Maintenance of Southern California Native Plant Gardens written by Bart O’Brien, Betsey Landis, and Ellen Mackey. 5.11.2. Tree maintenance shall be provided by an arborist certified by the International Society of Arboreal Culture. 5.11.3. Open space areas shall be maintained free of litter. Litter receptacles shall be provided at a ratio of at least one cubic foot for every 2,000 square feet of open space, with an additional cubic foot for every 2,000 square feet of space if outdoor eating is present. 5.11.4. The owner or owners of a lot on which the publicly accessible open space is to be provided and maintained shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide and maintain said publicly accessible open space as described in Section 5 of the Plan so long as the building or use the open space is intended to serve is maintained.

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ADDITIONAL GUIDELINES Plazas and Courtyards G.5.12.1. Plazas and courtyards are encouraged to incorporate amenities beyond the minimum required, including permanent and/or temporary seating, to facilitate their use. Roof Terraces G.5.13.1. Roof terraces shall incorporate trees and other planting materials in permanent and temporary planters that will provide shade, reduce reflective glare, and add interest to the space. ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS Community Gardens 5.14.1. Community gardens shall provide fencing, watering systems, and a secure storage space. 5.14.2. Community gardens must have solar access of at least 4 hours of summer sun between the hours of 10am and 4pm. 5.14.3. The Project shall identify the parties responsible for maintaining the garden’s operation. Park Recreational Areas 5.15.1. Park-Recreational areas shall be designed to the specifications of the Department of Recreation and Parks Paseo. 5.16.1. Paseos shall be designed to: a. Be at least 20 feet wide; b. Have a clear line of sight from the street to the end of the passageway, gathering place, or focal element; c. Be at least 50 percent open to the sky or covered with a transparent material; and, d. Be lined with ground floor spaces designed for retail, especially restaurants, and/or cultural uses along at least 50 percent of its frontage; Off-Leash Dog Park 5.17.1. Off-leash dog parks shall use softscaping to capture and “scrub” animal fecal matter. 5.17.2. Softscaping needs to be laid to a depth of at least 6” with a drainage system installed prior to installation of the material. It could also be composed of Turf Type Tall Fescue grass, a hardy grass that can withstand extreme temperature along with heavy traffic and retain its aesthetic value, and therefore hold up to the play of dogs.

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EXCEPTIONS 5.18.1. Subdivision projects subject to the requirements of LAMC Section 17.12 shall conform to the regulations stated herein with the exception that the percentage of area provided as open space shall be as defined in LAMC Section 17.12. 5.18.2. An exception to the native plant and drought tolerant requirement shall be made for up to 10 percent of an area for horticulture such as herbs, fruit, or vegetables. 5.18.3. An exception to the native plant and drought tolerant requirement shall be made for up to 100 percent of an area established as a community food garden.

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6

Parking and Access PURPOSE • • • • • •

• • •

To manage and control the parking supply and demand. To avoid an oversupply of parking. To increase pedestrian, bicycle, and transit use, and reduce vehicular trips to, through, and within the area. To minimize the area’s parking footprint and preserve land for other productive uses. To reduce the cost of parking typically associated with new construction. To provide vehicular access from side streets or alleyways to minimize driveways along Active Streets and to maintain building continuity and avoid vehicle and pedestrian conflicts. To create active ground floors around the base of parking structures that are adjacent to Active Streets. To screen parking to provide a safe, aesthetically pleasing, and secure environment for pedestrians. Provide adequate signage to public parking structures to aid visitors in finding them upon arrival and getting oriented to their surroundings.

Parking and Access 06

01

GUIDELINES The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall have no bearing towards a project’s compliance with this Plan. G.6.1. Parking lots shall be designed to assist the Project in conforming to the Parcel Level Stormwater requirements set forth in the Conservation Chapter 7. G.6.2. Integrate the design of public art, signage and lighting with the architecture of a parking structure to reinforce its unique identity REGULATIONS Off-Street Parking. Encourage the use of alternate modes of transportation by reducing the availability of off-street parking. 6.1.1. Residential Projects or those portions of Mixed-Use Projects that are residential shall: a. Provide, in a publicly accessible area, one shared vehicle parking space for every 25 units, b. Provide designated stalls for scooters, mopeds, and motorcycles at a ratio of one space for every 25 units, c. Provide a minimum of one bicycle parking space or locker for every two units, and d. Provide a maximum of one vehicle parking space per unit, exclusive of the shared vehicle and electric charging parking spaces. 6.1.2. Non-Residential Projects or those portions of Mixed-Use Projects that are non-residential shall: a. Provide a minimum of one share or carpool space for every 25,000 square feet. b. Provide designated stalls for scooters, mopeds, and motorcycles at a ratio of one space for every 25,000 square feet. c. Provide a minimum of one bicycle space or locker for every 2,500 square feet. d. Provide a maximum of one vehicle parking space per 1,000 square feet, exclusive of the shared vehicle parking spaces. 6.1.3. Project Open Space Areas and Public Parks shall: a. Provide a maximum of four parking spaces per acre. There is no minimum parking requirement. b. Provide a minimum of two bicycle parking spaces for every 15,000 square feet of open space or park area. 6.1.4. All Projects shall provide vehicle charging stations for a minimum of 5 percent of vehicle parking spaces.

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6.1.5. The owner or owners of a lot on which the publicly accessible shared parking space(s) are to be provided shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide said parking spaces for the use of a publicly accessible shared vehicle so long as the building or use the vehicle(s) are intended to serve is maintained. 6.1.6. All Projects shall unbundle the cost of parking from the cost of living and employment areas, either by charging a rent or lease fee, or selling the parking space separately. The owner or owners of a lot on which the parking is to be provided shall record an agreement in the Office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, as a covenant running with the land for the benefit of the City of Los Angeles, providing that such owner or owners shall continue to provide said parking spaces separate from the cost of the sale or lease of the living and/or employment areas so long as the building or use they are intended to serve is maintained. 6.1.7. Any parking space may be used for shared parking purposes. The purchaser or lessor of a parking space may rent the space to a secondary shared user for hours and/or days when the primary user of the space is not occupying the space. Parking Capacity. Avoid an oversupply of parking. 6.2.1. Publicly accessible parking spaces (above and beyond the Project’s maximum parking limit) may be developed, sold and/ or rented for either short and/or long term periods of time, at the prevailing market rate, so long as they are not designated for a single property or use. The development of said spaces (exclusive of any spaces developed within the allowable Project maximum) shall not exceed the allotted Parking Cap established for the geographic Plan Area in which the Project is located.

NOTE: Maximum parking amounts wil be filled in at the time of the release of the DEIR.

6.2.2. A Parking Cap is established for each of the five geographic Plan Areas. The cap defines the maximum number of public parking spaces, above and beyond the maximum parking spaces permitted for each project, that can be built within each of the Plan Areas. The Parking Cap for Area 1 is____, Area 2___, Area 3___, Area 4____ and Area 5 is____. The boundaries of each Area is illustrated on the Parking Cap Map on the following page. 6.2.3. The Department of City Planning shall maintain a database of publicly accessible parking spaces within each Area.

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Parking and Access 06

03

Bicycle Parking Design 6.3.1. Bicycle parking racks shall be provided in accordance with the amounts required in Sections 6.1.1.-6.1.3. and shall be: a. Located at a distance no greater than the vehicle parking spaces or 250 feet whichever is less, b. Located inside a parking structure or shall be located in other areas protected from the weather when automobile parking spaces are provided in a structure, c. Clearly marked and separated from auto parking by some form of barrier to minimize the possibility of a parked bicycle being hit by a car, d. Sufficient to accommodate a cycle at least six (6) feet in length and two feet wide and shall have a minimum of six feet of overhead clearance, e. Provided with some form of stable frame permanently anchored to a foundation to which a bicycle frame and both wheels may be conveniently secured using a chain and padlock, locker or other storage facilities which are convenient for storage and are reasonably secure from theft and vandalism, f. Placed no closer than 24 inches from a wall, g. Spaced such that there is at least 30� between the racks from side to side (measured from the center of the rack), and at least 48 inchesbetween the racks from end to end (measured from the end points of each rack). h. Provide aisles, at least five feet in width to access bicycle parking spaces, and i. Provide display signage, which is clearly legible upon approach to all pedestrian building entrances that indicates the location of bicycle parking.

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06 Parking and Access

Example of bicycle parking layout

DRAFT

NOTE: Maximum parking amounts wil be filled in at the time of the release of the DEIR.

Area Five 00000 Spaces

Area Four 00000 Spaces

Maximum Parking Capacity

d o R

River

and

n Fer

Metro Gold Line & Station

San

geles Los An

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa

Area Three 00000 Spaces y wa

N

ng pri

ad Bro

Area Two 00000 Spaces

St

NS

Area One 00000 Spaces

t

in S

a NM

0

400

800

1200

1600

feet Prepared by Los Angeles Department of City Planning Graphic Services Section, June 2008

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Parking and Access 06

05

05 05

PARK ING AND ACCESS PARK ING AND ACCESS

05

PARK ING AND ACCESS

05

PARK ING AND ACCESS

Parking Structure Design Good parking structure design can elevate the building’s stature and contribute to the overall quality of the built landscape. 6.5.1. Parking structures shall have an external skin designed to improve the building’s appearance and conceal ramps, walls, and columns. This can include heavy-gage metal screen, pre-cast concrete panels, laminated glass, or photovoltaic panels. 6.5.2. Parking structures that include parking at the ground level shall either line the perimeter with active uses and/or provide a low screen to block views of parked vehicle bumpers and headlights from pedestrians. 6.5.3. Vertical circulation cores (elevators and stairs) shall be located on the primary pedestrian corners and be highlighted architecturally so visitors can easily find and access these entry points. 6.5.4. Automobiles on parking levels above the ground floor shall be screened from public view. 6.5.5. Parking structures that abut or are adjacent to any residential use shall: a. Contain solid decorative walls and/or baffles to block light and deflect noise along those sides closest to residential use,

Precast panel and glass louver screening, Precast panel and glass louver screening, plus photovolatic panels on top deck plus photovolatic panels on top deck (upper), and metal screen with tower (upper), and metal screen with tower element marking entry corner and Pre-cast panel and glassthe louver screening plus photovoltic element marking entry corner and Precast panel andthe glass louver screening, panels on top deck (upper), and metal screen with tower vertical circulation (lower). vertical circulation (lower). element marking the entrypanels corner and circulation plus photovolatic onvertical top deck Precast panel and glass louver screening, (lower). (upper), and metal screen with tower plus photovolatic panels on top deck element marking the entry corner and (upper), and metal screen with tower vertical circulation (lower). element marking the entry corner and vertical circulation (lower).

b. Contain solid spandrel panels at a minimum of 3 feet 6 inches in height, installed at the ramps of the structure, to minimize headlight glare, c. Construct garage floors and ramps using textured surfaces to minimize tire squeal, d. Not contain exhaust vents along sides closest to residential uses, and e. Not produce glaring light sources toward adjacent units.

per c

Examples of parking garage with a glass facade and Example that of a parkingfunction garage with a backlighting transcends to provide an glass Example of a parking garage with a glass interesting architectural facade. that transcends facade and backlighting

facade and backlighting that transcends function to provide an interesting function to provide an interesting architectural facade. architectural Example of a facade. parking garage with a glass facade and backlighting that transcends Example of a parking garage with a glass function to provide an interesting Design Guide 6.15.09 22 Downtown facade and backlighting transcends Design that Guide 6.15.09 22 Downtown architectural facade. function to provide an interesting architectural facade.

06

06 Parking and Access

B. STAN B. STAN Architec Architec Parking s B. STAN Parking s noted in p noted in p B. STAN Architec materials materials Architec stature a Parking stature as noted in p Parking 1. Parks 1. Park materials noted in p build build stature materials andac and c stature a 1. pane Park pane 1. build 2. Park 2. Park and build as pc as p pane and c mate mate pane 2. poss Park poss p 2. as Park 3. Verti 3. Verti mate as p prim prim poss mate can can poss 3. 4. Verti Trea 4. Trea 3. prim Verti Reta Reta can primg the the g can low 4. a Trea a low head Reta 4. head Trea Reta 5. the Signg 5. Sign a low the g park park head a low 6. Integ 6. Integ 5. head Sign struc struc 5. park Sign publ publ park 6. getti Integ getti 6. struc Integ 7. Inter 7. Inter publ struc adja adja getti publc per per c getti 7. Inter adja 7. Inter per adjac

22

Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

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Downtown Design Guide 6.15.09

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Parking Lot Design 6.6.1. Parking lot area may not contribute towards the 15 percent Parks and Open Space Requirement. 6.6.2. The parking capacity of a surface parking lot shall be limited to no more than 10 percent of the maximum parking allowed for the specific project. 6.6.3. No at-grade parking space shall be located within the front yard. 6.6.4. Off-street parking facilities containing five or more spaces and not in a structure shall be effectively screened from abutting streets and lots. However, such screening shall not obstruct vehicle sight distances, entrances and exits and shall consist of one or a combination of the following: a. A strip at least five feet in width of densely planted shrubs or trees which are at least two feet high at the time of planting and are of a type that my be expected to form, within three years after time of planting, a continuous, unbroken, year round visual screen, or b. A wall, barrier, or fence of uniform appearance. Such wall, barrier, or fence may be opaque or perforated provided that not more than fifty percent of the face is open. The wall, barrier, or fence shall be at least four feet and not more than six feet in height. 6.6.5. Provide any combination of the following strategies for 50 percent of the surface parking lot and driveways: a. Shade within five years of occupancy, b. Paving materials with a Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of at least 29, or c. Open grid pavement system. 6.6.6. On grade, open parking facilities which contain five or more parking spaces shall be landscaped in accordance with the design regulations required by Sections 5.8.1.-5.11.3. and with the following requirements: a. At least five percent of the interior area of the parking facility shall be landscaped. This does not include the perimeter planting provided for beautification or to satisfy screening requirements. b. Each planting shall be at least 25 square feet in area and have no dimension less than five feet. c. Each planting area shall contain at least one tree and the facility as a whole shall contain at least one tree for every ten parking spaces. d. Trees used to satisfy parking lot landscaping requirements shall be a minimum of three inch caliper at planting and shall be suitable for location in parking lots.

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Parking and Access 06

07

ng

e. Existing trees shall be preserved wherever possible. f. Existing and new trees shall be protected by bollards, high curbs or other barriers sufficient to minimize damage. 6.6.7. Parking lots shall be designed to provide clear and designated paths of travel for pedestrians. 6.6.8. Paths shall conform to the standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

sland

ater

iendly

Credit: GREENFORM and connectiveissue

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06 Parking and Access

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commercial spaces (“unbundled”) in perpetuity. Parking that is required for residential but isaccess unusedshall and be all commercial parking should be made 12. Parking anduse loading shared where feasible. available as public parking during daytime and evenings. 13. Parking and loading access shall be located a minimum of 25 feet from a 9. primary Provide at least one secure pedestrian bicycle parking space for every two residential building entrance, paseo, or public outdoor gathering units.This Provide secureshall bicycle within 200porte yards cocheres. of a building entrance area. guideline notparking apply to a hotel for at least 10% of commercial and institutional building occupants. 14. Where a vehicular exit from a parking structure is located within 5 feet

of the back of sidewalk, a visual/audible alarm shall be installed to warn

Limitpedestrians the numberand and cyclists width of of curb cuts and vehicular entries to promote street exiting vehicles. wall continuity and reduce conflicts with pedestrians.

Vehicular Access. Limit the number and width of curb cuts and

D

10. Vehicular access shall be from an alley or mid-block on an east-west street PASEO

vehicular entries to promote street wall continuity and reduce conflicts where feasible. ALLEY with pedestrians. 11 11. Curb cuts and parking/loading entries into buildings shall be limited to the Figure 5-3 Vehicular Entries and Curb Cuts minimum number required and the minimum width permitted. 22 3 3 6.7.1. No curb cuts are permitted from Secondary Modified and Min.access 25’ shall be shared where feasible. 1 Access to parking/service/loading shall be from 12. Parking and loading Dim. Min. Collector exceptfeasible when no other street type is theModified alley, and Streets shared wherever 13. Parking and loading access shall be located a minimum of 25 feet from a adjacent to the Project. Curb cuts and parking/loading access into buildings primaryProposed buildingProject entrance, pedestrian paseo, or public2outdoor gathering Proposed Project shall be minimum width requirement by LADOT PARKING AND ACCESSarea. This guideline shall not apply to a hotel porte cocheres. 6.7.2. Modified, Industrial Streets, and Alleyways 3 Local Parking and loadingLocal accessModified shall be a minimum of 25’ 14. Where a vehicular from a its parking structure is located from within 5 feet paseos, or outdoor gathering areas arking, loading and vehicular circulation toexit minimize visibility. entrances, shall provide the primary point of vehicular access for service and of the back of sidewalk, a visual/audible alarm shall be installed to warn ng required for a project shall be integrated into the project it serves. parking facilities. pedestrians and cyclists of exiting vehicles.

c parking may be either a freestanding structure or integrated into a 6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide 21 ct, provided it is clearly signed as public parking. 6.7.3. Not more than two driveways shall be permitted per building, PASEO

pt for the minimum ground-level frontage required A L L E Y for access to 1 1 ng and loading, no parking or loading shall be visible on the ground of any building façade that faces a street.22 3 3 Min.

25’

and at least 20 feet in distance should span between them. Figure 5-3 Vehicular Entries and Curb Cuts

6.7.4. Driveways shall not exceed the minimum width required by the 1 Access to parking/service/loading shall be from Los Angeles Department of Transportation.

Dim. ground ng, loading or circulation located above the Min. floor shall be 1) the alley, and shared wherever feasible by habitable floor area along all street frontages or, 2) if the project 2 Curb cuts and parking/loading access into buildings Proposed Project Project sor demonstrates that it is notProposed feasible to line the parking with 6.7.5. Parking and loading access shall be located a minimum of shall be minimum width requirement by LADOT able space above the ground floor, integrated into the design of the 25 feet from primary building entrances, pedestrian paseo, or public 3 Parking and loading access shall be a minimum of 25’ ng façade. from entrances, paseos, or outdoor gathering areas

outdoor gathering area.

e parking above the ground floor that is not lined with habitable e is permitted, a maximum of three parking levels fronting on a public 6.7.6. A vehicular exit from6.15.09 Downtown Designwithin Guide 5 21 a parking structure feet of a t shall be allowed above the ground floor, provided they are integrated sidewalk area, paseo, or trail shall feature a visual/audible alarm to Vehicular Entries and Curb Cuts he design of the building façade and at least one habitable floor is warn pedestrians and cyclists of exiting vehicles. ded directly above the visibletoparking levels. 1. Access parking/services/loading shall be from the alley, and shared wherever feasible.

-through aisles for fast food or similar use are not permitted.

2. Curb cuts and parking/loading access into buildings shall be minimum width requirement by LADOT 3. Parking and loading access shall be a minimum of 25’ from entrances, paseos, or outdoor gathering areas.

Residential, Hotel or Restaurant Entry

Residential, Hotelor or Residential, Hotel Restaurant RestaurantEntry Entry

Drop-Off Zones. Locate drop-off zones along the curb or within parking facilities to promote sidewalk/street wall continuity and reduce conflicts with pedestrians. 6.8.1. Drop-off Zones, including residential, hotel and restaurant dropoff areas shall be provided either: a. Within, or along the driveway access to the off-street parking facilities, or b. Alongside the required curb line where there is a full-time curbside parking lane, with no sidewalk narrowing.

22

Residential, Hotel or Hotel Entry Restaurant Entry

al obstruction 3 3

ists

f travel.

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Parking and Access 06

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7

Conservation PURPOSE • • • • • • •

Encourage preservation and rehabilitation of historic resources. Reduce energy demand. Recycle water and decrease demand for potable water. Reduce waste and use of new materials. Reduce demand on natural resources. Reduce impervious surfaces and improve on-site systems to control, treat, and infiltrate stormwater. Incorporate stormwater strategies to provide adequate treatment and flow attenuation.

Overview 01 Conservation 07

01

GUIDELINES The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall have no bearing towards a projects compliance with this Plan. G.7.1. Adaptive Re-Use a. Existing structures should be re-used whenever possible or be integrated into a new development to retain the architectural character of the area. b. When integrating an existing building into a new development the overall site design should consider access, parking, and landscaping so that the existing structure is cohesive with the new development. c. Existing 2-3 story structures should be studied and consideration should be given to adding additional floors to the existing structure prior to any decision to demolish the structure. d. When renovating an older structure, designers should consider ways to add fenestration to a public faรงade that is adjacent to a retail or active street. e. The branding and identity of the development should respect the original building. f. New signage, architectural features and lighting should complement the original building materials and be compatible with the spirit of the original building design. G.7.2. Daylighting a. Integrate natural lighting through clerestories, windows and skylights wherever possible to reduce the need for artificial lighting and energy consumption. b. Integrate shading systems with daylight openings to reduce heat gain in the warmest months to reducing cooling demand. G.7.3. Appliances a. All residential washers should be High Efficiency Clothes Washers with a water savings factor of 5.0 or less. b. All commercial washers should be High Efficiency Clothes Washers with a water savings factor of 7.5 or less. G.7.4. Equipment All residential and non-residential spaces should use office and other miscellaneous equipment with a minimum of Energy Star rating.

02

01 Overview 07 Conservation

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REGULATIONS Historic Preservation 7.1.1. Projects affecting designated and eligible historic resources shall comply with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. Plumbing and Plumbing Fixtures 7.2.1. All faucets, not governed by City Ordinance 180822 shall not exceed 1.5 gallons per minute. 7.2.2. Residential shower stalls are not permitted to have more than one shower head per stall. 7.2.3. All residential units shall be either individually metered or submetered such that each unit is billed individually for its water use. 7.2.4. All Projects, which involve the installation of new internal rough plumbing system, shall install a dual plumbing system such that toilets and approved industrial uses can be served by recycled water. 7.2.5. Tankless and on-demand Water Heaters shall be installed in lieu of standard water heaters. 7.2.6. Conductivity Controllers or pH Conductivity Controllers shall be used when installing cooling towers. 7.2.7. Install a hot water on demand, re-circulation pump(s) to service any and all faucets requiring hot water.

DRAFT

Overview 01 Conservation 07

03

Interior Lighting Design and Operations 7.3.1. All non-residential buildings or portions thereof shall install lighting controls to extinguish or lower all unnecessary exterior and interior lights from 11pm to sunrise during the Spring migrations, from mid-March to early June, and the fall migration, from late August to late October. 7.3.2. All buildings shall schedule nightly maintenance activities to conclude before 11pm. 7.3.3. All non-residential buildings or portions thereof use gradual, “staggered switching� to turn on building lights at sunrise rather than instant light-up of the entire building. 7.3.4. All non-residential buildings or portions thereof shall install devices such as photo-sensors, infrared, and/or motion detectors to turn off lights when no occupants are present. 7.3.5. All commercial and industrial buildings or portions thereof shall design lighting layouts in smaller zones and avoid wholesale area illumination. 7.3.6. All non-residential perimeter space with a continuous depth of 20 feet shall have 20 percentage dimming ballasts and day lighting control. 7.3.7. All buildings shall include dimmers in lobbies, atria, and perimeter corridors for nighttime use.

04

01 Overview 07 Conservation

DRAFT

Solar Systems and Roof Materials 7.4.1. All projects shall install and maintain an onsite renewable energy generation system to provide a minimum of 20 percent of the Project’s non-residential electrical needs and 10 percent of the Projects residential demand. 7.4.2. Use roofing materials that have a Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) equal to or greater than the values in the table below for a minimum of 75 percent of the roof surface of all buildings within the Project or install a green (vegetated) roof for at least 50 percent of the roof area of all buildings within the Project. Combinations of SRI compliant and vegetated roof can be used provided that they collectively cover 75 percent of the roof area of all buildings. Roof Type

Slope

SRI

Low-Sloped Roof

< 2:12

78

Steep-Sloped Roof

> 2:12

29

Windows/Glazing See Sections 4.7.1-4.7.2. Architectural Details for regulations that will assist Projects in reducing internal heat gain. Pools and Jacuzzis 7.5.1. All pools shall be installed with a water-saving pool filter. 7.5.2. A leak detection system shall be installed on all swimming pools and Jacuzzis. Stormwater Treatment and Flow Attenuation Projects shall be designed to manage and capture stormwater, in order of preference for infiltration, evapotranspiration, reuse, and/ or high pollutant removal treatment of all of the runoff on site to the maximum extent feasible. 7.6.1. Residential projects of five units or more and non-residential projects shall develop and implement a Low Impact Development (LDI) plan that shall infiltrate, reuse, evapotranspire, or highly treat onsite stormwater through stormwater management techniques allowed pursuant to the Best Management Practices Handbook described in Appendix A-03. 7.6.2. The onsite stormwater management techniques shall be properly sized, at a minimum, to infiltrate, store for reuse, evapotranspire, or highly treat, without any runoff leaving the site to the maximum extent feasible, at least the volume of water that results from:

DRAFT

Overview 01 Conservation 07

05

a. The 85th percentile 24-hour runoff event determined as the maximized capture stormwater volume for the area using a 48 to 72-hour draw down time, from the formula recommended in Urban Runoff Quality Management, WEF Manual of Practice No. 23/ASCE Manual of Practice No. 87, (1998); or b. The volume of runoff based on unit basin storage water quality volume, to achieve 80 percent or more volume treatment by the method recommended in the California Stormwater Best Management Practices Handbook - Industrial/Commercial, (2003); or c. The volume of runoff produced from a 0.75 inch storm event. 7.6.3 Pollutants of concern shall be prevented from leaving the development site for a water quality design storm event as defined above. 7.6.4. Hydro-modification impacts shall be minimized to natural drainage systems. EXCEPTIONS 7.8.1. When the on-site stormwater requirements are technically infeasible, partially or fully, as defined in the LID Section of the Bureau of Sanitationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Development Best Management Handbook, the infeasibility shall be demonstrated in the submitted LID plan, shall be consistent with other City requirements, and shall be reviewed in consultation with the Department of Building and Safety. 7.8.2. If partial or complete onsite compliance of any type is technically infeasible, the project Site and LID Plan shall be required to comply with, at a minimum, all applicable Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan (SUSMP) requirements in order to maximize onsite compliance.

06

01 Overview 07 Conservation

DRAFT

DRAFT

Overview 01 Conservation 07

07

DRAFT

8

Performance Standards PURPOSE â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

To provide for a safe, clean, and healthy environment. To provide transit information.

Overview 01 Performance Standards 08

01

REGULATIONS Compliance 8.1.1. Prior to the issuance of a building permit or land use permit, the owner of the lot or lots shall execute and record a covenant and agreement, acknowledging that the owner shall implement each of the applicable regulations set forth in this Section. The covenant and agreement shall run with the land and be binding upon the owners, and any assignees, lessees, heirs, successors of the owners. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to enforce the covenant and agreement is in addition to any other remedy provided by the law. Air Quality 8.2.1. All K-12 schools, residential, or residential portions of mixeduse Projects shall be located no less than the allowable minimum distances to existing industrial land uses, or industrial land uses in a new mixed-use development as defined for each industrial use by the California Air Resources Board (CARB). 8.2.2. All K-12 schools, residential, or residential portions of mixeduse Projects located less than 500 feet of a freeway shall disclose the unhealthful implications of residing within 500 feet of a freeway to residents who are purchasing or renting housing in these locations and shall implement mitigation measures to reduce exposure to air pollution. Maintenance and Delivery Standards 8.3.1. All Projects shall be maintained in a clean, safe, and sanitary condition. 8.3.2. All Projects shall keep the site clear of weeds, rubbish, and all types of litter and combustible materials at all times. 8.3.3. All projects shall permit no loitering, camping, public begging, consumption of alcoholic beverages, use of illegal narcotics, or any other criminal activity on any premises. 8.3.4. All projects shall prevent standing water from accumulating anywhere on site. 8.3.5. Loading and unloading of vehicles shall occur either on site, within an alley, or a local modified, or local industrial modified street. Loading and unloading of vehicles from a Secondary street shall be permitted only when no other public right of way is adjacent to the project site. 8.3.6. Site cleaning, sweeping, trash collection, deliveries, and loading and unloading to the site are limited to the hours in the table to the right.

02

01 Overview 08 Performance Standards

Hours

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

MonFriday

6am-10pm

7am7pm

24 Hours

6am10pm

Sat., Sun., & Legal Holidays

8am-5pm

8am5pm

24 Hours

8am8pm

DRAFT

Noise 8.4.1. Loudspeakers or public address systems are not permitted to be installed or operated within any portion of Projects in the Urban Village, Urban Innovation, or Urban Center Districts. 8.4.2. Loudspeakers or other public address systems are permitted in the Greenway District but their use is limited to the hours of 8am7pm Monday-Thursday, 10am-10pm Friday-Saturday, and Noon-5pm Sundays and Legal Holidays. In any event the maximum noise level may not exceed 90 decibels on the A-weighted scale. 8.4.3. At the boundary line between two districts, the presumed ambient noise level of the quieter zone shall be used.

8.4.4. Maximum noise levels within Industrial Workspaces shall be as defined in the table below.

Noise levels between

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

7am-10pm

55 dba lbn

55 dba lbn

70 dba lbn

65 dba lbn

10am-7pm

45 dba lbn

45 dba lbn

65 dba lbn

55 dba lbn

8.4.5. Maximum noise levels within Commercial Workplaces shall be as defined in the table below.

Noise

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

7am-10pm

55 dba lbn

55 dba lbn

65 dba lbn 65 dba lbn

10am-7pm

45 dba lbn

45 dba lbn

60 dba lbn 55 dba lbn

8.4.6. Maximum noise levels within Residential Habitable Spaces shall be as defined in the table below.

Noise levels between

DRAFT

Greenway

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

7am-10pm

NA

50 dba lbn

50 dba lbn

50 dba lbn

10am-7pm

NA

45 dba lbn

45 dba lbn

45 dba lbn

Overview 01 Performance Standards 08

03

Recycled Materials 8.5.1. All Projects shall provide a recycling area that is clearly labeled, and easily accessible. 8.5.2. All Projects are required to develop a recycling program and contract for recycling pick-up if all recycled refuse is not re-used on site. 8.5.3. All recycled goods shall be placed or stored in Recycling Receptacles by the end of the business day and not be left in plain view on the site. 8.5.4. All recycling receptacles shall be kept covered, and made of durable, waterproof, rustproof, of incombustible construction, and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the materials collected. 8.5.5. The recycling area shall be kept free of litter, debris, spillage, bugs, rodents, odors, and other similar undesirable hazards. 8.5.6. Paper products and other lightweight materials shall be immediately placed into covered recycling receptacles. 8.5.7. All recycling receptacles and containers shall be kept in a secure location to prevent unauthorized entry and scavenging and theft of recyclable materials. 8.5.8. Recyclable materials, other than recyclable materials contained in reverse vending machine commodity storage bins, shall be emptied from recycling receptacles when full or every week, whichever comes first.

04

01 Overview 08 Performance Standards

DRAFT

Storage 8.6.1. No materials or equipment shall be stored out of doors to a height greater than the height of the enclosing wall or fence. 8.6.2. Open air storage of merchandise or materials must be confined to a storage area completely enclosed by a solid, non-combustible wall (with self-closing gates). 8.6.3. Trash storage bins shall be located within a gated, covered enclosure at least six feet in height. Transit Information 8.7.1. All Projects shall provide information about local transit service at a primary entry point to the site or building. The information shall be prominently displayed and shall include phone numbers for transit, para transit, and taxis as well as brochures and maps for local bus and rail service.

Utilities 8.8.1. All new utility lines, which directly service the lot or lots, shall be installed underground. If underground service is not available at the time the application is submitted and fees paid for plan check, then provisions should be made for future underground service to the satisfaction of the Bureau of Engineering, if determined necessary by the Department of Water and Power. 8.8.2. All utility boxes located within the public right-of-way shall be wrapped with a graphic image. See example to the left. Vibration 8.9.1. Consistent with ASHRAE 200 and the LAMC Section 111.02 the Maximum Vibration Levels for Industrial, Commercial, and Residential uses shall be as defined in the table below.

Use Industrial Commercial Residential

DRAFT

Hours

Urban Village

Urban Innovation

Urban Center

7am-10pm

16,000 pin/s

32,000 pin/s

16,000 pin/s

10pm-7am

5,600 pin/s

32,000 pin/s

8,000 pin/s

7am-10pm

16,000 pin/s

16,000 pin/s

16,000 pin/s

10pm-7am

5,600 pin/s

16,000 pin/s

8,000 pin/s

7am-10pm

8,000 pin/s

8,000 pin/s

8,000 pin/s

10pm-7am

5,600 pin/s

5,600 pin/s

5,600 pin/s

Overview 01 Performance Standards 08

05

DRAFT

9

Signage

PURPOSE • • •

To create strong building identity that is well integrated with the design of the architecture. To provide clear and attractive business identity. To attract visitors to publicly accessible open space areas.

Signage 09

01

SIGNAGE

10

Residential Project Signs GUIDELINES

5.

Signage should reinforce the identity of the residential complex and be The guidelines included here are provided as suggestions and shall visible from the most prominent public corner or frontage. have no bearing towards a projects compliance with this Plan.

6.

All signs shall be integrated with the design of the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architecture G.9.1.a. Signs to a lively, exciting in their and landscaping. As ashould familycontribute of elements, signscolorful, shouldand be related atmosphere signs and graphics that are compatible design pedestrian approach and convey with a clear hierarchy of information.

7.

Signage should identify the main/visitor entrance or lobby, resident or visitor parking, facilities, major amenities and commercial G.9.1.b.community Signage should be conceived as an integral part of the uses. These signs should be related in style and material while appropriately project design so as not to appear as an afterthought application. scaled for the intended audience.

8.

with the area.

G.9.1.c. location, size, and appearance of building identification Residents soonThe learn the project entries and facilities so signs should not signs should complement the building and should be in character with be too large or duplicative. the area.

9.

Signs for community facilities should be prominent and easily read by first time visitors. G.9.1.d. Signs shall complement buildings with respect to style,

design, materials, and colors. If illuminated, glare shall be carefully 10. Mixed-use projects with commercial or retail tenants shall comply with the controlled, and if internally luminated, lighting sources shall be retail section below. concealed. G.9.1.e. Multiple signs within a Project should be related in their design approach and convey a clear hierarchy of information. G.9.1.f. Signage should identify the main/visitor entrance or lobby, resident or visitor parking, community facilities, major amenities and commercial and industrial uses. These signs should be related in style and material while appropriately scaled for the intended audience. G.9.1.g. Signs that hold multiple tenant information should be designed so individual tenant information is organized and clear within the visual identity of the larger campus or building.

Integrated Design. Examples of residential identity signage integrated into a sculptural seating and lighting element at the main entry (left) and into an entrance canopy (right).

Hierarchy of Signs. Examples of residential Hierarchy of Signs. Examples of identity signage present at the most prominent corner. A related family signage or signs ranging fromat the residential identity present overall project identity to the parking garage are most prominent corner. A related family of shown here.

signs ranging from overall project identity to the parking garage are shown here (above).

02

09 Signage

6.15.09 Downtown Design Guide

51

51 DRAFT

9.

Signs

Signs for community facilities should be prominent and easily read by first time visitors.

reinforce the identity of the residential complex and be 10. Mixed-use projects with commercial or retail tenants shall comply with the most prominent public corner or frontage. retail section below.

be integrated with the design of the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architecture g. As a family of elements, signs should be related in their h and convey a clear hierarchy of information.

identify the main/visitor entrance or lobby, resident or community facilities, major amenities and commercial uses. ould be related in style and material while appropriately ntended audience.

learn the project entries and facilities so signs should not duplicative.

REGULATIONS Prohibitions 9.1.1. The exposed unfinished backs and sides of all signs shall not be visible from a public right-of-way or greenway.

unity facilities should be prominent and easily read by first

9.1.2. The following signs are prohibited; animated, blinking or scrolling signs; inflatable devices; off-site, supergraphics, pole signs, roof, and window signs.

ects with commercial or retail tenants shall comply with the elow.

9.1.3. Signs shall not obscure the architecture, windows, or window trim and molding. 9.1.4. No signs other than flags and banners, shall be located above the second story.

Integrated Design. Examples of residential identity signage integrated into a sculptural seating and lighting element at the main entryPermitted (left) and signs into an entrance canopy (right).

Hierarchy of Signs. Examples of residential identity signage presen most prominent corner. A related f signs ranging from overall project 9.2.1. Each premise or business shall be permitted one identification to the parking garage are shown h sign limited to a maximum of 12 square feet in size and shall not (above).

exceed a depth of one foot. An additional sign is permitted if the premise abuts another street, alley, public parking area, park or open space. An identification sign may be located on any portion of an awning as long as the sign does not exceed the maximum allowable dimentions.

a. For projects that have multiple storefront tenants of similar size, all Identification signs shall be of the same type but may vary in respect to font style and color. Integrated Design. Examples of residential identity

mples of residentialsignage identity signage a sculptural integrated intointegrated a sculpturalinto seating and lighting element the an main entry and canopy into an (right). ment at the main entry (left) and atinto entrance entrance canopy.

9.2.2. Building Identification signs shall be permitted one per building, 6.15.09 Design Guid of Signs.16 Examples of for one story-buildings. andHierarchy shall not exceed square feet For Downtown each residential identity signage present at the story above the first, the size of the sign may increase an additional prominent A related family of fourmost square feet. Ancorner. additional Building Identification Sign shall be signs ranging from overall project identity permitted for buildings located on a corner lot or where a second to the parking garage are shown here façade is visible to a publicly accessible park or open space. This (above). secondary sign shall not exceed the size of the primary sign. 9.2.3. Each premise or business shall be permitted one Information sign limited to a maximum of six square feet in size and shall not exceed a depth of one foot. An additional sign of equal size is permitted if the premise abuts another street, alley, public parking area, park, or open space. 9.2.4. Each building, premise, or business shall be permitted one Street Address Information sign limited to a maximum of six square feet in size and shall not exceed a depth of one foot. An additional Designif Guide 51 abuts another street, sign 6.15.09 of equal Downtown size is permitted the premise alley, public parking area, park, or open space. 9.2.5. Identification, Building Identification, Information, and Street

DRAFT

Signage 09

03

Address Information signs shall be permitted as wall, awning/canopy, or projecting signs. a. Projecting signs shall not extend more than five feet beyond the property line, shall not be located lower than eight feet above the sidewalk grade or edge of roadway grade nearest the sign, and shall not extend above the top of the wall. b. Wall signs that are made up of individual letters that use the wall of the building as background, the allowable sign area may be increased by 20 percent, provided there is no change in color between the background and the surrounding wall area. A wall sign shall not extend above the top of the wall of the building. Wall signs may extend no more than one foot beyond the face of the building. 9.2.6. Wall murals or mural signs are permitted with approval pursuant to LAMC Section 14.4.20. 9.2.7. One portable menu board sign may be permitted in the right-of-way for eating establishments, bakeries, florists, and similar businesses whose primary sales consist of perishable goods, provided that all of the following conditions are met: a. The sign is removed at the end of each business day. b. The signâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dimensions do not exceed two feet by four feet. c. The sign does not interfere with pedestrian movement or wheelchair access. d. The sign has a mounted base capable of keeping the sign upright in a moderate wind. e. The sign is not illuminated. f. The signâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permits have been secured from the appropriate City of Los Angeles departments.

9.2.8. Each publicly accessible park area shall be permitted one monument sign for every eight acres. a. Each monument sign shall have a maximum of 75 square feet of sign face visible to the same direction of traffic and shall be limited to an overall height of eight feet above sidewalk grade or edge of roadway grade nearest the sign. 9.2.9. Each publicly accessible park area shall be permitted one flag or banner style sign for every acre or portion thereof. a. Each flag/banner shall have a maximum of 24 square feet of sign face visible to the same direction and be affixed to a building or pole

04

09 Signage

DRAFT

at a height no lower than eight feet above sidewalk grade or edge of roadway grade nearest the banner. b. Height of the top of the flag/banner shall be measured from the nearest sidewalk or edge of roadway grade to the top of the sign. The overall height limitation of the flag/banner shall be determined by the length of adjoining street frontage as follows: 1. 25 feet for lots having 50 feet of street frontage; 2. 35 feet for lots having more than 50 feet and less than 100 feet of street frontage; and 3. 42 feet for lots having at least 100 feet of street frontage. 9.2.9. Additional signs, beyond the Permitted Signs described above shall not be permitted.

DRAFT

Signage 09

05

DRAFT

10

Street Designations

PURPOSE •

To connect the area to its neighboring communities, the City of Los Angeles, and the greater Los Angeles region through a safe, efficient, and accessible circulation network that embraces pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, truck traffic, and automobiles. To recognize the shared use of streets not only for moving traffic, but also as the front door to businesses that are the economic and fiscal foundation of the City and as pubilc outdoor space for residents and workers. To develop an efficient yet balanced circulation system that defines different types of streets based on their transportation function and community role. To provide residents, employees, and visitors with a variety of transportation alternatives that result in a more efficient use of transportation resources.

Street Designations 10

01

STREET TYPOLOGIES Modified Street Standards foster a multi-modal circulation network. Most of the existing streets within the Plan area will be designated with one of the new Modified Standards. Please refer to the Street Designation Table and Circulation Map to identify a streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new designation and its location within the street network. The Street Standards Table summarizes the dimensions and characteristics of each Modified Street type. The sections below reflect the typical mid-block cross section. At the intersections turning lanes could typically be accommodated, where necessary, by removing the on-street parking. *

*

The Modified Street Standards include: Varies

22.5' - 40'

Varies

42.5' - 75.5'

Secondary Modified Street SideSideParking* Parking* Travel Travel Parkway Parkway walk walk A Secondary Modified Street emphasizes intra-city, multi-modal travel, and connect urban activity centers. A Secondary Modified Street has two lanes in each direction and carry a mix of local and regional traffic. Typical features include on-street * * parking, exclusive bicycle lanes and wide sidewalks, landscaping, and stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs). To accommodate particular existing street characteristics or constraints there are five types (I-V) of Secondary Modified Streets. Local Modified Intersection Varies 22.5' - 40' Varies 42.5' - 75.5' Sidewalk

Side-

walk a. Secondary Modified I Street. The secondary Modified I* Street includes all of the typical features. * Parking*

Parkway

Travel

Parking*

Travel

Parkway

ORANGE COUNTY

Local Modified Intersection

Varies

M

22.5' - 40'

Varies

42.5' - 75.5' Sidewalk

Travel

Parkway

Bike Lane

Parking

Travel

Parking*

Travel

Parkway

Sidewalk

15'

100' Sidewalk

Parking*

Parkway

70'

15'

ORANGE COUNTY

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Parkway

Parking

Sidewalk

M

Secondary Modified I

15'

70'

Parkway

Sidewalk

Bike Lane

Parking

15'

100'

ORANGE COUNTY

Travel

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Parkway

Parking

Sidewalk

M

Secondary Modified I

15'

ORANGE COUNTY

70'

15'

100' b. Secondary Modified II Street. II Street provides on-street parking on only one side of the street. Park- The Modified Bike Bike ParkParking Parking Sidewalk

M

ndary Modified II

12'- 18'

way

Travel

Lane

ORANGE COUNTY

70' 90'

Sidewalk

Parkway

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

Travel

Lane

Sidewalk

way

8'

M

Travel

Travel

Secondary Modified II

Bike Lane

Travel

Sidewalk

12'- 18'

70'

Sidewalk

Bike Lane

8'

90'

ORANGE COUNTY

Parkway

Travel

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Sidewalk

M

Secondary Modified II

12'- 18'

70'

8'

90' Sidewalk

COUNTY

Parkway

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Sidewalk

M ORANGE COUNTY

c. Secondary Modified III Street. No on-street parking is provided in the Modified III Street.

76'

M

98'

ary Modified V

avel

Travel

Median

22'

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

ORANGE COUNTY

Sidewalk

Parking

Bike Lane

State 76' Park

Travel

98'

Travel

Median

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

State Park

M

ndary Modified V

22'

76' ORANGE COUNTY

98' Sidewalk

ORANGE COUNTY

Parking

*

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Median

Travel

M

40'- 68'

Travel

ondary Modified IV

M

56'

40'- 68' 90'

ORANGE COUNTY

Travel

Parking*

Sidewalk

Sidewalk Travel

Travel

Travel

M

6'-16.5'

02

Sidewalk

ORANGE COUNTY

State Park

12'

0'-10' 6'-16.5'

90'

Bike Lane

*

M

dary Modified IV

Travel

0'-10'

Sidewalk

Travel

Parkway

Parking*

Bike Lane

*

40'- 68'

10 Street Designations Parking* Travel Travel Travel

Sidewalk

80' Travel

Travel

Sidewalk

12' 12'

56'

ParkTravel way

Bike Lane

ParkBike Lane Travel way

Travel

Travel

Sidewalk Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Parkway

Sidewalk

M

Secondary Modified III

Secondary Modified III

12'

0'-10'

56'

12'

80'

90'

Travel

12'

80'

ORANGE COUNTY

Sidewalk

Sidewalk

Parkway

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

Secondary Modified III

Travel

Bike Lane

DRAFT

Parkway

Sidewalk

M

Secondary Modified II

12'- 18'

70'

8'

90' Parkway

Sidewalk ORANGE COUNTY

Bike Lane

ORANGE COUNTY

Travel

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Sidewalk

M

M

Secondary Modified I

Secondary Modified V

15'

70'

22'

76' Parkway

98'

Sidewalk

Bike Lane

Parking

Sidewalk

Travel

15'

100' Bike Lane Travel

Parking

Travel

Median

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel State Park

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Parkway

Parking

Sidewalk

d. Secondary Modified IV Street. Due to roadway constraints neither on-street parking or bicycle lanes are included in the Modified IV Street and there may not always be room for a sidewalk on both sides of the street. ORANGE COUNTY

M

Secondary Modified V

ORANGE COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY

22'

76' 98'

Secondary Modified IV

*

M

Bike Lane

Parking

Sidewalk

Travel

Travel

Median

Travel

ORANGE COUNTY

Bike Lane

Travel

M

State Park M

6'-16.5'

40'- 68'

12'

0'-10'

56' 80'

90'

Secondary Modified II Sidewalk

Travel

Travel

Travel

Travel

12'- 18' Parking*

ORANGE COUNTY

Sidewalk

Parkway

70'

Sidewalk

Parkway

Sidewalk

90'

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

e. Secondary Modified V Street. The Modified V Street includes a median and parking on one side of the street. Secondary Modified IV

6'-16.5'

40'- 68'

Travel

Travel

Travel

M

56' 80'

90' Sidewalk

Travel

Secondary Modified Sidewalk

Bike Lane

12'

0'-10'

8'

Travel

Travel

*

M

Bike Lane

ORANGE COUNTY

Travel

Parking*

Travel

Sidewalk

Sidewalk

Parkway

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

Travel

Secondary Modified III ORANGE COUNTY

Local Industrial Modified

6'

6'

42'

M

Street Type Alley

6'

Tr

60'

Secondary Modified V

Sidewalk

22'

Travel

Bike

T ra v e l

76'

P a r k in g

Bike

Parkway

Sidewalk

98' Bike Lane

Parking

Sidewalk

Travel

Travel

Median

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

State Park

Collector Modified Street Street Type Alley Local Industrial Modified 6' 6' 6' 42' A Collector Modified Street emphasizes multi-modal neighborhood travel and serves as a “Main Street” for Urban Villages and 60' SideParkUrban Centers. A Collector Modified SideStreet Typical features include wide sidewalks, Travel vehicle T r a v e l lane in P a r k idirection. ng Bike has one Bikeeach walk walk way exclusive bicycle lanes, on-street parking, landscaping, and stormwater BMP’s.

20' Travel

ORANGE COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY

M

*

M

Collector Modified Intersection Secondary Modified IV 6'-16.5'

12'-17.5'

Sidewalk Sidewalk

Travel

36' - 50'

40'- 68'

Parkway Travel

M

60' - 85'

90' Parking Travel

ORANGE COUNTY

Bike Lane Travel

Travel

Travel

Parking*

12'-17.5'

0'-10'

Sidewalk

Bike Lane

Parking

Parkway

12'

Sidewalk ParkSidewalk way

56' 80' Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Travel

Secondary Modified III M

Collector Modified Intersection

12'-17.5'

12'-17.5'

36' - 50' 60' - 85'

Sidewalk

Parkway

Parking

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Parking

Parkway

Sidewalk

Local Modified Street StreetStreet Type Alley Local Industrial 6' 42' A Local Modified StreetModified emphasizes access6' to individual properties and serve living 6'or work spaces. A Local Modified 60' allows for one lane in each direction and isSidenot designed to accommodate regular bus or truck traffic. Typical features include SideParkTravel T ra v e l P a r k in g Bike Bike walk walk way relatively narrow cross sections, on-street parking on the south and west sides of the street, sidewalks, landscaping, and stormwater BMP’s. The north and east sides of the streets will be designed with approximately 13’ wide parkways to allow for a broader shade canopy.

ORANGE COUNTY

M

Collector Modified Intersection

12'-17.5'

*

36' - 50' *

12'-17.5'

60' - 85' ParkSidewalk Varies way

Local Modified Intersection

Parking

Bike Lane22.5' - 40' Travel

Bike Travel Varies Lane

Parking

Parkway

Sidewalk

42.5' - 75.5' Sidewalk

Parkway

Parking*

Travel

Travel

Parking*

Parkway

Sidewalk

* Some roadways may have parking on only one side of the street.

DRAFT

Street Designations 10 ORANGE COUNTY

M

03

20' Travel

Secondary Modified V

Modified II

22'

12'- 18'

8'

90' Sidewalk

76'

70'

Parkway

Bike Lane

Travel

Travel

Bike Lane Bike Lane

Parking

Sidewalk Travel

Travel

98'

Travel

Travel

Median

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

Sidewalk

State Park

ORANGE COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY

*

M

M

LocalSecondary Industrial Modified Street Modified IV 12' 56' 6'-16.5' 40'- 68' 0'-10' A Local Industrial Modified Street emphasizes truck 90' access to industrial properties. A Local Industrial Modified Street allows for80' ParkBike Travelsidewalks, Travel Travel one lane in each direction and includes lane. limited on-streetSidewalk parking, generous Parking* include Sidewalk Sidewalk Travel a bicycle Travel Travel Typical Travel features way Lane landscaping, and stormwater BMPs. Secondary Modified III

76' 98' Travel

Median

Travel

Bike Lane

Travel

State Park

ORANGE COUNTY

*

M

Local Industrial Modified

6'

6'

42'

Street Type Alley

6'

60' 12'

0'-10'

Parking*

Travel

Sidewalk

Parkway

Sidewalk Bike Lane

Bike Travel

Travel

56' 80'

Travel

T ra v e l

Bike

Travel

P a r k in g Bike

Travel

Parkway Park-

12' Sidewalk Sidewalk

Lane way Modified Alleys Secondary Modified IIIand accommodate parking access and service functions as an A Modified Alley emphasizes access to individual properties, alternative to other streets and provide the opportunity to incorporate stormwater BMPs. It is anticipated that new alleys will be constructed as new projects are developed.

Sidewalk

ORANGE COUNTY

M

Collector Modified Intersection

12'-17.5'

12'-17.5'

36' - 50' 60' - 85'

6'

42'

Street TypeParkAlley Parking Sidewalk way

6'

60' T ra v e l

Bike

P a r k in g

Parkway

Bike Lane

20' Travel Travel

Travel

Bike Lane

Parking

Parkway

Sidewalk

Sidewalk

REGULATIONS Street Designations and improvements 10.1.1. All major and secondary highways and all collector and local streets identified on the Circulation Hierarchy Map, on the following page, and in the Street Designation Table shall be constructed and improved in accordance with the standards adopted by the City Planning Commission insofar as such is practical and will not create an undue hardship.

ORANGE COUNTY

M

12'-17.5'

36' - 50' 60' - 85' Travel

Travel

10.1.2. Projects shall make improvements to that portion of the adjacent public right of way that parallels the propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bike ParkParking street frontage as described in the Cornfield Arroyo Seco Streetscape Plan and consistent with the modified street standards Sidewalk Lane way identified herein. (A DRAFT Streetscape Plan is in progress and will be developed with community input over the next few months) 10.1.3. All improvements required to be made by the provisions of this subsection shall be done in accordance with the current applicable provisions of the Standards Specifications for Public Works Construction adopted by the City Council. 10.1.4. The City Engineer, in consultation with the General Manager of the Department of Transportation may approve and

04

10 Street Designations

DRAFT

20' Travel

Circulation Hierarchy Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco Local – Modified Collector – Modified Secondary – Modified I Secondary – Modified II Secondary – Modified III Secondary – Modified IV Major Class II – Modified Local Industrial – Modified

San

geles Los An

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Street Designations 10

05

10.2.2. Street Designations Table The following streets shall be designated according to the Table. Street

Current Designation

New Designation

Albion

Local

Local - Modified

Alhambra

Local

Local – Modified

Ann (b/t Spring & Main)

Collector

Local – Modified

Ann (South of Main)

Local

Local – Modified

Artesian

Local

Local – Modified

Aurora

Local

Local – Modified

Ave 16

Local

Local – Modified

Ave 17

Local

Local – Modified

Ave 18

Local

Collector – Modified

Ave 19

Local

Collector- Modified

Ave 20 (South of Broadway)

Collector

Collector- Modified

Ave 20 (North of Broadway)

Secondary Hwy

Secondary - Modified 3

Ave 21

Local

Local- Modified

Ave 22

Local

Local- Modified

Ave 23

Local

Local - Modified

Ave 25

Local

Local - Modified

Ave 26 (North of Gold Line Bridge)

Secondary Hwy

Secondary- Modified 4

Ave 26 (South of Gold Line Bridge)

Secondary Hwy

Collector – Modified

Ave 33

Local

Local - Modified

Baker – to Aurora

Local

Local - Modified

Barranca

Local

Local - Modified

Bloom

Local

Local - Modified

Bolero

Local

Local - Modified

Major Hwy Class II

Secondary - Modified 2

Broadway (Pasadena to Ave. 18)

Major Hwy Class II

Secondary- Modified 2

Broadway (East of Ave. 18)

Major Hwy Class II

Major Hwy Class II

Local

Local - Modified

Broadway (West of Pasadena)

Cardinal

06

Clover

Local

Local – Modified

College

Local

Local – Modified

Darwin

Local

Local – Modified

10 Street Designations

DRAFT

Street

Current Designation

New Designation

Elmyra (North of Main)

Collector

Local – Modified

Elmyra (South of Main)

Local

Local – Modified

Figueroa (East of Ave. 22)

Major Hwy Class II

Secondary- Modified 1&3

Gibbons (West of Ave. 22)

Local

Local Industrial – Modified

Humboldt

Local

Local – Modified

Lacy

Local

Local – Modified

Lamar

Local

Local – Modified

Leon

Local

Local – Modified

Leroy

Local

Local – Modified

Livingstone

Local

Local – Modified

Llewellyn

Local

Local - Modified

Magdelena

Local

Local – Modified

Secondary Hwy

Secondary – Modified 3

Main Messanger

Collector

Local – Modified

Moulton

Local

Local – Modified

Mozart

Local

Local – Modified

Naud

Collector Street

Local – Modified

Pasadena

Secondary Hwy

Collector- Modified

Rondout

Local

Local – Modified

Secondary Hwy

Secondary – Modified 3

Collector

Local – Modified

Spring (West of Baker)

Major Hwy Class II

Secondary – Modified 5

Spring (East of Baker)

Major Hwy Class II

Secondary – Modified 3

Spring St. (Bridge)

Major Class Hwy II

Secondary – Modified 3

Weyse

Collector

Local – Modified

Wilhardt

Collector

Local – Modified

San Fernando Sotello

DRAFT

Street Designations 10

07

DRAFT

A-01

Reference

PURPOSE â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

To provide general reference information and maps about adjacent community plans, community redevelopment project areas, neighborhood councils, employment assistance programs, and business improvement districts. To provide information and maps about existing historical, civic, cultural, and open space resources.

Overview 01 Reference A-01

01

COMMUNITY PLANS Land use planning for the area is defined by the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land Use Element of the General Plan which is represented by 35 Community Plans. The majority of the Plan area lies within two community plans with the exception of a slice of the area which is contained within a third community plan. The area west of the River is located primarily within the Central City North Community Plan with the northern sliver located within the Silver Lake, Echo Park Community Plan. The entire area east of the River is in the Northeast Community Plan. The Boyle Heights Community Plan area is located just outside of the southern boundary.

Community Plan Areas San

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco

and

n Fer

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Boyle Heights Community Plan Area geles Los An

Central City North Community Plan Area Northeast Los Angeles Community Plan Area

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Silver Lake â&#x20AC;˘ Echo Park Community Plan Area

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01 Overview A-01 Reference

DRAFT

COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT There are two Community Redevelopment Project Areas immediately adjacent to the Plan area. The Chinatown Redevelopment Project (Chinatown) borders the western edge of the Plan and the Adelante Eastside Redevelopment Project (Adelante) is adjacent to eastern portions of the Plan. The Adelante area was adopted on March 30, 1999 and includes approximately 2,200 acres. The Adelante project focuses on the preservation of industrial and commercial uses within the community. In addition, the project aims to improve local shopping areas. The Chinatown project area was adopted on January 23, 1980 and covers 303 acres. The project seeks to eliminate blight, create affordable housing and maintain the area’s prominence as the focal point of commerce and culture for the Chinese population of Southern California. Of special interest is the establishment of the Whiteside Redevelopment Project Area which lies immediately east of the map area illustrated here. The Whiteside project was initiated by the Los Angeles County Development Commission and is anticipated to be merged in the future with the Adelante project area to form a larger “Biomed Tech Focus Area.” According to the County’s website the goal of this City and County partnership would be to facilitate development and new job growth opportunities in the fields of biomedical research and related technology manufacturing.

San

Community Redevelopment Areas

and

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Specific Plan Area gele Los An

Chinatown Community Redevelopment Area Adelante/Eastside Community Redevelopmet Area

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Overview 01 Reference A-01

03

NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCILS Since the revision of the City’s Charter in 2000 over 88 Neighborhood Councils (NC) have been established throughout the City. Three distinct NC’s are located within the Plan area. The Historical and Cultural NC predominates the area on the western bank. The southerly section of this area is currently not located within any of the three NC’s although the William Mead Housing Project does have an active Resident Advisory Committee. The area on the east bank is largely contained with the Lincoln Heights NC with the exception of the northernmost edge that is contained within the Greater Cypress Park NC.

Neighborhood Councils Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco Specific Plan Area

San

Greater Cypress Park NC

n Fer and

Elysian Valley/Riverside NC

d o R

Greater Echo Park/Elysian NC gele Los An

Historic/Cultural NC Lincoln Heights NC Unafilliated

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01 Overview A-01 Reference

DRAFT

EMPLOYMENT The Los Angeles Business Assistance Program (LABAP) offers free training and technical assistance to business owners seeking to improve their organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profitability. It also offers training to people wanting to learn how to open and operate their own business. Business owners can also obtain a variety of information at: www. business.lacity.org/index.htm. More information about LABAP is provided at: http://www.lacity.org/cdd/bus_labap.html. Portions of the Plan area include both a State Enterprise Zone as well as a Federal Empowerment Renewal Community Designation. Within these areas businesses can take advantage of State and Federal tax credits and deductions not available to businesses elsewhere. The goal of the incentives is business attraction, growth, and increased employment opportunity within economically challenged areas within the City. Enterprise Zones assist businesses located in the zones to lower their operating costs by providing tax credits and deductions. The state offers incentives such as: hiring credits, sales & business use tax credits, and interest deductions. The City offers local incentives such as DWP rate discount waivers, sewer facility hookup payment plans, and Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Additional information is provided at: http://www.lacity.org/cdd/bus_statecred.html. Federal Empowment Zones give residents improved access to goods and services. This Zone provides Federal Tax Credits and local incentives including: wage credits, section 179 deductions, partial exclusion of capital gains, DWP rate discount, city business tax waivers, Work Opportunity Tax Credit, and the Brownfield Tax Deduction. Additional information is provided at: http://www.lacity.org/ cdd/bus_fedcred.html.

Economic Incentive Zones Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco Specific Plan Area

San

Federal Empowerment Zone

Fern and

State Enterprise Zone

d o R

Renewal Community gele Los An

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Overview 01 Reference A-01

05

BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS Two Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) currently exist within the Plan area. The first, the Historic Lincoln Heights Industrial Zone Business District was established in April 1999 and loosely mirrors the boundaries of Area 4 with the exception that it does not include the properties west of Avenue 26. The BID imposes a fee of .02 cents per square foot of lot size on each of the property owners that provides a revenue source for the overall maintenance of sidewalks, landscaping and public rights of way within the the zone boundaries. A second BID, The Lincoln Heights Business and Community Benefit District was established on April 23, 2008 and includes Broadway Boulevard starting at the River and continuing east past the Plan area boundaries to Lincoln Park, and Pasadena Avenue from the River to Workman Street. Property owners will pay a designated fee based upon their linear frontage, lot square frontage, and building square footage. The revenues will fund services that fall into one of four categories including sidewalk operation and beautification, district identity, administration, and contingency/city fees. This BID recognizes the importance of maintaining a clean and safe environment to attract local retail customers to visit this historical “Main Street” of Lincoln Heights. BID’s can play a key role in invigorating a business community whether its focus is supporting industrial, commercial or retail employment areas. While there is currently no Business Improvement District located within subarea 1 the need for one may occur as the area redevelops in order to support the cooperative needs of the various business organizations as they respond to the changes that will occur with the redevelopment of the State Historic Park.

Business Improvement Districts San

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco

Fern d o R

and

Specific Plan Area

iver geles R Los An

Lincoln Heights Industrial Business Park Lincoln Heights Business & Community Benefit Zones

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01 Overview A-01 Reference

DRAFT

HISTORICAL RESOURCES There are a number of properties in and around the Plan area that have been designated as Historic-Cultural Monuments (HCM) by the City of Los Angeles. Two properties just west of the Plan have also been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and an application to include the Zanja Madre has been submitted to the National Register. The William Mead Housing site is listed on the California Register of Historic Places. The Survey LA effort that is currently underway by the Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Historic Resources may potentially identify other historic resources within the Plan area. HCM No. 42 - San Antonio Winery. 725-749 Lamar Street. Designated in 1966. In 1917, Santo Cambianica, an Italian immigrant, opened the San Antonio Winery near the Los Angeles River. The Winery remains the only producing winery in the City of Los Angeles. HCM No.82 - River Station Area. 1231 N. Spring Street. Designated in 1971.Capitol Milling Company was one of Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; leading enterprises. They specialized in milling grains to produce flour, cereal and food. The nearby Southern Pacific Railroad allowed Capitol Milling to easily transport products nationwide. HCM No.156 - Fire Station No. 1. 2230 Pasadena Avenue. Designated in 1976 HCM No.211 - Granite Block Paving. (Bruno Street between Alameda and N. Main St.). Designated in 1979. HCM No. 261 and National Register No. 2344 - Lincoln Heights Branch Library. Opened its doors in 1916. This library has been called one of the most visually impressive buildings in Los Angeles. It is also one of the three remaining Carnegie Libraries in Los Angeles. Designers Lester H. Hibbard and H.B. Cody modeled the Lincoln Heights Branch after the Villa Papa Guilla in Rome. HCM No.281 - Cathedral High School. 1253 Bishops Road. Designated in 1984. HCM No.384 - Department of Water and Power Building. 2417 Daly Street. Designated in 1988. HHCM No.388 - Edison Electric Company (Los Angeles #3 Steam Power Plant). 650 S. Avenue 21. Designated in 1988. HCM No. 396 - Federal Bank Building. 2201 N. Broadway. Designated in 1988. HCM No. 442 - Albion Cottages and Milagro Market. 1801-1813 Albion Street. Designated in 1989. HCM No. 587 - Lincoln Heights Jail (Los Angeles City Jail). 401449 N. Avenue 19. Designated in 1993. HCM No. 872- Raphael Junction Block/NY Suspenders Building. 1635-37 N. Spring Street. Designated in 2007. Built in 1889 for early pioneering Los Angeles businessman Charles Raphael, the Victorianera Flatiron style building represents one of the earliest industrial

DRAFT

Overview 01 Reference A-01

07

developments in the downtown “Cornfields” area near the River and Spring Street Bridge. Significant for its unique late 19th Century triangular design and status as one of the oldest surviving buildings in this area of downtown, the Raphael Building once housed tenants of the New York Suspender Factory and California Ice Company. HCM No. 900 - North Spring Street Viaduct. Constructed in 1928. Designated in 2008. HCM No. 901 - North Main Street Bridge. Constructed in 1910. Designated in 2008. This bridge was the first in the series of monument LA bridges. It was the first open-spandrel arch bridge that was considered to be the longest and widest concrete bridge when opened in the state. It is also the first Beaux-Arts style bridge for LA river. It’s decorative features like the columns, pylons, balustrades and balconies were restored as part of 1998 seismic rehabilitation. HCM No. 907- Buena Vista Viaduct (now called the North Broadway-Buena Vista Bridge) Constructed in 1911. Designated in 2008. HCM No. 908 – Figueroa/ Riverside Bridge. Constructed between 1927 to 1939. Designated in 2008. California Register of Historic Places No. 2S2-William Mead Residences. 1300 N. Cardinal Street. Built in 1942. National Register No. 2460 - Olin Residence. 2622-2624 Mozart Street.

08

01 Overview A-01 Reference

DRAFT

Figueroa/ Riverside Dr Bridge

Historical Designation

908

Los Angeles River and Arroyo Seco Specific Plan Area Los Angeles Historic/Cultural Monuments

#

National Register of Historic Places California Register of Historic Places

d o R

Raphael Junction Block/ NY Suspenders Factory/ California Ice Co. Bldg

N. BroadwayBuena Vista Bridge

396

ay dw roa B N Albion Cottages & Milagro Market

907 900

281

ng pri

901

t in S N. Main St Bridge

a NM

Edison Electric Co./L.A. #3 Steam Power Plant

42

388

San Antonio Winery

Bruno Street 0

DRAFT

Olin Residence

2460

NS

William Mead

Department of Water & Power

St

82

211

Federal Bank Buiding

442

N. Spring St Bridge

Zanja Madre (pending)

261/ 2344

156 384

Cathedral High School

River Station Area/ Capitol Milling

and

Metro Gold Line & Station

Lincoln Heights Library

Fire Station #1

n Fer

Lincoln Heights Jail

s River

Lincoln Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ)

587

San

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#

400

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1600

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Overview 01 Reference A-01

09

COMMUNITY AMENITIES Everything in the CASP is intended to provide a framework for and support an increasingly active civic and cultural environment for residents, workers and visitors to the area. Figure 12-1 maps many of the current events, activities, cultural facilities and other aspects of life in the area’s public realm. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

10

Los Angeles State Historic Park (event site) Zanja Madre Los Angeles Conservation Corps Ann Street Elementary School William Mead Public Housing Los Angeles Department of Water and Power- Main Street Center Nick’s Café House at 1646 N. Spring Street- Bldg. Built 19__ Raphael Junction Block/NY Suspenders Factory/ California Ice Co. Building- Historic Cultural Monument #872- Bldg. Built 19__ Thomas Davis Co. Bldg. Built 19__ Carnation Building- Built 19__ Standard Oil Building- Built 19__ Farmlab and Under Spring Events, openings, music Future Bridge to State Historic Park Blossom Plaza (future) Event site, outdoor dining, paseo Gold Line Chinatown Station Capitol Milling- Historic Cultural Monument #82 Chinatown Bruno Street Homegirl Cafe Dodger Stadium Cathedral High School- Historic Cultural Monument #281 Solano Canyon neighborhood Elysian Park Los Angeles River North Main Street Bridge- Historic Cultural Monument #901 Downey Pool and Recreation Center Albion Dairy Park Albion Elementary School and Early Education Center Albion Cottages & Milagro Market- Historical Cultural Monument #442

01 Overview A-01 Reference

31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68.

Kipp LA College Prep school on Main Street San Antonio Winery- Historic Cultural Monument #42 The Brewery Edison Electric Co/LA #3 Steam Power Plant- Historic Cultural Monument #388 Olin Residence- National Register of Historic Places #2460 Broadway shopping/eating district N. Spring Street Bridge- Historical Cultural Monument #900 N. Broadway Buena Vista Bridge- Historic Cultural Monument- #907 Young Nak Church Lincoln Heights Jail- Historic Cultural Monument- #587 Goodwill Workforce Center and Outlet Store Alta Lofts (formerly Fuller Lofts) St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store Federal Bank Building- Historical Cultural Monument #396 Department of Water & Power Historical Cultural Monument #384 Fire Station- Historical Cultural Monument #156 Five Points Shopping District Lincoln Heights Library- Historical Cultural Monument #261 (National Register of Historic Places #2344 Lincoln Heights HPOZ AMCAL Housing Lincoln Heights/Cypress Park Gold Line Station Los Angeles Department of Water and Power- Artesian Site Lacy Street Park North Central Animal Shelter Lacy Street Studios Lacy Street Lofts Arroyo Seco Pedestrian Bridge Arroyo Seco Elementary School (on Pasadena Avenue) Elementary School (Cypress) Nightingale Middle School Heritage Square Gold Line Station Figueroa Shopping District Los Angeles River Center Home Depot Confluence Park Figueroa Riverside Drive Bridge- Historical Cultural Monument #908

DRAFT

62

63

Cypress Park

61

65

60

58 64 59 55

66

57 54

Community Amenities Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa

68

52

69

Specific Plan Areas

53

51

Community Amenities (see list)

#

56

67

Lincoln Heights

25

Shopping District

48

49

and d o R

s River

Metro Gold Line & Station

43

n Fer

Open Space

41

50

44

42

San

gele Los An

Lincoln Heights HPOZ Area

47

24 45 21 23

39

N

27 13 9 22

14

10

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30 29

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26

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33

34

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Overview 01 Reference A-01

11

OPEN SPACE The Plan area currently has limited park and open space amenities although recent acquisitions by California State Parks and the City of Los Angeles for the Los Angeles State Park (Cornfield) and Albion Dairy sites respectively have increased future park space by 38 acres. A temporary 11 acre park at the Cornfield site provides jogging and walking paths along with picnic areas. The Mountains and Recreation Conservation Association (MRCA) is developing the six acre Confluence Park in the north of the Plan area and efforts are underway to construct a multi-purpose path along the southern bank of the Arroyo Seco between San Fernando Boulevard and Avenue 26. Future long range plans envision a bikeway and multi-purpose path on the banks of the Los Angeles River. In addition to the future open space projects, the area is nearby to the recreation facilities and nature preserves of Elysian Park and Debs park and the Rio de Los Angeles State Park are within a mile of the Plan. But, it is the small neighborhood parks, playgrounds, pocket parks, community gardens, public plazas, dog parks and open spaces of a more intimate scale that are lacking in the area. New open space requirements in the Plan will increase development of these needed park spaces and in so doing contribute to an urban trail network that provides physical and visual connections to the civic, historical and cultural elements of the Plan area. The map and table on the following pages illustrate the location and amenities of the existing parks. Future park spaces are encouraged to reference this map and table in order to identify suggestions for potential amenities.

12

01 Overview A-01 Reference

DRAFT

Riv

3

ers

ide

Dr

15 3

2 6

6

20 28

30

6 26

25

6

6

29

27

9

6

18 27

7

18

31

24

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8

13/14 12 16 17

11

Parks and Open Space in and around the Cornfields-Arroyo Specific Plan Area Los Angeles River and Arroyo Secoa

Existing Open Space

One Mile Radius of Specific Plan Area

Specific Plan Area

Future Potential Open Space

Metro Gold Line and Stop

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Overview 01 Reference A-01

13

Auditorium

Dist. from Existing Parks Around CASP Area TypeAroundAcreage Center CASP (2) Existing Parks CASP Area Type

Baseball

Acreage

basketball

Auditorium

Dist. from Center CASP (2)

1

Alpine Recreation Center Neighborhood Alpine Recreation Center Neighborhood 1.9 1.06 mi 1

× 1.9

1.06 mi×

×

2

Cypress Recreation Center Neighborhood Cypress Recreation Center Neighborhood 3.5 1.13 mi 2

× 3.5

1.13 mi

×

3

Debs Park Community Debs Park 34.0 3

Community 1 mi

34.0

4

Echo Park Community Echo Park 28.4 4

Community 2 mi

×28.4

1 mi ×

2 mi ×

×

.5 mi

×

5

Echo Park Deep Pool (3) Neighborhood Echo Park Deep Pool (3) 2.1 5

2Neighborhood mi

6

Elysian Park Regional Elysian Park 544.6 6

Regional .5 mi

7

Everett Park Neighborhood Everett Park Neighborhood 0.5 1.34 mi 7

0.5

1.34 mi

8

Hazard Park Community Hazard Park 25.0 1.45Community mi 8

×25.0

1.45 mi×

×

9

Lincoln Heights Recreation Center Neighborhood Lincoln Heights Recreation Neighborhood 2.9 Center 0.6 mi 9

× 2.9

0.6 mi×

×

2.1 ×544.6

10

Lincoln Park Community Park 42.5 1.12Community mi 10 Lincoln

11

Pecan Recreation Center Neighborhood Recreation Center Neighborhood 4.3 1.71 mi 11 Pecan

× 4.3

12

Prospect Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood 2.7 1.3 mi 12 Prospect

2.7

42.5

13

Ramona Gardens Park Neighborhood Gardens Park Neighborhood 2.1 1.89 mi 13 Ramona

2.1

14

Ramona Gardens Recreation Center Neighborhood Gardens Recreation Neighborhood 6.4 Center 1.89 mi 14 Ramona

× 6.4

15

Rio de Los Angeles State Park de Los Angeles State Park 1.7Community 40.0 mi 15 Rio Community

16

State Street Recreation Center Neighborhood Street Recreation2.6 Center 1.5 Neighborhood mi 16 State

× 2.6

17

Wabash Recreation Center Neighborhood Recreation Center 2.1 17 Wabash

× 2.1

Sub Total

2Neighborhood mi

745.6 Sub Total

ba

2 mi

×

×

1.12 mi 1.71 mi×

×

1.3 mi 1.89 mi× ×

40.0

1.89 mi×

×

1.7 mi ×

1.5 mi×

×

2 mi ×

×

745.6

Existing Parks IN CASP Area Existing Parks IN CASP Area

18

Confluence Park

.6Neighborhood mi

0.4

19

Downey Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood 4.5 0.13 mi 19 Downey

4.5

20

Lacy Street Park

21

Los Angeles State Historic Park 21

22

Recreation Center Inside Historic22 Jail Recreation Center Inside Historic Jail

18 20

Neighborhood Confluence Park Neighborhod Lacy Street Park

0.4 0.8

Neighborhood Los Angeles State Historic 11.0Park

Sub Total

.6 mi ×

0.13 mi×

.74Neighborhod mi

0.8

.74 mi

Neighborhood .25 mi

11.0

.25 mi

16.7 Sub Total

16.7

Potential Future Open Space + Existing Surrounding CASP Area Parks Surrounding CASP Area PotentialParks Future Open Space + Existing 23

Variety of Parks Resulting from 15% 23 Open Space Requirement

Variety of Parks Resulting from 15% Neighborhood 28.9 Open Space Requirement

24

Los Angeles State Historic Park 24

Los Community Angeles State Historic 33.0Park

25

Historic Lincoln Heights Jail

25

Neighborhood Historic Lincoln Heights3.8 Jail

26

Midway Yard

26

Community Midway Yard

27

West Bank Greenway/Bike Path 27

28

Arroyo Seco Gateway Park

28

29

Confluence Park

29

Neighborhood Confluence Park

30

Albion Dairy + Downey Recreation 30 and Park

Sub Total

14

01 Overview A-01 Reference

Neighborhood

28.9

Community

33.0

Neighborhood

3.8

Community

11.0

Regional

5.4

Neighborhood Arroyo Seco Gateway Park 8.0

Neighborhood

8.0

1.2

Neighborhood

1.2

Community

10.5

11.0

WestRegional Bank Greenway/Bike 5.4 Path

Albion Dairy + Downey Recreation Community 10.5 and Park

101.68 Sub Total

101.68

DRAFT

aseball

basketball

bbq

× ×

Children play area

football (1)

gymnasium

×

×

×

×

handball

picnic

swimming

restroom

soccer (1)

tennis

volleyball

× ×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

×

× ×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

× ×

×

×

×

× ×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

×

× ×

×

×

×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

× ×

×

×

× × × ×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

×

(1) Rectangular Fields encompass activities such as Football, Soccer, Lacross. (2) Distance is measured from the eastern point of the Pasadena Ave bridge crossing the LA River. (3) Not shown in Map ×

×

× ×

DRAFT

Overview 01 Reference A-01

15

DRAFT

A-02

LEED ND Application

Cornfield Arroyo Seco Project #10094286 Certification Level: CERTIFIED Stage 1 22 April 2010

5 May 2010

To Whom It May C

The LEED速 certific green building and accepted performan developed a rating Natural Resources pilot tested with ne Development Ratin green building into certification provid and design meet hig

It is my 01pleasure to Pre-review Approv

A-02 LEED-ND Application

5 May 2010 Claire Bowin City Planner Los Angeles Department of City Planning 201 North Figueroa Street 90012-2655 Dear Claire, The U.S. Green Building Council, in collaboration with the Congress for the New Urbanism and the Natural Resources Defense Council, is proud to recognize the efforts and accomplishments of your project team by awarding LEED® for Neighborhood Development Pre-review Approval to Cornfields Arroyo Seco Specfic Plan in Los Angeles, CA. This means your project has completed Stage 1 of certification. Your project’s LEED for Neighborhood Development rating reflects 44 documented and approved points, which corresponds to the certified certification level under the pilot program. Enclosed you will find your project’s scorecard. Additionally, a letter to present to interested third parties—such as local land use authorities, investors, or potential tenants—and a brief narrative which defines the three stages of certification, has been included. The LEED for Neighborhood Development project list will be updated to reflect your project’s completion of Stage 1. You can now refer to your project as a LEED certified plan. In describing LEED for Neighborhood Development, you may state that LEED for Neighborhood Development is a certification program developed in collaboration with CNU and NRDC that integrates the principles of smart growth, new urbanism and green building into the first national system for neighborhood design. However, no projects are allowed to use the USGBC or LEED logos, nor the logos of CNU or NRDC. Also, please note that Natural Resources Defense Council, NRDC, and the NRDC logo are registered trademarks and may not be used in any advertising, press release, or other promotional or commercial materials without the express permission of the Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc., New York, New York 10011. We hope your project decides to see its involvement with LEED for Neighborhood Development through to completion by submitting for Stage 2 and Stage 3. Your project can submit for Stage 2 after receiving its entitlements or necessary approvals by following the submittal requirements outlined in the rating system. This process should be relatively easy, if the plan does not change significantly, because minimal additional information will be required. Please accept my congratulations on the Pre-review Approval of Cornfields Arroyo Seco Specific Plan. It is my sincere hope that this project serves as a model for future neighborhood development and more sustainable design. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Dara Zycherman, Manager, LEED for Neighborhood Development via email nd@committees.usgbc.org or phone 202.828.1156. We look forward to working with you in the future to further our common mission of transforming land development and creating a greener world for future generations.

Sincerely,

S. Richard Fedrizzi President, CEO & Founding Chairman U.S. Green Building Council

02

A-02 LEED-ND Application

DRAFT

5 May 2010 To Whom It May Concern, The LEED® certification program encourages and accelerates adoption of sustainable green building and development practices through the use of universally understood and accepted performance criteria. Although primarily focused on buildings, we have recently developed a rating system for neighborhood development in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Congress for the New Urbanism that is being pilot tested with nearly 240 development projects. The LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System integrates the principles of smart growth, urbanism, and green building into the first national certification tool for neighborhood design. LEED certification provides independent, third-party verification that a development's location and design meet high standards of environmentally responsible, sustainable development. It is my pleasure to recognize Cornfields Arroyo Seco Specfic Plan as having completed Pre-review Approval at the certified level. Cornfields Arroyo Seco Specfic Plan has submitted substantial documentation to show compliance with the rating system’s prerequisites and 44 points during the first (of three) stage of certification. The first stage involves the review of site plans and written commitments regarding the location of the project and the types of buildings and infrastructure to be constructed, prior to the project receiving its entitlements or necessary approvals. LEED for Neighborhood Development Pre-Review Approval means that if the project is built according to the plan and commitments submitted, the project should be able to achieve LEED for Neighborhood Development certification. The next step for Cornfields Arroyo Seco Specfic Plan is to gain any necessary approvals and entitlements from the relevant local authorities. Assuming the project is approved in its current state or with modifications that do not affect compliance with the rating system’s criteria, the project can then go on to earn Certification of an Approved Plan, which is the second stage of certification. After the project is substantially constructed, and it submits documentation confirming that it was built according to the plans previously reviewed, it will have completed the third and final stage of LEED for Neighborhood Development certification: Certification of a Completed Neighborhood Development. Please contact Dara Zycherman, Manager, LEED for Neighborhood Development, via email dzycherman@usgbc.org or phone 202.828.1156 with any questions about the LEED for Neighborhood Development program. Sincerely,

S. Richard Fedrizzi President, CEO & Founding Chairman U.S. Green Building Council

DRAFT

A-02 LEED-ND Application

03

Cornfield Arroyo Seco Project #10094286 Certification Level: CERTIFIED Stage 1 22 April 2010

LEED速 for Neighborhood Development Pilot 44 Points Achieved Certified 40 to 49 points

Possible Points: 106 Silver 50 to 59 points

16

Smart Location & Linkage

Y Y Y Y Y Y 2 1 8

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Prereq 3 Prereq 4 Prereq 5 Prereq 6 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4

1 3 1

Credit 5 Credit 6 Credit 7 Credit 8 Credit 9 Credit 10 Credit 11

Gold 60 to 69 points

Platinum 80 or more points

Possible Points: 30

Smart Location, Option 1 Proximity to Water & Wastewater Infrastructure, Option 1 Imperiled Species & Ecological Communities, No Species Wetland & Water Body Conservation, Option 2 Agricultural Land Conservation, Option 2 Floodplain Avoidance, Option 2 Brownfields Redevelopment High Priority Brownfields Redevelopment Preferred Locations Reduced Automobile Dependence Bicycle Network Housing & Jobs Proximity, Option 1 School Proximity Steep Slope Protection Site Design for Habitat or Wetland Conservation Restoration of Habitat or Wetlands Conservation Management of Habitat or Wetlands

15 Y

Green Construction & Technology Prereq 1 Credit 1

2 1 10 8 1 3 1 1 1 1 1

1 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 1

Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6 Credit 7 Credit 8 Credit 9 Credit 10 Credit 11 Credit 12 Credit 13 Credit 14 Credit 15 Credit 16 Credit 17

12

Neighborhood Pattern & Design

Possible Points: 39

1

Credit 18 Credit 19

Y Y 1 4 3

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6 Credit 7

1 1

Credit 8 Credit 9 Credit 10

1

Credit 11 Credit 12 Credit 13 Credit 14

1

Credit 15 Credit 16

04

Open Community Compact Development Compact Development Diversity of Uses Diversity of Housing Types Affordable Rental Housing Affordable For-Sale Housing Reduced Parking Footprint Walkable Streets Street Network, Option 2 Transit Facilities Transportation Demand Management Access to Surrounding Vicinity Access to Public Spaces Access to Active Spaces Universal Accessibility Community Outreach & Involvement Local Food Production

A-02 LEED-ND Application

Credit 20

7 4 3 2 2 2 8 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

Credit 1.5

Innovation in Design Innovation in Design Innovation in Design Innovation in Design Innovation in Design

Credit 2

LEED Accredited Professional

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

1

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention LEED Certified Green Buildings Energy Efficiency in Buildings Reduced Water Use, Option 1 Building Reuse & Adaptive Reuse Reuse of Historic Buildings Minimize Site Disturbance through Site Design, Option 1 Minimize Site Disturbance during Construction, Option 1 Contaminant Reduction in Brownfields Remediation Stormwater Management,February 2007 Version,Option 1 Heat Island Reduction, Option 1 Solar Orientation On-Site Energy Generation On-Site Renewable Energy Sources District Heating & Cooling Infrastructure Energy Efficiency Wastewater Management Recycled Content in Infrastructure Construction Waste Management Comprehensive Waste Management Light Pollution Reduction

Innovation & Design Process Credit 1.1

Possible Points: 31

Possible Points:

3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

6 1 1 1 1 1 1

DRAFT

LEED for Neighborhood Development Pilot Program Certification Process LEED for Neighborhood Development will certify projects that may have significantly longer construction periods than single buildings, and as a result the standard LEED certification process needed to be modified. The core committee wanted to be able to provide developers of certifiable projects with some form of approval even at the early, pre-entitlement stage. They also wanted to ensure that great plans became great real-life projects. With these goals in mind, the core committee created the following three-stage certification process:

Optional Pre-review (Stage 1) This stage is available but not required for projects at any point before the entitlement process begins. If pre-review approval of the plan is achieved, USGBC will issue a letter stating that if the project is built as proposed, it will be able to achieve LEED for Neighborhood Development certification. The purpose of this letter is to assist the developer in building a case for entitlement among land use planning authorities, as well as a case for financing and occupant commitments.

Certification of an Approved Plan (Stage 2) This stage is available after the project has been granted any necessary approvals and entitlements to be built to plan. Any changes to the pre-reviewed plan that could potentially affect prerequisite or credit achievement would be communicated to USGBC as part of this submission. If certification of the approved plan is achieved, USGBC will issue a certificate stating that the approved plan is a LEED for Neighborhood Development Certified Plan and will list it as such on the USGBC website.

Certification of a Completed Neighborhood Development (Stage 3) This step takes place when construction is complete or nearly complete. Any changes to the certified approved plan that could potentially affect prerequisite or credit achievement would be communicated to USGBC as part of this submission. If certification of the completed neighborhood development is achieved, USGBC will issue plaques or similar awards for public display at the project site and will list it as such on the USGBC website.

DRAFT

A-02 LEED-ND Application

05

DRAFT

A-03

Stormwater Guidelines

PURPOSE • •

To assist Projects with meeting the parcel level Stormwater requirements. To provide technical information about infiltrates and runoff rates and required detention volumes, raingarden sizing, drywells, permeable paving, and vegetated filter strips. To provide information on a variety of Best Management Practices (BMPS).

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

01

To achieve the Stormwater requirements identified in Sub-Sections 7.7.1. - 7.7.4. of this Plan Projects will have a variety of Best Management Practices (BMPs) to choose from. Some BMPs, such as raingardens and swales are better suited for parcels with large open spaces already intended for landscaping. Others, such as dry wells, green roofs and flow-through planters are more suitable where the sites are highly constrained. While more costly than raingardens, these devices require less space. Rainwater harvesting can also be used as a means for meeting parcel level stormwater management requirements. The tables and figures included here are intended to provide guidance for meeting the parcel level stormwater management requirements. The tables indicate a number of recommended BMPs for management of stormwater on individual parcels, provide critical dimensions per 1000 square feet of impermeable and permeable surface, and indicate whether the treatment and detention requirements can be met. The sizing of individual BMPs can vary greatly depending on soil characteristics and spatial constraints. While some BMPs will meet both of these requirements, others may only meet one of the requirements. With the exception of clay and some clay loam soils, and when bedrock prevents infiltration, open space does not need to be mitigated during the water quality event (WQE) because infiltration rates through the sil will be higher than rainfall rates. The technical tables and figures are described here first followed by Table 7 which illustrates a variety of BMPs.

02

A-03 Stormwater Guidelines

DRAFT

depending on soil characteristics and sizing of individual BMPs can vary greatly Parcel owners will also be required to less space. Rainwater harvesting can spatial constraints. also be used as a means for meeting depending on soil characteristics and treat 100% of the runoff from a 85th While some BMPspercentile will meet storm both of spatial constraints. and have detention parcel level stormwater management these requirements, others to may onlyat least 1/3 of the requirements. capacity retain While some BMPs will meet both of meet one of the requirements. Water QualityWith Event (WQE) runoff. To these requirements, others may only The following tables and figures are the exception of clay clay do and this, some owners will have a large variety meet one of the requirements. With intended to provide guidance for loam soils, and when bedrock prevents of BMP options to choose from. Some meeting the parcel level stormwater the exception of clay and some clay infiltration, open space does notsuch needas raingardens and BMP options, loam soils, and when bedrock prevents management requirements. The tables Soil Infiltration Rates tobe mitigated during theare WQE because swales better suited for parcels with infiltration, space does not need indicate a number recommended Soil infiltration rates of compared to the design storm rainfallopen rate are infiltration rates through the soil will already be large open spaces intended for tobe mitigated during the WQE because BMPs for inmanagement of stormwater compared Table 1 below. higher than rainfall infiltration rates through the soil will be rates. Soil1 infiltration higher than rainfall Table11 Table rates compared to the Soil rates. Soil infiltration Soil infiltration infiltrationrates ratescompared comparedtotorainfall rainfallintensity intensityduring duringthe theWQE WQE ainfall rate design storm rainfall rates compared to the Soilare compared in Soil type Saturated infiltration WQE Rainfall rate rate design storm rainfall conservation rate (in/hr) (in/hr Table 1. rate are compared in service group Table 1. A

Sand

8.0

0.2

A

Loamy sand

2.0

0.2

B

Sandy loam

1.0

0.2

B

Loam

0.5

0.2

C

Silt Loam

0.25

0.2

C

Sandy clay loam

0.15

0.2

D

Clay loam and silty clay loam

<0.09

0.2

Clay

<0.05

0.2

D Source: Urban Runoff Quality Management, WEF Manual of

Source: Urban Runoff Quality Management, WEF Manual of Practice No. 23v

150

Cornfield Arroyo Seco Specific Plan DRAFT

Water Quality Event (WQE) Runoff Rates and Detention Volumes WQE runoff rates and required detention volumes for individual parcels are explained in Table 2.

Table 2 WQE runoff rates and required detention volumes for parcels

Treatment Requirement

Surface Type

Runoff Coefficient C

Area (sq ft)

Runoff Rate (cf/hour)

Volume (ft)

Treatment Volume

Impermeable

0.9

1000

15.0

56

28

Open Space

0.35

1000

5.8

22

11

Note that treatment of runoff from open space is only required when soil infiltration is less than 0.2 inches per hour.

DRAFT

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

03

Raingardens Table 3 illustrates ideal dimensions for a rain garden in various soil conditions. The critical dimensions are bottom area and volume as these two factors affect how quickly water is infiltrated and how much water is spilled during a WQE. Spilled water should be diverted to an appropriate drainage system. Note that the footprints for sand, sandy loam and loam soils are somewhat similar, whereas, clay loam and clay soils tend to require larger footprints. When space is limited and clay loam or clay soils are present, an under drain system can be installed to allow for more rapid infiltration through an engineered soil such as clean sand. The under drain would discharge to an appropriate drainage system or to the street.

Table 3 Raingarden example sizing per 1000 square feet of roof + 1000 square feet of open space

Soil Type

Loam

Sandy Clay Loam

Clay

33

36

44

217

1

1

1

1

1

Volume (ft3)

61.9

68

72.6

84.4

306.5

Footprint (ft )

131

139

145

161

432

Loamy Sand

Sandy Loam

Bottom area (ft2)

29

Depth (ft)

 

2

Note that raingarden sizes for sandy clay loam and clay soils are larger than the total runoff volume for the WQE due to the need to infiltrate all runoff through the bottom area over the course of no more than 72 hours following a storm.

04

A-03 Stormwater Guidelines

DRAFT

Dry Wells Table 4 illustrates the variable configuration of dry wells depending on soil type. In order to be effective a dry well must drain relatively quickly so that it can be used to store water from consecutive storm events. Figure 1 below shows how with decreasing permeability of soil, a dry wellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideal dimensions become shorter and broader in order to allow for a greater surface area for infiltration. The required configuration of a dry well in clay loam and clay soils can make it difficult to construct and install under these conditions.

Figure1 Dry-well dimensions by soil type to meet water treatment and retention requirements Optimization of Dry Well Dimensions by Soil Type Dimensions Shown are for Storage of Runoff from 90th percentile storm event in Los Angeles Storm Intensity: I = 0.22 inches/hour Storm Duration: t = 6 hours Design Criteria: 1) Drains within 3 days of storm event 2) Height must not exceed 8 feet 3) Assumes cnstant infiltration rate during storm event

d = 4.4 h = 7.0 d = 4.8 h = 5.8

d = 6.2 h = 3.5

SAND Q=1.2 inches/hour

SANDY LOAM Q=1.0 inches/hour

d = 8.7 h = 1.8

LOAM Q=06 inches/hour

CLAY LOAM Q=0.3 inches/hour

Table 4 Dry Well sizing per 1000 square feet of impermeable drainage area

Soil Type

Sand

Sandy Loam

Loam

Sandy Clay Loam

Pipe Diameter (ft)

4.1

4.1

5.3

7.5

Depth (ft) (h)

5.5

5.8

6.0

6.0

Volume (ft )

71.5

74.8

1332.0

264.0

 

3

Clay not recommended

Note: Constructability of a dry well in both clay loam and clay soils is limited by the shallow well height and large well diameter

DRAFT

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

05

Permeable Paving Permeable paving is an effective means of reducing and treating runoff. Table 5 indicates the percent or fraction of a paved area that could be treated with permeable paving in order to meet either the attenuation requirement or the treatment requirement. For instance, in a loamy sand condition, only 12 percent of a concrete patio would need to be paved with a permeable surface in order to infiltrate enough water during the WQE to meet the attenuation requirement for the patio runoff.

Table 5 Permeable paving sizing as percentage of total paved area

06

Soil Type

Meets treatment and attenuation requirement

Loamy Sand

12%

Sandy Loam

24%

Loam

49%

Sandy

96%

Clay

use engineered soil and subdrain

A-03 Stormwater Guidelines

DRAFT

Vegetated Filter Strips Vegetated filter strips can be used to either treat runoff or to retain runoff through infiltration. Table 6 indicates the sizing requirement for vegetated filter strips used for either treating or attenuating runoff from impermeable surfaces. Note that when only treatment is required, the filter strip size is minimal whereas, if the filter strip is used to meet the attenuation requirement, the size grows due to the slow rate of infiltration. Note that, in clay soils, additional storage is needed to meet the attenuation requirements.

Table 6 Vegetated filter strip sizing per 1000 square feet of impermeable surface

DRAFT

Soil Type

Meets treatment requirement (ft2)

Meets flow attenuation requirement (ft2)

Loamy Sand

90

yes

Sandy Loam

182

yes

Loam

361

yes

Sandy Clay

729

Yes

Clay

784

requires an additional 16 cubic feet of storage

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

07

Table 7 Best Management Practices Drainage BMP Area Type Roof

Description

Disconnected Roof Leader

Most BMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s used for managing roof runoff require the roof leader to be disconnected from the storm sewer network. Typically runoff collected from the roofs is piped directly to the storm sewers. By disconnecting a roof leader, runoff can be directed towards BMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, infiltrated into the ground, or flow overland to the storm drainage network. This action will reduce the peak flows in the storm drainage network, and will make treatment and infiltration options available.

Flow Through Planter Box

Flow through planter boxes are formalized versions of raingardens, which are contained within a planting structure, generally formed of concrete. Planters are generally used when sites are constrained or when a specific aesthetic appearance is desired. Planter boxes occupy less space than raingardens due to the absence of side slopes and are usually attached or immediately adjacent to buildings in order to connect to individual roof leaders. Planters can be lined or can have open bottoms to promote infiltration If infiltration is limited due to low permeability of native soil, a perforated pvc subdrain can be added to connect to an adjacent drainage or storm sewer. Planter boxes generally contain engineered soils consisting of several inches of planting soil mixture with a sub bed of sand and native soil.

Green Roof

A green roof is a roof of a building that is partially or completely covered with vegetation and soil over a waterproofing membrane. A green roof provides stormwater attenuation by reducing the amount of runoff that flows off of the roof. The effect is primarily achieved by infiltration of water into the soil medium during a storm, effectively lowering the runoff coefficient and increasing storage capacity of the roof. Depending on their design, green roofs can typically eliminate runoff from small storm events but will still produce runoff during larger events. The soil and subsurface sand layers of a green roof can provide both detention and retention of runoff. Runoff from unplanted areas of the roof may be directed to a green roof for treatment or detention. Typically however, a green roof only treats water from the area it occupies.

Cisterns

Cisterns provide above ground storage of rainwater harvested from roof spaces. Water from cisterns is typically used for either irrigation or internal toilet flushing. Because water is reused on-site, cisterns provide stormwater retention, completely removing the captured water from contributing to runoff. An additional benefit of cisterns is to reduce the water consumption of the building.

Dry Well

A dry well is an underground structure that dissipates it into the ground. Water flows through a dirty well. The influence of gravity and discharges occurs through a number of small exit openings distributed over the sides and bottom of the dry well. Once full, a dry well can only accept water as fast as it can dissipate water.

Image

Simple dry wells consist of a pit filled with gravel, riprap, rubble, or other debris. Such pits resist collapse, but do not have much storage capacity because their interior volume is mostly filled by stone. A more advanced dry well defines a large interior storage volume by a reinforced concrete cylinder with perforated sides and bottom.

08

A-03 Stormwater Guidelines

DRAFT

Demensions in well drained soils per 1000 sq ft roof area*

Design Criteria

n/a

Area = 29ft2 Volume = 51 ft3 Depth to Soil = 1.75 ft Width = 2.5

Must drain within 24 hours - Spillway required to allow overflow - Overflows should be located at the opposite end of the planter box from the roof leader to promote settling. Box should be planted with dense vegetation to promote biofiltration.

1000 ft2 Green roofs

Total water storage capacity of the soil must be equivalent to 0.75 inches. Soil and sand layers must be no less than 4 inches combined. Detention requirements in other areas of the site can be off-set by increasing the detention capacity of the green roof up to a maximum of 1.3 inches. If runoff from other unvegetated areas of roof is directed to the green roof for treatment, calculations must be shown to indicate the green roof has the retention/detention capacity to handle the additional flows.

57 ft3

The cistern size must be large enough to retain the entire WQE runoff. This may be prohibitive from an economic perspective due to the large size of the cistern.

Volume = 71.5 ft3 Height = 5.5 ft Diameter = 4.1 ft

Dry wells should drain within 3 days of the WQE to allow space for subsequent storms. Typically, the depth should not exceed about 6 feet to avoid excessive excavation. Dry wells can be designed to retain and thus treat all of the WQE runoff. The size of the dry well is limited by the rate of infiltration through the bottom and side wall openings.

Treatment + Detention Volume = 90 ft3 Height = 7.2 ft Diameter = 4.0 ft

Dry wells should drain within 3 days of the WQE to allow space for subsequent storms. Typically, the depth should not exceed about 8 feet to avoid excessive excavation. Dry wells can be designed to retain and thus treat all of the WQE runoff. In the former case, an overflow system should be designed which allows spilled water to be treated by an alternative means. It should be noted that the size is limited by the rate of drainage

Detention Only Volume = 61 ft3 Height = 7.2 Diameter = 3.3 ft

In this case, an overflow system should be designed which allows spilled water to be treated by an alternative means.

DRAFT

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

09

Table 7 Best Management Practices continued Drainage BMP Area Type

Multi Purpose (Receive Runoff from Roofs or Open Space)

Description

Minimize Site Imperviousness

Decreasing the amount of impervious surface used for driveways, patios and other open spaces is an effective measure to decrease runoff and therefore the treatment and detention requirements, by reducing the runoff coefficient of land. Pavement should only be used in areas where drivable surfaces are required. One example of reducing pavement is to create planted areas down the center of driveways. Aside from reducing the runoff coefficient this will also aid in treating runoff from the driveway.

Vegetated Filter Strips

Separation of hardscape areas with planted open space reduces sheet flow runoff from hardscape, reduces overall site imperviousness and provides treatment of runoff from hardscape areas. Vegetated filter strips provide treatment through bio filtration- the process of water flowing horizontally through vegetation. They also provide retention through infiltration though the required sizing to meet the retention requirement tends to be much larger.

Permeable Pavement

Permeable Pavement is an effective BMP to manage stormwater on paved areas. Stormwater infiltrates through the porous material and can naturally infiltrate into the ground. Directing runoff from impermeable surfaces to permeable paving areas can help reduce the treatment requirements significantly. In areas where infiltration is limited by the soils permeability, a subdrain can be connected to an adjacent storm sewer. Alternative natural surfaces such as crushed gravel and coarse sand can also be used to the same effect. Permeable paving also reduces the overall imperviousness of a site.

Raingarden

Raingardens are cost effective BMP’s that can be used to detain and treat stormwater runoff from both roof surfaces and landscaped areas. A raingarden is a slightly depressed area with an overflow outlet draining to a nearby storm sewer or other drainage system. Treatment process includes infiltration and biofiltration. The overflow prevents flooding on the adjacent land, before naturally infiltrating into the ground. They also can have soil media that aids in filtering sediments and pollutants in stormwater. In cases where subsurface rock will not allow for infiltration, the bottom of the raingarden can be lined with a liner/ fabric, and a subdrain can be connected to the street network to drain flows. If infiltration is limited due to low soil permeability or not desirable adjacent to a buildings foundation, a perforated pvc subdrain can be added to connect to an adjacent drainage or storm sewer. The raingarden would then be sized according to the subsurface engineered soil infiltration rates.

Vegetated Swale

Swales are linear BMP’s that aid in treating stormwater while conveying flow to a desired location. Overland flow could direct stormwater to landscaped swales that are on the edges of a property that blend into the rest of the surrounding yard. For residential applications swales are typically 3’ wide at the bottom, and have side slopes at 3:1. The swales should be lined with grass and or flood tolerant vegetation to promote biofiltration and to reduce flows. Soil media can also be used to filter sediments and remove pollutants prior to infiltration into the ground. In cases where infiltration is limited due to low soil permeability a subdrain can be connected to a nearby storm sewer or drainage.

Image

* For all other soil types, see the BMP Sizing Charts ** 1/4 acre lot assumed to be 80% impermeable, 20% open space

10

A-03 Stormwater Guidelines

DRAFT

Critical Dimensions in Design Criteria well drained soils per 1000 sq ft impermeable surface* N/A

90 ft2

Runoff must either infiltrate completely into the vegetated filter strip, or spend a minimum of 10 minutes flowing through the vegetated filter strip in order to meet treatment requirements. The amount of water retained is equivalent to the water infiltrated during the storm event and depends on soil type. In most soils, the rate of infiltration will be the limiting sizing factor. However, in most clay soils, the residence time is the limiting factor. In clay soils, additional storage is required in conjunction with the filter strip.

120 ft2

For treatment to occur, runoff must infiltrate completely through the permeable paving surface. The sizing at left is for a permeable paving system with an infiltration efficiency of 75% compared to open ground. The size represents the portion of a 1000 square foot surface that would be required to have permeable paving. As the permeability of the native soil decreases, the fraction of the surface requiring permeable paving increases. Permeable paving is not recommended in clay soils. All drainage from the impermeable surface must sheet flow across the installed permeable paving.

Bottom Area = 29 ft3 Volume = 62 ft3 Total footprint = 131 ft2

Raingardens should be sized to drain over a period of no more than 3 days. For aesthetic purposes, depths should not exceed about 3 feet. Maximum unsupported side slopes of 3:1. Must drain completely within three days. A spillway is required to allow overflow. Overflows should be located at the opposite end from the inlet to promote settling and biofiltration. Should be planted with dense vegetation to promote biofiltration.

Bottom Area = 127 ft2

Runoff must either infiltrate completely into the vegetated swale, or spend a minimum of 10 minutes flowing through the swale in order to meet treatment requirements. In clay and sandy clay soils residence time tends to be the size limiting criteria. A swale is also used for conveyance and has a depth that is accommodated by gently sloping sides (no greater than 3:1). The depth should be sufficient such that the swale can convey runoff from the 25 year storm event.

DRAFT

Stormwater Guidelines A-03

11

DRAFT

A-04

Street Standards

PURPOSE: • Promote a multi-modal street network • Establish recommended standards for modified cross sections • Illustrate modified street standards • Establish street assumptions and criteria

Street Standards A-04

01

RECOMMENDED STANDARDS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CROSS SECTIONS The Plan’s Street Standards are modifications of the existing street designations and apply to the Plan’s street segments illustrated in the cross-sections on the following pages. The primary distinction between the various street designations that occur in the Plan is their number of traffic lanes. The designations are then further distinguished by the width of sidewalk and the presence or absence of on-street parking and/or bicycle lanes. Major Class II. Four full-time traffic lanes (two in each direction) and two additional peakperiod traffic lanes that displace off-peak parking. Secondary. Four full-time traffic lanes (two in each direction). Depending upon the road width and its particular role this designation also may include full-time parking lanes and/ or bicycle lanes. Collector. Two full-time traffic lanes (one in each direction) and full-time parking and bicycling lanes. Local. Two full-time traffic lanes (one in each direction) and full-time parking on at least one side of the street. The Plan’s Street Standards are illustrated by a series of cross-sections. The crosssections show the typical midblock conditions. Intersections are not shown. For each street, the existing street designation and existing cross sections by segment are shown in the left column. The proposed cross-sections for those same segments are shown in the right column. The legend on the following page identifies each element in the cross section diagrams. The proposed Plan Street Standard for each street segment includes: Right-of-way width (ROW). Roadway width (curb to curb). Sidewalk width within the ROW. The sidewalk width cannot be reduced. In other words, the roadway cannot be widened at the expense of the sidewalk. These standards will be accompanied by the Cornfield Arroyo Seco Streetscape Plan which will include improvement standards for pedestrian-scale street lights, tree plantings, landscaped parkways, bio-swales, bicycle parking, trash cans, benches, and transit accommodations. Property owners are required to maintain all improvements on the adjacent sidewalk. Upon final approval of these standards the Bureau of Engineering will add a layer to its Navigate LA website to inform all developers of the future block-by-block requirements for streets and sidewalk widths. The following assumptions and criteria further guide the development of future roadway improvements. ASSUMPTIONS Lane Capacity. Lane capacity assumptions for planning purposes are as follows. 850/lane one-way. 750/lane two-way with continuous center turn lane or left turns/median and parking. 700/lane two-way with left turns at intersections (from parking) and parking. Buses. Metro operates several bus lines through the Plan area, and Foothill Transit and DASH both run a single line through the Plan. The transit corridors served by Metro are

02

A-04 Street Standards

DRAFT

Avenue 26, Broadway, Figueroa, Main, Pasadena and San Fernando. In addition to these corridors Foothill Transit runs down Avenue 19 and the DASH uses a portion of Spring, Ann, and College. Due to the high volume of buses and number of riders all the streets served by transit need to have adequate sidewalk width for pedestrians, typically 15 feet minimum and more where there are higher concentrations of pedestrians. Bicycles. The 2010 Bicycle Plan designates all or portions of Avenues 18, 19 and 26, Broadway, Figueroa, Humboldt, Main, Spring, San Fernando, and Pasadena, Sotello, and Mesnager as Bikeways. In particular Broadway, Figueroa, Main and Pasadena have been identified on the Citywide Bicycle Network as priority bikeway corridors. Humboldt, Spring and San Fernando have also been identified as priority bikeway corridors on the Neighborhood Bicycle Network. The Plan recommends that the majority of these priority bikeways on either the Citywide or Neighborhood Networks be striped with Class II Bicycle Lanes. The widths on Main and San Fernando cannot accommodate both Bicycle Lanes and Parking Lanes and therefore the Plan recommends that Class II Bicycle Lanes be installed in -lieu of on-street parking. On Avenue 26, north of the Gold Line Bridge, severe width constraints due to the freeway on and off-ramps prohibit the addition of Bicycle Lanes through a portion of Avenue 26. Traffic volumes on Broadway east of the LA River require the six peak-hour lanes and therefore a Class II bikeway cannot be accommodated through this portion of Broadway. Pedestrians. The Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Street Standards recommend the broadening of sidewalk widths throughout the Plan area to better accommodate pedestrians commuting to transit, to school, nearby stores, restaurants, and parks. CRITERIA Due to the wide variety of street conditions found throughout the Plan area these criteria are established as general rules and there are always exceptions to general rules. 1. Roadways should maintain a consistent roadway width unless there is an overriding need. 2. Intersections should flare only at Major to Major intersections. 3. Striping should preserve on-street parking with left turns permitted only at the intersections except where a continuous turn lane is needed due to significant midblock turn movements. 4. Accept slower speed (35 mph or less) lane widths as appropriate for the Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s streets.

35mph or less

Curb Lanes 10-12 feet

Traffic Lanes 9-11 feet

5. Travel lanes adjacent to bicycle lanes should be a minimum of 11 feet. 6. Bicycle lanes should be a minimum of 6 feet but no more than 7 feet. 7. Sidewalk widths vary based on street width and traffic adjacency as well as land use. 8. Standards work both ways. For example, if a new street standard is currently wider than the proposed street width than a roadway narrowing should be triggered by the same actions that trigger roadway widening. 9. Vegetated Stormwater Curb extensions should be installed at all Local to Local intersections. 10. Maximize curb-side parking- convert red curb to parking where appropriate. 11. Allow peak-period curbside parking where curb lane is at least 18 feet wide.

DRAFT

Street Standards A-04

03

PASADENA PASADENA PASADENA NAUD Collector Collector Collector Modified Modified Local Modified Modified

ied ed odified

SPRING SPRING PASADENA SPRING Secondary Collector Secondary Secondary Modified Modified Modified Modified 5 5 5

SPRING Secondary Modified 5

STREET CROSS SECTION LEGEND

College - Roundout/Elmyra College - Roundout/Elmyra Broadway - Ave. 18 College - Roundout/Elmyra

Broadway - Ave. 18 Broadway - Ave. 18 Broadway - Ave. 18 Ann - Sotello

ootello .17

P

P BP BP B PB

42' 9' 16' 28' 5' 28' 16' 5'16'

P B

P B

P

PP BP BP B B

10' 10' 17.5' 50' 50' 50'28'17.5'17.5' 16'17.5' 16' 63' 17.5'17.5'

60' 32' 60' 60'

10' 22' 22' 22' 17.5'

85' 85' 85'60'

P

B

98' Roundout/Elmyra- Ann

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 P BP BP B

P

EXISTING P BP BP B PB P B P B P Secondary Hwy 10' 10' 17.5'Street 50' 50' 50'28'17.5'17.5' 16'17.5' 16' 63' 17.5' 17.5' (Current Designation)

PROPOSED P B B P 40'-66.7' 76' 76' 76' 22'5'-14.5' 22' 22' Collector Modified 55'-71.7' 98' 98' 98' 17.5' 50'Designation) 17.5' (Proposed Street

50' 28' 5' 28' 16' 5'18' 16' 16'

85' 85' 85'60'

A River) .19 ver) t - (LA River)

P BP BP B PB

50' 28' 5' 28' 16' 5'18' 16' 16' 50' 32' 60' 60'

15' 12' 15' 15'

P B

22' 12' 22' 22' P B

P

50' 50' 50'28' 15' 12' 16' 15' 15' 16' 56'

B

P B

P B

P

32'

Traffic Lane and Direction

P BP BP B

before Sotello)

15' 12' 15' 15'

B

P B

52' 52' 52'

P B

15' 12' 15' 15'

15' 8'-12' 16.5'16.5'16.5'

9.5'

15' 12' 15' 15'

P B

52' 52' 52'

P B

15' 12' 15' 15'

15'8' 22' 22' 22'

Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.)

15' 10' 15' 15'

B

P B

50' 56' 50' 50' 76' 76' 76'

04

A-04 Street Standards

Traffic Lane and Direction

P B

P

15' 10' 15' 15'

76'

98' Mesnager - Baker

P B

B

76'

22' 98'

52' 76'

98'

Sotello - Mesnager Bicycle Lane P B B B Curbside Parking Lane 22'

76' 76' 76'

SPRING Secondary Modi Baker - Wilhardt

15' 44.5'

40' 40' 40' 52.5'-56.5'

Wilhardt - Aurora Wilhardt - Aurora Wilhardt - Aurora P B B

P

76' 76' 76'

P BP BP B

76'

22'

40'

16.5'

56.5'56.5'56.5' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Wilhardt - Aurora

Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Ave. 34 - Ave. 35

B

15'

P B

B

Baker - Wilhardt SPRING SPRING SPRING Secondary Secondary Modified Modified 3 3 3 P PModified BSecondary B Baker - Wilhardt Baker - Wilhardt Baker - Wilhardt

P

76' 76' 76'

P BP BP B

B

98' 98' 98' Ave. 33 - Ave. 34

Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 33 - Ave. 34

EET ed

76' 98'

76' 44.5' 76' 76' B 98' 56.5' 98' 98' P

22' 22' 22'

P B

B 22'

P BP BP B B Proposed Roadway 76' 44.5' 76' 76' 22' 12' 22' 22' Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Proposed98' Right-of-way 56.5' 98' 98' (ROW) P B B P Mesnager - Baker Mesnager - Baker Mesnager - Baker 50' in ROW 15' 15' Proposed Sidewalk P BP BP B B 80' B

12' 50' 56' 50'in 50' 15' 15' 15' 15' 15' Existing Sidewalk ROW 15' 12' 80' 80' 80'

5'

B

50' 15' Sotello - Mesnager Sotello - Mesnager Sotello - Mesnager 80'

80' 80' 80'60'

P BP BP B

B

Ann - Sotello

P BP BP B Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

Existing Roadway Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Existing Right-of-way (ROW)

.20

7'

P B

B

85' Ann - Sotello Ann - Sotello Ann - Sotello

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Wilhardt - (LA River)

P

76'

22'

Roundout/Elmyra- Ann Roundout/Elmyra- Ann Roundout/Elmyra- Ann

50' 32' 60' 60'

P B

B

80' 76' 76' 50' 76' 17.5' 10'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Mesnagers - Wilhardt

8'

B

98' 85' 100' 98' 98'

Wilhardt .18 gers - Wilhardt - Wilhardt hardt

5'

College - Roundout/Elmyr

52' 52'-65'

56.5' Wilhardt - Aurora

P 15' 8'

76' 76' 76' 76' 60'-73'

98' 98' 98' Aurora - Ave. 18 Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) Aurora - Ave. 18 Aurora - Ave. 18 Aurora - Ave. 18

PP BP BP B B P B B B 40'-70' 3'-15' 6'-15' 50' 15' 22' 22' 76' 76' 76'15' 22' 49'-100' 76' 98' 98' 98'

76'

22' 98' Aurora - Ave. 18

P B 76'

22' 98'

SPRING SPRING SPRING Street Street Bridge Street Bridge Secondary Bridge Secondary Secondary Modified Modified Modified 2 2 SPRING 2 Street Bridge Secondar

DRAFT

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

PROPOSED

North South Street Section 1 Existing

North South Street Section 1 Proposed

ANN STREET Collector Street

ANN STREET ARTESIAN STREET Local Modified

AVE. 17 ARTESIAN STRE Local Modified

Spring - Weyse

Spring - Weyse Ave. 34 - Ave. 33

Ave. 34 - Ave. 33 Albion - Mozart

P 40'

10'

10'

5'

60'

P

50' 16'

5'28'

60'

60'

16'

Weyse - Naud Ave. 33 - Humboldt

Weyse - Naud

10'

40' 10'

40' 10'

60'

60'

Ave. 33 - Humbold Mozart - Darwin

P 40'

10'

35'

10'

60'

28'

16'

ARTESIANNaud - Main PL STREET

40'

P Artesian - Ave. 26 16'

10'

10'

60'

35'

Naud - Main

10'

16'

B 42' 10'

60'

60'

Darwin - Main ARTESIAN PL ST Local Modified

28'

16'

5.5'

60'

60'

40' 6'

Artesian - Ave. 26 5.5' P 33'

22'

32'

14'

P AURORA STREET 16'

P 40'

9.5'

60'

Main - Magdalena

Main - Magdalena Local Street

4.5'

54'

Baker - Spring

28' 60'

Baker - Spring

North South Street Section 1 Proposed

on 1 Existing

ANN STREET ARTESIAN STREET Local Modified Local

P 5'

P AVE. 16 Local Modified

50' 16'

5'28'

60'

60'

16'

DRAFT

35'

60'

ARTESIANNaud - Main PL STREET

P

40' 10'

10'

16'

10'

AVE. 16 Local Mo Looking north 24' 8' 40' 10'

10'

60'

40' 60' Albion - Ave. 33

Mozart - Darwin Pasadena - Spring/Broadway 28' 18'

B P

32' 28'

59' Albion - Mozart Barranca - Pasadena

Ave. 33 - Humboldt Mozart - Darwin 32'

P 16'

40' 10'

10'

60' Albion - Ave. 33

Weyse - Naud Ave. 33 - Humboldt

35'

P AVE. 18 AVE. 17 28' 15.5' Modified Local

AVE. 17 ARTESIAN STREET 45' Modified 6.5' 7' Local 59' Ave. 34 - Ave. 33 Albion - Mozart

Spring - Weyse Ave. 34 - Ave. 33

AURORA STREE Local Modified

16'

40' 6'

42' 10'

60'

60'

P 12'

10'

Street Standards A-04

Darwin - Main ARTESIAN PL STREET

05

60'

10' 40'

40' 10'

60'

60'

Darwin - Main Spring/Broadway - Albion

Artesian - Ave. 26 Artesian - Ave. 26 16' 16'

28' 28' 60' 60'

16' 16'

5.5' 5.5'

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING Main - Magdalena Main - Magdalena

P P AURORA STREET AURORA STREET 16' Local 16' Baker - Spring Baker - Spring

28' 28' 60' 60'

22' 22' 33' 33'

Artesian - Ave. 26 Artesian - Ave. 26 5.5' 5.5' P P 32' 14' 32' 14' 60' PROPOSED 60'

Albion - Mozart Albion - Mozart

40' 40' 60' 60'

10' 10'

Baker - Spring Baker - Spring

10' 10'

P P 7' 7'

45' 45' 59' 59'

Albion - Ave. 33 Albion - Ave. 33 Mozart AVE. 17 Local Modified P P 28' 18' Albion - Mozart 28' 18' 60' 60'

32' 32' Ave. 34 - Ave. 33 32' 32' P P

treet Section 1 Proposed 16'

'

40'

10'

10'

STREET AVE. 17 ARTESIAN 60' Local Local Modified

40' AVE. 18 AVE. 17 Local Modified

e

Ave. 34 - Ave. 33 Albion - Mozart Ave. 33 - Humboldt

Albion - Mozart Barranca - Pasadena Mozart - Darwin

B P

16'

10'

'

40' 10' 6'

40' 10' 42'

60'

60'

Ave. 33 - Humboldt Mozart - Darwin ARTESIAN PL STREET Local Modified B P Artesian - Ave. 26 42' 40' 12' 10' 6' 10'

16'

60' P

'

14'

32'

16'

5.5'

'

ena

06 16'

P B 8'

40' 8' 10'

24' 40' 10'

60'

40' 60'

P 10'

AVE. 18 60' Local Modified

Barranca - Pasade Ave 20 into (San Fernando R Pasadena - Spring Riverside (not in CASP area) P B 8' 10'

2'

48 13'

34' 10'

60'

60' 60'

Pasadena - Spring Riverside - Southbound Pasa Spring/Broadway

P

40' 10'

40' 10'

60'

60'

34'

13' AVE. 19

Mozart - Darwin Pasadena - Spring/Broadway Darwin - Main

60'

P B 10'

34' 40' 3'-5'

22.5' 13' 10'

3'-5'

31.5'-37.5'

60' 60'

14'

Darwin - Main ARTESIAN60' PL STREET Local Modified

ena

10'

Barranca - Pasade

P

P

P 10' 12'

AVE. 18 Local Modified 14' 14'

24'

8'

d

P

15.5' 15.5'

AVE. AVE. 16 16 Local Local Modified Modified Looking north Local Modified Looking north

AVE. AVE. 16 16 Local Local Modified Modified Local

e

28' 28' 59' 59'

15.5' 15.5'

6.5' 6.5'

treet Section 1 Proposed Albion - Ave. 33 Mozart Albion - Ave. 33 ARTESIAN STREET d Local Modified

'

14' 14'

AURORA AURORA STREET STREET Local Local Modified Modified

16' 16'

40' 10' 40' 10' 60' 60'

10' 40' 10' 40' 60' 60'

10' 10'

Artesian - Ave. 26 AURORA STREET 22' Local 5.5' Modified P 33' Baker - Spring 32' 14' 14' P 60'

28' 15.5' 15.5' A-04 Street Standards 59' AURORA STREET Local Modified

Darwin - Main Spring/Broadway - Albion

P

P 10'

Spring/Broadway Riverside - Northbound Pasa Albion - Mozart

40' 10'

40' 10'

60'

60'

P 10'

22.5' 10'

5'-10'

32.5'-42.5'

P

DRAFT 40' 60'

60'

Albion - Mozart Pasadena Fwy. - Humboldt

Albion - Mozart

10'

40' 5'-10'

10'

8'

44' 10'

40'8'

60'

60'

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

REET d

33

PROPOSED

AVE. 18 AVE. 17 Local Local Modified

AVE. 19

Albion - Mozart Barranca - Pasadena

Barranca - Pasadena Ave 20 into (San Fernando Rd) - Riverside (not in CASP area) P B P

P

P 10'

boldt

10'

40' 8'

24' 10'

60'

40'

8'

Mozart - Darwin Pasadena - Spring/Broadway

B P

P 12'

STREET d

10'

34' 10'

60'

60'

40' 10'

40' 10'

60'

60'

3'-5'

40' 10'

60'

60'

34' 3'-5'

22.5' 13'

P 5'-10'

22.5' 10'

8'

9'44'

42' 8'

60'

60'

Riverside - Southb Pasadena - Broadway

13'

B

9'40'

10'-12'

42' 10'-12'

60' - 64'

40' 5'-10'

60'

Riverside - Northbo Broadway - Albion

P

32.5'-42.5'

B

B

Spring/Broadway - Albion Riverside - Northbound Pasadena Fwy.

10'

B

60'

31.5'-37.5'

P

40' 10'

13'

Barranca - Pasadena San Fernando Rd

P

P B 10'

AVE. 19 Collector Modified

AVE. 19

Pasadena - Spring/Broadway Riverside - Southbound Pasadena Fwy.

Darwin - Main Spring/Broadway - Albion

10'

48 13'

P

P

26

2'

AVE. 18 Local Modified

B 10'

10'

60'

B

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

14' Albion - Mozart Pasadena Fwy. - Humboldt

Albion - Mozart

P

EET d

10'

40'

10'

8'

60'

Pasadena Fwy. - H Albion - Mozart

P

44' 10'

40' 8'

60'

60'

B 10'

10'

B

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

Humboldt - Barran Mozart - Darwin

Humboldt - Barranca 15.5'

BP 8'

44'

8'

10'

60'

Modified

B

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

Darwin - Main

3

P

P 40'

10'

14'

60'

DRAFT

Street Standards A-04

07

10'

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

AVE. 19 Local

d

PROPOSED

AVE. 18 Local Modified

San Fernando Rd - Riverside Barranca - Pasadena Ave 20 into (San Fernando Rd) - Riverside (not in CASP area) P B P

P 8'

2'

nway

48 13'

34' 10'

60'

60'

13'

Pasadena - Spring/Broadway Riverside - Southbound Pasadena Fwy.

P 3'-5'

34' 3'-5'

22.5' 13'

AVE. 20

Barranca - Pasadena San Fernando Rd - Riverside

Barranca - Pasade Pasadena - Broadway

8'

P

42' 8'

60'

60'

9'

8'

B P

10'-12'

9'40'

42' 10'-12'

60' - 64'

P

P 10'

5'-10'

22.5' 10' 32.5'-42.5'

10'

60'

P

42' 10'

60'

60'

8'

44' 10'

40'8'

60'

60'

10'

10'

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

8'

44'

8'

10'

60'

42' 10'

60'

60'

40'

8'

56' Albion - Mozart

9'

60' 40'

8'

56' Mozart - Darwin

P

Darwin - Main 9'

60' 40'

8'

P 10'

12'

P 36' 60'

60'

A-04 Street Standards

36'

12'

P

08

P

56' Darwin - Main

Darwin - Main

40'

36'

12'

8'

10'

P

P

Mozart - Darwin

B P

9'40'

36' 60'

Humboldt - Barranca Mozart - Darwin

BP

P 12'

8' Humboldt - Barranca

8'

56' Broadway - Albion

9'

B P

B

40'

Albion - Mozart

Pasadena Fwy. - Humboldt Albion - Mozart

P

28' 60'

B P

9'40'

B P

P

12'

8' Albion - Mozart Pasadena Fwy. - Humboldt

Pasadena - Broad

60'

B 10'

60'

9'

Riverside - Northbound Pasadena Fwy. Broadway - Albion

P 40' 5'-10'

36'

56'

Broadway - Albion

8' Spring/Broadway - Albion Riverside - Northbound Pasadena Fwy.

B P

40' 12' 8'

Riverside - Southbound Pasadena Fwy. Pasadena - Broadway AVE. 20

60'

31.5'-37.5'

9'44'

B 13'

AVE. 19 Local Modified

B P

B

P

P B 10'

AVE. 19 AVE. 19 Collector Modified 2

DRAFT

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

d

adena o Rd) - ea) P 13'

ring/Broadway asadena Fwy.

PROPOSED

AVE. 19 AVE. 19 Local Collector Modified 2

AVE. 20

San Fernando Rd - Riverside Barranca - Pasadena

Barranca - Pasadena Pasadena - Broadway

9'44'

42' 8'

60'

60'

9'

8'

B P

B 10'-12'

'

42' 10'-12'

9'40'

10'

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

10'

10'

9'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

10'

60'

60'

DRAFT

80'-83'

56'

56'

12'

80'

Barranca - Pasadena

P 12'

12'

60'

8'

8'

Darwin - Main

12'

56' - 68' P 60' - 80' 8'

8

12'P 40' 56'

P 36'

40'

Darwin - Main 12'

8'

12'

56'

Ave 26 - Ave 19

P

60' 40'

8

56'

36'

12'

40'

Mozart - Darwin 56' 12' P P 80'

56' Mozart - Darwin

9'

12' P

P

8'

P

8

Albion - Mozart 12'

36'

10'-12' P 40'

Humboldt - Barranca

36'

P 10'

P

8'

P

P

60'

80'

56'-61'

8'

40'

80'

56' Darwin - Main

Darwin - Main

40'

10'-12'

P

12'

8'

10'

12'

56' Albion - Mozart

9'

56' 12'

Broadway - Albion

56' Broadway - Albion

40'

56' 12'

Figueroa- Humboldt AVE. 20 Local Modified

8'

Mozart - Darwin

B P 42' 10'

12'

60'

Humboldt - Barranca Mozart - Darwin

9'40'

B P 28'

12'

8'

BP

40'

9'

B P

B

12'

Albion - Mozart

Pasadena Fwy. - Humboldt Albion - Mozart

P

P

12'

8'

dt

B

60'

B P

B

Pasadena - Broadway Ave. 19 - Figueroa

Pasadena - Broadway

9'

Riverside - Northbound Pasadena Fwy. Broadway - Albion

P 10'

56'

Broadway - Albion

8'

ay - Albion asadena Fwy.

36' 60'

60'

60' - 64'

AVE. 20 AVE. 20 into San Fernando Rd Secondary Modified

B P

40' 12' 8'

Riverside - Southbound Pasadena Fwy. Pasadena - Broadway AVE. 20

P 13'

P

B P

B 8'

AVE. 19 Local Modified

12'

60'

Street Standards A-04

09

8

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

PROPOSED

Modified 2

AVE. 19 AVE. 20 Secondary Hwy Local Modified

AVE. 20 AVE. 20 into San Fernando Rd Secondary Modified

AVE. 20 into San Ferna Secondary Modified 3

ndo Rd - Riverside

Barranca - Pasadena Pasadena - Broadway

Pasadena - Broadway Ave. 19 - Figueroa

Ave. 19 - Figueroa

P

B P 42' 8'

8'

9'

60'

B P

40' 12' 8'

36'

56'

60'

B 12'

Pasadena - Broadway y Southbound Pasadena Fwy. AVE. 20 Secondary Hwy P B P B P Broadway - Albion

42' 10'-12'

28'

12'

9' 8'

Northbound Pasadena Fwy.

9'

10'-12'

56'-61'

36'

12'

56'

12'

80'

B P

8'

9'

Barranca - Pasadena

P 36'

12'

60'

12'

12'

60' 8'

40'

B P

8'

8'

P

Darwin - Main 9'

60' 40'

P 12'

12'

12'

Humboldt - Barranca

B 12' P

40'

80' 8' Barranca - Pasadena

B

40'

80' 8' Ave 26 - Ave 19

B 56' - 68'

12'P 40'

60' - 80'

8'

56'

12'

60'

10

A-04 Street Standards

56'

12'

P 36'

56'

12'

56'

56' - 68' P 60' - 80' 8'

56' Darwin - Main

10'

8'

Darwin - Main

8'

P

80'

Ave 26 - Ave 19

60' 8'

56'

12'

56'

36'

12'

B

Mozart - Darwin 56' 12' P 80' P

56' Mozart - Darwin

- Barranca

Figueroa- Humboldt

40'

8'

P

Mozart - Darwin

80'

10'-12' P

P

50'

15'

Albion - Mozart

56' Albion - Mozart

Fwy. - Humboldt

42' 10'

40'

12'

56'

Humboldt - Barranca

60' 8'

P

8'

P

60'

80'

Broadway - Albion

8'

12'

56' 12'

80'

80'-83'

56' Broadway - Albion

Collector Street Albion - Mozart

B P

42' 10'

40'

56' 12'

Figueroa- Humboldt AVE. 20 Local Modified

60'

60'

42' 10'

12'

12'

P

B

DRAFT

North South Streets 2 - Proposed

North South Streets 2 - Exisitng AVE. 21

AVE. 26 AVE. 21 Local Modified

AVE. 28

Figueroa - Pasadena Fwy. PROPOSED (Gold Line) - Humboldt

Huron (not in CASP area) - F Figueroa - Pasad

North - South Streets (Looking North) (Gold Line) - Humboldt EXISTING North South Streets 2 - Exisitng AVE. 21 10' Local

North South Streets 2 - Proposed P P AVE. 28 6'

(Gold Line) - Humboldt

AVE. 26 AVE. 21 68' 40' 12' 10' 10' 10' Modified Local 90' 60' Figueroa - Pasadena Fwy. (Gold Line) - Humboldt

Humboldt - Barranca

Pasadena Fwy. - Lacy P P Humboldt - Barranca

BLOOM

40'

10'

60'

10'

40'

10'

10'

60' 40'

10'

AVE. 26 Secondary Modi

10' 10'

60'

10' 68' P 40' 90' 60' 40'-60' 8'-10' 40' 10' 60'-82' 60'

12' P 10'

10'

AVE. 26 44' 6' 10' Secondary Modi 56' 9 Huron (not in CASP area) - F Figueroa - Pasad

Pasadena Fwy. -

44' 10' 56' Main - Magdalena 10'

6'

6'

40'

9

60'

Humboldt - Barranca

Pasadena Fwy. - Lacy Humboldt - Barranca

BLOOM 6.5'

Barranca - Pasadena

Lacy - Gold Line Bridge P P Barranca - Pasadena

47' Lacy - Gold Line Main - Magdalena 40' 10'

10'

40'

10'

10'

10'

60' 40'

10'

10'

60'

40'-60' 40' 10' P 8'-10' 60'-82' 60' 40' 10' 40' 10' 60' 60'

P 10' 10'

Lacy - Gold Line Bridge Barranca - Pasadena

Barranca - Pasadena

40'

10'

60'

10' 10'

40' 10' 60'

10' 40' 55'

10'

60'

10'

75'

13' AVE. 23 10'

40'

10'

60' Humboldt - Barranca AVE. 25 Local 10'

40'

10'

AVE. 25 5'

Humboldt - Barranca 75' 60' 10' P P 83'

Artesian - Humboldt AVE. 23 36' 12' Modified Local 60' AVE. 26 13'

60' Humboldt - Barranca

P 83' Humboldt - Barranca AVE. 25 Local Modified 36' 12' AVE. 26 10'

10'

50' Humboldt - Barranca

35'

10'

15 COLLEGE 6.5' B 34'

Spring - Main Artesian - Humbo

P B AVE. 26 COLLEGE 40' 10' 10' Collector Modifi 15 60'

Humboldt - Barra Spring - Main

P

P

12'

P 36' 60'

P B 6.5'

15 47'

12'

AVE. 26 10' 40' 10'40' Collector Modifi 60' 60'

10'

Humboldt - Barra

Humboldt - Barranca 40' 10' 60'

50'

12'

Humboldt - Barranca AVE. 25 36' 12' Modified Local 60' 10'

5' DRAFT

P

60' Humboldt - Barranca 40' 10'

P

47' Gold Line Bridge Cardinal - Bolero P B Artesian - Humbo

12'

Humboldt - Barranca 60' 10'

60' 35'

10'

60' P B 34' 6.5' AVE. 26 15 47' Collector Modifi B 34' 6.5'

Cardinal - Bolero

6.5'

AVE. 23 Artesian - Humboldt Local Modified 55' 10'

Humboldt - Barranca

47' Lacy - Gold Line 34' 6.5' AVE. 26 47' Collector Modifi Magdalena - Cardinal 40' 10' Gold Line Bridge

6.5'

Gold Line Bridge - Artesian AVE. 23 Local

Magdalena - Cardinal 60' 40' 10' 34' 6.5'60' 6.5' 6.5'

Gold Line Bridge - Artesian P P 10'

Pasadena Fwy. 34' 6.5'

P Street Standards A-04 12'

P

11

10'

40' 60'

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING North South Streets 2 - Proposed

Exisitng

PROPOSED

AVE. 26 AVE. 21 SecondaryLocal Hwy Modified

AVE. 28

(Gold Line) - Humboldt Figueroa - Pasadena Fwy.

Figueroa - Pasadena Fwy. Huron (not in CASP area) - Figueroa

P 10'

P

12' 10'

BLOOM

8'-10' 40'

P

10'

Main - Magdalena 10'

10'

60'

55'

10'

75'

36' 60'

9'

42' 16' 60'

9'28'

60'

A-04 Street Standards 36' 12' 60'

P

34' 6.5' AVE. 26 47' Collector Modified

15 B 34'

9'

50' 80'

6.5'

6' 28'

60'

P 9'

45' 16' 60'

6'

28' 60'

B P 50' 80'

15

10'

COLLEGE Collector Modifi

15

Spring - Main

B

AVE. 26 40' Collector Modified 10'

10'

60'

Humboldt - Barranca

P

P 12'

45' 16' 60'

Magdalena - Cardinal Cardinal - Bolero

15

P B

COLLEGE

Spring - Main

Humboldt - Barranca 40' 10'

P

Main - Magdalena Magdalena - Car

10'

Artesian - Humboldt

12'

Humboldt - Barranca AVE. 25 Local Modified

12

BLOOM Local Modified

P

6.5'

47'

Humboldt - Barranca 60' 10' P P 83'

60'

34'

85' 36' 110' 60'

Spring - Main Main - Magdalen

10'

Gold Line Bridge - Artesian Cardinal - Bolero B P P B 6.5'

AVE. 23 Artesian - Humboldt Local Modified

10'

40' 60'

Magdalena - Cardinal 10' 40' 60'

Gold Line Bridge - Artesian

AVE. 26

ELMYRA

12'

P 10' 40'

12'

12.5'

47' Lacy - Gold Line Bridge

6.5'

13'

12'

Pasadena Fwy. - Lacy

60'

40' 10' 60'

68' 90'

6'

P

Lacy - Gold Line Bridge Barranca - Pasadena

10'

44' 10' 56'

6'

6.5'

10'

Huron - Figueroa Figueroa - Arroyo Seco Ave

P

10' 68' 40' 90' 60'

40'-60' 10' 60'-82'

CYPRESS AVE. 28 Local Modified

P

Pasadena Fwy. - Lacy Humboldt - Barranca

10'

AVE. 26 Secondary Modified 4

10'

P 40' 60'

10'

DRAFT

B 40' 60'

Artesian - Humboldt 47'

Artesian - Humboldt Humboldt - Barranca

P

P B

P

North - South (Looking North) 60' Streets 10' 13' 12'

EXISTING

83'

36'

12'

Humboldt - Barranca Humboldt - Barranca

40' 12' 60'

50'

15

COLLEGE Collector Modifi

15

80'

Spring - Main

10'

10' 36'

40'

60'

10'

P

P 40'

10'

12'

40'

10'

Humboldt - Barranca 60'

P

B

B

Spring - Main AVE. 26 Collector Modified

AVE. 26 AVE. 25 Local Local Modified

10'

B P

COLLEGEPROPOSED

60'

P

60'

10'

60'

60'

treets 2 - Proposed

d

AVE. 28 Local

y. umboldt

Huron - Figueroa Huron (not in CASP area) - Figueroa Figueroa - Pasadena Fwy.

AVE. 26 Secondary Modified 4

Figueroa - Arroyo Seco Ave Huron - Figueroa

Main - Magdalena Figueroa - Arroy

P 12' 10'

44' 10' 56'

6'

BLOOM Local

6'

68'

12'

12.5'

12'

90'

ELMYRA

Pasadena Fwy. - Lacy

CYPRESS Local Modified

P

85' 36' 110' 60'

P B 12.5' 12'

6.5'

34' 31' 6.5' 47'

Magdalena - Cardinal ELMYRA Local Modified

BLOOM Local Modified

P 10'

Main - Magdalena 10'

40'

Spring - Main Main - Magdalena

10'

60' 6.5'

34'

6.5'

6.5'

9'

42' 16' 60'

34'Spring - Main 6.5' 47'

P

47' Lacy - Gold Line Bridge

adena

9'28'

16'

60'

40'

10' Cardinal - Bolero

60'

P 10'

Magdalena - Cardinal 40' 10'

Main - Magdalena Magdalena - Cardinal

10'

60' 6.5'

an

10'

34' 6.5' AVE. 26 47' Collector Modified

15 B 34'

6.5'

47'

50'

47'

45' 16' 60'

6'

28'

16'

60'

Magdalena - Cardinal Cardinal - Bolero

15

80'

P B

COLLEGE DRAFT

12'

9'

34'Main - Magdalen 6.5'

LLEWELLYN

P

45' 16' 60'

P 6'

28' 60'

16'

10'

40' 16' 60'

15 Spring - Main

MESNAGERS

B P 50' 80'

15

60'

Roundout - Main Magdalena - Ca

P 9'

28'

16'

Artesian - Humboldt

rranca 10'

P

6.5'

P

Gold Line Bridge - Artesian Cardinal - Bolero B P P B 6.5'

d

'

LEROY

P

ranca

'

CYPRESS AVE. 28 Local Modified

13 Street Standards A-04 COLLEGE Spring - Naud Collector Modified

10'

28' 60'

6.5'

B

50'

15 34'

80'

6.5'

9'

North - 47' South Streets (Looking North)

d

EXISTING Artesian - Humboldt

rranca

P

'

12'

10'

50' 80'

40'

10'

P

40'

10'

10'

Figueroa - Arroyo Seco Ave Huron - Figueroa

12'

12.5'

12'

90'

10'

LEROY

RIVER

CYPRESS Local Modified

Main - Magdalena Figueroa - Arroyo Seco Ave

P

85' 36' 110' 60'

P B 12.5' 12'

ELMYRA BLOOM Collector Local Modified

y. - Lacy

5'

50'

P

P 68'

40'

5'

60'

40' 10' 28 CYPRESS AVE. Local Local Modified 60'

- Figueroa sadena Fwy.

Spring - Naud

B P

B

60'

' 12' odified 4 0'

10' 28' 60'

Spring - Main

AVE. 26 Collector Modified

P

60'

COLLEGE Collector Modified

15

Humboldt - Barranca

rranca

40'16'

10'

MESNAGERS

Spring - Main

d

60'

16'

B P

COLLEGE 15 Secondary Hwy

0'

6' 28' 60'

16' 45'

PROPOSED

P B

10'

P

P

15

6.5'

LEROY Local Modified

Huron - Figueroa Main - Magdale

P

B P

34' 31' 6.5' 47'

48'

35'16' 50'

31'7.5'

110'

7.5'28'

60'

ROUNDOUT Magdalena - Ca

Magdalena - Cardinal ELMYRA Local Modified

P

0'

Spring - Main Main - Magdalena

10'

'

6.5'

9'

ne Bridge

0'

42' 16' 60'

9'28'

16'

60'

Main - Magdalena Magdalena - Cardinal

10'

'

6.5'

dified

45' 16' 60'

28'

16'

60'

60'

40'

10'

Cardinal - Boler

60'

LLEWELLYN

28'

16'

Roundout - Main Magdalena - Cardinal

P

P

15 9'

80'

45' 16' 60'

6'

28' 60'

16'

10'

40' 16' 60'

B P

80'

10'

P 28'

16'

48'-50' Roundout - Mai

10'

60'

14

A-04 Street Standards COLLEGE Collector Modified

Spring - Main

Spring - Naud

40' 60'

MESNAGERS

15

P

Naud - Main

6.5'

mboldt

50'

LLEWELLYN Local Modified 37' 4.5'-6.5'

6.5'

B P 50'

Spring - Naud

60'

ge - Artesian Magdalena - Cardinal Cardinal - Bolero Local

28'

16'

60'

P 16'

P

SOTELLO

34'Main - Magdalena 6.5' 47'

6'

28'

16'

P

10' Cardinal - Bolero

P 9'

34'Spring - Main 6.5' 47'

P

Spring - Main

DRAFT

37'

6.5'

50' MESNAGERS Local Modified

Spring - Naud

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

LEROY Local

ve a

PROPOSED

RIVER

CYPRESS Local Modified

Main - Magdalena Figueroa - Arroyo Seco Ave

P

P B 12' 12.5'

6.5'

34'31' 47'

LEROY Local Modified

Huron - Figueroa Main - Magdalena

P

B P

6.5'

48'

35' 16' 50'

31' 7.5'

110'

7.5' 28'

6.5'

47'

16'

rdinal

SOTELLO

40' 16' 60'

28'

16'

P 10' 28'

50' 10'

DRAFT

50'

P 28'

P SOTELLO Local Modified

16'

16'

Spring - Naud

LLEWELLYN Local Modified 37' 4.5'-6.5'

Naud - Main 10'

P

P

60'

40'

Naud - Main

10'

60' 37'

P

6.5'

16'

P 38'

28' 60'

Spring - Naud

11'

28'

16'

P

P

B P

ROUNDOUT Local Modified

35' Spring - Main 7.5'

50' MESNAGERS Local Modified

5'

50'

60'

28'

60'

Spring - Naud

40'

7.5'

48'-50' Roundout - Main

6.5'

5'

16'

Spring - Naud

60'

MESNAGERS Collector

ied

P 16'

28'

P

60'

P

P 10'

Naud - Main

11'7.5'

Cardinal - Bolero

6.5'

16'

50'

16'

Roundout - Main Magdalena - Cardinal

o

35'

10'

60'

16' LLEWELLYN Local

7.5'

60'

Main - Magdalena 34' 6.5' 47'

16'

40'

Huron - Figueroa

P 16'

28'

P

10' Cardinal - Bolero

6.5'

Spring - Main 16'

Spring - Main 34' 6.5'

Spring - Naud

60'

P

na

RIVER Local Modified

P

ROUNDOUT Magdalena - Cardinal

Magdalena - Cardinal ELMYRA Local Modified

WILHARDT

11'

60'

Street Standards A-04

15

North - South Streets (Looking North) EXISTING

RIVER Local

PROPOSED

Huron - Figueroa Main - Magdalena

o Seco Ave

P

B P 48'

WILHARDT

LEROY Local Modified

31'

35' 16' 50'

7.5'

110'

16'

7.5'

35'

11' 7.5'

50'

ROUNDOUT Magdalena - Cardinal Local

Naud - Main

16'

10'

P

7.5'

35' Spring - Main 7.5' 50'

16'

LLEWELLYN Local Modified 37' 4.5'-6.5'

P 28'

P

Naud - Main 10'

16'

P

P

16'

P 40'

37'

28' 60'

10'

Naud - Main

60' 6.5'

16'

SOTELLO LocalFERNANDO Modified RD SAN

16'

P

6.5'

16'

50' MESNAGERS Local Modified

28'

16'

60'

Spring - Naud

P

P 11'

38'

11'

60'

16

A-04 Street Standards

28' 50'

Spring - Naud

48'-50' Roundout - Main

rdinal

11'

P

Spring - Naud

6.5'

1

Naud - Main

60'

28' 16' SAN FERNANDO RD 60'

28'

11'

50'

ROUNDOUT Local Modified

Cardinal - Bolero

16'

11'

50'

16'

na

28'

P

60'

SOTELLO

P

P 28'

P

Spring - Naud

P

60'

P

WILHARDT Local Modified

Spring - Naud Huron - Figueroa

P 7.5' 28'

Spring - Main 16'

RIVER Local Modified

DRAFT

1

8'

North - South Streets (Looking North)

P

P 36'

12'

60'

art - Darwin

80' P

P 36'

12'

win - Main anca - Pasadena ay

40'

36' 36' 60' 60'

B P 28'

Ave. 19 - Figueroa

12'

10'-12'

56' 12'

80'

80'

56'-61'

P

56'

12'

80'

8'

Barranca - Pasadena

n - Mozart

P 12'

12'

60'

8'

56'

12'

80' 8' Humboldt - Barranca

B 12' P

40'

B 56'

12'

12'

80' 8'

56'

Barranca - Pasadena

B

40'

B 56'

12'

12'

80' 8'

56'

art - Darwin

36'

Ave 26 - Ave 19

Ave 26 - Ave 19

P

B

Darwin - Main 12'

60'

12'

56' - 68' P 60' - 80' 8'

8'

56' - 68'

12'P 40'

B

8'

12'

60' - 80'

56'

win - Main

P 36'

15'

B

12'

Mozart - Darwin 56' 12' P P 80'

8'

50'

15'

B

10'-12' P

P

P

80'

56'

8'

P

12'

Albion - Mozart

60'

P

P

12'

Figueroa- Humboldt

40'

Humboldt - Barranca

P

36'

56' - 68'

B

56' 12'

8'

12'

B

Pasadena - Broadway Ave. 19 - Figueroa

8'

36'

12'

60' - 80' AVE. 20 into San Fernando Rd Secondary Modified 3

80'-83'

dway - Albion

56'

56' - 68' P 12'P 60' - 80' AVE. 20 AVE. 20 into San Fernando Rd 40' 8' 8' Secondary Modified 56'

Broadway - Albion 12'

B

B

12'

60'

P

8'

Figueroa- Humboldt AVE. 20 Local Modified

dena - Broadway

B PROPOSED 12'

80' SAN FERNANDO RD Secondary Modified 3

56'

B 12' 12'

Barranca - Pasadena

Ave 26 - Ave 19

P B P

P

P

Darwin - Main

8' 19 l Modified

P P

Mozart - Darwin 56' 12'

Ave 26 - Ave 19

60'

8'

EXISTING 12'

SAN FERNANDO RD 8' Secondary Hwy

P

8'

56'

Barranca - Pasadena

n - Mozart

8'

40'

8'

DRAFT 12'

Street Standards A-04

17

Spring - Main 16'

28'

7.5'

16'

50'

60'

P

North - South Streets (Looking North)

10'

EXISTINGCardinal - Bolero

P

SOTELLO Collector 16'

na

28'

P

P

Naud - Main 10'

16'

28' 16' PROPOSED60'

16'

60'

P 40'

37'

28'

16'

Naud - Main

10'

60' 6.5'

16'

P

48'-50' Roundout - Main

rdinal

P

Spring - Naud

LLEWELLYN Local Modified 37' 4.5'-6.5'

P

6.5'

28'

16'

50' MESNAGERS Local Modified

16'

60'

Spring - Naud

P

P

ified

WILHARDT RIVER 38' 11' 11' Collector Local Modified 60'

WILHARDT Local Modified

dalena

Spring - Naud Huron - Figueroa

Spring - Naud

P

7.5' 28'

P 7.5'

16'

35'

11' 7.5'

50'

60'

Naud - Main

- Cardinal

50'

11'

50'

Naud - Main

ROUNDOUT Local Modified

7.5'

16'

35' Spring - Main 7.5' 50'

11'

28'

16'

28'

11'

50'

P

Bolero

16'

60'

P SOTELLO Local Modified

16'

60'

Main

28'

11'

P

60'

YN ified '-6.5'

11'

P

28'

28'

P 28'

Spring - Naud

P

18

A-04 Street Standards 16'

28' 60'

16'

28' 50'

SOTELLO Local Modified

16'

Spring - Naud

6.5'

11'

P

60' 16'

35' Spring - Main 7.5'

DRAFT

1

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

East West Streets 1 - Exisitng

East West Streets 1 - Proposed

ALBION STREET Local

AVE. 33 ALBION STREET Local Modified

BARRANCA AVE. 33 Local Modified

Main - Ave. 16

Pasadena - Humboldt Main - Ave. 16

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Pasadena - Hum

P 8.5'

40'

8.5'

8'

57'

Ave. 16 - Ave. 17

34' 12.5' 50'

P 8' 32'

60' 12' 60'

12.5'

57'

Humboldt - Artesian Ave. 16 - Ave. 17

40'

8.5'

8'

57'

Ave. 17 - Ave. 18

34' 12.5' 50'

P 8' 32'

40'

8'

57'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

8.5'

40'

34' 10.5' 50'

57'

40' 57'

32.5' 13' 42.5'

10.5'

57'

34'

P 24'

10.5'

8.5'

10.5'

8'

Spring- Aurora

5'

57'

34' 50'

10.5'

BOLEROBAKER STREETSTREE Local Modified Bloom - Leroy Spring- Aurora

30'

5'35' 50'

9'

35'

DRAFT

P 8'

P 36'

50'

Pasadena - Arte

24'

50' Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

P BAKER STREET

10' 24'

Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 AVE. 34 Local Modified

57'

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

8.5'

8' 36'

P Pasadena - Artesian 36' 10.5' 8'

60'

P

AVE. 34 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

8.5'

10' 32'

Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 Artesian - Lacy

Artesian - Lacy Ave. 17 - Ave. 18

8.5'

40' 12' 60'

10'

12.5'

57'

P 8.5'

60'

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 2 Humboldt - Arte

P 8.5'

32'

Street Standards A-04

19

6' 20'

35'

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

ALHAMBRA

ALHAMBRA

North South Street Section 1 Proposed

ion 1 Existing

ANN STREET ARTESIAN STREET Local Modified

AVE. 17 ARTESIAN STREET Local Modified

AVE. 18 AVE. 17 Local Modified

Spring - Weyse Ave. 34 - Ave. 33

Ave. 34 - Ave. 33 Albion - Mozart

Albion - Mozart Barranca - Pasadena

P 5'

P

50' 16'

28' 5'

60'

60'

16'

Weyse - Naud Ave. 33 - Humboldt

10'

P

40' 10'

40' 10'

60'

60'

Ave. 33 - Humboldt Mozart - Darwin

P 28'

35'

60'

Naud - Main ARTESIAN PL STREET Local P Artesian - Ave. 26 28' 16'

16'

10'

6'40'

42' 10'

60'

60'

24' 10' 40'

16'

5.5'

32'

60'

12'

16'

10'

10'

59'

P

10' 40'

40' 10'

60'

60'

Albion - Mozart

10'

40' 60'

Baker - Spring

28'

60'

14'

AURORA STREET Local Modified

15.5'

40' 10' 60'

Darwin - Main Spring/Broadway - Albion

P 45' 6.5' 7' A-04 Street Standards 59'

10' 40'

P

60'

Main - Magdalena

28'

P

Artesian - Ave. 26 22' 5.5' P 33' 14'

20

8' 40' 60'

Mozart - Darwin Pasadena - Spring/Broadwa

Darwin - Main ARTESIAN PL STREET Local Modified

60'

Baker - Spring

10'

B P

35' 16'

P AURORA STREET 16'

10'

15.5'

DRAFT

10'

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

sitng

PROPOSED

East West Streets 1 - Proposed AVE. 33 ALBION STREET Local Local Modified

BARRANCA AVE. 33 Local Modified

BROADWAY BARRANCA Local Modified

Pasadena - Humboldt Main - Ave. 16

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Pasadena - Humboldt

Cottage Home - Bishops Ave. 18 - Ave. 1

P 8'

34' 12.5' 50'

P 8' 32'

60' 12' 60'

12.5'

57'

Humboldt - Artesian Ave. 16 - Ave. 17

34' 12.5' 50'

8' 32'

12.5'

P 8' 36'

Bishops - Savoy San Fernando R

P

Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 Artesian - Lacy

Savoy - Solano Ave. 23 - Ave. 2

10' 32'

32.5' 13' 42.5'

10.5'

16'

P 24'

10.5'

4'

16'

10'

50'

34'

68' 22.5'

80'42.5'

Solano - Casanova Ave. 25 - Ave. 2

P 4'

10'

68'22.5' 80'-84’ 42.5'

8'

50'

10.5'

4'

P 8'

P

57'

13'

Pasadena - Artesian

24'

8'

36'

10' 24'

Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 AVE. 34 Local Modified

50' Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

Spring- Aurora

80' 60'

60'

57'

P BAKER STREET Local 10.5'

68' 34'

68' 28' 80' 60'

57'

P Pasadena - Artesian 36' 10.5' 34'

13'

P

AVE. 34 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Local

8'

4'

60'

40' 12' 60'

10'

57'

34' 10.5' 50'

16'

P

Artesian - Lacy Ave. 17 - Ave. 18

8'

32'

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21 Humboldt - Artesian

P 8'

P

Casanova - Park Row Dri

BOLEROBAKER STREETSTREET Local Modified

4'

Bloom - Leroy Spring- Aurora

BOLERO STRE 68' Local Modified 80' Bloom - Leroy

P Park Row Drive - Pasade 5'

30' 35'

9'

5'35' 50'

6' 20'

35'

10'

28'

16' 5'-9’

56'

60'

66'-74’

DRAFT

21 Street Standards A-04 Pasadena - Ave. 18

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

s 1 - Proposed BARRANCA AVE. 33 Local Local Modified

BROADWAY BARRANCA Local Modified

BROADWAY BROADWAY Secondary Mod

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Pasadena - Humboldt

Cottage Home - Bishops Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Cottage Home -

P 60' 12' 60'

12.5'

P 32'

16'

4'

13'

60'

12'40' 60'

13'8'

Bishops - Savoy San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21

P 10'

68' 34'

B 12.5'

80' 60'

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21 Humboldt - Artesian

12.5'

B

12'-18' 75' 100'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Bishops - Savoy

P 10' 32'

16'

4'

16'

60'

Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 Artesian - Lacy

6

B

68' 28' 80' 60'

16'8'

Savoy - Solano Ave. 23 - Ave. 25

15'

12'-18' 70' 100'

6

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Savoy - Solano

P

B 32.5' 13' 42.5'

10.5'

10' 24'

13'

24'

10.5'

34'

4'

68'22.5' 80'-84’ 42.5'

8'-12’ 10'

5.5'

4'

Bloom - Leroy Spring- Aurora

BOLERO STREET 68' Local Modified 80'

5' 35' 50'

6' 20'

8'

Bloom - Leroy

35'

10'

28'

16' 5'-9’

56'

60'

66'-74’

22

A-04 Street Standards

Pasadena - Ave. 18

6

B

6

65'

5.5'

76' Casanova - Par Bloom - Leroy 12'-18' 5.5'

B

6

65'

5.5'

76' Park Row Drive

P Park Row Drive - Pasadena 9'

12'-18' 70' 100'

Elmyra - Bloom 12'-18'

Casanova - Park Row Drive

BOLEROBAKER STREET STREET Local Local Modified

10.5'

10'

15'

CARDINAL STREET Solano - Casan

8'

50'

P

10'8'

P

P 8'

68'22.5' 80'42.5'

Solano - Casanova Ave. 25 - Ave. 26

Pasadena - Artesian

24'

10'

50'

Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 AVE. 34 Local Modified

P

4'

16' 5'-9’

B 5'-9'

6

DRAFT BROADWAY/B

Secondary Mo

Pasadena - Ave

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

boldt

PROPOSED

BROADWAY BARRANCA Major Hwy Class II Local Modified

BROADWAY BROADWAY Secondary Modified 2

DARWIN BROADWAY Major Hwy Clas

Cottage Home - Bishops Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Cottage Home - Bishops

Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave.18 - Ave.19

P 16'

4'

13'

B

68' 34'

B 8' 13'

12.5'

80' 60'

1an

Bishops - Savoy San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21

12'-18' 75' 100'

4'

16'

64' - 70'12.5' 90'

8' 16'

Savoy - Solano Ave. 23 - Ave. 25

15'

12'-18' 70' 100'

4'

10'

68'22.5' 80'42.5'

64' - 70'15'

8' 10'

90'

10'

68'22.5' 80'-84’ 42.5'

8'-12’ 10'

Elmyra - Bloom 12'-18' 5.5'

8'

28'

5'-9’

56'

60'

66'-74’

DRAFT Pasadena - Ave. 18

55.5' 15' 75.5'

10'

90'

B

Elmyra - Bloom

8'

P

5.5'

B

65'

76'

Bloom - Leroy

8'

P

5.5'

20'

76' Park Row Drive - Pasadena

16' 5'-9’

B 5'-9'

5'-9'

66' - 74' BROADWAY/BRIDGE Street Standards A-04 Secondary Modified 2 Pasadena - Ave. 18

36' 76'

B 56'

36'

20'

B 64' - 70'

12'-18'

10'

CARDINAL STR Local Modified

B 64' - 70'

65'

Bloom - Leroy

5.5'

P Park Row Drive - Pasadena 16'

8'

90'

Bloom - Leroy

10'

64' - 70'15'

76' Casanova - Park Row Drive

Casanova - Park Row Drive

4'

P

B

90'

8'

BOLERO STREET 68' Local Modified 80'

12'-18' 70' 100'

10'

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21

CARDINAL STREET Solano - Casanova

P 4'

15'

55.5' 15' 75.5'

10'

8'

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Savoy - Solano

Solano - Casanova Ave. 25 - Ave. 26

ian

P

B

B 13'

10'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20

B

68' 28' 80' 60'

55.5' 12.5' 75.5'

10'

8'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Bishops - Savoy

P 16'

P

B

23

80'-84’ 42.5'

8'

90'

East - West Streets (Looking West) Casanova - Park Row Drive

5.5'

B Bloom - Leroy 64' - 70' 12'-18' BROADWAY/BRIDGE Secondary Modified 90' 2

8'

Bloom - Leroy

5.5'

28'

16' 5'-9’

56'

65'

60'

76'

B

Bloom - Leroy

8'

P

5.5'

16'

B

5'-9’

36'

20'

76'

B 56'

5'-9'

66'-74’

36'

20'

76' Park Row Drive - Pasadena

P Park Row Drive - Pasadena 10'

5.5'

76' Casanova - Park Row Drive PROPOSED

EXISTING

BOLERO STREET 68' 4' Local Modified BROADWAY/BRIDGE Major Hwy Class 80' II

65'

P

5'-9'

66' - 74' BROADWAY/BRIDGE Secondary Modified 2

Pasadena - Ave. 18

Pasadena - Ave. 18 12'

56'

12'

P

80'

P 56'

12'

12'

80'

BROADWAY BROADWAY Major Hwy Class II Modified 2 Secondary

DARWINBROADWAY FIGUEROA Major Hwy Class II Modified

Cottage Home - Bishops Ave.18 - Ave.19

B

B 13'8'

12.5'

12'-18' 75'

64' - 70' 12.5'

100'

P 8'

15'

12'-18' 70' 100'

64' - 70' 15'

12'-18' 70' 100'

8'

8'-12’ 10'

75.5'

104'

10'

64' - 70' 15'

10' 70'

75.5'

100'

90'

A-04 Street Standards B Elmyra - Bloom 64' - 70' 12'-18'

10'

55.5' 15' 75.5'

B 8'

Ave.19 - Ave.20

12.5' 15'

65'-74' 19.75' 90'-100'

Elmyra - Bloom

12.5 36'

75.5'

Ave.20 - Ave.21

P

P 12.5' 15'

100'

CARDINAL STREET Local Modified

75.5'

P

Ave.26 - Ave.28

10' 70'

36' 13'

82'

P

P 8'

56'19.75'

Ave.22 - Ave.26

55.5' 15'

B

P 12.5' 13'

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21

CARDINAL STREET Solano - Casanova

24

10' 75'

P

90'

B 15'

55.5' 12.5'

B

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Savoy - Solano

10'8'

P

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20

B 16'8'

10'

90'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Bishops - Savoy

- Ave. 21

Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave. 20 into (San Fernando Rd) - Av

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.17 - Ave.19

B

DARWIN Local Modified

65'-74' 19.75' 90'-100'

12.5 36'

75.5'

Ave.28 - River

DRAFT 12.5'

65'-74' 90'-100'

12.5

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Savoy - Solano

B

15' 12'-18' 70' EXISTING 100'

64' - 70' 15'

8'

90' 5.5'

65'

P

5.5'

ve

T

Bloom - Leroy 12'-18'

8'

B

P

90' 5.5'

65'

5.5'

na

16'

B

5'-9’

B

- 70' 12.5' 12'

8'

10'

0'

P

P Pasadena - Ave. 18

P

55.5' P 12.5' 75.5' 12'

13' P 12.5'

10' 75'

104' 56'

DARWIN Local Modified 3

P 56'19.75'

FIGUEROA HUMBOLDT Secondary Modified 3

10'

0'

55.5' 15' 75.5'

P B 19.75'

75.5'

100'

P

B

- 70' 15'

8'

10'

0'

a

DRAFT

B 8'

55.5' 15' 75.5'

65'-74' 19.75' 90'-100'

Ave.26 - Ave.28

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21

100'

CARDINAL STREET Local Modified Elmyra - Bloom

12.5' 36'

50'

100'

65'-74' 19.75' 90'-100'

12.5' 36'

75.5'

65'-74' 90'-100'

50' 15'

19.75'

100'

FIGUEROA 45' 5' Secondary Modified 1 50' Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 P B B 15' 40'

12.5'

B 70'

Ave. 21 - Ave. 23

P

Ave.28 - River

12.5'

19.75'

75.5'

P 12.5' 15'

8' 70'

45' P B 5'

P

Ave.20 - Ave.21

P 10' 70'

35' 15'

Ave.22 - Ave.26

Ave.19 - Ave.20

P 12.5' 15'

8'

B

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21

P 10' 70'

Ave.19 - San Fernando Rd San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22

P 13' 36'

82'

12' Ave.22 - Ave.26

P 8'

12.5'

20'

Ave. 20 into (San Fernando Rd) - Ave. 22 Ave.17 - Ave.19

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20

B

65'-74' 90'-100'

80'

- 70' 15'

- 70'

12.5'

B

BROADWAY/BRIDGE Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave.18 - Ave.19 Secondary Modified 2

ishops

12.5'

76'

56' 5'-9' 5'-9' DARWINBROADWAY 66' - 74' FIGUEROA Local Major Hwy Class II Modified

ied 2

65'-74'

River - Cypress

36'

20'

76' Park Row Drive - Pasadena

75.5'

20'

Bloom - Leroy

8'

12.5' 36'

90'-100'

P

76'

B 64' - 70'

12.5'

36'

20'

76' Casanova - Park Row Drive

65'-74' 19.75' 90'-100'

Ave.28 - River

Elmyra - Bloom

8'

P 12.5' 15'

CARDINAL STREET Local Modified

B

Ave.20 - Ave.21

P

55.5' 10' 70' 15' PROPOSED 75.5' 100'

10'

90'

CARDINAL STREET Solano - Casanova Local B Elmyra - Bloom 64' - 70' 12'-18'

8'-12’ 10'

P

B

East - West Streets (Looking West)

10'8'

Ave.26 - Ave.28

Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21

70' 10' 100'

50' 25 Street Standards A-04 Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave.28 - River

15'

19.75'

15'

70'

19.75'

36'

East - West Streets (Looking West)

P

P

P

P EXISTING

DWAY DARWIN FIGUEROA Major Hwy Class II Local Modified 3 Hwy Class II Modified 100'

75.5'

P

P

P

Ave.19 - Ave.20 10' 75'

P P

P 56'19.75'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 36' 13' 19.75'

P

Ave

Ave.26 - Ave.28

FIGUEROA HUMBOLDT Secondary Modified 3

19.75' 36' 15' 70' Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave. 20 into (San Fernando Rd) - Ave. 22

15' - Ave.19

B

PROPOSEDSecondary Modified 1 FIGUEROA

Ave.20 - Ave.21

Ave.20 - Ave.21

P

P B

75.5'

100'

6'

HUMBOLDT Ave Local Modified

100'

19.75' 15' 70' San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 Ave.19 - San Fernando Rd

P

P B 15'35'

P B

B

15'

B

P

Ave.22 - Ave.26 8' 70'

P

Ave.19 - Ave. 20 6' B B

42' Ave 82' 50' 104' 75.5' 100' 60' BROADWAY FIGUEROA AY BROADWAY DARWIN DARWIN DARWIN FIGUEROA FIGUEROA HUMBOLDT WAY AY DARWIN DARWIN FIGUEROA FIGUEROA HUMBOLDT HUMBOLDT Major Hwy Class IILocal Modified Local Modified 3 Secondary 3 Local Local Modified Local Modified Modified Class IIIIModified Major Hwy Class II Modified Modified 33 3Local75.5' Modified 3 Secondary Modified Secondary 33 3 Modified Modified 3 ywy Class Class Modified II Modified Local Local Modified Modified Secondary Secondary Modified Modified 104' 100' San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21 Ave. 20 - Ave. 2 12.5' 19.75' 15' 6' 12.5' 19.75' 15' 75' 36' 70' Ave.22 - Ave.26Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave.22 - Ave.26 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 - Ave.20 Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave.17 - Ave.19 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.19 - Ave. 20 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 ve.19 Ave.19 - Ave. 20 Ave.19 - Ave. 20 Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave.17 - Ave.19 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 Ave.19 - Ave.19 B B B P P P P P P B P P P P P P PP P B B P B 5' BPPBP B BBPB PPP P P PPPP PP P P PPPP P BB B BB P BB P B BP 45' 42' 6' Ave.18 - Ave.19 San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 Ave.17 - Ave.19 Ave 60' 12.5'19.75' 12.5' 70' 70'15' 15' 15' 75'65'-74' 36' 70' 6' 8' 10' 12.5' 15' 15'50' 19.75'70' 12.5' 15' 75' 75' 36' 70' 42' 12.5' 12.5' 19.75' 15' 15' 75'75' 36'36' 70'70' 42'42' 12.5' 19.75' 19.75' 15' 12.5' 12.5' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 15'15' 19.75' 19.75' 36' 15'15' 6' 6' 90'-100' 100' 100' 75.5' 104' 75.5' 100' 104' 104' 75.5' 100' 60' 104' 104' 75.5' 75.5' 100' 100' 60'60' Major Hwy Class II Modified Local Modified 75.5' 3 Ave. 21 - Ave. 23 Secondary Modified 100' 3 Loc Ave. 21 - Ave. 2 BROADWAY DARWIN FIGUEROA HUM Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 20 - Ave. 2 B B Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave.22 - Ave.26 - Ave.21 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.22 - Ave.26 Ave.22 - Ave.26 ve.20 Ave.22 - Ave.26 Ave.22 - Ave.26 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.20 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.19 - Ave.20 FIGUEROA B BB P BP 45' 5' 42' 6' B B Secondary Modified 1 P P P P P B B P PP B P PPP P P PPPPBB B PPPP P P PP P BB P BPPBP 50' 60' 42' 42'42' 6'6' 6' Ave.26 - Ave.28 12.5'19.75' 12.5' 60' 70'15' 60'60' 15' 70'65'-74' 70' 15' 15' 15' 36' 8' 10' 15' 15' 70' 70' 15' 15' 15' 70'70' 36' 36'Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 70'70'15' 15' 15' 15' 19.75' 15'15'70' 36' 36' 19.75' 19.75' 15'15' 19.75'70' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' Ave. 23 - Ave. 2 90'-100' 100' 75.5' 100' 100' 75.5' 100' 100' 100' 75.5' 75.5' 100' 100' P B 100' 100' 100' 75.5' 75.5' B P Ave. 21 - Ave. 23 Ave. 21 - Ave. 23 Ave. 21 - Ave. 2 B B 70' 15' 15' BB P BP 40' 10'100' 42' 6'BB B Ave.28 - River Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 NAL STREET ve.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.21 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 Ave.20 - Ave.21 FIGUEROA FIGUEROA FIGUEROA FIGUEROA FIGUEROA 50' 60' Modified 42' 42'42' 6'6' 6' Secondary 1 Secondary Modified Secondary 11 1 Modified Modified 1 Secondary Secondary Modified Modified P PP P PPP P P PPPP P P PP P 60' 60'60' Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave. 25 - Ave. 2 - Bloom Ave.28 - River Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave.26 - Ave.28 12.5'19.75' 12.5' 8' 70' 70'65'-74' 15' 15' 36' 19.75' 15' 15' 70'70'15' 15' 15'70' 36' 36' 19.75' 36' 36' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' 19.75' Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 Ave. 23 - Ave. 2 90'-100' B P P 100' 75.5' 100' 100' P P 75.5' 75.5' 100' 100' 75.5' 75.5' B BPPBP P B B P B PB PP P BB B BB P B BB B BB P BP 40' 10' 36' 20' 70'15' 15' 15' 70' 15'6' 15'42' 15' 70' 70' 15' 70'70' 15' 15'15' 15'15' 50' 60' 76' River - Cypress 100' 42' 100' 6'6' 6' 42'42' 100' 100' 100' 100' CARDINAL L STREET CARDINAL STREET STREET AL NAL STREET STREET 12.5' 13'

Local Modified ified Local Modified Modified dified

Leroy Elmyra - Bloom oom Elmyra - Bloom Bloom - Bloom 12.5' 8'

P P

P PP P 36' 36'36' 36' 76' 76' 76'76'

20' 20' 20' 20'20'

65'-74'

P90'-100'

36' 20' 76'

20' 36' 76'

PP P 36' 36'36' 76' 76'76'

PP

P

20' 20' 20'20'

20'

6'

60' 60'60' Ave. 26 - Artesia

12.5'

Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave. 25 - Ave. 2 B B

River - Cypress Ave.28 - River Ave.28 - River Ave.28 - River Ave.28 - River Ave.28 - River

P P B BPPBP 60' P B PP P BB B BB P B 60' 70'15' 15' 15' 15' 70' 70' 15' 70'70' 15' 15'15' 15'15' 100' 100' 100' Ave. 30 - Ave. 31 100' 100'

B

P

60' PP PBB B Ave. 31 - Ave. 33 15' 15'15'

BB P BPPBP 70' 70'70'15' 100' 100' 100'

P B

15' 15' 15'15'70' 100'

P

B6'BBPB

BB P BP 42'

60' 42' 42'42' 6' 6' 70' 6' 15' 15' 60' 60'60' 100' Ave. 30 - Ave. 3

Ave. 26 - Artesian Ave. 26 - Artesian Ave. 26 - Artesia B B

River - Cypress River - Cypress River - Cypress River - Cypress River - Cypress 60'

36' 20' 20' A-04 Street Standards 76' 76'

20' 36'

26

15'

Ave. 26 - Ave. 30

Bloom - Leroy Bloom - Leroy

roy eroy Leroy 8'

P

PP

P

8'

B

BB P BP 42' 6'BB B P 6'6'B6' P 42' 60' 42'42' 60' 60'60'

70' 15' 15' DRAFT Ave. 31 - Ave. 3 100'

Ave. 30 - Ave. 31 Ave. 30 - Ave. 31 Ave. 30 - Ave. 3 B B

East - West Streets (Looking West)

N odified 3

Ave.19 Rd) - Ave. 22

EXISTING

PROPOSED

FIGUEROA HUMBOLDT Local Secondary Modified 3

HUMBOLDT Local Modified

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 22 Ave.19 - San Fernando Rd

Ave.19 - Ave. 20

P 36' 13'

P B 19.75'

8'

75.5'

B

35' 15'

8' 70'

50'

100'

P 15'

12.5' 36'

75.5'

42'

6'

100'

19.75'

Ave. 21 - Ave. 23

B P

Ave. 23 - Ave. 25

P

B P

B

15'

10' 100'

42'

6'

12'

60' Ave. 25 - Ave. 26

P B 40' 15' 50'

B 10'

70'

15'

Ave. 26 - Artesian

B P

B B 70' 100'

P

42'

6'

60' Ave. 31 - Ave. 33

12'

60'

15'

Ave. 30 - Ave. 31

B P

B 60'

12'

60'

100'

60' P B

Ave. 30 - Ave. 31

42'

6'

River - Cypress

60' 15'

B P

B

P

Ave. 26 - Ave. 30

DRAFT

12'

60'

Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave.28 - River

12.5'

42'

6'

70'

50'

12'

60'

15'

FIGUEROA 45' 5' Secondary Modified 1 50' Ave.26 - Ave.28 Ave. 23 - Ave. 25 P B B 15' 40'

12.5'

P

B P

75.5'

B 70'

Ave. 21 - Ave. 23

Ave.21

12.5' 36'

50' 15'

19.75'

B P

B

45' P B 5'

12'

Ave. 20 - Ave. 21

Ave.22 - Ave.26

P

42'

6'

60'

San Fernando Rd - Ave. 21

Ave.20

B P

B

42'

6'

12'

60' Ave. 31 - Ave. 33 Street Standards A-04

B

B P

27

15' 15'40' 40' 50' 50'

70' 10' 70' 10'100' 100'

15' 15'

East - West Streets (Looking West)

Ave. 26 - Ave. 30 Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 Ave.28 - River EXISTING River - Cypress

12.5' 12.5'

P B P B 60' HUMBOLDT 40' 10' 70' 15' Local 60' 70' 15'50' 100' 100' Artesian - Ave. 30 Ave. 30 - Ave. 31 Ave. 26 - Ave. 30

B B

60' P B 60' 60' 60' 15' Ave. 31 - Ave. 33 Ave. 30 - Ave. 31

B P B P

B B

P P

42' 6' HUMBOLDT 42' 6' Local Industrial 60' 60' Artesian - Ave. 30 Ave. 30 - Ave. 31 Ave. 26 - Artesian

15' 15'

70'

42' 42' 60' 60'

6' 6'

P 15'

40' 60' 60' 60'

10'

B P B P 42' 42' 60' 60'

6' 6'

Ave. 31 - Ave. 33

40'

12' 12'

Ave. 31 - Ave. 33

B P

B 10'

12' 12'

Ave. 31 - Ave. 33 Ave. 30 - Ave. 31

100'

B B 10'

12' 12'

B P B P

B B B

12' 12'

Ave. 26 - Artesian Ave. 25 - Ave. 26 PROPOSED

River - Cypress

12.5'

42' 42' 60' 60'

6' 6'

10'

42'

6'

60'

12'

60' East West Street Sections 2 - Proposed

East West Street Sections 2 - Existing

LACY STREET Local Modified

LACY STREET Local

MAIN

Ave. 26 - Ave. 23 33

Ave. 26 - Ave. 33 Vignes - College

MAIN Secondary Modif Vignes - College Bloom - 150' east of Bloom

P 10'

40'

10'

12'

50'

Elmyra - Ann

55'

12'

Ann - Bloom

55' 5.5' 5.5' A-04 Street Standards 66'

Elmyra - Ann 56' P 80' 28'

14'

5.5'

66'

28

11'-16'56' 28' 11'-16' 12' 50' 60' 80'

Roundout - Llewellyn

12'

80'

12'

12'

14' Llewellyn - Elmyra

12' 56' 80'

8

B 12'

12' 56' 80'

60'

5

Roundout - Llewel 400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt

12' 28'

8

18'

60'

56' P 80'

5

B

Ann - Bloom 12'

12' 56'

College - Roundou 150' east of Bloom - 400' eas

MAGDALENA College - Roundout Local Modified

MAGDALENA

5.5'

B

18'

DRAFT

5

8

Llewellyn - Elmyra Wilhardt - Albion

B

Vignes - College Ave. 26 - Ave. 33

Ave. 26 - Ave. 23

Bloom - 150' east of Bloom Vignes - College

P

B

East (Looking West)12' 40' Streets 10' 10' - West

11'-16'56'

EXISTING 50'

80'50' - 60' PROPOSED

28'

12' 11'-16'

College - Roundout MAGDALENA Local Modified

MAGDALENA Local Elmyra - Ann

12'

Elmyra - Ann 56'

12'

55'

5.5'

66'

Roundout - Llewellyn

Ann - Bloom

5.5'

55'

12'

Llewellyn - Elmyra

Bloom - Leroy

55' 66'

28'

14'

12'

12' 5.5'

28'

14'

12'

12' 56'

5

80'

8

400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt Roundout - Llewe

B 12'

12'

12' 56'

5

80'

8

18'

Wilhardt - Albion Llewellyn - Elmyra

B 56'-61' 12'

12'

80'-83'

51

8

18'

60'

Elmyra- Ann

8

18'

60'

Bloom - Leroy 56' P 80'

80'

B

60'

Ann - Bloom 56' P 80'

5.5'

66'

5.5'

28'

14'

5

150' east of Bloom - 400' eas College - Roundou

P 80' 5.5'

12' 56'

Albion - Gibbons Elmyra- Ann

B 12'

56'

12'

12'

80'

Ann- Bloom

12' 56'

5

80'

8

Gibbons- Lamar Ann- Bloom

B 12'

56'

12'

12'

80'

DRAFT

Street Standards A-04

29

12' 56'

5

80'

8

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

East West Street Sections 2 - Proposed

s 2 - Existing

LACY STREET MAIN SecondaryLocal Hwy Modified

MAIN Secondary Modified 3 Vignes - College Bloom - 150' east of Bloom

Ave. 26 - Ave. 33 Vignes - College

P 12'

11'-16'56'

B 28'

12' 11'-16'

12'

80'50' - 60'

Elmyra - Ann 56' P 80' 28'

14' Roundout - Llewellyn

12'

28'

14' Llewellyn - Elmyra

12'

28'

14'

12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

56'

56' 12'

12'

A-04 Street Standards

12'

80'

12' 56' 80'

8

56

8

400' east of Leroy Clover - Ave 19

12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

80'

12' 56' 80'

56

8

18' Ave 19 - Moulton Wilhardt - Albion

Wilhardt - Albion Llewellyn - Elmyra

B 56'-61' 12'

12'

80'-83'

B 56' 10'-12'

B 12'

12'

80'

12' 56' 80'

56

8

18' Moulton - Ave 20 Albion - Gibbons

Elmyra- Ann Albion - Gibbons

12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

12'

80'

12' 56' 80'

56

8

Ave 20 - Ave 21 Gibbons- Lamar

B

30

56

B

Ann- Bloom Gibbons- Lamar

80'

12' 56'

150' east of Bloom Ave 17 - Clover

B

B

Ann- Bloom

56'

12'

80'

400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt Roundout - Llewellyn

80'

12'

12'

80'

B 12'

B

18'

60'

Elmyra- Ann

56' 12'

B

60'

Bloom - Leroy 56' P 80'

B

College - Roundout 150' east of Bloom - 400' east of Leroy

60'

Ann - Bloom 56' P 80'

12' 56' 80'

College - Roundout MAGDALENA Local Modified 12'

Bloom - 150' east Lamar - Ave 17

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

80'

12' 56' 80'

DRAFT

56

8

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

eet Sections 2 - Proposed MAIN MAIN SecondarySecondary Hwy Modified 3

T d

Bloom - 150' east of Bloom Vignes - College

33

'

12' 11'-16'

12'

80'

56' 12'

B 12'

12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

B

B 56' 12'

B 12'

7'

25'

5' 12'

5

32'

80'

8

Ave 17 - Clover 150' east of Bloom - 400' east of Leroy Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave 17 - Clover

B 56' 12'

Ave.16 - Ave.17 Lamar - Ave 17

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

B 56' 12'

B 12'

7'

80'

25'

5

5' 12'

8

32'

18'

0'

400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt Roundout - Llewellyn

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

Clover - Ave 19 400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Clover - Ave 19

B 56' 12'

B 12'

7'

80'

25'

5

5' 12'

8

32'

18'

0'

'

B

150' east of Bloom - 400' east of Leroy College - Roundout

d

'

12' 56'

MOZART

Lamar - Ave 17 Bloom - 150' east of Bloom

B

60'

'

MAIN Secondary Modified 3

Ave 19 - Moulton Wilhardt - Albion

Wilhardt - Albion Llewellyn - Elmyra

B 56'-61' 12'

12'

80'-83'

B 10'-12' 56'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave 19 - Moulton

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

B 56' 12'

B 12'

7'

25'

5' 12'

5

32'

80'

8

18'

0'

Moulton - Ave 20 Albion - Gibbons

Albion - Gibbons Elmyra- Ann

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

B 56' 12'

Moulton - Ave 20 WEYSE STREET

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

B 56' 12'

12'

B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 5 12'

80'

8 7'

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

DRAFT

B 56' 12' 80'

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

7'

47' Ave 20 - Ave 21

Ave 20 - Ave 21 Gibbons- Lamar

Gibbons- Lamar Ann- Bloom

33'

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

80'

Street Standards A-04

5

8

31

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

PROPOSED

dified 3

MAIN Secondary Hwy

MOZART MAIN Secondary Modified 3

NAUD

m e

Lamar - Ave 17 Bloom - 150' east of Bloom

Ave.16 - Ave.17 Lamar - Ave 17

Ann - Sotello Ave.16 - Ave.17

B 56' 12'

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

east of Leroy dout

56' 12'

B 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

rdt wellyn

B

56' 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

12'

12'

B 12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

56' 12'

12'

12' 56' 80'

80'

7'

80'

56' 12'

B 12'

7'

12' 56' 80'

80'

32

A-04 Street Standards

5' 12'

12'

56' 12'

12'

56'

32'

50' 7' 50'

14'

12'

25' 32'

B 12'

Ann - (ends before

P

80' 7'

B

9.5'

12'

28' 47'

B 12'

32'

WEYSE STREET Local Modified

B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 56' 12' 33'

18' 25'

7'

47' Ave 20 - Ave 21

80'

50'

80'

80'

56' 12'

18' 25'

Ave.19 - Ave.20

Moulton - Ave 20 WEYSE STREET

B

50' 7'

B

32'

80'

B 12'

25'

14'

80'

B

Ave 20 - Ave 21 Gibbons- Lamar

12'

56'

5' 12'

32'

B

32'

7'

B

25'

60'

Wilhardt - (LA River) Ave.18 - Ave.19

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave 19 - Moulton

B 12'

12'

80'

B 12'

9' 25'

B 56'

5' 12'

42' 7'

Mesnagers - Wilhardt Ave.17 - Ave.18

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Clover - Ave 19

Moulton - Ave 20 Albion - Gibbons

B

25'

B

B 12'

7'

9'

80'

32'

Ave 19 - Moulton Wilhardt - Albion

yra

56' 12'

56'

B

80'

B 12'

56' 12'

5' 12'

B

Clover - Ave 19 400' east of Leroy - Wilhardt

10'-12' 56'

25' 32'

80'

B 12'

56' 12'

7'

B

Ave 17 - Clover 150' east of Bloom - 400' east of Leroy Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave 17 - Clover

B 56' 12'

B

MOZART Local Modified

B 56'

12'

80'

DRAFT

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

st of Bloom

PROPOSED

MOZART Local

NAUD

Ave.16 - Ave.17 Lamar - Ave 17

Ann - Sotello Ave.16 - Ave.17

B 56' 12'

B 12'

7'

25'

5' 12'

56'12' 56'

56'

12'

7'

80' 80'

25' 32'

7r oy - Wilhardt

56'12' 56' 80' 80'

25'

12'

32'

12'

7'

25'

on 9 r s

12'

56'12' 56'

12' 12'

B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 25' 56' 5' 7' 12'

80' 80'

B 12'

33'

BB 56'12' 56' 80' 80'

12' 12'

P 9.5'

1 20 on

DRAFT B 12'

32' 80' 28'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Broadway - Ave. 18 Wilhardt - (LA Rive

5'16'

12'

17.5'56'

P

B

P

16' 50' 12' 28' 85' 60'

80' PASADENA Collector Modified

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Broadway - Ave. 18

P B

Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Wilhardt - (LA River) Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Mesnagers - Wilhardt WEYSE STREET Local Modified P P B B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 28' 50' 12' 16' 15' 52' 16' 17.5' 12'

P

5'16'

12'

16'

15' 56' 17.5' 80'

60'

76'

28'

50' 12' 80' 85'

80' 85'

9.5' Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

P B

P 12'

P

16' 50' 10' 28' 85' 60'

P B

47' Wilhardt - (LA River)

B B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 25' 56' 5' 7' 12'

B

85' PASADENA Collector Modified

28' 25'

7'16'

9.5'

47' Ave 20 - Ave 21 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave.18 - Ave.19 WEYSE STREET Local Modified

20 on 9 r

17.5'63'

P

P

P

7'

60'

B

32' 80' 7'

10'

60' 32'

Ave.19 - Ave.20 Moulton - Ave 20 Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.17 - Ave.18 WEYSE STREET

BB

5'16'

P

32' 80'

32'

P B

50' 28' 18' 25' 7'16' 50' 60' 32' NAUD Local Modified

B 25' 56' 5'

7'5' 12'

14'

10' 28'

16'

Broadway - Ave. 18 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Mesnagers - Wilha

28' 18' 25'

50' 7'16'

63'

85' PASADENA Collector Modified

Wilhardt - (LA River) Mesnagers - Wilhardt Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ann - Sotello

B 12' 12'

10'

P

32' 80' MOZART Local Modified

BB 56'12' 56' 80' 80'

14'

B

Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.19 - Ave.20 Ave 19 - Moulton Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave.16 - Ave.17

9 7nr

5'

Mesnagers - Wilhardt Wilhardt - (LA River) Ann - Sotello Ave.18 - Ave.19

25' 56' 5'

7'5' 12'

9' 25'

60' 50' 32' NAUD Local Modified

B 7'

Ann - Sotello

P

Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave.18 - Ave.19 Ave.16 - Ave.17 Clover - Ave 19

12' 12'

42' 7'

B

32' 80' MOZART Local Modified

BB

56'

9'

Ann - Sotello Mesnagers - Wilhardt Ave.17 - Ave.18

25' 56' 5'

7'5' 12'

Broadway - Ave. 18

60' 32' NAUD Local Modified

B 12' 12'

NAUD Local Modified

P

7om - 400' east of Leroy Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave.16 - Ave.17 Ave 17 - Clover

BB

PASADENA

B

32' MOZART 80' Local Modified

80'

MOZART Local Modified

28'

16'

12'

15' 52' 76'

60'

B

P

52' 12' 50' 76' 80'

9.5'

47' Ave.19 - Ave.20 WEYSE STREET Local Modified Ann - (ends before Sotello) 25' 5' 7'

Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 33 Street Standards A-04

P B 10'

15' 56'

B 52' 10' 50'

P

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

7

NAUD MOZART Collector Local Modified

PASADENA

Ann - Sotello Ave.16 - Ave.17

Broadway - Ave. 18 Ann - Sotello

56'

SPRINGPASADENA Collector Modified

NAUD Local Modified

College - Roundout/Elmyra Broadway - Ave. 18

P

B 12'

9'

80'

42' 7'

9' 25'

60'

32'

5'

10'

63'

P B 10'28'

16'

85'

16'

10'

17.5'

60'

B

80'

50'

100'

85'

P

10'

Roundout/Elmyra- Ann Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Mesnagers - Wilhardt Ave.17 - Ave.18

r

56'

P 12'

14'

80'

50' 7'

18' 25'

50'

32'

5'

10'

63'

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

14'

80'

50' 7' 50'

18' 25'

5'

12'

'

9' 25'

5'

18' 25'

'

5'

Ann - Sotello 32'

College - Roundout/Elmyra 80' Broadway - Ave. 18

College - Round 80'

12'

Ave. 20 - Ave. 21

10'

WEYSE STREET 63' 16' Local Modified 85'

56'

Ann - (ends before Sotello)

10'

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

47' 16'

18' 25' 32'

5'34

17.5'

B

80'

50'

100'

85'

76'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

12'

52' 76'

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

12'

44.5'

56'

8'-12'

B

10'

B

P

Roundout/Elmyra 52' 44.5'76'

52.5'-56.5' P 22' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Wilhardt - Aurora 17.5'

P B

P B Ann - Sotello B P

12'

P 56.5' B Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) 12' 28' 50' 16' 15' Sotello - Mesnager 60' 80' 10'

Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 17.5' 22' Baker - Wilhardt P B

85'

Ann - Sotello

Wilhardt - (LA River)

56' 12' 16' A-04 Street Standards 80'

P B

15'

P B 40'-66.7' 5'-14.5' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 55'-71.7' 10' 28' 50' 16' 17.5' 60'

10'

P

Roundout/Elmyra- Ann 52' 12'

P 9.5'

P

'

12'

Mesnagers - Wilhardt 28'

63'

Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 16' 10'

60'

12'

'

P B 10' 28'

85'

River) e.18 - Ave.19 80'

80'

Broadway - Ave. 18

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 P

32' B

50'

15' Sotello - Mesnager

SPRING PASADENA Collector Modified 56' 12'

9.5'

21 '

16'

NAUD Local Modified 25' 5' 12'

12'

Wilhardt 80' e.17 - Ave.18

P

PASADENA Secondary Hwy 7'

32' B 56'

12'28' 60'

P

20 '

44.5' P 56.5' B

12'

80'

32'

Ave.19 - Ave.20

80' e.16 - Ave.17

16'

B

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

Wilhardt - (LA River)

44.5' Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 56.5' P B SPRING B P Mesnager - Baker Secondary Mod 50' 15'

on

12'

56'

P

85'

Ann - Sotello

P 12'

B

17.5'55'-71.7' 50'

16'

60'

B

B ZART cal Modified 56'

10'28'

16'

P B 40'-66.7'

5'-14.5'

85'

Wilhardt - (LA River) Ave.18 - Ave.19

56'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Mesnagers - Wilhardt

B

9

o)

PROPOSED

8'

15' 52'-65' 60'-73'

B

52' 76' 22'

8' P B

P Aurora - Ave. 18 Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasad 15' DRAFT Sotello - Mesnag P B B P 40'-70' 3'-15' P6'-15' B 15' 49'-100' 50'

Roundout/Elmyra- Ann Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Wilhardt e.17 - Ave.18

'

18' 25'

'

32'

5'

10'

63'

10' 28'

16'

18' 25'

5'

12'

56'

16'

32'

60'

17.5'

PASADENA Ann - Sotello Collector Modified

12' 12' 28'

22'

85'

Wilhardt - (LA River)

80'

P

B

17.5'55'-71.7' 50'

16'

60'

PASADENA Secondary Hwy

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

P B

P B 40'-66.7' 5'-14.5' PROPOSED

P

'

16'

Ann - Sotello

P B

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 44.5' P 56.5' B 50'

15' Sotello - Mesnager

22'

P

B

15'

Sotello - Mesnag

80'

P B

25'

5'

12'

56'

44.5' Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 56.5' P B Mesnager - Baker 50' 15' 12'

Ave. 20 - Ave. 21

e.19 - Ave.20

12'

80'

32'

22'

P

B

Mesnager - Bake

15'

P B

80' 22'

Ave. 33 - Ave. 34

YSE STREET cal Modified

n - (ends before Sotello)

5'

P

85'

River) e.18 - Ave.19

'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19

Mesnagers - Wilhardt

East - West Streets (Looking West) EXISTING

Roundout/Elmyra

Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Baker - Wilhardt P B

12'

52'

12'

76'

P 28' 47'

52'

15' 8'-12'

SPRING Second Baker - Wilhardt

P

B

15'

44.5'76' 16.5'

52.5'-56.5'

9.5' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35

Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Wilhardt - Aurora

P B 12'

52'

12'

8'

76'

Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.)

10'

56' 76'

10'

15' 52'-65'

52'

60'-73'

76'

Wilhardt - Aurora

P

B 8'

15' 22'

Aurora - Ave. 18 Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) 3'-15'

P B 40'-70'

Aurora - Ave. 18

B P 6'-15'

15' 49'-100' 50' 76'

P B 15'

22'

SPRING Street Bridge S

DRAFT

Street Standards A-04

35

East - West Streets (Looking West)

D DModified Modified Sotello Sotello P P 10' 28' 28' 60'

16' 16'

60'

EXISTING

PROPOSED

SPRING PASADENA Collector Major Class Hwy IIModified PASADENA Collector Modified Broadway - Ave. 18 College - Roundout/Elmyra Broadway - Ave. 18 P B P B 50' 80' 17.5' 10' 17.5' 100' 50' 85'

SPRING Secondary Modified 5 SPRING Secondary Modified 5 College - Roundout/Elmyra College - Roundout/Elmyra P B P B 76' 22' 22' 98' 76'

Roundout/Elmyra- Ann

85'

60'

Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 P B 40'-66.7' 5'-14.5' P B 17.5'55'-71.7' 50' 50' 17.5' 85' Ann - Sotello 85'

ardt - (LA River) ardt - (LA River) P P 16' 12' 28' 28' 16' 60'

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 Ave. 19 - Ave. 20 44.5' 12' P 56.5' B P B 50' 15' Sotello - Mesnager 50' 15' 80'

nagers - Wilhardt nagers - Wilhardt P P 16' 10' 28' 28' 16' 60'

60'

B P B P 10' 17.5' 17.5'

P P

B B

P P

B B

17.5' 17.5'

15' 15'

80' 44.5' Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 56.5' Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 P B Mesnager - Baker P B 50' 15' 50' 15' 80' 12'

12'

P P

B B

15' 15'

80' Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 Baker - Wilhardt P B P B 52' 15' 52' 15' 44.5'76' 8'-12' 76' 52.5'-56.5'

12'

Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 Wilhardt - Aurora Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 P B P B 15' 52'-65' 52' 8' 15' 60'-73' 52' 76'

12'

P P

B B

15' 15'

10'

36

Ann - Sotello Ann - Sotello P B P B 22' 22'

B B

8'

P P

98' Mesnager - Baker Mesnager - Baker P B P B 76' 22' 22' 98' 76'

Aurora - Ave. 18 Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) A-04 Street Standards Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) P B B P 40'-70' 3'-15' 6'-15' P B B P 15' 15' 49'-100' 50'

B B

B B

B B

98' SPRING Secondary Modified 3 Baker - Wilhardt Secondary Modified Modified 4 SPRING Secondary 3 Baker - Wilhardt

Wilhardt - Aurora Wilhardt - Aurora 15' 15'

B B

98'

76' 98' 76' 98' Sotello - Mesnager Sotello - Mesnager P B P B 76' 22' 22' 98' 76'

16.5' 16.5'

76'

sadena Fwy.)

98' Roundout/Elmyra- Ann Roundout/Elmyra- Ann P B P B 76' 22' 22' 98' 76'

B B

22' 22' Aurora - Ave. 18 Aurora - Ave. 18 P B P B 22'

40' 56.5'40' 56.5'

76' 98' 76' 98'

DRAFT 76'

B B

56' 12'

12'

7'

80'

25'Ave. 20 - Ave. 21 56' 5' 12' Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 80' 32' P B B

12'

P

9'

22' 42' 7'

25' 9'

60'

32'

98'

76' 5'

63'

10'

10' 28'

16'

60'

85'

Mesnager - Baker SPRING Secondary Modified 3 Baker - Wilhardt Ave. 18 - Ave. 19 PROPOSED Mesnagers - Wilhardt Ave.17 - Ave.18 P B B

East - WestP Streets (Looking West) B B P

50' 15' Baker - Wilhardt oom - 400' east of Leroy EXISTING Ave.17 - Ave.18 Ave 17 - Clover 80' 52' 15' 12'

B

56' 12'

B

12'

80'

roy - Wilhardt 12'

12'

80' sadena Fwy.)

76'

44.5' 8'-12' SPRING Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 56' 25' 12' 7' 5' Major Class Hwy II 52.5'-56.5' 32'Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 80' P B B Wilhardt - Aurora P B B 52' 15' Ave.18 - Ave.19 Clover - Ave 19 76' 52' 15'

12'

7'

80'

B

P

15' 15'

P

B 12'

15'

6'-15' 15'

80' B

P B

80' 33'

50' 32' SPRING Secondary Modified 3 Baker - Wilhardt Wilhardt - Aurora

85'

56.5' 98' 50' 18' 25' 5' 7' Wilhardt - Aurora Aurora - Ave. 18 50' 32'

P B BRIDGE SECTION Ave.19 - Ave.20 Secondary Modified 76' 3 22'

12'

80'

12'

10' 28'

16'

60'

Wilhardt - (LA Rive

40' 76'

16.5' 22'

P 56'

12'

16'

12' 28' 60'

80'

B Ave. 20 - Ave. 21

SPRINGAurora - Ave. 18 Street Bridge Secondary Modified 2 25' 5' 7' 12'

B 12'

B

56'

12'

80'

76' 22' Ave. 33 - Ave. 34 WEYSE STREET98' Local Modified SPRING Street Bridge Secondary Modified 2 Ann - (ends before Sotello)

12'

P 9.5'

52'

12'

76' 28' 47'

B

Ave. 19 - Ave. 20

Wilhardt - (LA River) Ave.18 - Ave.19

P

7'

B 56' 12'

63'

32' P B

47' Ave 20 - Ave 21

ar

P 10'

80' 7'

Mesnagers - Wilha

98'

15'

Moulton - Ave 20 76' WEYSE STREET Collector B Ann - (ends before Sotello) 56' 12'

76' 22' 16.5' SPRING 98' 40' 50' 25' 56.5'5' 18' 7' Secondary Modified 4

B

50'

15'

ns

14'

P

Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) 25' 12' 56' 5' 12' 32'

56' 12'

12'

49'-100' 76' B

B

56' 12'

B

52'-65' 76' 8' B B 60'-73' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35 56' 25' 12' 12' 14' 7' 5' Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.) Aurora - Ave. 18 80' 32' P B B P

P B 52' 15' Ave 19 - Moulton Ave.19 - Ave.20 3'-15' 76' 15' 40'-70' 50'

n 10'

15'

8'

B

56' 12'

15'

9.5' Ave. 34 - Ave. 35

B 56'

12'

12'

52'

12'

76'

80'

Ave. 35 - (Arroyo Seco/Pasadena Fwy.)

10'

56' 76'

DRAFT

Street Standards A-04

37

10'