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Advising Handbook 2011 - 2012

1001 E Beltline NE

â–Ş

Grand Rapids, MI 49525-5897

â–Ş www.cornerstone.edu


Welcome Statement The purpose of the Advising Handbook is to provide you with information that will assist you in making wise choices regarding your academic success. Some of the information inside this handbook will change from year to year, so it will be very important to seek clarification from your academic advisor when questions arise. This handbook does not cover every question or concern you may have, but it will give you plenty of information so you can take ownership of your academic career. The stated five-year plans outline when classes plan to be offered, and they assist you in course selection and in the creation of a four-year plan. Each division has its own set of plans and has been instructed to update those plans annually. You will want to refer to the most recent edition of these plans to have the most accurate information. When making appointments with your academic advisor, it will be to your benefit to plan your course schedule in advance. This will allow your time to be spent talking about long-term career paths or other goals rather than simply using that time to select courses together. Keep in mind that your advisor is there to help in more areas than just your academic success and can be of assistance in other areas of your life as well!

Registration Helps & Links Registration help is located on the Eagle’s Nest. The links are listed below:    

CU Eagle’s Nest Undergraduate Tab Registrar’s Office Additional Links

WebAdvisor provides not only links for registration, but also transcript information and Program Evaluation (degree audit for academic planning and graduation tracking).

1


Table of Contents 2011 – 2012 Calendar

3

Student Advisee Role & Responsibilities

5

Changing Academic Advisor

5

Getting Help

6

Cornerstone University Academic Advisors

7

Core Curriculum Information

9

Course Selection Tips Repeat Policy Placement Criteria for Incoming Students Undecided/UnDeclared Programs with Special Advising Guidelines

11

Off Campus Study Programs

16

Five Year Course Planning Schedule Bible, Religion, & Ministry Division Business Division Communication & Media Studies Division Humanities Division Kinesiology, Science & Math Division Music Division Social Science Division Teacher Education Division

17 17 20 23 27 30 35 37 41

Program Planning Form

43

Four Year Planning Guide

46

Frequently Asked Questions

48

What is Assessment

51

Department List

53 2


Calendar 2011 July August September

October

November

1

Receive Fall 2011 Bill Alternative and PLUS loan applications due

5 & 20

Make first payment if on the payment plan

20

Payment due for pay-in-full students

31

Terra Firma participants students only; Residence Halls open

1

5

Second payment due for payment plan Residence Halls open for returning students & students not participating in Terra Firma Labor Day

7

Classes begin/Drop-Add Classes Begins

11

Drop-Add Classes Ends

5 & 20 17 & 18 19

Third payment due for payment plan Fall Break (no classes) Classes Resume

24

Registration for Spring 2012 begins

5 & 20

Balance owed for Fall 2011 semester due

2–5 8

Senior Assessment Last day for withdrawal without W/P or W/E

23 23 – 25 27 28

December

Residence Halls close for Thanksgiving Break Thanksgiving Break (no classes) Residence Halls reopen Classes Resume

5

Last day for withdrawal without W/E

5 7

Balance owed for Fall 2011 semester due Receive Spring 2012 bill

9

Final Day of Classes

12 – 15 16

Final Exams Residence Halls close at the end of the semester

3


2012 January

February March

April

May

5 & 20 4 10 5 – 19

First payment due for payment plan Residence Halls reopen for J-Term students Payment due for pay-in-full students J-Term 2012

21 21 – 23

New Student Arrival Residence Halls reopen

23

Spring 2012 Classes begin/Drop-Add Classes Begins

27

Drop-Add Classes Ends

1 5 & 20

File Financial Aid Forms Institutional Scholarship applications due Second payment due for payment plan

1 1 4 5 & 20 5–9 13

Priority deadline for filing for financial aid for 2012-2013 Spring Break Vacation Housing Forms Due Residence Halls close for Spring Break Third payment due for payment plan Spring Break Residence Halls re-open

12 12

Classes Resume Registration for Summer 2012 and Fall 2012 begins

26

Last day for withdrawal without W/P or W/E

28 – 31

Junior Assessment

5 & 20 2–6 6

Balance of second semester due Senior Assessment Good Friday (no classes)

8 9 10 23 24 - 27

Easter Sunday No Classes (Mon.) Classes Resume (Tues.) Last day for withdrawal without W/E Final Day of Classes

Apr. 30 – May 3 1

Final Exams Balance of 2nd semester due

3

Residence Halls close for semester

4 5

Senior/Parent Luncheon Commencement

4


Student Advisee Role & Responsibilities The following points frame a set of expectations the Cornerstone University student should perform in his or her role as advisee: Please meet with your academic advisor often as he/she will assist you in many ways. 1. Prepare adequately for each advising session. 2. Spend time clarifying personal gifts, abilities, values, interests, and goals by seeking help from God, advisor, faculty, Career Services, staff, and peers. 3. Develop a realistic academic plan consistent with personal gifts, abilities, values, interests, and goals. 4. Contact and make appointments with advisor when required or when in need of assistance. If it is impossible to keep an appointment, the advisee should notify his or her advisor as soon as possible. 5. Follow through on action steps identified during each advising session. 6. Become knowledgeable about Cornerstone’s academic policies, procedures, and requirements. 7. Evaluate the advising system, when requested, in order to strengthen the advising process. 8. Accept final responsibility for all academic planning and curricular choices. (Adapted from The Noel-Levitz Center for Enrollment Management, 1994) ♦ (Revised April 2001)

Changing Your Academic Advisor Changing your major and advisor does not have to be painful or difficult. The following outlines the steps you should take in order to care for the entire process. Before going through the steps, be sure you need to change your advisor. If you are changing your major, have a discussion with your current advisor to see if he or she is knowledgeable of that content. If your current advisor is knowledgeable of your new major, you may not want to change at all since consistency will be an asset to you. However, if your advisor is not versed in that particular field, please use the following list to help guide your choice. You will want to choose someone in the field you are pursuing so that he or she will have better insight to help guide you both in undergraduate education as well as long-term vocational goals. Once you have determined that a change of advisor is appropriate, please go on-line to ―CU Eagle’s Nest/Undergraduate/Registrar/On-Line Forms‖ to make the change. Your new advisor will need to approve the change. After your change has been approved, arrange a meeting with your new advisor to talk through your academic career and long-term planning.

5


Getting Help Every advisee, regardless of level of experience, faces questions that he or she cannot answer. The key is to know who to contact. After your advisor, use the following guidelines for getting answers to academic-related questions: For registration-related questions contact the Registrar’s Office (x1431). For course-related or academic policy questions, contact the appropriate faculty member, division chair, dean, or the Registrar’s Office, in that order. Academic Division

Division Chair

Bible, Religion, & Ministry

Dr. Douglas Mohrmann x1250

Business

Dr. Brad Stamm x1398

Communication & Media Studies

Prof. Pete Muir x1617

Humanities

Dr. Michael Pasquale x1378

Kinesiology, Science & Math

Dr. Jim Fryling x1283

Music

Prof. Michael Stockdale x1624

Social Sciences

Dr. Brenda King x1523

Teacher Education

Dr. Kerisa Myers x1363

6


Cornerstone University Academic Advisors Division

Name

Content Area

Bible

Banashak, Jeanette

Art of Ministry

Bustrum, Philip

Intercultural Studies

Duff, John

Bible & Theology

Mohrmann, Doug

Transfers, Ancient Studies, Bible & Religion

Perini, Don

Art of Ministry & Creativity

Smith, Andrew

Bible & Theology

Bos, Larry

Accounting/General Business

Morter, Scott

Finance

Newhouse, Shawn

Marketing/International Business

Riter, Bill

Management, CIS, Accounting

Stamm, Brad

Transfers, Economics & Sports Management

Young, Michael

Management

Anderson, Dave

Media Studies/Film

Blanchard, Alan

Journalism

Detwiler, Tim

By permission only

Duff, Desiree

Communication

Hunter, Jennifer

Theatre

Muir, Pete

Transfers, Media Studies/Video/Audio

Sindorf, Kathy

Media Studies/Video

Beach, Cynthia

English/Creative Writing/Humanities

Benson, Erik

History

Bonzo, Matt

Philosophy/Humanities

Fabisch, Jude

English

Business

Comm. & Media Studies

Humanities

Looman, Tammy Pasquale, Michael

Transfer/Humanities

Stevens, Michael

English/Honors/Humanities

Van Dyke, Michael

English/Humanities

7


Kinesiology, Science, & Math

Bell, Mark

Soccer Players only

Campbell, Ryan

Volleyball Players only

Crompton, Nigel

Biology/Health Science

Fryling, James

Chemistry/Pre Professional, Transfers

Gates, Raymond

Biology/Environmental Biology

Keller, Charles Ned

Physics/Science

Keys, Robert

Science/Education/Environmental Biology

Marra, Marty

Kinesiology

Sprague, Thomas

Math/Computer Science

Wortley, Rod

Track Players only Kinesiology

Zainea, Kim

Music

Social Sciences

Teacher Education

Stockdale, Michael

Transfers/Contemporary Christian Music

Van Dessel, Joan

Instrumental Performance/Music Education

Van Dessel, Peter

Instrumental Performance/Music Education

Westerholm, Matthew

Worship Arts

Carew, Nola

Social Work

Ehnis, Dan

Psychology

King, Brenda

Transfers/Sociology

McDonald, Nicole

Psychology/Family Studies

Sanders, Scott

Social Work

Bailey, Gary

Consortium Students/Post Bach

Bell, Suzanne

Elementary

England, Darla

Learning Disabilities/Elementary

Kronemeyer, Ron

Social Studies/any

McAdams, Keith

Secondary

Myers, Kerisa

Early/Elementary/Transfers

NOTE: Bold indicates Division Chair

8


Core Curriculum for Fall 2011 Course IDS-103 CU Foundations I IDS-104 CU Foundations II IDS-101 Creativity, Innovation and Problem Solving REL-104 Old Testament Literature HIS-114 World Civilization II KIN-100 Foundations of Wellness KIN-1XX Activity Course COM-112 Communication in Culture ENG-212 Writing in Culture (writing competency required) PHI-211 Philosophy in Culture REL-204 New Testament Literature REL-352 Christian Beliefs and History IDS-311 Imagination in Culture SCI-311 Science in Culture Social Science Course Lab Science Course Math Competency (see below) English Competency Global Studies Requirement (see below) (B.A. and select majors require Foreign Lang.) Total Core Requirements

Hours 1 1 2 3 3 2 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 0-3 0-6 0-3 (0-8) 44 (minimum)

Math Competency. Choose one of the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

MAT-110 College Mathematics MAT-121 College Algebra MAT-122 Trigonometry MAT-131 Calculus I MAT-132 Calculus II Exemption by examination (see catalog for details)

Global Studies Requirement. Choose one of the following: 1. Minimum two-week international study experience as approved by International Programs Committee. 2. A minimum three-credit cross-cultural internship as approved by the division. 3. A Global Studies course as approved by the International Programs Committee, UAC, and Faculty Senate (See current catalog for listing of courses.) Approved list as of 3/1/11 includes: BUS-215 BUS-317 BUS-411 EDU-363 ECN-215 COM-311 ECN-335 LIN-100

International Business Experience International Business Cross-Culture Business Diverse Populations/Diff Instruction International Business Experience Intercultural Communication International Economics Language in Culture

MGT-339 MKT-359 REL-243 SOC-352 SOC-417 SSC-312 SWK-417

International Management International Marketing The Intercultural Mandate Intercultural Communication Minorities World Affairs Human Diversity

4. Students with a non-U.S. high school diploma are exempt.

9


B.A. Foreign Language Requirement (& select majors) Choose one of the following: 1. Language-101 and LIN-100 Language in Culture. 2. Language-101 and Language-102. 3. Two years of the same high school foreign language (meeting the minimum grade standard level) and LIN-100 Language in Culture .

4. Two years of the same high school foreign language (meeting the minimum grade standard level) and Language-102 . 5. Three years of the same high school foreign language (meeting the minimum grade standard level) . 6. Students who have English as their second language are exempt.

10


Course Selection Tips (use with 2011-2012 Cornerstone University Catalog) In initial advising sessions, it is especially critical to communicate where you are in your academic decision-making. For example, you may communicate that you are strongly committed to a particular major, only moderately committed to a particular program, or still undecided as to a major. Although pragmatic factors such as times when classes are offered, participation in co-curricular activities, or employment schedules are important factors, your level of decisiveness and strength of commitment to an academic program should be the primary long range basis for course selection and academic planning. If you are strongly committed to a particular program and/or major, you may want to print a ―program evaluation‖ to use along with the university catalog to assist you in working with your advisor to make wise course selections. Core requirements for undergraduate degree programs can be found under “Degree Information” in the catalog.

Repeat Policy Federal rules do not permit a student to receive aid for a course more than once unless the school grants the student additional credit for the repeated courses. Based on this information, a student can only receive financial aid when retaking a course if he/she initially failed or withdrew from the course. (A passing grade is D- or higher.) Students are eligible to retake a course with the possibility of improving the previous grade. However, the retake grade always takes precedence. So when advising students to retake a course, remind them financial aid cannot be applied to the retake course unless they failed or withdrew from the course. The course will not be counted as a part of load for financial aid purposes, so their enrollment level will be calculated based on the remaining registered courses. (i.e. Student takes ENG-114 again after receiving a D along with 11 other credits – total of 15 credits – the student is not considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes.)

Placement Criteria for Incoming Students All incoming students should have performed satisfactorily in a college preparatory curriculum prior to coming to Cornerstone. In some cases, however, developmental course work is necessary after a student has matriculated. To determine whether you need one or more developmental courses, the Mathematics Department utilizes a placement test and the English department has established criteria based on performance on the ACT. Sub scores can be obtained from your advisor. The criteria for placement are as follows:

Math Placement Criteria The Mathematics Department determines placements into core Mathematics courses by means of a placement examination. The placement examination is given each fall during freshman orientation, and each semester in preparation for the next. Since mathematics skills can be lost over time, placement scores are current only for one year. Expired scores can be renewed by re-taking the examination. Special needs can be met by making arrangements with the Mathematics Department. Students who wish to enroll in more advanced courses, such as College Algebra, Trigonometry, or Calculus may do so by transcript evaluation. In addition to the placement examination results, students in College Algebra must pass the arithmetic and algebra sections of the Placement Examination, and have completed intermediate algebra (or two years of high school algebra). Placement into Trigonometry is the same, plus College Algebra or a third year of high school algebra. Placement into Calculus I requires completion of trigonometry or pre-calculus either in college or high school. Due the wide variety of courses offered by high schools and colleges, students seeking placement into College Algebra or above are urged to contact the Mathematics department.

11


English Placement Criteria First Placement Criteria 2011-2012 Writing Course Placement Criteria – Revised 3/30/08 Courses: ENG 099 Basic Writing, ENG 114 College Composition, ENG 212 Writing in Culture Criteria: ACT English Score and ACT Combined English/Writing Score If both scores are not at or above the standard for placement, student should be enrolled in the lower course. Course ACT English Score ACT Combined English/Writing score Writing in Culture – ENG 212 25 and above 24 and above College Composition – ENG 114 17 to 24 16 to 23 Basic Writing – ENG 099 16 and below 15 and below Second Placement Criteria (for students who do not have an ACT Combined English/Writing Score) Criteria: ACT English Score and cumulative high school GPA If both scores are not at or above the standard for placement, student should be enrolled in the lower course. Course ACT English Score Cumulative HS GPA(based on a 4.0 scale) Writing in Culture – ENG 212 25 and above 3.0 and above College Composition – ENG 114 17-24 2.0 to 2.9 Basic Writing – ENG 099 16 and below 1.9 and below Third Placement Criteria (for students who have taken the SAT instead of the ACT) Criteria: SAT Verbal scores and cumulative high school GPA If both scores are not at or above the standard for placement, student should be enrolled in the lower course. Course SAT Verbal Score Cumulative HS GPA (based on a 4.0 scale) Writing in Culture – ENG 212 570 and above 3.0 and above College Composition – ENG 114 440 to 569 2.0 to 2.9 Basic Writing – ENG 099 439 and below 1.9 and below Note: If a student does not agree with his or her placement based on the above criteria, please refer the student to Tammy Looman, WAC (Writing Across the Curriculum) Director for further writing evaluation.

Undecided/Undeclared If you are only mildly committed to pursue a certain program or are totally undecided, there are at least two courses of action you can take. One is to take an introductory course in a field of interest to help you begin assessing whether or not you have motivation and/or giftedness in that field. Although this does have merit and you will see it reflected in the special concerns of particular divisions in the last section, a better approach might be to take ―safe‖ courses and address the questions of major, minor, or program through other means such as developmental advising, self-assessment, mentoring, Career Services, etc. The following are ―safe‖ courses in that, generally, regardless of degree program or major, all first-time students and transfers with less than 24 hours need. If you are undecided, look to these courses first in order to complete initial course schedules. Exceptions or notes are in parentheses: If looking to the first set fails to produce a full schedule of classes, go to the following second set of classes to try to fill out your course schedule. Again, exceptions are noted in parentheses:  Math class (check criteria for correct placement; except possible El. Ed. students)  PSY-111 General Psychology or SOC-111 Introduction to Sociology (except possible El. Ed., Sec. Ed, and B. Mus. students)  A 100- or 200-level physical science course (if prerequisite is met).

12


Programs with Special Advising Guidelines Yes, they do. Special requirements for Education have been built into the program for more accurate decisionmaking by the newer student. Generally, the core requirements for non-education Humanities programs and B.A. programs in Science and Math, Social Sciences, and Kinesiology correspond with the B.A. core requirements in the undergraduate catalog. If in doubt, check the catalog. Faculty and Division Chairs offer the following important, special guidelines for declared majors in Bible, Business, Science, Mathematics, Fine Arts (Music), Social Work, and Teacher Education:

Special Guidelines for Bible, Religion & Ministry Division Courses Bible division students should enroll in REL-130 O.T. Literature for BRM majors and REL-236 N.T. Literature BRM majors, not REL-104 or REL-204. (Honors students should take REL-130 and REL-236.) Students who have a BRM division major (B.A. or B.S.) will apply for admission to the BRM program while enrolled in REL-236 NT Literature. To be admitted to the program, a student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, complete an application including a reference from their pastor, a reference from a professor outside the BRM division, an interview with a BRM professor, and be approved by the BRM Committee on Program Admissions. Students who maintain the minimum academic standards and show Christian maturity will continue in the program. Assistance in these areas may be obtained from your academic advisor, the BRM faculty, Spiritual Formation, the Learning Center, and Career Services. Any student in a program not in the BRM division may substitute either REL 354 Theology I or REL 356 Theology II for REL 352 Christian Beliefs and History in the core.

Special Guidelines for Declared Business Majors If you declare a Business Administration Major or Business Major with an emphasis in International Business, Management, Marketing, or Sports Management, you should enroll in MGT-231 Principles of Management and MKT-251 Principles of Marketing in your freshman year. If you are an Accounting Major, you should enroll in ACC-221 Accounting I and CSC-116 Introduction to Data Management in the fall semester of your freshman year and ACC-222 in the spring semester of your freshman year. If you are a Business Major with an emphasis in Finance, you should enroll in ACC-221 Accounting I in the fall semester and ACC-222 Accounting II in the spring semester of your freshman year.

Special Guidelines for Communication & Media Studies Majors For Journalism majors: JRN -261 (The Herald), JRN- 201 (News Writing & Reporting I), or JRN -236 (Photojournalism I)

13


For Media majors: Media majors (Film or Video emphasis): COM-112 (Comm. in Culture) and MDA-121 (Intro. to Electronic Media) concurrently the first semester. Media majors are allowed to take MDA 261 (Audio Production I), but it’s not required for freshmen. Audio majors are recommended to take MDA-261 (Audio Production I) and MDA-161 (Audio-Video Tech Production) the first semester. Theatre majors: COM -112 and THR- 242 is required the first semester. Music Theatre emphasis: THR- 245 (Musical Theatre Workshop I) is also required the first semester.

Special Guidelines for Declared Mathematics Majors Every mathematics major or minor should begin with MAT-131 or MAT-121 during the fall semester of their freshman year. Some students who have studied calculus in high school may be able begin with a higher-level course. Such students should consult with a faculty advisor in the Mathematics Department for proper placement

Special Guidelines for Declared Music Majors NOTE: All prospective students must audition for admission into any music major degree program. Specific information regarding dates, suggested repertoire and other guidelines can be obtained on the music department portion of the Cornerstone University website, or by calling the music department at 616-222-1545. Transfer students beginning their studies in the spring semester must audition before or at the beginning of that semester. On the basis of the audition, the music department will either accept or deny the student admission into the program. In some instances, students may be accepted on a probationary basis. If a student is not accepted into the program, that student has two additional opportunities to re-audition and can enroll in freshman-level music major courses. Entering students intending to pursue a music major who have not auditioned before the music faculty may enroll in all freshman-level music major courses. These students must complete audition requirements at the fall semester jury, and will be fully accepted or denied admission into the program at that time. All music majors, regardless of emphasis, should enroll in the following classes for fall semester, freshman year: MUS-099 MUS-113 MUS-117

Music Convocation Aural Perception I Music Theory I

Students who have little or no piano training must take MUS 143 Class Piano I. All students enrolled in music major degree programs must take piano until they pass a piano proficiency exam as part of the degree requirements. Students must take one of three large ensembles MUP-101 University Chorale (by audition only) MUP-111 Chancel Singers MUP-121 Symphonic Winds and Chamber Winds (by audition only) Students must take Applied Lessons. Performance majors must take two credits of applied lessons; all other music majors may take one or two credits. (MUA-XXX)

14


Special Guidelines for Declared Science Majors Students declaring a major or minor in the physical or biological sciences should recognize that fitting science classes and labs into their class schedules can be challenging. Waiting until your sophomore year to start science or mathematics classes can delay graduation. Therefore fill your class schedule as much as possible with required math and science classes and then add core classes to bring your total credits to the desired level (generally 16—17 credit hours.). At a minimum, students should take a math class (MAT-122 or higher preferred) and one biology course during the first semester (BIO-151 for most science majors.) You should anticipate a need for guidance in scheduling your classes. Dialogue with your academic advisor (from the science division) early and often! If you do not think you have an advisor in the science division, talk with the Divisional Secretary or Division Chairman. We will direct you to a professor who can help.

Special Guidelines for Students in Teacher Education EDU-466 Secondary Journalism Practicum is available only to English majors who have a Journalism or Communication Arts minor. EDU-468 Secondary Psychology Practicum is available only to History or Social Studies majors who have a Psychology minor. EDU-469 Secondary Chemistry Practicum is available only to Biology majors who have chemistry minor.

If you intend to complete a major in an Elementary Education program and have not taken MAT-110 College Mathematics or are currently registered for MAT-110, please be aware of this information: Students must meet the Math Competancy requirement (MAT-110, 121, 122, 131, 132 or exemption by exam) prior to taking MAT-312 Elementary Mathematics & Methods. In order to take MAT-312, student must have taken EDU-230 Principles and Philosophy of Education and be accepted into the Teacher Education Program.

Special Requirements for Students in Teacher Education Since the goal of Teacher Education students is to become certified by the State of Michigan, there are minimum grade requirements in many courses that may not apply to other fields. According to the Michigan State Board of Education ADMINISTRATIVE RULES GOVERNING THE CERTIFICATION OF MICHIGAN TEACHERS: “Satisfactory college credit” means a grade of C- or its equivalent. Rule 22 refers to communication and major and minor fields; therefore a minimum of C- is required for both Writing in Culture and Communication in Culture as well as major and minor courses. Rule 23 refers to professional courses and growth and development; therefore, all EDU numbers, methods classes that do not have an EDU number, and Developmental Psychology require a minimum of C-. Rule 24 refers to certification; therefore an applicant for an elementary or secondary provisional certificate shall have completed satisfactory college credits before assignment in directed teaching. (Certification in major & minor)

15


Off-Campus Study Programs The Off-Campus Study Programs (OCSP) provides students the opportunity to broaden and deepen their educational experience and to further prepare them to impact the Kingdom. Interested students should consider the impact of an OCSP on their overall educational program and make adjustments in their schedules and financial planning early on. Students typically earn 12-16 academic credits in a semester-long program. Some summer programs are also available. Cornerstone University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). Because of this affiliation, Cornerstone participates in a number of off-campus academic study programs in which qualified students may participate upon application and acceptance. There are also several other independent programs with which Cornerstone is an affiliate. Approved programs in which Cornerstone participates are grounded in Christian worldview. Students should refer to the current academic catalog for questions relating to financial aid and other requirements,. Interested students should meet with off-campus program coordinator, Nicolas Babarskis, Assistant Director of Global Study to discuss eligibility, policy and process. Students then complete a Cornerstone University OffCampus Program application (available on the CU Eagle’s Nest) as well as the specific program application (usually located on each program’s website). Students should consult the program’s website for the most up-to-date information, deadlines and credit information.

16


Five Year Course Planning Schedule Bible, Religion, & Ministry Division Course Title

FA 11

CMI-151

Lifespan Development

X

CMI-211

Edu. Min. of the Church

X

CMI-221

Learning, Liturgy, & Technology

X

Course No.

CMI-222

Poverty & Justice

J 12

SP 12

Cultural Anthropology

CMI-252

Interpersonal &Intrapersonal Relationships

X

CMI-311

Evangelism & Discipleship

X

CMI-321

Camp Philosophy & Administration

X

CMI-334

Spiritual Formation

X

CMI-336

Integrated Leadership

X

CMI-342

Spiritual Conflicts in CrossCultural Contexts

X

CMI-380

Internship

CMI-382 CMI-383 CMI-384

Internship I: Career Development Internship II: Teacher & The Teaching Task Internship III: Specialization Pre-Field Inter-Cultural Internship

CMI-385

Inter-Cultural Internship

CMI-418

Art of Ministry

CMI-434

Short-Term Missions

CMI-444

Inter-Cultural Strategy for 21st Century

CMI-462

Senior Seminar

CMI-470

Readings in Chr. Ministries

CMI-480 CMI-481

Current Issues/Critical Concerns Counseling Families in Ministry

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

X

X

CMI-223

CMI-381

FA 12

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

X

X

X

X

J 16

SP 16

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X X

FA 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

As Needed As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

17


Course No.

Course Title

CMI-490

Independent Study

GRK-101

Greek Grammar I

GRK-102

Greek Grammar II

GRK-201

Semantic Analysis I

GRK-202

Semantic Analysis II

GRK-336

Septuagint Studies

GRK-471

Advanced Greek Reading

GRK-480

Advanced Topics Sem: Greek

HEB-101

Hebrew I

HEB-102

Readings in Hebrew

HEB-480

Advanced Topics Seminar: Hebrew

HEB-490

Independent Study

REL-103

Biblical Hermeneutics

REL-130 REL-204 REL-236

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

Old Testament Literature and History Old Testament Literature for BRM Majors New Testament Literature and History New Testament Literature & History for BRM Majors

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

J 16

SP 16

As Needed X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

Hebrew II

HEB-470

REL-104

FA 11

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

REL-245

Issues in Hermeneutics

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

REL-243

The Inter-Cultural Mandate

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

REL-313

Religion in America

REL-315

Religions of the World

REL-330

Mosaic Literature

REL-333

Wisdom Literature

REL-334

Prophetic Literature

REL-335

Pauline Literature

REL-338

Dead Sea Scrolls & Second Temple Judaism

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X X

18


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

REL-339

Gospel Literature

X

X

X

X

REL-342

Philosophy of Religion

X

X

X

X

REL-352

Christian Theology

X

REL-354

Theology I

X

REL-356

Theology II

REL-357 REL-358

Old Testament History & Theology New Testament History & Theology

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X X

Islam

REL-431

The Gospel of Luke

REL-433

History & Religions of the Ancient Near East

REL-437

Acts of the Apostles

REL-438

Seminar in Romans

REL-440

Revelation

REL-441

Apologetics

REL-470

Directed Readings

As Needed

REL-480

Advanced Topics Bible Seminar

As Needed

REL-481

Thesis Project I

As Needed

REL-482

Thesis Project II

As Needed

REL-490

Independent Study

As Needed

Inter-Cultural Comm.

X

X

SP 16

X

X

X X

X

REL-414

SOC-352

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

J 16

X X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

19


Division of Business Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

ACC-221

Accounting I

X

ACC-222

Accounting II

ACC-321

Intermediate Accounting I

ACC-322

Intermediate Accounting II

ACC-331

Cost Accounting

ACC-327

switch places w/331Taxation

X

X

ACC-332

Accounting Information Systems

X

X

ACC-380

Internship

ACC-421

Advanced Accounting

ACC-423

Auditing

BUS-211

Business Statistics

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

BUS-213

Business Communications

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

BUS-215

International Business Experience

BUS-241

Personal Financial Planning

BUS-280

Topics in Business

BUS-317

International Business

BUS-337

Quantitative Methods

BUS-361

Business Law

BUS-380

Internship

BUS-411

Cross-Cultural Business

BUS-470 BUS-480

Directed Readings in Business Advanced Topics in Business

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

X

J 14

SP 14

X X

SP 15

FA 15

J 16

SP 16

X X

X

X

X

J 15

X X

X

FA 14

X

X

X X

FA 13

X X

X

X

X

X X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

As Needed As Needed

BUS-490

Independent Study

As Needed

CSC-112

Intro. Spreadsheets

As Needed

CSC-113

Intermediate Spreadsheets

As Needed

CSC-116

Intro. to Data Management

As Needed

CSC-121

Intro. to Programming

As Needed

20


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

CSC-151

Hardware and Software Concepts

As Needed

CSC-221

Visual Basic

As Needed

CSC-222

Intro to Web Development

As Needed

CSC-380

Internship

As Needed

CSC-470

Directed Readings

As Needed

CSC-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

CSC-490

Independent Study

As Needed

ECN-231

Macroeconomics

ECN-232

Microeconomics

X

ECN-321

Managerial Microeconomics

X

ECN-331

Research in Economics

ECN-334

Money & Banking

ECN-335

International Economics

ECN-380

Internship

As Needed

ECN-460

Entertainment Industries

As Needed

FIN-341

Principles of Finance

FIN-342

Corporate Finance

FIN-371

Investments

FIN-372

Securities Brokerage

X

X

J 15

SP 15

X

X X

FA 14

FA 15

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X

FIN-380

Real Estate Management & Investment Insurance & Risk Management Management of Financial Institutions Internship

MGT-100

Intro to Leadership

X

X

X

X

X

MGT-215

Intro to Sports Management

X

X

X

X

X

MGT-231

Principles of Management

X

MGT-238

Principles of Leadership

X

MGT-270

Leadership Readings

FIN-373 FIN-374 FIN-376

SP 16

X X

X

J 16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

As Needed

21

X


Course No. MGT-332 MGT-333

Course Title Human Resources Management Operations Management

FA 11

FA 12

J 13

MGT-336

Project Management

MGT-337

Entrepreneurship

MGT-338

Advanced Leadership Studies

MGT-339

International Management

MGT-361

Sports Media Relations & Event Management

MGT-364

Sport in Society

MGT-380

Internship

MGT-432

Strategic Management

MGT-434

Organizational Development & Change

MKT-251

Principles of Marketing

X

MKT-350

Marketing Management

X

MKT-352

Marketing Research

X

MKT 353

Marketing Communication

MKT-355

Retailing

MKT-357

Consumer Behavior

MKT-358

Sales Management

MKT-359

International Marketing

MKT-362

Sports Markting & Sales

MKT-380

Internship

MKT-452

Marketing Problems & Strategies

SP 13

X

X

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

X X

J 15

SP 15

J 16

X X

X

FA 15

SP 16

X

X X

X

FA 14

X

X

X

Organizational Behavior

European Excursion

SP 12

X

MGT-335

New York Excursion

J 12

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X As Needed

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

22


Communication & Media Studies Division Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

COM-112

Communication in Culture

X

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

Introduction to Public Relations Interpersonal Communication Introduction to Oral Interpretation

X

COM-262

Advertising Principles

X

COM-311

Intercultural Communication

X

COM-315

Philosophy, Theory & Practice of Communication

X

COM-321

Group Communication

COM-322

Adv. Public Speaking

COM-324

Argumentation & Debate

COM-325

Rhet. Theory & Criticism

COM-326

Organizational Communication

COM-361

Advertising Practices

X

COM-362

Public Relations Campaigns

X

COM-363

Media Relations

COM-364

Special Events & Promotions

COM-365

Writing for Public Relations

COM-369

Comm. Research Methods

COM-380

Internship

COM-400

Senior Seminar

COM-490

Independent Study

DAN-129

Beginning Dance

COM-161 COM-212 COM-241

DAN/KIN181 DAN/KIN183 DAN/KIN184 DAN/KIN185

Modern Dance I Jazz Dance I

X X

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

X

FA 14

X

X

X X

X

X X X

X

X

X

FA 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X X

SP 16

X

X

X

J 16

X

X

X

X

SP 15

X

X

X

J 15

X

X X

X

X

SP 14

X

X

X

J 14

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X As Needed

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

Jazz Dance II

X

X

Fundamentals of Ballet

X

X

23


Course No. DAN/KIN 186 DAN/KIN187 JRN-201 JRN-202

Course Title

FA 11

Broadway Dance

X

J 12

SP 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

X

Fundamentals of Tap Dance News Writing & Reporting I News Writing & Reporting II

FA 12

X

The Herald

X

X

JRN-313

Feature Writing

X

JRN-318

Editing Books, Magazines, Newspapers, Online

JRN-320

Sports Writing

X

X

JRN-321

Editorial, Columns, Opinion Writing

JRN-380

Journalism Internship

JRN-400

Senior Seminar

X

JRN-401

Mass Media Ethics, History, Law

JRN-402

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

SP 16

X

X

JRN-261

J 16

X

X X

FA 15

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Reporting Public Affairs

X

X

X

X

X

JRN-404

Seminar in News Photography

X

X

X

X

X

JRN-490

Independent Study

MDA-121

Introduction to Electronic Media

MDA-161

AV Tech. Production

X

X

X

X

X

MDA-232

Film A - Z

X

X

X

X

X

MDA-250

Writing for Film

MDA-252

Film Industry Intensive Experience

MDA-254

Film History

MDA-255

Basic Film Editing

MDA-261

Audio Production I

MDA-262

Live Sound Production

X

X

X

X

X

MDA-271

Video Production I

X

X

X

X

X

MDA-272

Deconstructing Popular Music Production

As Needed

As Needed X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

24


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

FA 13

J 14

FA 14

J 15

FA 15

J 16

Video Production II

MDA-318

Writing for Electronic Media

MDA-319

Mass Media Literacy

MDA-337

Creativity Video Production

X

X

X

MDA-352

Faith, Film & Culture

X

X

X

MDA-353

Producing for Film

MDA-354

Announcing & Reporting

X

MDA-355

Media History, Business, & Ethics

X

MDA-356

Corporate Video Production

MDA-357

Dramatic Video Production

MDA-359

Documentary Video Production Multi-Camera Studio Production

X

X X

X

X X

X

SP 16

MDA-282

X

X

SP 15

Audio Production II X

X

SP 14

MDA-281

MDA-358

X

SP 13

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X X

X

X

MDA-363

Audio for Post Production

X

X

MDA-372

Music Video Production

X

X

MDA-375

Deconstructing Cinema

MDA-376

Intermediate Screen Writing

MDA-377

Illusions of Light

MDA-379

Cornerstone University Production Company

X

MDA-381

Mixing and Mastering

X

MDA-382

Music Producing I

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

Cornerstone Student Radio Station I Cornerstone Student Radio Station II

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

MDA-484

Music Production II

MDA-486

Cornerstone Music Co.

PHO-213

Print, Web Media Graphics

X

X

X

X

X

PHO-235

Principles of Visual Communications

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

Radio Production

MDA-463

X

X

X

X

X

MDA-362

MDA-461

X

X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

25


Course Title

FA 11

PHO-236

Intro to Digital Photography

X

PHO-238

Documentary Photography

PHO-261

Photography Practicum

X

PHO-301

Color Photography

X

X

X

X

X

PHO-302

Photo Editing

X

X

X

X

X

PHO-303

Photography Studio Techniques

X

THR/KIN 188

Fight Choregraphy

X

THR-242

Introduction to Theatre

X

THR-245

Music Theatre Performance I

X

THR-248

Theatre Production Lab I

X

THR-249

Theatre Practicum

THR-340

Principles of Acting

X

THR-341

Stage Construction & Design

X

THR-342

Theatre History I – to 1850

Course No.

THR-343 THR-344 THR-346 THR-347

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

X X

X

Theatre Production Lab II

THR-380

Internship

THR-441

Play Directing

THR-445

Advanced Acting

THR-447

Advanced Directing

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

X

X

X X

X

J 15

X X

X

X

SP 15

FA 15

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

SP 16

X

X

X

J 16

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

Acting & Directing Shakespeare Stagecraft, Production & Management Contemporary American Theatre Theatre History II – since 1850

THR-348

J 13

X

X

X

X

X X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X X

X X

X

X X

26


Humanities Division FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

Course No.

Course Title

ARB-101

Introductory Arabic I

As Needed

ARB-102

Introductory Arabic II

As Needed

ARB-201

Intermediate Arabic I

As Needed

ARB-202

Intermediate Arabic II

As Needed

ENG-098

Personalized Writing Seminar

X

ENG-099

Basic Writing

X

ENG-114

College Composition

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ENG-212

Writing in Culture

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ENG-223

Intro. to Literature

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ENG-224

World Literature

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ENG-226

Intro to Creative Writing

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ENG-315

Poetry Writing

ENG-316

Fiction Writing

ENG-317

Creative Non-Fiction

X

ENG-319

Advanced Grammar

X

X

X

X

ENG-321

Children’s Literature

X

X

X

X

ENG-322

The Practice of Criticism

X

X

X

ENG-323

Adolescent Literature

X

X

X

ENG-324

Literary Modernism(s): British and/or American

X

ENG-326

Contemporary Literature

ENG-328

Selected Authors and Eras

ENG-334 ENG-342

American Renaissance in the 19th Century British Romantic & Victorian Literature

ENG-344

British Literature to 1700

ENG-347

Religious Authors

ENG-353 (LIN-353) ENG-361 (HIS-361)

Linguistic History of the English Language Holocaust Literature

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

FA 15

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X As Needed

X

X

X

X

As Needed

27

J 16

SP 16


Course Title

FA 11

ENG-364

Writers and Styles

X

ENG-380

Internship

ENG-463 (COM-463)

Secondary Language Arts Methods

ENG-470

Directed Readings

As Needed

ENG-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

ENG-490

Independent Study

As Needed

FRN-101

Elementary French I

As Needed

FRN-102

Elementary French II

As Needed

FRN-201

Intermediate French I

As Needed

FRN-202

Intermediate French II

As Needed

HUM-382

Humanities Seminar

X

HUM-421

Creative Endeavors

X

HUM-482

Thesis

X

X

X

X

X

X

IDS-311

Imagination in Culture

X

X

X

X

X

X

LAT-101

Elementary Latin I

As Needed

LAT-102

Elementary Latin II

As Needed

LAT-201

Intermediate Latin I

As Needed

LAT-202

Intermediate Latin II

As Needed

LIN-225

Introduction to Linguistics

LIN-353 (ENG-353)

Linguistic History of the English Language Second Language Acquisition

Course No.

LIN-371

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

X As Needed

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

LIN-372

Sociolinguistics

X

X

LIN-380

Internship

LIN-460

Selected Linguistics

(SPA/EDU-465)

LIN-465

Methods of Teaching a Foreign Language

LIN-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

LIN-489 (ENG-489)

TESL Practicum

As Needed

LIN-490

Independent Study

As Needed

As Needed X X

X

X

28

J 16

SP 16


Course Title

FA 11

PHI-211

Philosophy in Culture

X

PHI-213

Plato & Aristotle

PHI-215

Augustine & Aquinas

PHI-311

Modern Political Philosophy

PHI-353

Philosophical Ethics

X

PHI-352

Epistemology

X

PHI-380

Internship

PHI-411

Selected Thinkers

PHI-413

Globalization & Localization

PHI-470

Directed Readings

As Needed

PHI-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

PHI-490

Independent Study

As Needed

SPA-101

Elementary Spanish I

SPA-102

Elementary Spanish II

SPA-201

Intermediate Spanish I

As Needed

SPA-202

Intermediate Spanish II

As Needed

SPA-231

Business Spanish

As Needed

Course No.

SPA-311 SPA-319

Advanced Spanish Conversation Advanced Composition & Grammar

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

J 14

SP 14 X

X

FA 15

X

X X X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

SPA-380

Internship

As Needed

SPA-411

Intro. to Hispanic Literature

X

X

X

As Needed

SPA-465

SP 15 X

X

Spanish Translation

Spanish Civilization & Culture Methods of Teaching a Foreign Language

J 15

X

SPA-332

SPA-412

FA 14

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

SPA-470

Readings in Spanish

As Needed

SPA-490

Independent Study

As Needed

29

J 16

SP 16


Kinesiology, Science, & Mathematics Division Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

BIO-111

Intro. to Bio. Science

BIO-151

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

General Biology

X

X

BIO-225

Botany

X

BIO-233

Zoology

BIO-241

Anatomy & Phys. I

BIO-242

Anatomy & Phy. II

BIO-331

Ornithology

BIO/KIN341

Anatomical Kinesiology

BIO-342 BIO-347

Exercise Physiology (BIO/KIN 342) Intro. to Nutrition (BIO/KIN 347)

J 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

SP 14

FA 14

X X

X X

X X

J 14

SP 15

FA 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

J 16

SP 16

X X

X X

X

X X

J 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

BIO-351

Genetics

BIO-352

Microbiology

BIO-400

Bioethics & Argument. Theory

BIO-431

Vertebrate Zoology

BIO-451

Molecular Biology

CHM-111

Prin. of Gen. Chem.

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-121

General Chemistry I

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-122

General Chemistry II

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-212

Principles of Org. Chem. & Bio. Chemistry

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-230

Organic Chemistry I Lab

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-231

Organic Chemistry I

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-232

Organic Chemistry II

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-233

Organic Chemistry II Lab

X

X

X

X

X

CHM-411

Perspectives in Chemistry

X

CHM-472

Biochemistry

ECO-241

Environ. Science

ECO-341

Ecology

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

30


Course No. ECO-342

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

J 16

SP 16

Field Biology

As Needed

ECO-442

Adv. Field Studies

Florida: J-Term every 6th year starting w/J-Term 2015 Grand Canyon: J-Term every 6th year starting with J-Term 2017 Ireland: Summer 2012 Winter Field Ecology: Jterm 2012, 2014, 2016 Yellowstone Trip: Every 6th year in the spring starting with SP 2013

KIN-100

Foundations of Wellness

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-111

Badminton

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-113

Golf

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-115

Tennis

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-116

Racquetball

X

KIN-119

Downhill Skiing/Snow Boarding

KIN-121

Outdoor Skills

KIN-123

Beginning Fencing

KIN-124

Pickleball

KIN-126

Intermediate Racquetball

KIN-127

Intro. to Martial Arts

KIN-129

Beginning Dance

KIN-132

Coed Soccer

X

KIN-133

Volleyball

X

KIN-143

Jogging

X

KIN-146

Physical Conditioning

KIN-147

PE for Class Teachers

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-148

Weight Training

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

KIN/DAN181 KIN/DAN183 KIN/DAN184 KIN/DAN185 KIN/DAN186 KIN/DAN187

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

Fundamentals of Ballet

Fundamentals of Tap Dance

X

X

X

Jazz Dance II

Broadway Dance

X

Summer - with the Greece Trip

Modern Dance I Jazz Dance I

X

X X

31


Course Title

FA 11

KIN-211

History of Prin. of PE

X

KIN-231

Principles of Coaching

Course No.

KIN-243 KIN-251

Strategies for Teaching PE K-12 Motor Dev. & Learning

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

J 13

X X

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

X

X

X X

X X

X

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

X

X

SP 16 X

X X

X

J 16

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-280

Special Topics

KIN-333

Coach Cross Country

KIN-334

Coaching Soccer

KIN/BIO341 KIN/BIO342

Anatomical Kinesiology

KIN-344

Adapted Physical Ed.

KIN/BIO347

Introduction to Nutrition

KIN-357

PE in Pre & Elem Schools

KIN-359

PE in Secondary Schools

X

X

X

X

X

KIN-362

First Aid & Injury Prevention

X

X

X

X

X

KIN/PSY363

Sports & Exercise Psych.

KIN-370

Practicum in Coaching

KIN-380

Internship

Exercise Physiology

KIN-422

Professional Capstone Seminar Professional Capstone Seminar: Ethics in PE Safety & the Law

KIN-441

Organization & Admin.

KIN-442

Measurement & Evaluation

KIN-400 KIN-401

KIN-461 KIN-470

Competitive Skill/Performance Readings in PE

As Needed X X X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

As Needed X X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

KIN-480

Advanced Topics

KIN-490

Independent Study

MAT-096

Pre-Algebra

X

MAT-107

Algebra

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

32

X


Course Title

FA 11

MAT-110

College Math

X

MAT-121

College Algebra

X

MAT-122

Trigonometry

MAT-131

Calculus I

MAT-132

Calculus II

X

X

X

X

X

MAT-151

Statistics

X

X

X

X

X

MAT-233

Differ. Equations

MAT-234

Multivariate Calculus

MAT-241

Applied Linear Algebra

MAT-243

Discrete Math

X

X

X

X

X

MAT-245

Mathematical Proofs

X

X

X

X

X

MAT-252

Computer Statistics

X

MAT-333

Real Analysis

MAT-341

Modern Algebra

MAT-380

Internship

Course No.

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X X

X

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

X

X

X X X

X X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X As Needed

Sec. Math Methods

MAT-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

MAT-490

Independent Study

As Needed

PHY-211

General Physics I

PHY-212

General Physics II

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

X X

SCI-211

Integrated Science for Elem. Teachers Science of Music

SCI-213

Quantitative Reasoning

SCI-261

Astronomy

SCI-262

Geology

X

SCI-263

Atmosphere & Weather

X

Science in Culture

SP 16

X

MAT-471

SCI-311

X

J 16

X

MAT-470

SCI-201

X

X

Geometry & the History of Mathematical Sciences Readings in Math

MAT-400

FA 15

X

X

X

SP 15

X

X X

J 15

X

X

X X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

33

X


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

J 16

SP 16

SCI-361

Evolution & Origins

SCI-380

Internship

SCI-400

Integrated Science Capstone

X

X

X

SCI-423

Neuroscience

X

X

X

SCI-465

Sec. Science Methods

SCI-470

Readings/Science

As Needed

SCI-480

Adv. Topics

As Needed

SCI-490

Independent Study

As Needed

SCI-495

Senior Research Project & Seminar

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

34


Music Division Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

MUA-XXX

Applied Music (All orchestral instruments, piano, organ, vocal, & composition

MUP-XXX

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

X

X

X

SP 14

FA 14

X

X

X

X

Performance Ensembles

X

X

X

MUS-099

Music Convocation

X

X

X

MUS-113

Aural Perception I

X

MUS-114

Aural Perception II

MUS-117

Music Theory I

MUS-118

Music Theory II

MUS-143

Class Piano I

MUS-144

Class Piano II

MUS-161

Vocal Fundamentals

X

X

X

X

MUS-165

Guitar Fundamentals

X

X

X

X

MUS-171

Intro. to Music Technology

X

X

X

X

MUS-213

Aural Perception III

X

X

X

X

MUS-214

Aural Perception IV

MUS-217

Music Theory III

MUS-218

Music Theory IV

MUS-221

Music History and Lit. I

MUS-222

Music History and Lit. II

X

X

X

X

MUS-225

Music History and Lit. III

X

X

X

X

MUS-243

Class Piano III

MUS-244

Class Piano IV

MUS-251

Basic Conducting

MUS-253

Diction I

MUS-254

Music for Elem. Teachers

MUS-255

Diction II

MUS-280

Topics in Music

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

FA 15

X

X

J 15

X

X

X

SP 15

X

X

X

J 14

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

As Needed

35

J 16

SP 16 X


Course Title

FA 11

MUS-291

Brass Methods

X

MUS-292

Woodwind Methods

MUS-293

Percussion Methods

MUS-294

String Methods

MUS-311

Counterpoint

MUS-314

Orchestration & Arranging

MUS-315

Song Writing

MUS-317

Keyboard Harmony

MUS-326

Non-Western Music

MUS-334

Music & Worship

MUS-337

Church Music Methods & Materials

Course No.

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

MUS-340

Junior Recital

MUS-352

Adv. Conducting: Choral

X

X

MUS-353

Adv. Conducting: Instr.

X

X

MUS-371

Sequencing

MUS-380

Internship

MUS-382

Music Teacher Assistant Practicum

MUS-411

Form & Analysis

MUS-432

Pedagogy

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

MUS-440

Senior Recital

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

MUS-441

Senior Recital Project

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

MUS-442

Special Recital

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

MUS-450

Music Methods: Middle & High School

X

MUS-457

Music Methods: Elementary

MUS-460

Music Business

MUS-480

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X As Needed

X

X

SP 16

X X

X

J 16

X

X

X

FA 15 X

X

X

SP 15

X X

X

J 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

Advanced Topics

X As Needed

`

36


Social Sciences Division Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FAM-211

Introduction to Relationships

X

FAM-332

The Ecology of Family Interaction

X

X

X

X

FAM-346

Child Welfare

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

X

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

X

Marriage & Family Counseling Integrated Statistics/ Research I Integrated Statistics/ Research II

X

HIS-113

World Civilization I

X

HIS-114

World Civilization II

X

X

X

X

HIS-115

American Studies

X

X

X

X

HIS-211

Michigan History

X

HIS-221

U.S. History I

X

HIS-222

U.S. History II

HIS-321

American Colonial

HIS-324

20th Century Am. History

FAM-451 FAM-453 FAM-454

HIS-327 HIS-332 HIS-340

X

Medieval History

HIS-342

Renaissance & Reformation

HIS-343

Early Modern Europe

HIS-345

Europe: 1815- Present

HIS-346

Britain: 1688-Present

HIS-361

Holocaust Literature

HIS-362

Latin American History

HIS-380

Internship

HIS-432

History & Religions of the Ancient Near East

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

History of American Foreign Relations The Classical World: Greece & Rome Tudor-Stuart Britain 1489-1714

HIS-341

X

FA 15

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X X

X

X As Needed X

X

37

J 16

SP 16


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

J 15

Historiography

X

HIS-480

Victorian

X

X

HIS-461

Church History

X

X

HIS-470

Readings in History

HIS-480

Victorian Studies

HIS-490

Independent Studies

PSY-111

General Psychology

X

PSY-232

Developmental Psy K-12

X

PSY-237

Child Psychology

PSY-238

Adolescent Psychology

PSY-239

Adult Psychology

X

X

X

X

PSY-322

Theories of Personality

X

X

X

X

PSY-341

Educational Psychology

X

PSY-343

Learning & Motivation

X

PSY-346 FAM-346

Child Welfare

PSY-351

Social Psychology

X

X

X

X

PSY-353

Abnormal Psychology

X

X

X

X

PSY-362

Sports Psychology

PSY-380

Internship

PSY-400

Senior Seminar

X

X

X

X

PSY-421

Theories of Counseling

X

X

X

X

PSY-422

Systems of Psychology

PSY-441

Physiological Psychology

PSY-443

Play Therapy

PSY-444

Art Therapy

PSY-452

Techniques of Counseling

PSY-454 PSY-470

Integrated Statistics/ Research I Integrated Statistics/ Research II Readings in Psychology

X

SP 15

HIS-451

PSY-453

X

FA 14

FA 15

X

As Needed

As Needed X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

X X

X X

X X

X

X X

X X X

X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

As Needed

38

J 16

SP 16


Course No.

Course Title

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

PSY-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

PSY-490

Independent Study

As Needed

SOC-111

Intro. to Sociology

SOC-243

Social Problems

SOC-321

Social Theory

X

SOC-342

Substance Abuse

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Child Welfare

X

Sociology/Small Groups

X

Inter-Cultural Communication

X

SOC-353

Social Psychology

SOC-380

Internship

As Needed

SOC-400

Senior Seminar

As Needed

SOC-417

Minorities

SOC-432

The Family

SOC-441

Gerontology

SOC-454

Integrated Statistics/ Research I Integrated Statistics/ Research II

X

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

X

X

X

X

X

X

SOC-346 SWK-346 SOC-351 COM-321 SOC-352 COM-311

SOC-453

FA 14

X

X

X X X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

SOC-470

Readings in Sociology

As Needed

SOC-480

Advanced Topics Seminar

As Needed

SOC-490

Independent Study

As Needed

SSC-161

World Geography

SSC-211

American Government

SSC-262

Geography of North America

SSC-312

World Affairs

SSC-451

Social Studies Research

X

SSC-464

Secondary Social Studies Methods

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

SWK-111

Intro. to Social Work

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

SWK-221

Human Behavior in the Social Environment I

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

39

J 16

SP 16


Course No.

Course Title

SWK-222

Human Behavior II

SWK-311

Social Welfare Policy

SWK-331 SWK-332 SWK-333 SWK-344 SWK-346

Social Work Practice I: Individuals & Families Social Work Practice II: Groups Social Work Practice III: Comm. & Organizations Substance Abuse

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

X

FA 14

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

Child Welfare

X X

SP 15

X X

X X

X

X

SWK-441

Gerontology

SWK-450

Field Practicum

X

X

X

X

SWK-451

Field Practicum Seminar

X

X

X

X

SWK-454

X

X

Human Diversity

Integrated Statistics/ Research I Integrated Statistics/ Research II

X

X

SWK-417

SWK-453

X

X

X

X

X X

X

FA 15

X

X

X

J 15

X

X

X X

X

SWK-462

Senior Seminar

X

SWK-470

Directed Readings

As Needed

SWK-480

Advanced Topics

As Needed

SWK-490

Independent Study

As Needed

X X

40

J 16

SP 16


Teacher Education Division Course No. EDU-230 EDU-231 EDU-233 EDU-234 EDU-243 EDU-262 EDU-333 EDU-335 EDU-338 EDU-342

Course Title Principles & Philosophy of Education School Observation Practicum Intro. to Special Ed. & the Exceptional Learner Emerging Educational Models in Special Ed. Art for Elementary Classroom Teachers Computers & Technology in Education Early Childhood Curriculum Theories & Methods of Learning Disabilities Assessment & Diagnosis for Learning Disabilities Dev. Read./Lang. Arts Methods

FA 11

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

J 13

SP 13

FA 13

J 14

SP 14

FA 14

J 15

SP 15

FA 15

J 16

SP 16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-344

Content Area Literacy

EDU-346

Reading & Writing in the Content Area (K-8)

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-352

Pre-Primary Meth./Materials

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-363

Diverse Populations & Differentiated Inst.

X

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-371

Young Child & Community

X

EDU-372

Assessing & Teaching the Young Child

EDU-381

Educational Psychology

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-382

Teacher Assistant Program

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-430

Directed Teaching Seminar

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X

Admin./Supervision of Early Childhood Programs Current Issues in Learning Disabilities Education Practicum in Learning Disabilities

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-441

Assessing Early Literacy

X

X

X

X

X

EDU-443

Severe Reading Problems

EDU-445

Assessing & Correcting Reading Problems

EDU-431 EDU-432 EDU-434

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X

41

X


Course No. EDU-450 EDU-460 EDU-465 EDU-466 EDU-467 EDU-468 EDU-469

Course Title

FA 11

Elem. Science Methods Elem. Social Studies Methods Methods of Teaching a Foreigh Language Secondary Journalism Practicum Secondary Speech Practicum Secondary Psychology Practicum Secondary Chemistry Practicum

J 12

SP 12

FA 12

X

X

X

X

SP 13

FA 13

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

J 13

J 14

SP 14

X

X

EDU-486 EDU-487 EDU-488 EDU-489 EDU-490

Independent Study

EDU-491

Music Directed Teaching Practicum

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed

EDU-485

SP 16

X

Advanced Topics

EDU-484

J 16

X

EDU-480

EDU-483

FA 15

X

As Needed

EDU-482

J 15

X

Directed Readings Field Experience: Early Childhood Elem. Directed Teaching Practicum Elem. Directed Teaching Prac./Cross Cultural Secondary Directed Teaching Practicum Sec. Directed Teaching Practicum/Cross Cultural K-12 Directed Teaching Practicum K-12 Directed Teaching Practicum/Cross Cultural Advanced Practicum in Teaching Education Teaching Eng. as a Second Language Practicum

SP 15

X

EDU-470

EDU-481

FA 14

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

As Needed X

X

X

X

X

42


Program Planning Form Graduation Worksheet (Alternative: Use Program Evaluation in WebAdvisor to take this information) Name

______________________________________

Catalog Used

___________

Major

______________________________________

Total Credits

___________

Minor

______________________________________

Total Credits

___________

Minor

______________________________________

Total Credits

___________

Core Requirements Course

Credits

Major Course

Credits

43


Minor Course

Credits

Minor #2 (if desired) Course

Credits

Educational Professional Program Elementary

Secondary

Credits

44


Changes/Substitutions

Approval

In File?

Credits in progress Credits next semester Credits the following semester Learning Center credits (not counted toward graduation) TOTAL CREDITS

Cumulative GPA (2.0 needed) Major GPA (2.5 needed)

Minor GPA (2.0 needed) 12 hours in major at Cornerstone 32 hours overall at Cornerstone 24 of last 33 hours at Cornerstone 64 hours at Cornerstone for bachelor honor graduates List all program changes made in consultation with your advisor. These changes must have approval recorded with the Registrar’s office to be valid.

45


4 – Year Planning Guide (or see Divisions for pre-estabished 4 yr. plans) Student Name: ___________________________ Student # ______

Advisor: ___________________________

Major: _________________________________

Minor: ____________________________

Freshman Year 1st Semester

Freshman Year 2nd Semester

Course

Credits

Course

Credits

Total Credits

Total Credits

Sophomore Year 1st Semester

Sophomore Year 2nd Semester

Course

Total Credits Junior Year 1st Semester

Credits

Course

Credits

Total Credits Junior Year 2nd Semester 46


Course

Credits

Course

Total Credits

Total Credits

Senior Year 1st Semester Course

Senior Year 2nd Semester Credits

Total Credits

Credits

Course

Credits

Total Credits

47


Frequently Asked Questions Class Standing Q: A:

How many credit hours do I need to be a Sophomore, Junior, Senior? Freshman 1-25 semester hours Sophomore 26-57 semester hours Junior 58-89 semester hours Senior 90 or more semester hours

Education Program Q: A:

Why are there no majors in Elementary or Secondary Education? Because of state requirements regarding the granting of Bachelors degrees. The state of Michigan requires that students in education programs major in approved content areas.

Q:

Compared to the core requirements for other programs, the core requirements for Elementary and Secondary Education are different. Do students have to take an additional course or courses if they enter or leave the Education Program? Yes, under normal conditions.

A:

Financial Aid Q: A: Q: A:

Can I take classes concurrently at Cornerstone and other institutions to total up to a full-time load and get full-time student aid? No. For further explanation contact Student Financial Services. How much financial aid will I lose if I drop a course or courses? If and how much financial aid you lose depends on the number of credits you are dropping, whether you retain full-time status or drop to part-time status, and if you drop before, during, or after the drop-add or refund period. Before dropping your class or classes, contact Student Financial Services to determine the financial consequences of the contemplated change.

Graduation Q: A:

Can I walk at graduation and complete my last few hours in the summer? It is possible but not encouraged. Students may march in May commencement ceremonies only if: ▪ they have six or fewer hours to complete to graduate ▪ they have an approved plan for completion of outstanding degree requirements by August 15 in the same year following the May commencement ▪ they have a completed and approved Academic Policy Exception form (per Deans' Council decision, March 15, 2000)

Q: A:

What GPA do I need to graduate? What GPA do I need in my major? You need a cumulative GPA of 2.0, 2.5 in your major, and 2.0 in your minor. See individual programs in your catalog, such as Teacher Education, for further discussion of GPA requirements.

Q: A:

Do remedial courses count toward the 120 or 129 completed hours for graduation? No. Remedial credits do appear on the transcript, however are not included in Program Evaluation which calculates all requirements for graduation.

Q: A:

How do students track graduation requirements? Program Evaluation (formerly known as degree audit) is available through WebAdvisor. (CU Eagle’s Quick Links – WebAdvisor)

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Junior Writing Program Q: A:

Do all students need to complete the Jr. Writing Portfolio requirement? Students who enrolled the fall of 2006 or after must complete the requirement.

Q. A.

Where can I find information about the Jr. Writing Portfolio requirement? Information is included in your catalog under the section on Academic Information.

Q. A.

Do I have to register for the Jr. Writing Portfolio? No, as you reach junior status (58 credits), the Registrar’s office will automatically register you for the English Jr. Writing Portfolio. At that time, you will be given access to the course in Odyssey where you can find specific information about what papers are required and instructions on how to submit your portfolio.

Music Program Q: A:

Q: A:

Is it acceptable to take Music Theory I (MUS-117) and Aural Perception I (MUS-113) in separate semesters since they are separate courses? No. These courses must be taken concurrently, as stated in the current catalog. Material is coordinated between the classes, and prerequisites also require that these courses be taken concurrently so you will not fall behind in the degree program. Is it acceptable to take a semester break from a large ensemble, applied lessons, Music Convocation, or piano? No. All degrees require students to participate in one of the three large ensembles (MUP-X01, -X11,-X21) every semester. Likewise, students must also take applied lessons and Music Convocation every semester. Students must continue enrollment in piano courses until they pass they keyboard proficiency exam.

Overlapping Requirements Q: A:

What do I do if my major and minor overlap; i.e., they have some of the same courses? If your major and minor overlap, you will need to take additional courses to fulfill the requirements for the major and/or the minor. The only exception to this is the Business Division which does allow double counting of Business courses between programs. Counting across divisional boundaries is in transition. Some obvious exclusions include Business Administration Major/Business Administration Minor, Accounting Major/Accounting Minor. The Business Division has allowed double counting of the 30 business core hours so that students may take multiple majors/emphases. Some additional double counting can occur when a specific course is listed in multiple majors. Examples include: Systems Analysis (Accounting and CIS), some of the International courses (International Management and International Marketing). Also if a student carefully designs the internship experience it may also be double counted. Regardless, the student still needs 129 unique semester hours. In spite of the overlap, the programs still meet state requirements for total hours in the major and minor.

Physical Education Credit Q: A:

Do varsity sports or military service count for physical education credit? A maximum of two credits will be awarded for participation in two different varsity sports or two years of active duty or four years reserve duty of military service. These credits will be allowed as physical education electives only. They may not be used to fulfill any part of the three-hour general education requirements. Persons with military experience, described above, must take KIN 149 (Principles of Wellness).

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Prerequisites Q: A:

What should a professor do when students show up for class without having taken the prerequisite for that class? There are several possible responses. One would be to ask follow-up questions of the student. There might be an appropriate reason (i.e. took course at another college which would fulfill the pre-req but transcript is not here, received permission from appropriate people to take course and pre-req at the same time, etc.). Another would be to try to assess whether the student is academically ready for the advanced class. The term ―prerequisite‖ means ―required as a prior condition to something,‖ and although the professor may assume the right to dismiss the student from the class, in the absence of explicit policy, it is probably better to proceed with caution.

Repeating Classes Q: A:

What courses do I have to repeat? Any course in your core, major, minor, or program which you fail. Also COM -112 and ENG-212 (PSY-232 Teacher Ed. majors only), & all EDU courses must be repeated if you get a grade lower than C-. (See Repeat Policy on Page 9).

Scheduling Concerns Q: A:

“Do I have to take...?” or slight variants such as “How many credits of.... do I need?” It depends on the program. Check the catalog.

Q: A:

Can I take courses here that are not in the schedule? Yes, you can take independent studies or directed readings if you meet the class standing and GPA requirements and have a supervisor with whom to work. Contact your advisor first. Independent studies or directed readings should not be scheduled for courses which are in the Cornerstone University undergraduate catalog. Relatedly, you may take courses off-campus with a guest student application or participate in one of a number of academic off-campus study programs with which Cornerstone is affiliated. See the Cornerstone University undergraduate catalog for details on these programs.

Science Q: A:

Can I count my science courses as fulfilling core requirements and as part of the requirements for my major and/or minor? Yes, as long as they meet the criteria for both and they are not counted as separate courses in your calculation of total hours toward graduation. (Revised April 2001)

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What is Assessment? The ―assessment of student learning‖ is an important part of the rhythms of a growing and vibrant academic community. In order to evaluate student academic work and to provide data helpful to logistic and strategic decisionmaking, the mission of assessment at Cornerstone University is to measure student learning in relationship to the curricular and co-curricular goals of the University for the purpose of providing a quality educational experience for each student through continual enhancement of programs and services. Students and advisors should discuss the importance of a number of routine assessment practices including:  The completion of both Junior and Senior assessment testing in fulfilling graduation requirements.  The completion of the end-of-course faculty evaluation forms at the end of every semester.  The needed diligence to complete the embedded course assessment of student learning (tests, quizzes, papers, recitals, etc.)  The participation of the Cornerstone community in broad-based campus assessment, including such instruments as the Student Satisfaction Inventory, the Institutional Priorities Survey and other similar items.  The completion of any other assessment done to enhance the programs offered by the University. For an understanding of the overall nature of the University’s assessment efforts, please see the ―Cornerstone University Assessment Plan‖ – available on the CU website at www.cornerstone.edu/assessment.

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Department List Accounting & Finance Administration Building Phone: 616.222.1445 (x1445) ▪ Fax: 616.222.1540 Contacts:

Shari McKee, Accounts Receivable Coordinator, x1345

The Accounting Office assists and serves students in several areas: handling payments, issuing paychecks, cashing personal checks up to $75, issuing checks and monthly reports for various student organizations, and issuing vehicle permits.

CAMS Faber Hall 216 Phone: 616.222.1535 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1511 ▪ cams@cornerstone.edu The Center for Academic Media Services (CAMS) handles all multimedia needs for the Communication and Media Studies division while continuing to serve the wider CU community. For the CMS division, CAMS maintains audio and video gear for student rental and troubleshoots department technology issues. For the rest of campus, CAMS offers a limited selection of multimedia equipment rental, including camcorders, tripods, and sound recorders. For a small fee, CAMS provides multimedia services for class assignments, including DVD burning, scanning, and digitization of analog media.

Financial Services Ketcham Building Phone: 616.222.1424 Fax: 616.222.1400 Email: secfin@cornerstone.edu Contact:

Carol Nixon, Office Manager

The Student Financial Services office has two primary functions. 1. Assisting students in receiving the maximum amount of financial assistance for which they qualify under federal, state, and Cornerstone University programs. 2. Assisting students with setting up plans to pay for the portion of their school bill not covered by financial aid.

Information Systems Bolthouse Hall, Room 143 Phone: 616.222.1510 (x1510) ▪ 888.272.4001 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1511▪ technologysupport@cornerstone.edu Contact:

Bryan Johnston, Director of Information Systems, Operations Services and Support

Information Systems is committed to maintaining the Cornerstone University technology infrastructure including network equipment and software applications as well as assisting clients (students, staff, and faculty) in various areas such as: Network Software Application & Internet Questions ▪ Password Resets & Login Issues ▪Telecommunications ▪ Computer / Peripheral Devices Support and Repair ▪ Laptop Initiative Administration ▪ Classroom Technology

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Students are encouraged to contact the Technology Support Center with network software application and hardware questions. Students are also encouraged to report potential problems with Cornerstone University laptops, lab PCs, and lab printers to the Technology Support Center.

Learning Center Miller Hall Phone: 616.222.1596 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1595 Contact:

Director of Academic Support, x1519 Julie Skinner, Coordinator of Learning Support Operations and Office Manager, x1596 Tammy Looman, Writing Center Director, Office - Quincer 206, x1977 Dr. Nicole McDonald, Student Disability Services: National Certified School Psychologist, Disabilities Accommodations Officer, x1909

The Learning Center offers customized academic assistance to students: One-on-one tutoring and/or group tutoring by appointment ▪ Writing tutoring appointment and on a walk in basis ▪ A two-credit Learning Strategies Class (CLC 100) The Learning Center also coordinates accommodations for students (Student Disability Services) who have documented physical or learning disabilities. Students should contact the Learning Center to become registered for learning or disability accommodations. Students with a 3.0 or higher overall grade point average who would like to apply for a paid position as a peer tutor (3.5 gpa or higher in the discipline they would tutor), contact Kristin Warren at 222.1953. The following statement (updated Nov 2008) reflects the University’s stand in relation to student accommodations as determined by Student Disability Services. (This statement should be published in all syllabi): The university will make reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities, in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The purpose of accommodation is to provide equal access to educational opportunities to students affected by disabilities, and the university does not intend that the standards be altered, nor that the essential elements of programs or courses be changed. Students having documented disabilities may apply for accommodations through Student Disability Services (SDS), which is part of the Cornerstone University Learning Center located in Miller Hall on the main campus. In the event that students have questions regarding whether they are eligible for accommodations, how they might provide appropriate documentation of disabilities, or how they might handle a disagreement with a professor over questions of accommodation, the Director of Academic Support should be contacted immediately at (616) 222-1596 or via email at learningcenter@cornerstone.edu. Further information about applying for and utilizing accommodations is provided in the Student Handbook and on the university’s website.

Library Miller Library Building Phone: 616.222.1458 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1405 Library Website: www.library.cornerstone.edu Dr. Fred Sweet, Director Circulation: Brian Holda The Circulation Department of Miller Library handles the checkout and return of library materials, fines for overdue materials, and course reserves. Reference: Fay Bush, Assoc. Director of Access Services

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Phone: 616.949.5300, x1329 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1405 The Reference Department of Miller Library is responsible for reference and research questions Technical Services Dept: Eric Bradley, Assoc. Director of Technical Services Phone: 616.949.5300 x1628 CMC (Curriculum Materials Center); and Interlibrary Loan: Gina Bolger: 616.949.5300 x1245 Other Library staff include: Gail Atwood, Jamie Tiemeyer, Debbie Shelly, April VanPutten, Mary Ellen Lawlor, (also, about 27 part-time student workers.) Miller Library is also home to the Writing Center and the University Archives.

Mail Services Corum Student Union Phone: x1532 ▪ Fax: 616.254.1626 ▪ Email: john.miedema@cornerstone.edu Contact:

John Miedema, Supervisor

Hours: 9am to 4pm: Monday – Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday. The Mail Service Center offers stamps, various sizes and types of envelopes, U.S. Postal services, and UPS and Fed Ex. Mail is delivered to the student boxes once a day. All students (resident and commuters) are assigned a mail box. There is a $10 refundable box key deposit. For any mail sent to students at Cornerstone, use the following address: Student Name Campus Box # Cornerstone University 985 E. Beltline NE Grand Rapids, MI 49525 Copy Center/Print Shop Corum Student Union (Part of Mail Services) Phone: x1279 ▪ Fax: 616.254.1626 ▪ printshop@cornerstone.edu Hours: 9am to 4pm: Monday – Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday Services Available: Copying: Black/White or color on white and colored papers in various sizes and weights. There is a minimal charge for printing. Other Services: Stapling, cutting, folding, 3-hole punching, booklets, coil binding, glue binding, and transparencies are available for a minimal charge. There is a print work order on Eagles Nest for easy electronic submission. First, select University Offices from the menu. Then select Print Shop and Mail Services. Then select Print Shop Work Order. Click the hyperlink for new work order. Complete the form and attach a document. Then select Submit. Walk up service is also available.

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Off-Campus Studies Programs (See Spiritual Formation Information below) Provost Office Administration Building Phone: 616.222.1589 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1434 Contacts:

Rick Ostrander, Provost Tim Detwiler, Associate Provost Liz Wheeler, Executive Assistant

Registrar's Office Administration Building Phone: 616.222.1431 Contact:

Gail Duhon, Registrar

The Registrar's Office provides the following services: registration, grades, grade reports, transcript evaluation, Professional & Graduate Studies (PGS) advising, degree audits, and official transcripts. The office also handles aspects of the graduation process, which include ordering caps and gowns, degree audits, graduation applications, and the verification of a student’s ability to participate in the graduation ceremony.

Retention Ketcham Building Phone: 616.222.1402 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1418 Contact:

Kay Landrum, Director of Retention

The Retention Office serves as a resource for students experiencing academic, social or financial difficulties. The office also coordinates the campus-wide effort to provide a quality educational experience by improving programs and student services.

Spiritual Formation

Corum Student Union Second Floor Phone: 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Gerald Longjohn, Vice President for Spiritual Formation Chip Huber, Dean of Student Engagement The Division of Spiritual Formation challenges students to become more holistic and fully devoted followers of Jesus through a variety of programs including:

Career Services Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1433 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contacts: John Warren, Associate Dean of Career Services

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Career Services offers a variety of services, programs and resources to undergraduate and graduate students and alumni in the following areas: career advising, job listings, resume preparation and job hunting assistance, on-campus jobs, internships, career fairs, and credential service. Chapel & Worship Arts: Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Matthew Westerholm, Associate Dean of Worship Arts and Chapel Come together for the word and worship of God on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 10 a.m. and Sunday at 9 p.m. in the Hansen Athletic Center. Mandatory Chapel provides corporate guidance in spiritual formation and various forms of worship with an emphasis on the spoken Word. If you have specific questions or concerns regarding chapel attendance, please send an email to: Amy.Flesher@cornerstone.edu. Commuter Life: Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Ryan Davis, Assistant Director of Commuter Life & Student Activities It’s not just people living on campus who have all the fun! Check out page 12 in the student handbook for more information specifically for you! Counseling Services Miller Hall 616.222.1441 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1541 Contacts:

Scott Courey, Director of Counseling Services Rachel Rose, Counseling Services Assistant

Counseling services are available to all traditional undergraduate Cornerstone students who may struggle with issues due to the stresses and challenges of life and the college experience. All services are confidential and based upon unchanging Biblical truth. All full-time Cornerstone students are eligible for 10 free counseling sessions per school year as part of their student insurance plan. Counseling appointments may be made by calling 616.222.1441. Counseling Services are located in Miller Hall and open Mon. through Friday. Discipleship Groups: Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Christine Mutch, Associate Dean of Discipleship

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A place to be yourself – in community – and talk together about God, the bible and this journey we call life. Groups are available for commuters, residential students or a blend of the two. A variety of topics are available. The AssociateDean of Discipleship trains the small group leadersto carry out the process of spiritual formation through peer ministry. . Global Opportunities Corum Student Union Second Floor Phone: 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact:

Nicolas Babarskis, Director of Global Studies Minga Ndjerareou – Global Engagement Trip (Mission/Service)

There are cross-cultural opportunities for you to use your spiritual gifts and serve in a variety of cultures. Health Services Miller Hall 616.222.1441 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1551 Contact: Dana Marino, Director of Health Services Carol Carpenter, Office Manager On-campus health services are available for any student, faculty or staff member who is ill or injured. Our Health Service is under the direction of Grand Rapids Family Physicians and a mid-level provider who are on campus two to three days each week during the academic year. Other staff includes Registered Nurses, and an Officer Manager. Available medical services include allergy injections, TB tests, immunizations (travel and basic), crutches, suture removal, work physicals, pelvic exams, and many health education brochures, etc. Care for common colds, strep, mono, urinary tract infections and pregnancy testing are some of the additional needs that can be cared for in Health Services. Minimal and fair charges for supplies used for special needs (such as syringes and medicines) will be billed to the individual. Laboratory services, Rx orders and other diagnostic tests are available per the college physician’s orders or the student’s own physician’s orders. We desire to supplement the existing care of the primary care physician whenever possible. Student insurance is handled through Health Services. Our plan is a student accident and illness plan and is designed to supplement the existing plan of a student’s family. The plan allows for a $300 Health Service benefit, a $200 travel immunizations benefit and limited off-campus services when referred by Cornerstone University Health Services personnel. A $10.00 co-pay per visit with a Physician or mid-level provider will be charged. There is no co-pay for consultations with Registered Nurses. Brochures are available through the office in Miller Hall or online at the Cornerstone website under Health Services. Traditional undergraduate students carrying six credit hours and traditional graduate students carrying five credit hours are automatically enrolled in this plan. Coverage is world-wide. Leadership Development: Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contacts: Chip Huber, Dean of Student Engagement Cornerstone offers opportunities to apply for more than 150 leadership positions on campus. 58


Pastoral Care and Mentoring: 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Gerald Longjohn, Vice President for Spiritual Formation Christine Mutch, Dean of Discipleship Chip Huber, Dean of Student Engagement Staff members in the Spiritual Formation division are available to provide a listening ear and a caring presence during the good and bad times of your college life. For those who are looking for someone to journey with them for a longer period of time, contact Christine Mutch who can partner you with a peer mentor, faculty or staff member, or an alumnus who is ready and willing to walk with you during your current chapter of life.

Community Life: Corum Student Union Second Floor 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Molly Heemstra, Director of Community Life Abby Smith, Resident Director – Cook & VanOsdel Halls Jim VanStensel, Resident Director – Babcock & Crawford Halls Kimberly Bytwerk, Resident Director – Keithley & Pickitt Halls Late night talks in the lounge, section sneaks, educational events and more are a part of residence life. Each residence hall section has a resident assistant (R.A.) to help you get acquainted with one another and your new surroundings. Don’t hesitate to ask any questions! If you have specific questions regarding housing, please call the Spiritual Formation Office at x1423 or send an email to Molly.Heemstra@cornerstone.edu. Student Activities 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: Ryan Davis, Assistant Director of Commuter Life & Student Activities Student Government 616.222.1423 ▪ Fax: 616.222.1529 Contact: CUSG President Chip Huber, CUSG Advisor The Dean of Student Engagement serves as the advisor to the Student Government Association and works with the six Executive Council members in overseeing the Student Government’s Committees, programs and budget.

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Advising Handbook