Issuu on Google+

AMATEUR BOXING PRO BOXING KICKBOXING MMA APRIL 2013

ISSUE 07

101 WITH NADINE CHAMPION CORNERMAN’S

ADELAIDE BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS Who are the champs of 2013?

OZAN CRADDOCK

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE ON WINNING FIGHT MOVES

A crash course in determination

PLUS THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ’AUSSIE’ JOE BUGNER $7.95 (incl GST) ISSN 1839-9894

02

9 771839 989002

THECHIEF Peter Graham’s quest for total world domination


FO UN 10 DA 0 D TI IS ON C ME OUN MB TE ER D SH IP S

OW !!

ringside view

SA LE N

ON

APRIL 2013

SYDNEY’S MOST EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS ONLY BOXING & FITNESS CENTRE

09

08

CONTENTS AMATEUR BOXING

5-19

2013 AMATEUR RANKING

6

Cornerman’s summary of the Country’s most prestigious tournament.

FIGHTER PROFILE: DANIEL LEWIS

9

A young amateur star gunning for Olympic and Commonwealth glory.

STRETCHING PROTOCOL FOR BOXERS

15

Exercise physiologist Sandy Sher explains neck and thoracic stretching.

SHIPS

ER B M E M 0 0 5 LY N O O T D E IT LIM

PRO BOXING

20-34

THE CAREER OF “AUSSIE” JOE BUGNER

20

Sean Castle takes a closer look at the highs and lows in the life of an “Aussie” boxing great.

22

24

CONTROLLED AGGRESSION 4

22

Boxing veterans and emerging stars fight it out in Windsor.

MUNDINE VS GEALE 2

24

The “Real Deal” still the king, while “The Man” contemplates the future.

FIGHTER PROFILE: OZAN CRADDOCK

29

This young Queensland slugger beats the odds and enters the professional ranks with a bang.

kickBOXING

35-45

JNI - PERSONS OF INTEREST

30

An action packed night full of exciting boxing and Muay Thai fights.

NEXT GENERATION - KICKBOXINGAND MMA

36

NSW and ACT’s kickboxing and MMA stars on the Central Coast.

THUNDER AND LIGHTNING

36

Peter “The Chief” Graham – a mixed martial artist in every sense of the word.

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT 7

42

The biggest and best one yet.

mixed martial arts STORM DAMAGE 2

46-59 46

8 warriors duke it out in Canberra’s Heavyweight Eliminator Gauntlet.

JUDGE PROFILE: SAL D’AMATO

48

The UFC’s judge tells us about his job.

RISE OF MARK HUNT

Get Fit, Without Getting Hit! For membership enquiries and more information call (02) 9264 4492 or contact www.corporatefightgym.com.au sales@corporatefightgym.com.au facebook.com/corporatefightgym

54

Looking back on the road to the UFC heavyweight title.

dvd catalogue

62

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING

58

Matt Spooner shows us how to get strong and fit using bodyweight exercises.

DIRECTORY

60-61

www.cornerman.com.au


APRIL 2013

ringside view

From the

Corner I

Editor: Tomas Vysokai Sub-editor: Allb Etsareoff Creative director: Nathan Wynyard Contributing journalists: Penny Pryor Keeta Nova, James Cooney, Hakan Saglam Sarah Ngo, Kiara Brooks, Matt Spooner, James White, Joel Keegan, Anja Stridsman, Sam Atkinson, Janice Yee, Sean Castle, Christian Baker, Sandy Sher, John Davidson, Rodney Williams, Wayne Tolton Contributing photographers: Milos Lekovic Hakan Saglam Marcel Jendruch Louie Abigail Werner Kalin Shelly Barnes Stephen Walton Ross Mailer Phillip Wheeler Wayne Tolton Leigh Taafe Jay Christiaens Peter McDermott Darren Burns

REMEMBER doing an interview with Peter Graham in early 2012 when he told me that along with his kickboxing titles he wanted a title belt in boxing and MMA. Since our chat he’s won the NSW title (and defended it successfully with a KO), Printing: Hero Print Australia hasn’t lost any of his MMA fights Distributor: Wrapaway and even opened up a new gym in NSW. He also somehow found the For all advertising enquiries: time to go back to school and finish 0415490963 or sales@cornerman.com.au a business course. Janice Yee writes For all editorial inquiries: about this and more on page 39. tomas@cornerman.com.au The Australian Boxing Titles were in Adelaide this year and we bring you two very different reports from NSW and QLD. Also, on page 5-6 there is our national amateur ranking, so look for your name if you have competed in this prestigious tournament. After a very quiet January there have been a lot of exciting local events and we bring you reports from amateurs to pros in all the ring sports. We have approached exercise physiologist Sandy Sher to show us essential stretching movements for boxing on page 14. Anja Stridsman has watched the Warriors of the Mongkon TV series and you can read her review on page 35. OXING MMA XING KICKB XING PRO BO Nadine Campion from UFC gym Sydney shares her favourite technique in ‘101 AMATEUR BO E BOXINGS ADEL AIDPIO with’ and UFC judge Sal D’Amato tells Cornerman more about his interesting NSHIP CHAM Wh o are the H IT W 3? 1 champs of 201 10 profession. ISSUE 07

APRIL 2013

I hope you have been enjoying our magazine so far, we bring you the new issue every quarter now. Please send us your feedback and questions to tomas@ cornerman.com.au

NADINE AMPION CH N’S CORNERMA

DOCK OZAN CRAAD crash course

n

in determinatio

EP GUIDE STEP-BY-ST NING ON WIN FIGHT MOVES

Yours truly, Tomas Vysokai tomas@cornerman.com.au For everyone that lives and breathes ring sports.

PLUS

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ’AUSSIE’ JOE BUGNER GST) $7.95 (incl ISSN

1839-9894

9 771839 989002

02

’ F IE H THEC ination

st for total world dom

Peter Graham’s que

Cover photo: Milos Lekovic www.southsidestudios.com.au

STRIKING GOLD Rodney Williams gives a New South Wales perspective of the National Boxing Championships

I

T was only with the whole group posing for a photo in their schmick Morgan supplied uniforms that you could see what a young team was being fielded. Even our two big guns, Willis Meehan and Jai Opetaia, were only 17 years of age and already boxing in the male elite category. It was three or four days into the competition when I had Bodo Andreas comment to me after another NSW victory. “Oh, it’s great to see NSW is kicking hard.” My reply to him was, “Yes, but more importantly kicking with young legs.” This was not only in reference to the athletes, but also to the newly formed board. Our young team and relatively young amateur boxing association board made us an easy target for other states and the critics that reside within our state itself. But we soon proved our point. So with 40 relatively young athletes, two great captains in Shelley Watts and George Kambosos, the NSW Dragons set their sights on the six hard days of competition before us. Each day we held team training sessions, which were well attended by all the athletes on the team. These sessions were not at the local park or a trendy local gym. No, these training sessions were held in the underground car park of the hotel we were staying in. The industrial feel of this space – of concrete, steel and tar – helped put an edge on our boxers. Working in this space with the kids were some of the state’s finest trainers. These included Igor Goloubev, Garry and Chris Large, Nudge Mieli, Tapu Opetaia, Alf Davies, Tom Lambert and myself. It was a boxer’s paradise with many great boxing minds to choose from and lots of inspiration to be imbibed.

And let’s not forget Boris Tzyu – a time keeper who would once have done this same job for the great Kostya. Over the first three days NSW had plenty to cheer about. We had a number of athletes win through to the next round of competition. What was most impressive about this was the level of support each athlete competing received from the team. Once the NSW team started chanting, there was no other team that could drown us out. As the camaraderie grew between team members, bonds were getting stronger and the chants louder and louder. Over the last three days of competition the heavens began to open for NSW. With the success of our sub juniors it began to rain gold. This is despite the fact that within the state of NSW we are unable to competitively box kids under the age of 14, these young kids did us very proud. Thanks not only to the great teachings of their home coaches, but also those who run various sub-junior sparring programs. Friday was a rest day for the elite boxers as their finals bouts would make up the Saturday program. So on went the junior and youth finals. Thanks not only to our junior boxers, Friday became a day laden with gold for NSW. Of the last nine bouts on the day’s card, the junior boys cleaned up with six gold and two silver medals! The only thing we lost that day were our voices while cheering. As a result of their winning efforts, Brock Shelley, Satali Tevi-Fuimaono, Mark Glew, Blake Travers, Josh Mckay and Nikita Tzyu are all now members of the Australian junior team to compete at World Championships in Kiev, Ukraine in August this year. Congratulations and best

of luck boys. Take a bow. After an unbelievable Friday the NSW elite boxers had plenty to live up to. As the NSW team athletes entered the Magic Millions Pavilion myself and other state officials were very proud to see a team now filled with great friendships, and strong bonds between athletes of all ages. Of the thirteen bouts on the card, NSW athletes were to appear in six of these contests. I know they say lightning never strikes twice in the same place, but I could only guess that someone forgot to tell this to the NSW elite squad. By the day’s end, five of the six athletes managed to clinch gold. The finish to these seven days are what dreams are made of. Jai Opetaia had the team going crazy with his sensational victory in the heavyweight division. NSW was on fire! And when big Willis Meehan came out to fight an even bigger hometown champion (and Australian Olympian) Johan Linde in the super heavyweight division, the crowd went wild. Throughout the course of this fight there was not a silent athlete in the NSW team section. The chanting, the shouting, the screaming and the support were a thing to behold. Oh, and yes Willis smashed him. We all now knew, especially the Queenslanders, that NSW was back in town in a big way. And if anyone in that pavilion was unsure, the trophy presentation would set things straight. To all the parents and coaches of athletes on this team, be proud of your children. Their behaviour and manners on this trip was second to none. They have not only done themselves and Boxing NSW proud, but you too.


APRIL 2013

Amateur boxing

MALE JUNIOR SCHOOL BOYS

MALE ELITE 47kg

49kg

52kg

1. Josh English (NSW) 2. Robert Trigg (SA) 3. Dylan Perkins (ACT)

49kg

52kg

56kg

1. Andrew Moloney (VIC) 2. Jahmarley Dawson (QLD) 3. James Conroy (NSW)

52kg

56kg

56kg

60kg

64kg

1. Tim Locock (VIC) 2. Nick Cooney (TAS) 3. Matthew Linsey (WA) 3. Ben Dencio (ACT) 4. Stevo Dugec (VIC) 5. Ryan Goodes (SA) 6. Bak Anei (WA) 7. Jessie Travers (NSW) 8. Eddie Neiva (NT) 9. Youssef Dib (NSW) 10. Edward Bon Cos (QLD)

60kg

64kg

70kg

1. Luke Woods (TAS) 2. David Biddle (SA) 3. Callum Cassidy (WA) 3. Shaun Schaaf (SA) 4. Jake Perrins (VIC) 5. Neal Swinton (WA) 6. Josh Keirl (VIC) 7. Glenn McKeown (TAS) 8. Peter Lazurus (QLD) 9. George Kambosos (NSW)

64kg

69kg

3. Anthony Buttigieg (VIC) 3. Liam Nicolson (QLD) 4. Jorge Kapeen (ACT) 5. Aaron Phillips (QLD) 6. Kori Fano (WA) 7. Terry Nickolas (SA) 8. Abe Archibald (ACT) 9. Jeremy Sebastian (SA) 10. Byron Davies (NT) 11. Joseph Corner (TAS)

69kg

60kg

1. Jackson Woods (TAS) 2. Jeremy Udovich (VIC) 3. Brent Rice (QLD) 4. Jason Moloney (VIC) 5. Ziad Aaty (NSW) 6. Jayden Hansen (WA)

75kg

1. Daniel Lewis (NSW) 2. Danny Hayes (WA)

32kg

75kg

1. Jason Fawcett (NSW) 2. Theo Rayfield (QLD)

32kg

81 kg

d) v Angel Rushton (Re (blue) Mamate Schuser

81kg

91 kg

91kg

91kg

1. Willis Meehan (NSW) 2. Johan Linde (SA) 3. Zac Flaukner (TAS) 3. Joseph Goodal (QLD)

Nathaniel May (red) Lynken Dickso n (blue)

38kg

40kg

40kg

42kg

1. Jayden Druery (WA) 2. Sam Cameron Hands (QLD)

40kg

42kg

46kg

1. Bailey Seabourne (TAS) 2. Mitchell Mackie (QLD) 3. Joaby Stevens (NSW) 3. Zachary Leeson (NSW)

42kg

MALE YOUTH 49kg

56kg

60kg

1. Kaleb Kozak (VIC) 2. Liam Pope (BAI) 3. Liam Wilson (QLD) 3. Anthony Falabella (NSW) 4. Luke Blackwell (TAS) 5. Sam Ferro (SA) 6. Innes Matthew (WA)

56kg

60kg

64kg

1. Nathaniel May (WA) 2. Lynken Dickson (NSW) 3. Jack Haines (SA) 3. Isiah Farr (BAI) 4. Isaac O’Rourke (VIC) 5. Tony Ingram (VIC) 6. Dylan Tilmouth (NT)

60kg

64kg

69kg

1. Clay Waterman (QLD) 2. Jason Mallia (BAI) 3. Jesse Williams (VIC) 3. Koen Mazoudier (NSW) 4. Nat Hinchcliffe (BAI) 5. Wayne Fraser (SA)

64kg

69kg

75kg

1. Campbell Somerville (VIC) 2. Alexander Cooper (ACT) 3. Marcus Howard (SA) 3. Brady Robinson (NSW) 4. Reagan%Dessaix (QLD)

69kg

75kg

80kg

1. Luke Pilanoris (VIC) 2. Luke Travers (NSW) 3. Luke Hart (ACT) 3. Niall Curry (SA)

6 www.cornerman.com.au

38kg

1. Dylan Cochrane (TAS) 2. Dahrel Duggan (WA) 3. Pavel Nikiforov (NSW) 3. Ronan Poulos (QLD)

38kg

92kg

99kg

36kg

1. Josh Fitzpatrick (NSW) 2. Sean Mulford (QLD) 3. Dylan O’Sullivan (TAS)

91kg

1. Jai Opetaia (NSW) 2. Jason Whateley (VIC) 3. Mark Smith (VIC) 3. Dean Reid (ACT)

34kg

36kg

1. Dylan Hardy (TAS) 2. Roger Grant (VIC) 3. Henry Torrens (VIC) 3. Simon Cooper (QLD) 4. Tim Parker (SA) 5. Cobbin Robbinson (NSW) 6. Alex Byrne (SA) 7. Zach Baciglupo (QLD) 8. Roy O’Sullivan (WA) 9. Paul Morrison (WA) 10. Jordan Bunder (NSW) 11. Aiden Tait (ACT) 12. Cameron Jasper (BAI)

81kg

34kg

36kg

1. Ben Cameron Hands (QLD) 2. Declan Powell (WA) 3. Jundumarra Layton (NSW)

1. Sam Banney (QLD) 2. Ross Weaver (WA) 3. Daniel Smith (VIC) 3. Jordan Samardali (WA) 4. Stephen Finey (SA) 5. Kurtis Cooper (ACT) 6. Kyle Corpus (NT) 7. Ned Kane (NSW) 8. Jack Game (VIC) 9. Tyler Hein (QLD)

75kg

32kg

34kg

2013 2012

AMATEUR AMATEUR RANKING RANKING

46kg

48kg

1. Ben Wise (VIC) 2. Johnny Silvestro (WA) 3. Joshua Mataele (QLD) 3. Jordan Percey (TAS)

46kg

48kg

50kg

1. Claude Anderson (WA) 2. Josh Parricone (NSW) 3. Reegan Paterson (VIC)

48kg

50kg

52kg

1. Tai Waterman (QLD) 2. Raymond Wood (NSW) 3. Billy Parker (WA)

50kg

52kg

54kg

1. Mitch King (VIC) 2. Kyle Howard (SA)

52kg

54kg

57kg

57kg

60kg

1. Brock Campbell (NSW) 2. Ikenna Enyi (ACT) 3. North Sabetta (WA)

57kg

60kg

63kg

1. Conner Tyson (SA) 2. Guy Rayfield (QLD) 3. Viliami Tupou (VIC) 3. James Lynch (NSW)

60kg

63kg

65kg

1. Michael Peace (SA) 2. Paul Silvestro (WA) 3. Toby Westcott (NSW)

38kg

40kg

1. Tylaer Blizzard (TAS) 2. Tarran Walker (QLD)

38kg

40kg

44kg

1. Josh McGauhran (QLD) 2. Sam Gore (TAS)

40kg

44kg

46kg

1. Julian Jeakings (WA) 2. George Payne (VIC) 3. William Murdoch (NSW) 3. Bryce Hansen (QLD)

44kg

46kg

46kg

48kg

50kg

1. James Beazley (QLD) 2. Yianni Parascos (ACT) 3. Tristen Davis (WA) 3. Sam Goodman (NSW) 4. Martin Snooks (VIC) 5. Christos Kastrissios (NT)

48kg

50kg

52kg

1. Sebastian Wallace (WA) 2. Marshall Kruse (TAS) 3. Matthew Large (NSW) 3. Luke Webb (VIC)

50kg

52kg

54kg

1. Tai Hawkins (QLD) 2. Jacob Cooper (NSW) 3. Madamadiotis (WA) 3. Dean Clarke (VIC) 4. Joseph Dohnt (SA)

52kg

54kg

57kg

1. Nikita Tszyu (NSW) 2. Sacha Peters (VIC) 3. Darren Smith (TAS)

54kg

57kg

60kg

1. Papa Upia (QLD) 2. Ceasar Tapia (NSW) 3. Kosta Antolis (SA) 3. Harry Garside (VIC) 4. Riley Brown (ACT)

57kg

60kg

66kg 70kg

66kg

70kg

75kg

1. Hone Huni (QLD) 2. Amaeze Enyi (ACT) 3. Taylor Walsh (VIC) 3. Tom Holtham (SA) 4. Shelby Stevens (NSW)

70kg

75kg

80kg

1. Satali TeviZFuimaon (NSW) 2. Lachie De Santis (QLD)

75kg

80kg

51kg

1. Fleur Logan (ACT) 2. Kaila Riley (WA)

48kg

51 kg

54kg

1. Kristy Harris (VIC) 2. Kerry Coull (WA) 3. Skye Nicholson (QLD) 3. Eleanor Boden (NSW)

51kg

54kg

57kg

1. Adriana Smith (ACT) 2. Carly Salmon (VIC)

54kg

57kg

60kg

1. Kylie Fulmer (WA) 2. Simone Bailey (VIC) 3. Julie Sims (ACT)

57kg

60kg

64kg

1. Jessica Retallack (QLD) 2. Shelley Watts (NSW) 3. Kim Baldacchino (VIC) 3. Deahna Hobbs (QLD) 4. Angela Saxaby (SA) 5. Kyllie Martell (WA)

60kg

64kg

69kg

1. Dawn Berryman (VIC) 2. Emily Jans (VIC) 3. Emma Carruthers (QLD) 3. Pamela McCelland (NSW)

64kg

69kg

75kg

1. Caitlin Parker (WA) 2. Lauren Sheldon (VIC) 3. Emma Peters (ACT) 3. Pamela McCelland (NSW)

69kg

75kg

80kg

1. Jessica Messina (NSW) 2. Cassandra Lear (VIC) 3. Gabriel Brown (VIC)

60kg

1. Mark Glew (NSW) 2. Luke Adams (TAS) 3. Kade Alexander (VIC) 3. Nelson Savage (SA) 4. Tanner Foord (ACT)

66kg

48kg

FEMALE JUNIOR

1. Blake Travers (NSW) 2. Bailey Lindsay (WA) 3. Andrew Hunt (QLD) 3. Jack Hadley (TAS) 4. Isaac Howard (SA)

63kg

46kg

63kg

1. Josh McKay (NSW) 2. Allan Nicolson (QLD) 3. Jack Gipp (VIC) 3. Jack Seabourne (TAS) 4. Jonah Avia (WA)

63kg

FEMALE ELITE

48kg

1. Adrian Farquhar (ACT) 2. Jack Bowen (VIC) 3. Kai Morriarty (QLD) 3. Brody Burwick (NSW)

60kg

1. Jordan Percey (TAS) 2. Kyle Schneider (NSW)

54kg

36kg

90kg

1. Brock Shelley (NSW) 2. Samson Teremona (QLD)

63kg

65kg

1. Schuster Vaolele (ACT) 2. Kalani Grant (WA)

FEMALE YOUTH 50kg

54kg

57kg

1. Cherneka Johnson (QLD) 2. Tiffany Travers (NSW)

54kg

57kg

60kg

1. Beth Nicolson (QLD) 2. Montana Garth (TAS)

60kg

64kg

70kg

1. Mamate Schuster (ACT) 2. Angel Rushton (QLD) 3. Anne-Maree Kelly (NSW)

SCHOOL GIRLS 40kg

42kg

50kg

1. Tyeisha Palu (NSW) 2. Alexia Johnson (WA)

50kg

52kg

60kg

1. Dakota Garth (TAS) 2. Payton Aird-Cardiff (QLD)

www.cornerman.com.au 7


APRIL 2013

Amateur boxing Clay Waterman (Red) v Jason Mallia (blue)

LEWIS GUNNING FOR OLYMPIC & COMMONWEALTH GLORY Daniel Lewis might have missed out on the London 2012 Olympics but the promising amateur welterweight is setting his sights on medals at next year’s Commonwealth Games and the 2016 Olympics. John Davidson reports.

B

THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT

Wayne Tolton gives a Queenslander’s account of the Australian Championships 2013.

F

ROM a Queensland perspective, our tally of medals says we didn’t have the greatest year at the Australian Championships. Having said that, we certainly took home the elite prizes and showed tremendous promise in the junior ranks. Sam Banney, from Stretton Boxing club in Queensland, dealt with his disappointment of not getting to the 2012 Olympics by taking the Gold in the Elite Male 81 kg division. He did it the hard way and in emphatic style, four fights with four wins. He took not only the gold but also the Arthur Tunstall Medal for the best boxer of the tournament. A remarkable performance by Banney. Jessica Retallack from Queensland was voted the best Elite Female Boxer, scoring a close victory over Shelley Watts in the final. Watts appeared to be running away with the bout until Retallack dug deep and pulled back to win 18:17. There wasn’t a best junior female category, but had there been one Beth Nicolson from the Albert Boxing Club would have certainly taken the title. Beth was ruthless, landing heavy punches from all angles and forcing her Tasmanian opponent to retire after one round. Nicolson’s teammate Cherneka Johnson became the clubs second female national champion in the first bout of the session. Johnson shook her opponent Tiffany Travers early in the first round resulting in the referee giving a standing eight count. Tiffany’s defence improved as the fight went on. Johnson went on to score a comfortable points victory, however.

James Beazley had the bit between his teeth and took the junior gold medal in the 48kg division. He’s a heavy hitter who seemed to get stronger and stronger as the tournament went on. He had to fight hard for the title, though – three fights and three very convincing wins. He got up 16-7 in the first fight, a stoppage in the second round in the second fight and a 19-15 victory in the final. He will certainly be a short priced favourite at the World Championships. Clay Waterman, the former 2011 World Champion at 46 kg’s, showed that he still has the talent and power at 64kg’s by winning the gold medal convincingly by defeating Jason Mallia 10 points to 5. It was a quality match up, but Waterman looked superior throughout the fight, showing incredible poise and anticipation. His punches also looked cleaner and more effective. There is no doubt he’s a force to be reckoned with on the world stage. Keeping it in the family, Tai Waterman (younger brother of Clay) also won his first National Title. We can expect a lot more from this kid. Some of the younger boxers, although not getting the gold medal, showed that they are future champions in the making. In their first year of boxing, brothers Guy and Theo Rayfield both took home silver medals. Both boys losing closely fought contests in their first National Titles appearance! It’s an awesome achievement by any standard. Josh McGaughan of Kirwana Boxing Club comfortably outpointed Sam Gore of Tasmania

winning by a 15:8 margin. Tai Hawkins of Qld also took the 52 kg junior division in dominating fashion as did little Ben Cameron-Hands of Impact. Papa Utia and Hone Huni from Bethania Boxing Club became their clubs second and third National champions, Papa scoring a 15:5 victory over Kosta Antolis of South Australia and Huni defeating Victorias Taylor Walsh 14:10. There were close points losses to a number of Queenslanders which could have gone either way. Andrew Hunt of Bethania was one of these and lost a narrow decision to Bailey Lindsay of Western Australia. Another very unlucky loser was Allan Nicolson from Albert Boxing Club. Allan lost on a countback to Josh McKay from NSW. Most viewers thought Nicolson had done enough to secure victory but the officials saw it differently. Lachie De Santis from Queensland was unlucky to come up against the extremely talented Satali Tevi Fuimaono in his division. Satali’s superior experience was the difference between the two fighters. The 17:2 points margin does not reflect the competitiveness of the bout. Both boxers traded heavy punches and experience was the dominant deciding factor. Jahmarley Dawson was also unlucky to come up against the vastly experience Andrew Maloney with the referee stopping the contest in the final round. In conclusion, Queensland were not as dominant as they have been in previous years

OXING is in Daniel Lewis’ blood. His father, Jason was an Australian champion, and Daniel has been battling away in the ring since he was 10 years old. For him, boxing is a family affair with his father also serving as his trainer. He even has his own gym on his parents’ property at the Hawkesbury, converted from his grandparents’ old house. “Dad’s my coach, it’s a good relationship,” Lewis says. “I grew up around boxing, it was always around my family.” Since entering the ring as a kid, and earning a first round stoppage in his debut bout, Lewis has been hooked on the sport. Now 19, he has earned a string of titles and plaudits along the way, including an AIS scholarship. The current Australian champion at 69kg, after beating Daniel Hayes on points at the recent National Championships in Adelaide, Lewis also went home with the Under 19 64kg title at the Australian Championships back in 2011. That same year he carved a name for himself in Aussie amateur folklore, becoming one of the first Australians to claim a gold medal in boxing at the Commonwealth Youth Games. “I was pretty happy to make history,” Lewis admits. “It was an unbelievable feeling.”

It hasn’t been all smooth sailing for the Windsor fighter, however. After the high of the Commonwealth Youth Games in the Isle of Man came a crushing blow. It was two years ago, at the NSW state titles, when he faced Cameron Hammond. In the second round Hammond landed a sweet left hook and his jaw was broken in three places. Lewis bravely boxed on, finishing the fight, but losing on points. Hammond went on to the London Games but Lewis’s Olympic dream was over and he was forced to spend the next 12 months out of the sport recovering. “It was devastating,” Lewis reveals. “I lost by two points. I only just missed out.” But the Londonderry local has bounced back and successfully returned to the ring in August last year. He has amassed a record of 67 wins and 13 losses from 80 fights. Lewis admits the severe injury and time out was “very tough”, but believes he has come back even stronger now. The truth can be seen in his results. Apart from claiming the Australian title, Lewis has been selected to tour with Boxing Australia on recent representative tours to Cuba and China. At the moment Lewis is in Europe as part of the Australian team on a five-week tour where he will compete at several

AIBA Star International Tournaments. He was one of just four boxers selected for the Academy Team. Lewis has a big couple of years ahead of him. The World Championships are coming up and he wants to represent Australia at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow and the Rio Olympics in 2016. Turning professional after that is his aim. “I don’t want to just go and get a tracksuit,” Lewis says. “I want a medal. A gold medal, that’s my dream.” The New South Welshman grew up admiring the style of former heavyweight world champion Mike Tyson. “Just how he brings his aggression into the ring,” Lewis says. “A crowd pleaser. I like to please the crowd.” Lewis likens his own fighting style to one with a lot of power and controlled aggression. Already he has fought some memorable battles at the NSW and Australian titles with Tim Tsyzu, son of Aussie boxing legend Kosta. “I try to hurt people to the body,” Lewis says. “I like to go for knockouts, to take it Lewis powers through out of the judges’ hands. It shows you’re at Tom Watson a different level. Tim’s a real tricky fighter. Not particularly powerful, but a good dancer. More of a mover.” Away from the ring Lewis enjoys riding motorbikes and watching motorcross. He bills himself as an outdoors person: “I like to go shooting, hunting with my family.” But it’s in the ring where Lewis really excels. At 19 he has already achieved a lot, but the best is yet to come. So far he has sparred with former IBF junior-lightweight world champion Gairy St Clair and regularly receives tutelage from iconic Australian trainer Johnny Lewis. With a great like Lewis giving him advice, this Penrith-born pugilist will surely go far. “Gairy comes to my gym,” he says. “It’s pretty good training with him. He’s a good guy. Johnny Lewis does help me a lot. I just take it all in. It’s a privilege to work with him.”

www.cornerman.com.au 9


APRIL 2013

Amateur boxing

PCYC

Mark Glew

BOXING BOXING REPORT REPORT

PCYC

Cornerman takes a closer look at the PCYC boxing scene.

FIGHTERS IMPRESS AT NATIONALS N NSW PCYC Boxing take on the Australian Championship 2013.

SW PCYC Boxing Academy achieved some great individual and team results at the Amateur Boxing National Titles, demonstrating that it is in a great position to continue to build upon the development work begun nearly 5 years ago. Among many notable individual performances at the recent Amateur Boxing National Titles at South Australia were gold medal victories to PCYC Academy boxers Josh Fitzpatrick, Satali Tevi-Fuimaono, Jason Fawcett and Mark Glew. The PCYC Academy also won awards for “Best Team Overall” and “Best Junior Team”. These individual and team results are a clear indication that the development work initiated by the PCYC is bearing fruit. Five years ago, a review of the training processes and resources undertaken by the PCYC identified a number of issues hindering the program. Primarily, there was a lack of coaches at junior level, no forum in which juniors could compete, and no development opportunities for boxers or coaches. A number of strategies and corrective actions implemented as a result of the review have addressed these matters and

it is to be expected that NSW amateur boxing will continue to see the benefits for years to come. Each of the gold medalists from the PCYC Academy program handed in stellar performances.

Josh Fitzpatrick

The first boxer to win a gold medal from the PCYC Academy program was schoolboy 38kg Josh Fitzpatrick, the pocket rocket fighting out of Sutherland PCYC. Fitzpatrick struggled to click into gear in his semi-final fight against West Australian boxer Dylan O’Sullivan, winning a narrow 8:7 decision in a bout that didn’t showcase the skills this young man has. Some sage words of advice from his father and coach Sean Fitzpatrick, transformed Fitzpatrick into a different boxer in the final. His opponent, Sean Mulford of Queensland, had his dreams of a gold medal quickly snuffed out, by Fitzpatrick’s smooth footwork and powerful combinations. Fitzpatrick landed some telling blows from late in the first round, which gave him the confidence to counter box, a skill not well developed by most at his age. The final score of 12:5 was an indication of how effective Fitzpatrick was at

scoring, particularly with his dynamite right hand. There wasnt a better performance in the schoolboy division.”It’s a great result for Josh and the team at Sutherland PCYC. They are so thorough with the way they train the kids there, that I’m sure they will produce many more State & National Champs in following years” said Academy Director Joel Keegan.

Satali Tevi-Fuimaono Umina PCYC Junior 75kg Satali Tevi-Fuimaono won his 3rd straight Australian Title with the style, flair and power that he has become renowned for. His opponent, tough and rugged Queenslander Lachie De Santis, tried everything he could to compete and upset the rhythm of Satali but could not contain the Brisbane Waters High School Captain who was clinical, repeatedly landing powerful shots that forced one 8 count against a very willing opponent. Satali raced away to win 17-1, the biggest winning margin of the entire week of the National Championships. The World Amateur Championships await Satali later this year and Keegan is upbeat about his prospects, “it was a near faultless performance from

Satali Tevi-Fuimaono

Satali, despite what was a pretty disrupted preparation. Qualifying for the World Championships has been a big goal for a while, but we will need to improve another 10-20% to be a medal chance . This looks like being the biggest World Championships on record, with both Cuban and American representation, as well as the entire European and Asian blocks, so we will be ready!”

Jason Fawcett Fellow Umina PCYC Schoolboy 32kg Jason Fawcett, who only stumbled onto boxing less than 12 months ago while doing Archery at the Umina PCYC, was given little chance against the highly-fancied and undefeated Queensland sharpshooter Theo Rayfield. However, it was the Umina power puncher who proved too sharp, landing clean shots with both hands and racking up a big score by the end of the second round. The final score was 12-4 with Fawcett’s dominance punctuated by some telling punches. Keegan was always confidant of Fawcett’s chances, “I never doubted Jason ”Pacman” Fawcett for a second. He had everything going against him - a red hot opponent, needing to drop weight, being a rank novice with only two fights himself - I knew it wouldn’t matter. This kid is a competitor!”

Mark Glew Call Call us on us(02) on (02) 9715 9715 2083 2083 and and get started get started NOW NOW or email or email us atusjoe@joesboxing.com.au at joe@joesboxing.com.au for more for more information information 20/118 20/118 Queens Queens Rd Five Rd Five Dock, Dock, NSWNSW www.joesboxing.com.au www.joesboxing.com.au

Muswellbrook PCYC Junior 66kg Mark Glew, fighting at his first National Titles, had to find something special in each of his two bouts to claim his gold medal and his plane ticket to the Ukraine for the

World Championships. In coming from behind in to snatch victory in the dying moments of both his semifinal and final, Glew showed great character and earned a reputation as the ”heart-attack kid”, such was the anguish of the coaching staff as they were forced to watch him twice claw back a deficit with just seconds to spare. In the semi-final, Glew had his hands full against Victorian Kade Alexander, whose rangy build and awkward style posed real problems and had him two points down going in to the final round. Digging deep, Glew overwhelmed his opponent and the points denied him in the first two rounds started to flow for a very close win. The final was a very similar story, with Glew’s Tasmanian opponent slipping away to a two point lead until Glew charged home in the last round. In an incredibly close decision, Glew won on count back after the scores were locked 8-8 and his path to World Championships was secured. Keegan has always been impressed with Glew, “Mark is a special kid who trains with a great team up at Muswellbrook PCYC led by Lance Cox. What he was able to do, come from behind and virtually refuse to lose, showed so much character. It wouldn’t surprise anyone that watched him train though. He will have to, and I’m sure he will lift another level for these World Champs!”

Other notable results A number of other young New South Wales PCYC Academy boxers also achieved notable results: Junior 48kg Sam Goodman (Sutherland PCYC),

who was desperately unlucky to not win his semi-final bout against an ACT opponent who he had previously beaten twice. Goodman looked good thing beaten, and headed for selection for World Juniors along with teammates Glew & Tevi-Fuimaono, but he will have to regroup and set some new goals. Schoolboy 36kg Pavel Nikiforov (Sutherland PCYC) put in a strong performance in his first National Titles, only going down by a few points in a tough semi-final to another boxer from the strong Sutherland PCYC stable. Junior 44kg Will Murdoch (Muswellbrook PCYC), was able to hold his own for long patches against decorated two time Australian Amateur Champion Julian Jeakings from Western Australia. With only a handful of fights under his belt, Will’s improvement is certain. Elite 81kg Jordan Bunder (Umina PCYC) was not at his best, but certainly better than a one-sided score suggested, as he was bundled out of the 81kg quarter finals 17:9. Jordan will be back bigger and better. Schoolboy 54kg Kyle Schneider (Umina PCYC) who was desperately unlucky not to have an opportunity to win a gold medal when he was ruled out by the doctor before the final. There is no doubt these results are an indication of how strong the PCYC Academy Boxing program is. That strength is based in the quality of the coaches who dedicate their time to help develop these young, motivated boxers, and the individual clubs who fundraise and lend resources to support the efforts of coaches and athletes. The leadership and mentoring that is created from boxing is what PCYC is about and will continue to support.

www.cornerman.com.au 11


FEBRUARY

amateur boxing 64kg Photos by Hakan Saglam

SOUTHS

JUNIORS

now&then Cornerman takes a closer look at the AMATEUR boxing scene.

69kg 75kg

Thang Ledo vs Keegan Moriarty Harry Nguyen vs Edward Hart Brown Shane Doyle vs Tyrell McCullagh Josh Crealy vs Michael Pengue Anthony Kassis vs Glenn Williams Jordan Thomas vs Steve Rados

81kg

Pouno Lopeti vs Ed Burns

91kg

Loyd Brown vs Rob Lee

91+kg

Mohamad Abdul Rahman vs Alex Trafton

Winner (Pts)

Winner(Pts) Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

RSC (Rnd 1) Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

MARCH Max Underwood vs Jordan Thomas

A

FTER a prolonged Christmas period, amateur boxing fans gathered together on Tuesday night to witness some great matchups. We bring you highlights from the February and March events. You can watch all the fights on www.cornerman.com.au

February 2013

CKO BOX

ING RING

& lympic g Sizes ed Low Rin shing l th a l F r Ch Wi i Colou • Mult Ce display ar entran aChine M es sMoke e Quot e r F • eas • All Ar es ive Pric it t e p ss m • Co Busine d e n w yO • Famil Service ly d n ie • Fr

ard, O • Stand

75kg Jordan Thomas vs Steve Rados

HIRE

fan one Ste

Ph

Email ckoboxi n

8 2 4 8 7 0400 9

g@me.c

om

Both boxers showed really good technical boxing skills, Rados kept his hands up from the opening round, but didn’t want to engage in an array of fistic exchanges and was circling away. Thomas kept the centre of the ring for the most of the fight and stayed low, initiating attacks more and scoring valuable points. His confidence was growing each round that showed on the judges scorecards, which ruled Jordan Thomas a winner.

81kg Pouno Lopeti vs Ed Burns This was their second encounter since July last year when these two fighters met here at Souths. On the last occasion, Lopeti took a close points decision over Burns. They started the first round cautiously. Lopeti’s quick lead hand was working well but it didn’t take long until the pace started to pick up. Lopeti kept connecting with his left hook and was throwing more in multitudes. He

was getting better of the exchanges in round two and after a barrage of body and head shots, unanswered, referee Maria Pittiglio stepped in for a mandatory 8 count. The final round was a mixture of holding, wrestling and hitting behind the head as Burns was trying to come from behind. Lopeti was loading up on his shots, both keen to get in close and personal. After three rounds the winner was announced, now with a score of 2 fights to nil to Pouno Lopeti.

64kg Harry Nguyen vs Edward Hart Brown Main event of the evening was in the elite category over 3x3 minute rounds. Pressure fighter Nguyen couldn’t keep Brown where he wanted him - on the ropes. He used the ring and moved well and was just always a little quicker to the mark. Round two was better for Nguyen. He had Brown steady and was able to connect with few clean shots. In the last round Nguyen came storming from the corner as he needed to score more points to turn the fight around, but Brown was able to move and turn from the corners and secure him self a points victory.

March 2013 64kg William Shaaker vs Vincenzo Bilal Bangato This was an even bout fought over 3x2 minute rounds. Both boys were

happy to trade punches, Shaaker had the reach advantage and Bangato wanted to get close to hurt his opponent with hooks and uppercuts. After a well executed right hand from Shaaker, referee John Shamsabad stepped in for an 8 count to check on the health of the fighter. It was a well-fought fight by both boxers resulting in a close points victory awarded to William Shaker.

64kg Andrew Wang vs Keegan Moriarty Southpaw Wang was moving well with his lateral footwork, keeping his hands down and connecting well with his power hand. Moriarty could not find his rhythm in the opening round and was just taking counters. He had a better last round when he started to trade more but it wasn’t enough and Andrew Wang got the decision.

75kg Max Underwood vs Jordan Thomas

showed slick move but couldn’t get through his opponents guard to score while he was open and was getting hit. As the fight progressed Robinson stopped moving as much and was more susceptible to his heavy-handed Altimeemy. After a well-fought 3 rounds of fistic fury, the judges saw this one in favour of Ali Alimeemy.

AIBA Technical and Competition Rules The shaking of hands shall take place under the referee’s direction and before the commencement of the bout (not when the boxers come out to box after the ‘bell’ signaling the commencement of the first or any subsequent round); and again after the announcement of the contest result. Any further shaking of hands by boxers shall be prohibited.

64kg

69kg 75kg 91kg

Matt Robinson vs Ali Altimeemy Andrew Wang vs Keegan Moriarty William Shaaker vs Vincenzo Bilal Bagnato Josh Crealy vs James Dark Jayden Haywood vs Abdullah Jamal Mohamed Yassine vs Charles Pools Max Underwood vs Jordan Thomas Brad Marks vs Matt Charlton Paul Ogedengbe vs Alex Trafton

Winner (Pts) Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts)

Winner (RSC)

Winner (KO) Winner (Pts)

Winner (Pts) Winner (Pts)

Pouno Lopeti vs Ed Burns

This was another even and very entertaining bout where a high pace was set early in the opening round. Underwood’s four short hook combinations got Thomas’ legs to wobble and referee stepped in for the count. Thomas looked unfazed and stepped into the offensive in round two. Eventually as Thomas moved forward he started scoring with left and right combos. It was another fight that ended with the judge’s decision in favour of Max Underwood.

64kg Matt Robinson vs Ali Atimeemy This fight was set for 3-minute rounds. Altimeemy controlled the center of the ring straight from the opening bell. Robinson

www.cornerman.com.au 13


ARPIL 2013

amateur boxing

THORACIC AND NECK STRETCHING PROTOCOL FOR BOXERS Accredited Exercise Physiologist Ph:0412388705 e: sandy@live2bewell.com.au w: www.live2bewell.com.au

Sandy has over 15 years experience in Personal Training, group fitness training,Exercise therapy and Occupational Rehabilitation. She has extensive experience in working with individuals with different conditions including musculo skeletal injuries, metabolic, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, rheumatic and autoimmune conditions.

S

upper back in a flexed position for prolonged periods in training, sparring and fighting to protect the head and neck. The impact of getting hit in the head or the body during sparring and fighting competitions may cause the muscles in the area to tighten and spasm. Stretching is an essential tool for all athletes to assist them perform at an optimal level by ensuring muscle lengths are restored.

• Place the foam roller perpendicular to your body • Lie back on roller under your lower back • Lift your hips up and lengthen your arms over your head. • Use your legs to help move the roller from you upper and lower back. • Roll back and forward 10-20 times Fascia is a structure of connective tissue that surrounds the muscle. They provide a sliding and gliding environment for muscles. This exercise helps to release the fascia in the lower back and thoracic region allowing better muscle mobility in these regions. We often prescribe this exercise to help warm up the muscles in the back.

SANDY SHER

TRETCHING plays an important role in enhancing performance, injury prevention and rehabilitation, ensuring muscle and tendon lengths are restored , assist in balancing out the body and improving postures. Specifically in boxing where the athlete is required to work in a forward flexed head and hunched over trunk position. Boxers tend to have tight thoracic and lumbar spine muscles as a result of keeping there

THORACIC / LUMBAR FASCIA RELEASE STRETCH

NECK SIDE FLEXION STRETCH

The Live 2 Be Well Exercise Physiology team has put together a stretching program specifically for neck and thoracic spine of boxers to help balance muscle length - tension ratio in the upper trunk. The stretches below should be done when your muscles are warm ie. after a workout or warm shower. Never stretch to point of pain or force a stretch. If you have any pain or adverse symptoms consult your doctor immediately.

Sitting up tall on chair, extend on hand to hold under the seat pan of chair • Place the other hand on the top of your head • Gently pull head down to shoulder until you feel a stretch on the side of your next extending down to the shoulder • Hold 10-15 secs and repeat on the other side Boxers use their upper trapezius muscles to keep their hands up at chin level to protect the head and neck region. The side neck stretch will help to restore muscle length in the upper trapezius muscles and range of motion in the cervical spine.

STATIC THORACIC SPINE RELEASE STRETCH ON ROLLER This exercise can be done on a foam roller or a rolled up towel. Lie face up on the roller down your spine Knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Palms facing up Lie for 5 mins and notice how your trunk muscles start to relax and stretch out over this time period. This stretch is helpful in restoring balance in the upper trunk region. Since boxers train in a forward trunk flexion position this exercise will help release tight muscles in the thoracic region.

CHIN TUCK STRETCH Standing or sitting up tall Looking straight ahead with neck in a neutral position • Pull chin inwards without tilting head down (make a double chin) • Hold for 5 – 10 secs • Repeat 5x The chin tuck stretch is important to help bring the head and neck back into a neutral position and assist with restoring good head and neck posture.


APRIL 2013

amateur boxing CAT AND CAMEL STRETCH Start in a 4 point position on your hands and knees • Arch your back up to the ceiling and look down towards your knees

• Arch your back down to the ground and look up to the ceiling • Move slowly between the 2 back arches 10 x This exercise we often use to help gently warm up the back and move the spine through a full extension and flexion range of motion.

SEATED THORACIC ROTATION STRETCH

CHEST STRETCH

Sitting up tall in a chair

• Lift your arm up and make a 90 degree angle at the elbow • Place the elbow and forearm against the wall/ bar • Turn you feet away from the wall until you feel a stretch in your chest • Hold for 15-20 seconds • Repeat this with the other arm

• Place one hand on the same side of the chair • Place the other hand on the opposite knee • Rotate as far as you can to face the back of the chair • Hold 15-20 secs and repeat on the other side As boxers tend to adopt the flex trunk and head position in training and competing, this stretch will help return the spine to a neutral position and release the tight thoracic musculature.

Standing next to a door frame or post

In order to protect the head and neck, fighters have to adopt a hunched over position and keep the thoracic spine and shoulders in a forward flexed position for long periods of time. The chest stretch will assist with restoring the flexors of the trunk and help improve overall posture.


APRIL 2013

amateur boxing

STEVE ASHWORTH

CORPORATES WITH GLOVES

TIM CHILLINGWORTH Age: 47 Occupation: Retail Company: Faster Pussycat Favorite fighter: Sugar Ray Leonard How did you get into Corporate Fighter training? I was actually challenged by a good mate of mine after we went to a Corporate Fight Night. We’d always joked about it over the beers but it’s another thing committing to it. How is it going? It’s unbelievable. No booze since New Year and a complete change of lifestyle and mindset. What was the most cha llenging so far? Pushing ever y part of my min d and body to the limit and beyond. Which I thought I had.

ALBERTO GOODMAN Age: 27 Occupation: Personal trainer, cocktail bartender Favorite fighter: Manny Pacquiao and Miguel Cotto How did you get into Corporate Fighter training? It was through word of mouth, through work. I expressed a lot of interest in and applied, and now I’m part of it. How is it going? My progress through the start till now is beyond words. One word to describe how I’m going “Awesome!” What was the most challenging so far? keeping on The hardest thing that has been so far is the dieting and . training in ance perform my through off paid has it but track,

After 10 weeks of hard training Cornerman speaks to some hard working Corporate fighters about their experience.

GAN CAMERON MCGOO Age: 28 Occupation: Ser vice Manager Company: R Marine Sydney Favorite fighter: Roy Jones Jr. (in his prime) How did you get into Corporate Fighter training? I’ve always wanted to put on the gloves and challenge myself. I saw the set up of past CFs and the program is ver y professional. How is it going? Great – fitness is excellent and so is learning the basics of boxing and learning something the gym. new every time I walk into llenging so far? cha st What was the mo the last three and is giving up alcohol for The mental challenge, as the end it’s all in but es a lot of discipline half months. Boxing tak positive.

Age:44 Occupation: Managing Director Company: Buell Favorite fighter: Muhammad Ali, Michael Katsidis, Sam Ah-See, Mark Demori How did you get into Corporate Fighter training? Through Johnny Lewis. How is it going? The best thing I have done for myself in a long time. What was the most challenging so far? Coming from a zero skill base.

DON JANSEN Age: 33 on April 16, three days before fight night! Occupation: CF O Company: Uber Biz Favorite fighter : Forrest Griffin, Mi ke Tyson How did you ge t into Corporate Fighter trainin g? Ando signed up my two brothers and myself, and Peter from our work. How is it goin g? Pumped and ready to go. Still working on improving spee d, head movement and everything– footwork, slipping and boxing. Look ing for ward to a grea t night. What was the most challeng ing so far? Breathing, you’d think that’d be ea sy! Breathing durin gassing is tricky. g sparring and no t


APRIL 2013

amateur boxing

THE CAREER OF “AUSSIE” A JOE BUGNER

By Sean Castle

Photo by Werner Kalin

USTRALIAN boxing fans have enjoyed the recent resurgence of Aussie fighters venturing overseas and competing successfully in big international bouts. Immediately the deeds of Middleweight World Champion Daniel “The Real Deal” Geale come to mind with his two victories in Germany against local fighters Sebastian Sylvester (IBF title) and Felix Sturm (WBA title) in hostile territory. We’ve recently had Sam Soliman also defeating Sturm in Germany in an IBF middleweight title eliminator and it was not too long ago that Michael “Rocky” Katsidis was taking on allcomers and Vic Darchinyan was cleaning up every foreign fighter put before him. The last generation of Australian boxing fans have been spoilt by the arrival of top level fighters who for whatever reason have left their homeland and decided to ply their trade down under. In the past twenty years we have had two of the greatest fighters of their generation settle down under in undisputed world champions Kostya Tszyu (Russia- Junior Welterweight) and Vic Darchinyan (Armenia- Super Flyweight), adopting Australia and making their life here. A search through the record books shows a long and distinguished list that also includes the class of world champions Johnny Famechon (France) and more recently Lovemore Ndou (South Africa). When examining such a topic it is important to look closely at the career and the contribution to their sport that each individual has made. Therefore it is entirely appropriate to include the Former British Empire (Commonwealth) and European Heavyweight Champion Joe Bugner amongst this select group of fighters and rightfully recognise his position in this part of Australia’s rich boxing history. Born József Kreul Bugner in Hungary in 1950, Bugner holds triple nationality and citizenship, holding passports with the United Kingdom, Australia and his native homeland of Hungary. To get a clear understanding of Bugner’s life it is necessary to understand the environment of Eastern Europe in the period following World War II. This section of the world was very unstable politically. With the advent of the Cold War, Hungary, along with a long list of Eastern European nations, fell to Communist Soviet (USSR) forces in 1956. This was the catalyst for the Bugner family fleeing perscution and seeking refuge in England. Bugner’s professional career is remarkable in that it spans across an incredible four decades, commencing in England in 1967 and finally drawing to a close in Australia 32 years later in 1999. Bugner competed in an amazing 83 heavyweight contests, winning 69 (43 KOs). There was no indication that such longevity was on the cards when Bugner lost his first professional fight, courtesy of a 3rd round stoppage against mediocre Englishman Paul Brown. Brown only claimed two victories in a thirteen fight professional career, one being Bugner. For the sake of fairness it is only right

to point out that Bugner twice avenged this early defeat by knocking out Brown in both rematches. Following his knockout in his debut fight, Bugner had to make a choice on what path to take. Respond and continue with his dream of becoming a professional fighter or take up a trade position in industrial England. And respond he did. Demonstrating a major difference in approach to the often pampered professionals of the modern era, Bugner stepped into the ring an astonishing 33 times between 1968-70, for 32 victories and a narrow points decision loss. The defining fight in his career came early in 1971 when Bugner took on the beloved English icon Henry Cooper for the British Empire (Commonwealth) and European titles, in a time when these titles were held with prestige and where often held in-lieu of world titles as European fighters were often locked out of the big sanctioning bodies by American promoters. Cooper, who became famous for his 1963 bout with the legendary Cassius Clay (later Muhammad Ali) where he had Clay in serious trouble, sprawled all over the canvas towards the end of Round 4. Legend has it that Clay only survived when trainer Angelo Dundee cut Clay’s glove between rounds giving the American valuable time to recover and stop Cooper on cuts in the fifth. In a fiercely contested title fight that went the full scheduled 15 rounds, Bugner was awarded a narrow and highly disputed points victory, sending Cooper into retirement. Following this victory, Bugner would feel the full brunt of English displeasure from here on, with many fight fans actively turning against the Hungarian-born fighter resulting in his popularity plummeting to at an all-time low. When assessing Bugner’s standing in boxing it is important to have a sound knowledge of the history of the sport. Unlike today, where there are many soft belts given away and too many sanctioning bodies to count, the 1970s, when Bugner was at his best, basically had only the traditional WBA and the more recent breakaway WBC sanctioning world title fights. Often regarded as the golden era of heavyweight boxing with champions of the ilk of three-time undisputed world champion Muhammad Ali, “Smokin” Joe Frazier and the fearsome George Foreman reigning at various times, easy fights were often hard to find. Contrast this with the poor state of the heavyweight division today where quality contests and interest are at an all-time low. Fighters such as Bugner must lament the fact that had they been born a generation later, the titles and the riches that go with them would have been there for the taking. Bugner, who spent the best part of the 1970’s ranked in the Top 10, has a record that shows that he twice went the distance with Ali and also once with Frazier, getting up off the canvas in the 10th round against Smokin’ Joe to lose a tight decision. It incredibly took Bugner until his 59th professional fight for him to finally get his shot at the world championship. Coming up against Ali in Kuala Lumpar, Malaysia in 1975, Bugner showed dogged

tenacity to push the fighter widely recognised as the greatest of all-time to the full 15 rounds in a bout where Ali collected a then record purse of $2 million dollars. The conditions and environment of the fight meant that Bugner had to arrive at the open air stadium in a bullet proof van as there was a credible assassination threat should Bugner defeat Ali, a Muslim, in an Islamic nation. The period after the loss to Ali marked the decline in Bugner’s career as a legitimate threat to the world title. A lack of top quality opponents and motivation led to a series of retirements and sporadic comebacks throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s for the fighter dubbed by Ali as the best white fighter in the world. Relocating to Australia in 1986 and adopting the moniker “Aussie Joe”, Bugner again set out on a journey with the hope of one last shot at glory. Beginning his “Aussie” career by defeating former WBA Heavyweight Champion Greg Page over 10 rounds, Bugner returned to his former home of England in 1987 to take on multiple Mike Tyson whipping boy and future WBC Champion Frank Bruno. This stoppage loss to Bruno at Tottenham Hotspur’s White Hart Lane in front of a large Bruno crowd again sent “Aussie Joe” into another retirement. It was during the next period out of the ring that Bugner branched out into various other walks of life including acting in a variety of movies for Director Bud Spence, coupled with some other high-risk ventures such as the vineyard he bought and operated in Queensland. Its failure and the mounting debts that accompanied it, and also being inspired by George Foreman regaining the world heavyweight championship at age 45, led Bugner back into the ring in 1995, 8 years and 11 months since the Bruno fight. Highlighting his obvious international class and the lack of depth and quality in the Australian fight game, Bugner was able to capture the national championship in his return bout against Vince Cervi via a 12 round points decision. 1996 brought the regional Pan-Asian Boxing Association (PABA) title after knocking out big-punching Young Haumono in Canberra. Multiple Australian champions Colin Wilson and “Big” Bob Mirovic were on the receiving end of decision losses in 1998 as Bugner prepared for his match up against former world champion James “Bonecrusher” Smith for the lightly regarded World Boxing Foundation title. Smith’s retirement at the end of Round 1 due to a dislocated shoulder gave “Aussie Joe” a “world” title belt at the age of 48 before a final victory in 1999 against Levi Billups finally closed the curtain on an astonishing 32 year ring career. Maybe if Bugner fought at his peak in another era then a genuine world title belt might be rightfully placed in his trophy cabinet. Nevertheless, as Australia pays due respect to its “imported” and home grown champions, it is appropriate to recognise the contribution and service of “Aussie” Joe Bugner to this great sport over such an extended period.

www.cornerman.com.au 21


APRIL 2013

PRO boxing Photos by Milos Lekovic.

Sam Mawson relentless pressure paid off

CONTROLLED

4 N O I S S E R G AG

A full house packed the Windsor Function Centre in February to watch an entertaining seven-fight professional card full of blood, guts and promising young fighters. John Davidson reports.

T

HUNDER Boxing’s fourth promotion featured a mixture of newcomers, veterans and debutants in western Sydney. The main event was focused on the mauler from Minchinbury, Valentine Borg, in his third professional bout. A talented amateur champion, Borg turned pro in July 2012 and had so far racked up two wins from two fights. In his third fight the youngster faced Filipino Allan Jay Tuniacao Good exchange between Glen Purvis (right) and Corey Hess

over eight rounds for the vacant NSW lightweight title. A promising young puncher, Borg weighed in at 60.8kg while his older, more experienced opponent hit the scales at 60.65kg. With a slight weight and height advantage, Borg made it count. The New South Welshman started the fight by demonstrating his power, causing Tuniacao to smile back at him at one point. In the second round Borg continued to land

some big shots, but Tuniacao returned in kind. The third round progressed much like the first two – Borg showing off his impressive speed and power, looking to catch the southpaw on the ropes, while Tuniacao aiming to hit Borg on the counter. In the fourth round Borg started to ramp up the damage he was inflicting with a flurry of dazzling punches. Tuniacao, now based in Canberra, managed to stay on his feet but he was clearly hurting, with blood coming out of his nose. Borg’s relentless pressure paid off in the fifth round as, after dishing out another punishing barrage, Tuniacao decided he’d had enough and the fight was over. Borg, who had been sparring with the likes of Michael Katsidis, Gairy St Clair, Paul Fleming and Lenny Zappavigna in preparation, was just too strong for the 25-year old Filipino. The NSW lightweight title is just the beginning for the undefeated Borg, who appears destined for bigger and brighter things. Appearing in his fourth fight was Tamworth’s Aaron Davis. With a record of one win from three bouts, Davis was up against Luke Norton for the WBF lightweight Asia Pacific title. Norton, coming off a string of five consecutive losses, proved to be tough opposition in the ten round bout. Based in Sydney, Norton started the fight well trying to work off his left jab. With a long amateur background behind him, Norton showed off some fancy footwork and was happy to box from the outside. Davis waited patiently, stalking the Sydneysider and looking for an opportunity.

In the third round Davis worked Norton on the ropes, landing a barrage of hooks, with Norton trying to counter. Norton was saved by the bell in this round, with Davis going in for the kill and going close to knocking his opponent down. Norton keep moving slickly in the fourth round, at times proving hard to hit, but Davis kept chipping away and tried to turn it into a brawl. Norton was successful with some one-off counter shots, but Davis’ higher work rate meant he was ahead on points at this stage. Norton came out in the fifth round more aggressive, coming forward instead of backing away and increasing his tempo. But Davis roared back with a great two-punch combination, scoring with his punches freely. He continued this in the sixth and seventh rounds, trapping Norton on the ropes, with another strong assault at the end of the eighth. In the final two rounds both fighters started to trade shots tirelessly, both pushing for the win and both firing away in the final seconds as the bell sounded for the end of the fight. It what was an exhausting battle; Davis got the victory and the title, by majority decision, and is now looking to move down in weight to featherweight. This fight proved to be the last of Norton’s 12-year boxing career, with the Panania pugilist announcing his retirement immediately after the bout. Also on the card was a cruiserweight showdown between Port Macquarie’s Shane Quinn and New Zealander Atalili Fai. This proved to be a mismatch early on, with the 36-year old Australian dominant against his older Kiwi rival. Fai might have had more pro fights than Quinn heading into this one, 11 to Quinn’s four, but the bruising, heavier Marrickvillebased fighter was just too strong. Quinn, who weighed in at nearly eight kilograms more than Fai, started the fight cautiously and let the New Zealander come to him. Quinn searched for an opening and found one quickly, with Fai bobbing and weaving to avoid his hard punches. Quinn soon found his range, unleashing a number of big hooks, which knocked Fai down in the middle of the first round. Fai was up at the count of eight but it mattered little, with Quinn loading up his shots and quickly dropping Fai again with a lovely left/ right punch combo. Fai couldn’t recover this time and Quinn got the TKO ten seconds before the end of the first round. Earlier in the night Leroy Brown took on Iranian Amir Randjar in an eight round middleweight tussle. A Rouse Hill resident, Brown started well and had Randjar on the back foot. The more experienced Randjar stumbled in the first round and held on to Brown, tackling him, and then was warned by the ref. In the second round Brown dictated the tempo of the fight as Randjar continually dropped his hands. Then Brown suffered a bad cut near his left eye, after a head clash. The fight was stopped but continued after inspection from the doctor and Brown increased his line of attack. Brown almost finished Randjar in the second round, with blood appearing around the Iranian’s nose, but the former kickboxer stayed upright. In the third Brown kept delivering a lot of damage with some nice use of his left jab and the referee stepped in to end it, saving Randjar from any more punishment. Both fighters ended this bout a bloody mess after some furious action. In a six round welterweight clash Bashir Sadiq rumbled with Jason Mac Gura. An exciting young fighter who made his pro debut in July 2012, Sadiq used his height to good affect. Originally from Afghanistan but now based in Blacktown, Sadiq showed nice speed and technique to earn a third

round TKO. A powerful right jab put Mac Gura down with a minute left in the third round and the Filipino couldn’t beat the count. Penrith’s Sam Mawson defeated Kiwi Daniel Maxwell in four round middleweight fight. Mawson, appearing in his second bout, earned a unanimous 40-36 decision with an aggressive but effective display. He was busier of the two and much quicker, taking the fight to Maxwell, and the New Zealander battled bravely but had no answer.

In the opening bout of the night debutants Corey Hess took on Penrith resident Glen Purvis over four rounds. In a tight bout, Purvis was the slicker of the two and got the points decision through a higher work rate. Purvis managed to land the cleaner punches over Hess, who had Michael Katsidis in his corner and who showed a lot of heart on his professional debut. In an open and bruising encounter, Purvis received the unanimous decision 3937, 39-37 and 39-38.

Val Borg with his team

Val Borg in action

www.cornerman.com.au 23


APRIL 2013

PRO boxing

“THE REAL DEAL”

STILL THE KING AS “THE MAN” CONTEMPLATES THE FUTURE

Photos by Louie Abigail

24 www.cornerman.com.au

By Sean Castle

can have little to complain about as he beaten by a fighter at the peak of his game despite putting in a brave effort himself that will encourage calls for a third and final “decider” after Mundine took the honours in 2009. Both fighters entered the ring just after 11pm after most of the undercard bouts went the distance, with the exception being the Kimbo Slice vs Shane Tilyard heavyweight slugfest. And both were keen to highlight their indigenous heritage on their arrival to the ring as well as on their boxing trunks. This was after the crowd was forced to sing the national anthem while both fighters were still in their dressing rooms due to Mundine’s threat to stage a protest on

international television by boycotting the anthem to highlight his perceived mistreatment of Aborigines throughout Australia. Once the bout was underway, both fighters understandingly spent the opening couple of rounds finding their range and adapting to the pace of the fight. Early on it was Geale setting the pace as he tried to use his recent world title experiences to his advantage. Mundine was able to avoid most of the dangerous combinations with solid defence and slick footwork, ensuring that no real damage was done. In the middle to later rounds the 37 year old Mundine was expected to slow down and struggle, but he demonstrated excellent condition as he willingly

BRUNKER MOVES CLOSER TO A WORLD TITLE By Sean Castle

S

YDNEY featherweight “Aussie” Joel Brunker proved he is a serious contender for the world featherweight with a solid win over former Mexican WBO World Champion Ivan Hernandez on the Mundine vs. Geale II undercard. The world-rated Richmond fighter has compiled an unbeaten record of 25-0 (14 KOs) as a professional and had recently returned from making his overseas debut in America with a first round knockout of Dominican Carlos Fulgencio. The undefeated Brunker has moved another step closer to a world title bout courtesy of the clinical points win over the rugged Hernandez and consolidates his ranking across the major sanctioning bodies. Going into the bout the former Olympian was ranked with the WBO (No. 3), IBF (No. 10) and WBA (No. 11) and will be hoping to move up with all three organisations. Hernandez (26-7-1, 17KO) was far from impressed with the result and visibly shook his head as the judges’ scores of; 80-72, 79-73 and 78-75, were read out but Brunker was the far more accurate throughout the eight-round featherweight contest. Brunker suffered a cut above his right eye due to a head clash in the third round but that did not stop him applying pressure to his rival with his noted walk-forward style and crisp uppercuts and combinations. The visitor fought gamely throughout the full eight rounds and had his moments in the fight where he troubled the former Athens Olympian but it was Brunker who was poised and busy,

of the decision. But rightly the judges all scored the fight for the champion with Mundine demonstrating predictable unsportsmanship in leaving the ring before the final presentation. The question is where to know for both fighters? For Geale, as the champion, it looks likely that a mandatory home defence against Sam Soliman is on the cards after he defeated former Geale victim and WBA middleweight king Felix Sturm in Germany. For Mundine it is less clear but he showed that at 37 years of age that he is far from washed up and still has some gas left in the tank. Earlier in the evening “Aussie” Joel Brunker

defeated Mexican Ivan Hernandez in a Featherweight contest to further his world title ambitions while Australian Cruiserweight Champion Daniel Amman successfully defended his belt against Team Mundine fighter David Aloua. Lauryn Eagle won the female Australian Lightweight belt against Queenslander Nadine Brown and former world title contender Jamie Pittman scored a much-needed win over the tough Sydney fighter Zac Awad. Cult figure and internet street fighting legend Kimbo Slice overcame a first round scare to stop Queensland Heavyweight Champion Shane Tilyard with Grange fighter Steve Lovett scoring a close win

Photos by Louie Abigail

R

EIGNING IBF World Middleweight Champion Daniel “The Real Deal” Geale successfully defended his belt at the Sydney Entertainment Centre against two-time WBA Super Middleweight title holder Anthony “The Man” Mundine on the 30th January. Geale, who was defending the title he won from Sebastian Sylvester in Germany nearly two years ago for the fourth time, put on a strong display in front of more than 9000 fans and a worldwide television that ran into the millions and was rightly awarded a clear verdict from all three judges (116-112, 117-111, 117-111). Predictably, Mundine protested that he was “robbed”, but he

traded with the champion. Both fighters had their moments throughout the course of the 12 round tussle but Geale again showed why he has had so much success at this level over the past 3 years in contrast to Mundine whose last genuine world title fight victory came in 2008 at Super Middleweight level against Sam Soliman. Mundine, to his credit, stood his ground and fought strongly through to the final bell that concluded Round 12. A protracted period of time between the end of the fight and the announcement of the winner provided Mundine with the opportunity to circle the ring indicating that he was certain

taking a deserved unanimous decision. For Brunker now is the time for him to sit patiently while his management team of trainer John Barber and manager Angelo Di Carlo plot the path ahead that hopefully results in a shot at the world title. For Brunker this was a dangerous fight against a hungry opponent who was looking to reboot his career after falling short in his two previous world title showdowns, fully knowing that another slipup would send his career into a terminal decline. “For me it’s all about winning and moving forward to a shot at the title. I took this bloke very seriously and knew that I couldn’t afford a slip up or it can set me right back. But in saying that I wasn’t that pleased with my performance and know that I need to keep getting better” Brunker commented. For Brunker it is important not to get frustrated and lose his focus as he waits for his shot at a world champion. Ideally Brunker is looking at getting a shot at the very beatable WBO and former IBF Champion Orlando Salido. “I am craving a shot at Salido. I reckon his style is made for me and his record shows he is vulnerable to a pressure fighter like me. But I need to stay ring sharp and keep busy so that I’m ready when the time comes. But I also need to make sure that I focus on only the fight and opponent in front of me” Brunker added.

The ultimate scenario for Brunker in 2013 would be winning the WBO title against Salido later in the year and setting up a unification bout against fellow Australian, IBF title holder Billy Dib. “Everyone knows I want a shot at Dib and I called him out last year. I respect him as a world champ but believe he wouldn’t be able to withstand my style of fighting. The best chance to get him in the ring is to get the WBO belt and dangle the carrot of the WBO title in front of him knowing his only loss came fighting for this belt against Steve Luevano”. Brunker and his team are grateful they were given the chance to fight on the card of arguably the biggest All-Australian boxing promotion of all time in Mundine Vs. Geale II. “Garrie Francisco and the Grange team have had me on a couple of their promotions including Gealey’s world title card down in Tassie in 2011. To get the chance to fight on another world title card after my recent New York fight gave me the opportunity to show what I can do to a world-wide audience” Brunker said. All of his raucous fans are eagerly looking forward to the time when it will be Brunker headlining a world title bout in Sydney. “I’ll go anywhere and fight anyone for a shot at the world title. But it would be my ultimate dream to bring a world title fight to Sydney one day but first thing is first” Brunker wisely noted.

www.cornerman.com.au 25


APRIL 2013

PRO boxing

F

ORMER world-title contender Jamie Pittman successfully returned to the ring against former IBF Pan Pacific champion Zac “Shaker” Awad with a shutout victory over eight rounds at the Sydney Entertainment Centre. Fighting on the Mundine vs. Geale II undercard, Pittman entered the ring knowing that another loss might draw the curtain on what was a once promising career. Fighting for the first time since a controversial second round TKO loss in a PABA Super Middleweight title bout against Serge Yannick on the Geale vs. Albert world title promotion in August 2011, Pittman knew he couldn’t afford another slip up against the tough Awad and entered the ring clearly as a man on a mission. Known in the fight game as “Mr Business”, Pittman was smarting over a decision to stop his previous fight over against Yannick over a cut that he regarded as minor. “I’d just one the first round against Yannick and was feeling good and starting to get my range. He got me with a clean shot but it didn’t do much damage. The cut was only small and I couldn’t believe it when the referee stopped it. It was only a scratch but ended up putting a big dent in my career but that’s the way

Photos by Louie Abigail

“MR BUSINESS” IS BACK IN BUSINESS

By Sean Castle

it goes” said Pittman. That loss forced the proud indigenous fighter from the Central Coast of NSW to seriously reassess the direction of his career. “I took a little time out to think things through. I wanted to make sure everything was spot on before getting back in the ring. I never intended it to be 18 months between fights but a couple of fights fell through which was frustrating” Pittman added. And it was clear that everything that everything was spot on as Pittman’s punches were sharp and his defence was tight. His footwork and combinations had the durable Awad on the back foot throughout the fight and he never really got into rhythm. It has been three years since Pittman decided to make the switch to the Grange team and he is pleased with the changes that trainer Graham Shaw has made. “Graham has remodelled my fighting from top to bottom, working on my footwork and tightening up my defence. I felt really confident going into this fight and needed some good rounds under my belt. Awad is a tough bloke and he beat Junior Talipeau for the IBF regional belt so I’m very pleased to beat him so convincingly” Pittman noted Fighting out of the Grange Old School Boxing gym has given Pittman the chance to train alongside good friend and world champion Daniel Geale and Pittman is the first to sing his praises.

“Daniel is one of the best fighters this country has ever produced. He has done things no other fighters have. He has won two of the biggest titles going and did it the hard way by going to Germany and dethroning two German world champions. I know how hard that is after losing a world title fight there against Sturm in 2008. Training alongside Gealey inspires me to get back to that level and I feel a better fighter after each workout”. Pittman, who has spent time working for the Department of Community Services helping abused children rebuild their lives, had had a distinguished amateur career, winning 136 of 167 fights and collecting numerous state and national titles as well as 4 Oceania Gold Medals. Obvious highlights include winning Gold at the Commonwealth titles, representing Australia at the 2002 Commonwealth Games and holding the prestigious honour of captaining the Australian team at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Along the way Pittman got to take on the best of the best including Lucian Bute, teammate Geale and Jean Pascal. He knows that now is the time to turn all of that promise and potential into fulfilment and is convinced that the Grange team has him primed to deliver. “The Grange setup is world class. It’s all about team. I fought Sturm for the WBA world title back in 2008 but I feel a much more complete fighter today and know that with this team behind me I can build on this victory and step up in the world rankings” Pittman added.

BIG KIMBO SLICE ICES SHANE TILYARD By Sean Castle

S

TREET-fighting legend, MMA star and part-time movie actor Kimbo Slice brought his unique brand to Australia when he fought Shane Tilyard on the undercard to the IBF world title contest between reigning champion Daniel Geale and Anthony Mundine. Slice, who is somewhat of a cult-figure who has garnered a massive following via his former life as a gun street fighter captured the affection of the Australian public in the lead up to his Australian debut and didn’t disappoint the fans with a brutal display in the main support bout on Geale vs Mundine card. After starting the opening round standing toe-to-toe with the Tilyard, Kimbo had the Queenslander hurt early before being stunned in the second part of the first round when the reigning Queensland Heavyweight Champion connected with a few big bombs of his own flush on Big Kimbo’s chin. The huge crowd at the Sydney Entertainment Centre rose as one sensing a big upset as Slice was wobbled and crouched up against the ropes with the Aussie connecting with some vicious blows. Kimbo survived a knockdown with a take-down manoeuvre reminiscent of his MMA days that

26 www.cornerman.com.au

allowed him valuable recovery time. By the end of the first round both fighters were blowing hard, having given and received a series of massive blows. Slice is most famous for street fighting days that became an internet sensation and for his MMA first round victory over for WBO Heavyweight champion and Olympic goldmedallist Ray Mercer which came when he employed a guillotine choke. Slice’s professional career now stands at 7-0 (6 KOs) and he says that people shouldn’t leave their seats when it’s showtime. “I said before the fight it wouldn’t last long and it didn’t. I love nothing more than hurting them quick and sending them out of here in a stack of pain” Slice commented. Slice was generous in his praise for Tilyard, who earned a fight with Kimbo after sending his entry into the promoter’s at Grange Old School Boxing who were holding a competition to find an opponent. “He is a big boy and doesn’t hold back. He can throw them too and got me with a couple of good shots. That is what we were looking for and the fans loved it. I hope to come back and fight for you all again” Slice added.

The fight ended midway through the second round as both fighters delivered thunderous blows to each other. But it was a brutal body that dropped the Queenslander who went down on his knees in great pain, failing to beat the 10 count of referee Anthony Shipley. Slice has had an interesting life, born in the Bahamas before migrating to Florida where he grew up with his family. He was a star high school footballer and trialed with the Miami Dolphins in 1997 and has also appeared in five movies, including the 2012 film “The Scorpion King 3: Rise of the Dead” where he starred alongside Billy Zane. Slice even spent time living in his car after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. It is all of these experiences that Slice brings to the table and makes him such a draw card. Buoyed by his victory, Slice is determined to forge ahead with his career in the squared-ring and has is willing to return to our shores for the right fight on the right promotion. “I had a great time here down under and if we can make it happen then yeah, I’ll come back” Slice said. All who were present at the fight or who watched it on TV are hoping this is the case.

www.cornerman.com.au 27


APRIL 2013

PRO boxing

GARTH WOOD’S VIEW ON EX-FOOTBALLERS IN BOXING

Kurt Finlayson vs Ozan Craddock

There has been a lot of banter lately of ex-footballers coming into the boxing scene, looking for a big payout while making a mockery of the sport of boxing. Hakan Saglam writes.

A

RECENT such event has caused a lot of anger for fight fans. A poor display of boxing, controversial judging and allegations of testing positive for drugs where some of the headlines that came out from the event. Needless to say it’s doing nothing for the sport we love so much. There have always been footballers that have made the transition into boxing and have been quite successful. One such boxer, who started out as a footballer, decided to leave the Rabbitohs and give the fistic arts a go. You might have heard of him, he’s the Australian Contender winner – Garth Wood. Wood did the hard yards. He didn’t take any short cuts. He paid he’s dues and worked he’s way up the ranks until he got a lucky break and was selected into the Contender Australia boxing series. I have to point out this was no picnic for Wood. Fighting Australia’s best contenders to eventually face off and beat Anthony “The Man” Mundine. We asked what his thoughts were – being an

ex-footballer, on this controversial subject of his football counter parts coming into the boxing scene. “If they’re willing to do the hard work, then it’s all good and well. I’ve had a look at the Koder issue and it all seems to be a business plan just to roll the cash in. But you know they’ll get caught out sooner or later. I knew about this 10 years ago.” Wood exclaimed. “I’d rather not give them any air time, f*&k ‘em, wipe ‘em out or kick ‘em out!” Garth Wood was on the main card on Friday the 15th night after taking a year off. He fought a tough Samoan southpaw-Togasilimai Letoa who is now based in Kalgoorlie for the vacant light heavy weight PABA title. Wood has never fought a southpaw before and started the first 2 rounds with caution. “I tried to come in from the side and not go straight down the gun. I tried to come in like a shark, you know what I mean, circle around and not come straight in.” Wood said. “It’s the first time I fought a southpaw and found

it very foreign and awkward. I’ve learnt from it and I’ll definitely go again with a southy.” In round 3 Wood looked more comfortable. He started leading in with the cross and scoring really well. In the following round – round 4, Letoa had picked up the pace and was pushing forward onto Wood. Early in the round he had Wood on the ropes and was working his body. Not long after, Wood connected with a looping right hand and rocked Letoa. He found himself on the canvas and the ref started with the mandatory 8 count. Letoa looking a bit shaky, got up, brushed it off and charged at Wood. Wood now sensing victory was near, went in to finish him off but his opponents toughness and determination prevailed and got him through to the end of the round. I asked Wood later if he was going in for the kill after the knockdown. “Mate I was, but it was like on my first date.” Wood replied. “When you know, you take you girlfriend up to the pictures in the back row trying to put her away.” The change room erupts with laughter. Wood looking “Patience is a virtue”. Wood for quick finish finally adds with a cheeky smirk on his face. The next three rounds Wood dominated and pushed Letoa constantly against the ropes. In the 9th round Wood lands a powerful right hand and knocks the mouth guard out from Letoa. Once again Wood has him up against the ropes and Letoa is now looking weary. To the head, the body and back up to the head Wood gives him a good working over. Letoa eventually goes down following a final body shot. He struggles back up to one knee contemplating on whether to get back up or not. But it’s all too late as the referee reaches the 10 count and ends the bout scoring a TKO victory to Garth Wood. In his post fight speech he was asked what the plans are for the future. “I don’t like to think ahead, I’ll just take it fight by fight. Obviously after tonight I’m in the top 10. I’ve got my man Fidel who’s got connections in all the right places, and hopefully we can go overseas.”

A CRASH COURSE IN DETERMINATION

In the professional boxing world you have to have a great deal of self-confidence to adopt the nickname “Crash”. Confidence isn’t what this young man lacks. Wayne Tolton writes.

A

T only 21 years of age, Ozan ‘Crash’ Craddock is a veteran of the boxing game, having had 57 (42-15) amateur fights. After losing seven out of his first ten boxing fights, something clicked. A new no nonsense and disciplined approach to his training and bouts brought him numerous amateur accolades, including three Queensland State titles and three Golden Gloves titles. Great things were expected. Motivated, he maintained a relentless training schedule until disaster struck. Ozan experienced niggling knee pains and had to seek medical advice. He was diagnosed with osteochondritis dissecans, a rare bone disease affecting ten in every hundred thousand people. The disease restricts the flow of blood to the knee, leading to death of the bone tissue with potential for further joint and cartilage damage and development issues. The end of Ozam’s career was forecast. Osteochondritis dissecans was his most feared opponent.

After a series of operations Craddock was on crutches for ten weeks. Half way through the twelve-month rehabilitation period, his other knee succumbed to the same disease. Further operations and another lengthy period of rehabilitation ensued, before he was told in April 2012 that he would never run again. But with the same kind of determination he would show in the ring, he persisted with his training. Six fights in quick succession followed, the only loss being to Commonwealth Youth Champion Daniel Lewis. A hard-hitting body-punching affair for the 2012 Golden Gloves title saw Craddock end his amateur career on an extremely close decision. The bout was voted fight of the tournament, a decent effort considering there were over 150 fights that weekend. The six fights were in preparation for an assault upon the paid ranks. An assault is an understatement, with Craddock taking two professional fights in the last six months. The first fight ended with Sione Asipeli being clubbed to the

floor and counted out on his feet in the first round. In his last fight at Mansfield Tavern in Brisbane, Craddock entered the ring wearing a mask in homage to Hannibal ‘The Cannibal’ Lecter from the thriller film The Silence of the Lambs. The crowd’s curiosity was piqued as Craddock stalked the ring prior to the opening bell. It didn’t take them long to draw the resemblance to Lecter. Vicious body punching coupled with perpetual aggression saw Kurt Finlayson bowled over in the first round of the bout. A powerful left uppercut to the body left Finlayson paralysed on the canvas. The referee could have counted to ten many times. This young man holds much promise. Born in Turkey to a Turkish mother and Kiwi father, Craddock arrived via New Zealand at nine years of age. A very popular fighter with a growing and enthusiastic fan base, he fights next at the Sands Tavern Maroochydore on 3rd May 2013. Be sure not to blink because this determined and aggressive slugger holds nothing back.

www.cornerman.com.au 29


APRIL 2013

kick boxing

PERSONS OF INTEREST JNI Promotions’ “Persons of Interest” fight night was, as usual, a rip-roarer of a night. Janice Yee reports.

T

HE Hurstville Entertainment Centre was packed to the gills with raucous, hot blooded Irishmen, formidable Samoans and everyone else in between, gathered to support a common cause; grown men and women engaging in shenanigans in the ring. A stellar line-up with two title bouts, as well as an electric atmosphere, made for an exceptional night of boxing and kickboxing.

Well executed sweep by Luis Regis

Nick Brown vs Jake Raisin (K1) In the evening’s opening bout, both fighters rushed into the clinch, fighting at close range for the majority of the four rounds and both consistently landing knees to the body. Jake Wilson emerged as the winner by unanimous points decision.

Keith McGrane vs Jake Jones (Modified Thai rules) It was clear that the gangling, southpaw McGrane was the authority in this fight from the start, his rambling, slightly chaotic style belying a tough as nails disposition and fearsome pair of legs. Jones put up a strong front in the first round, attempting to charge McGrane and pull him into the clinch, but appeared to lose some confidence as McGrane steadily nailed him with his trademark leg and body kicks and clean straight punches to the head. Jones got his own back early in the second round, with a parry and cross that landed cleanly on McGrane’s jaw and had him stumbling. But making a quick recovery, McGrane managed a near TKO with a flying knee to Jones’ head, continuing with a headbody punch assault that had Jones against the ropes. Stoic but shaken, Jones narrowly avoided another TKO shortly after, buckling to his knees as he was caught with a left body kick followed by a cross to the jaw. The third round ended with a tumult of roars and ecstatic singing from the great number of rowdy Irish in the crowd, as McGrane sliced Jones across the body with his trademark liver kick, and at 1:06 the fight was all over.

Rob Whaley vs Mark Dalby (Boxing) The first half of this six rounder saw Whaley scoring consistently with straight punches, keeping Dalby on the back foot. Dalby seemed the more cautious fighter, jabbing to keep his opponent at bay, but punctuating his defensive style with a number of powerful hooking combinations to Whaley’s head and body, allowing Whaley to walk him backward before executing his attacks. After the fourth round, Dalby started to move forward more aggressively, forcing his opponent to tighten up his body defences and engage in closer exchanges of body boxing, clinching with Whaley up against the ropes in the fifth round and stepping back with a right hook to the head. The fight went to Dalby by majority points decision.

30 www.cornerman.com.au

Schiavoni in this five round Muay Thai fight. Schiavoni made a worthy adversary, with perhaps greater power in her hands than Earl, but it was Earl’s lightning fast accuracy and evasive ringcraft that gave her the lead once again. Schiavoni was bloodied but not bowed, having put up a conscientious effort for all five rounds. Junior Talipeau vs Eddy Lenart (Boxing) It was another classy performance by Talipeau, who briskly defeated Lenart by TKO 2:42 into the first round. Lenart looked to be a tidy fighter, using his slightly longer reach to score a few decent blows on Talipeau early in the round. However, he inevitably succumbed to the explosive heavy hands and devastating left body hook of Talipeau, literally rolling on the canvas in agony as the liver shot put him out for the eight count. Lenart had barely made his recovery when Talipeau dealt him a vicious left hook to the head, seamlessly driving it home with another left body rip, and the fight was finished for Lenart.

Peter Graham vs Dave Levi (Boxing, NSW Heavyweight Title) The crowd was pumped for the co-main event of the evening, and the heavyweight bout did not disappoint. Peter “The Chief” Graham was nimble on his feet, immediately moving in to work his opponent with head body combinations, while Dave “Krayze” Levi maintained his ground. It seemed like Levi was biding his time and looking for the knockout, preparing to risk his own head and goading Graham along as he waited for the perfect opportunity. Levi’s entertaining but perhaps flawed tactic was to glove up and take everything the Chief could throw. Periodically he would explode into action, much to the delight of the roaring Levi supporters in the crowd, weaving into Graham’s guard and throwing Mark Dalby with trainer Aaron Smith

Sylvia Schiavoni (left) vs Carol Earl (right)

huge swinging bombs in the hope of catching him with his hands down. But despite his posturing and astonishing ability to take a punch, Krayze Dave couldn’t deny the incredible power of the Chief’s hands forever. The Samoan giant fell spectacularly to the Chief’s left hook 2:17 into the sixth round, standing shakily after nine counts but unable to resurface and continue the fight. It was a TKO conquest for Graham, who left proudly with his NSW Heavyweight Boxing Title still intact.

Luis Regis vs Stephen Meikle (Full Thai rules, Commonwealth Title) A disappointing bout for the Scottish Meikle,

who was outclassed by Regis in a fight that never really had time to gain momentum. The fighters maintained a relaxed pace in the first round, perhaps in anticipation of five rounds of fighting, but Regis landed more significant strikes. In the second round, Luis upped his intensity, throwing a beautiful jab cross that had Meikle sprawled on the ropes for the eight count. Calculating his attacks, Regis moved in for the kill, knocking Meikle back into the ropes with a flying knee before landing a beautiful right uppercut flush on Meikle’s jaw. 1:43 seconds into round two, Luis Regis was declared the winner by TKO, claiming the Commonwealth Muay Thai Title belt for his own.

Peter Graham with his team

TJ Doheny vs Kongfah Signwancha (Boxing) This six round superbantamweight bout was a brawler, with both fighters coming into the first round swinging, Signwancha taking a Thai style open palm stance which was penetrated by solid uppercut and hooking combinations thrown by Doheny. Doheny made short work of the fight, dropping Signwancha three times with uppercuts in the second round, the referee declaring a TKO after the final knockdown.

Carol Earl vs Sylvia Schiavoni (Full Thai rules) Muay Thai veteran Carol Earl solidified herself an indomitable player in the ring as she took on

www.cornerman.com.au 31


Photo: SouthsideStudios Photography, Milos Lekovic

www.southsidestudios.com.au

ANTHONY MUNDINE VS RIGOBERTO ALVAREZ


warriors OF THE

MONGKON

Muay Thai TV series review by Anja Stridsman

W

ARRIORS of the Mongkon is a documentary Muay Thai TV series made by driftwood cinemas, exploring the art of Muay Thai within Australia through established and up-and-coming fighters. Through 11 episodes (between 10-12 minutes long), we follow several fighters as they each prepare for some of the biggest fights of their careers. We get to share the thoughts, fears and struggles that go on inside the heads of these hardtraining athletes – some young, some experienced – who dedicate their lives and bodies to a sport that can be at once both violent and beautiful. Being the national sport of Thailand, the first episode takes us to Asia to explore the origin of the sport in today’s culture. It visits Muay Thai camps, where Thai boxing is a way of life, and for many possibly the way to a better life. It creates a setting for the story that is about to be told, a

beginning. We get to follow a young Thai fighter about to go up against one of the best pound-forpound fighters in Thailand, at the Grand Lumpinee Stadium in Bangkok, and a young 7-year old boy about to have his second fight. The first episode finishes with the voiceover grandly narrating: “Siamese soldiers never gave in, using their bare knuckles to protect and gain freedom for their country. It is no wonder that the modern day warrior, that steps into the ring is willing to give it all, even if it meant not stepping back out. This is the heart and soul of Muay Thai.” And I can’t wait to see more. The rest of the 11 episodes take place in Australia, where we meet experienced fighters such as John Wayne Parr preparing for his last hurrah, 6 time world title holder Steve McKinnon ploughing through his opponents, as well as 16 year old Glen Purvis struggling to get fights and

stepping up to the plate. They say that boys don’t cry… well here they do, and that if anything makes you understand just how much of themselves these fighters put into the sport. For the Thai’s it is the alternative to poverty and for the western fighters, it is a choice, a purpose – but for both it is a way out. Frank Giorgi says training comes first, family second. John Wayne Parr says it’s the biggest adrenaline rush you can ever imagine. Deceased Mark Fowler gave everything in the ring, and the story of his tragic death is an emotional but inspiring one. The only bad thing for me after the first episode is that it’s made me want to go back to Thailand and find out more. Warriors of the Mongkon is confronting, inspiring and emotional. It also feels like way less than the 2 hour runtime. Available for download at www.driftwoodcinema.com


APRIL 2013

kick boxing

NEXT GENERATION FIGHT NIGHT T

IM Drury of Fite 108 Submission Grappling and Muay Thai Gym hosted an event to be proud of, with a selection of his own fighters representing on the card. Each fight was a highlight in its own right and not a mediocre or lackadaisical performance was to be had.

Peta Lowe vs Claire Todd (M/T rules) Both fighters seemed to favour their hands in the only ladies’ bout of the evening. Lowe and Todd both boxed aggressively, as well as being active in the clinch, making use of knee strikes and close range punches under limited grappling rules. It was a close

Charlie Bubb high kicks

fight which somewhat predictably resulted in a split decision, and Peta Lowe emerged as the victor.

Photos by Hakan Saglam

In an explosive opening to the 2013 fight calendar year, NSW and ACT’s bright stars of MMA and Muay Thai gathered on the Central Coast for 15 bouts of organised chaos, not one of which was in the carpark.

Ali Cevik and his KMA team

Ben Regan vs Michael Mandavy (M/T rules) The junior bout was one of the most impressive of the evening, the fighters keeping up a fast technical exchange and demonstrating an array of tight boxing and kicking combinations. Regan appeared to gain the upper hand in the final round, tagging Mandavy with a killer left hook and sidestep. In the end, both fighters showed equal prowess, resulting in a majority draw decision.

Campbell Ross vs Mitch Robertson (M/T rules) Both fighters were very evenly matched physically and in ability, with tight hands and calculated combinations. Robertson’s pivotal moment was a clean right hook to Ross’ head late in the second round, followed by an onslaught of punches to further his advance in the final round. Ross held his own with assertive counter fighting ability and landed numerous clean hard headshots, but the win went to Robertson via split decision.

Mat Williams vs Dean Roughan (M/T rules) This thrilling light welterweight fight had the crowd gasping in exhilaration and terror, as the fighters rushed each other with an intensity that was probably unrivaled by any other bout. Williams was dropped by a solid right head kick in the first round, and astonishingly clambered to his feet to see out the round. An unrelenting pace was maintained throughout the fight, the sheer volume and aggression in Roughan and Williams’ striking compensating for any possible technical deficiency. Roughan won via unanimous decision, but Mat “Wombat” Williams, bearing a cut above his right eyebrow as a souvenir of the bout, achieved Fight of the Night for his indomitable performance and staunch display of manliness. He may not have taken the official decision, but the beaming faces of his trainer Drury and the Fite 108 Team proved the bout was still a win.

Jack Wilson vs Kane Scott (M/T rules)

Charlie Bubb

36 www.cornerman.com.au

This was another highly entertaining bout showcasing two young, hungry middleweights. Wilson, a southpaw with a showy but aggressive style, dropped Scott early in the first round with a well timed left Superman punch, the first of many. However, Scott’s boxing eventually gave him the edge and made him winner by unanimous decision, the second round showing him boxing Wilson into a

corner and tagging him with a number of beautiful uppercuts to the jaw.

Tim Patmore vs Luke Daniels (M/T rules) Daniels appeared to be the aggressor in the start of this middleweight bout, using his rangy reach advantage to keep Patmore on the defensive with long looping shots. However, although beginning conservatively, Patmore blossomed in the latter rounds, methodically working up to longer combinations and landing some solid leg kicks while Daniels’ early energy seemed to flag. It was a triumph for Patmore, who achieved the unanimous points win.

Terry Kounsavat vs Aaron Lane (M/T rules) Both fighters maintained a high workrate in this light welterweight bout, exchanging a comparable number of hard punching combinations and body and leg kicks. It was only in the third round that Kounsavat gained a narrow lead as Lane seemed to fatigue, taking out the win by unanimous decision. James Stockwell vs Nick Hogarth (M/T rules) Though both cruiserweight fighters were heavy handed and strong in the clinch, Stockwell was able

to use his height and reach to his advantage, pushing his opponent onto the back foot and dropping him in the second round by an overhand right following a number of knees to the face. In the third round Stockwell dropped Hogarth again with hard knees to the solar plexus, and the referee declared the fight all over.

Adam Watts vs Chad Chinnery (MMA) The MMA fights did not disappoint. Watts began strongly in this bout, dropping Chinnery with a left hook in the first round and controlling his opponent on the ground, subsequently gaining mount and taking Chinnery’s back. Unfortunately he did not fare so well in the second round, taking down Chinnery successfully but falling prey to a triangle from guard in the first minute.

James Long vs Luke Reid (MMA) It was a disappointing match for Long, who was noticeably excited by the prospect of fighting, but was controlled by his opponent in most of the 2:46 minute round. After a number of unsuccessful takedown attempts on Reid, Long shot in for yet another double leg takedown, but got caught in a head arm hold by Reid which led to his eventual defeat by standing guillotine. Even so, Long tried to have the last say in

a tenacious lunge at his opponent after he regained consciousness, but the fight was already over.

David Codrington vs Rob O’Connell (MMA) Codrington took O’Connell down with a high crutch in the first round, and after a reversal from O’Connell, managed to gain top guard position. O’Connell was able to take Codrington’s back in the second round and again in the third, getting hooks in but unable to complete the rear naked choke, with his opponent scrambling into top position and going in for the ground and pound at the end of the round. It was a narrowly won battle, with Codrington scoring a unanimous points decision. Dave Fanoua vs Damien Brown (M/T rules) The crowd winced with every resounding blow dealt by the 127.9 kilo Fanoua, while it may have been his 21 kilo weight advantage that saved him from the vicious jab cross combination and right hand of Brown. The third round saw Brown catching Fanoua with a knee to the head from clinch, following up with a devastating cross that brought the audience to its feet, with Brown ultimately declared the winner by unanimous decision.

Adam Washbourne vs

Brenden Plummer (MMA) Plummer, a confident striker, attempted to keep his opponent on his feet, but Washbourne achieved a throw in the first round, with Plummer limiting damage from the bottom but unable to sweep him from guard. After another successful takedown in the second round, Washbourne took mount and the referee called stoppage by ground and pound.

Ali Cevik vs Dominic Spreckley (MMA) This was a standout bout if only for its lightning fast, brutal finish. In a mere six seconds, Cevik landed a crushing right cross to Spreckley’s jaw, sending his opponent plummeting face first to the canvas. It was a testament to the power in Cevik’s right hand that Spreckley was unable to make it out of his corner as the referee raised Cevik’s hand for a KO victory.

Blake Edwards vs Charlie Bubb, ISKA State Title (M/T rules) The night ended with a blast with this gripping five rounder. It was a brawler of a match, with both fighters charging in swinging, but Bubb’s longer reach proved a slight advantage, scoring plenty of head strikes and leaving triumphantly with the title. You can watch any of these fights on www.cornerman.com.au

www.cornerman.com.au 37


kick boxing

APRIL 2013

THUNDER

& LIGHTNING XXXX

Peter “The Chief” Graham is a mixed martial artist in every sense of the word. By Janice Yee.

M

Y first experience of Peter “The Chief” Graham was when I joined up at Boxing Works Gym in Darlinghurst in 2010, where he taught boxing, kickboxing and other assorted combat sports. I was young, bloodthirsty and looking for pain and in Pete’s Muay Thai class I found the outlet I’d been seeking. I attended with a friend and we shared a silent, uneasy communion, pummelling our way through class after class until we were plastered to the mats in

a raw, sweaty inertia, unable to speak even if we’d wanted to. We gazed upon Pete as a fearsome figure of awe. Between the two of us we nicknamed him “Fridge” – no disrespect, mind, merely a nod to the fact that he’s white, 6 foot 3, weighs around 114kg and you’d probably need a couple of burly removalists and a trolley to get him out of your apartment. I needed a hero, and Pete was he. I wanted to be Pete, with his irreverent sense of humour and “don’t stop till you’re dead” style of training and fighting.

Photos by Hakan Saglam

First round stoppage of Erik Nosa

38 www.cornerman.com.au

Ironically, I am 5 foot 4, Asian and female but I didn’t let that deter me. I idolised fighters and Pete was the fightingest fighter I had ever known. With the clueless cockiness of the yet unblooded I wore cheap Thai boxers to the cardio kickboxing classes and I thought I was a badarse. I was about as bad as Justin Bieber at a Twilight marathon and yet I persevered, hoping that somehow, Pete would notice me as a diamond in the rough among the hoards of perspiring chumps who “just do this for fitness”. It didn’t occur to me that I was those chumps. Eventually, I realised that I would probably never become heavyweight champion of the world, but it is still Pete who gave me the initial glimpse of true fighting spirit, made me realise that even the greatest fighters begin as one of those chumps and the only distinction is their work ethic. Fast track three years and I am probably the closest I’ll ever get to being like The Chief. I dyed my hair platinum blonde and got some better Thai shorts. I’m still hoping to one day become a world champion, maybe at internet memes or Facebook, or something. But for Pete, who has of this date had 88 program andfights intensity to eachkickboxing opponent once professional in boxing, and they are confirmed.” I was with including the fight, I6think it mixed martial arts overhappy 13 years, world went really well, butfor I like fighting, so maybeanother I would championship belts kickboxing, adding have liked for ittotohis gorésumé a little longer.” couple of titles is merely just another “I like is a common my small stepfighting” in his ultimate goal forthread worldindomination. conversation with is oneaofspring thosechicken At 37 years old,Graham. Pete is noHelonger fortunate, rarewhere peopleyoung who loves and goes in an industry men his andjob women can to work everyphysically day filled and withmentally passion for whatthey’re he does. be broken before old His passion is matched by his ambition, with the enough to have a mortgage. acknowledgement in order to body reachstill therobust top, one But Pete’s mind isthat clear and his and must make luck. to live his own dream every healthy, andhisheown continues Born in Sydney, moved outthe ofworld home –atat14 day; to train, fight, Graham and be the best in and spent many of his teenage years drifting in and everything he possibly can. outI of andwith on the streets,not hanging with satyouth downrefuges for a chat Graham long after the latest wrongK1crowd. was 18 when he took the step his win atHe Capital Punishment 7 in Canberra thatMarch irrevocably changed his life.him He smash walkedlow intokicks a in this year. I’d watched karate admittedly onSuper his way to buy alcohol into theschool leg of -former WKBF Heavyweight from the local joined the up,Samoan two weeks laterat Champion Erikbottle-o Nosa, –TKOing fighter “got 1:43 belted” first karate and One the only of at thehis first round bytournament, way of leg kick. journey being a champion began. thing histoopponent, and for that matter everyone in that, I didn’tisdo any the“Before, audience learned, thatanything a kick inofthe legreal by The interest,” reflects Chief really hurts.Graham, and it is clear he found himself he found martial arts. “I over didn’tbefore have Was when he disappointed the fight was any real prowesstoor any a basis to say I’d he’d evensporting had a chance break sweat? be “Ia always good athlete orgo winthe a distance, world title.but I never train to I wasreally a little finished anything I tried). says But ever since Iwho was a shocked it finished(task so quickly,” Graham, little kid,maintains I knew I wanted to beregime a fighter, and afterofthat always his training regardless first karate class, was it. I never back. whether fights arethat scheduled, simplylooked tailoring theI just

www.cornerman.com.au 39


APRIL 2013 A vicious body attack on Dave Levi

Give me the biggest, the baddest, the scariest, the most padded up, undefeatable person you can find, and that’s the person I want to fight. wanted that next belt, that next grading. I wanted it bad. And nothing’s changed in nearly 20 years.” In that time, Graham’s career is continuing to blossom, with opportunities presenting across the board in boxing, kickboxing and MMA. It is unusual for a professional fighter to compete simultaneously in more than one discipline, but The Chief likes to have his fingers in a lot of pies. “I fight all three because I get to fight more often,” Graham explains, a twinkle in his eye. “Fighters fight, right? I like fighting.” Did I mention Peter Graham likes to fight? After defending the NSW Super Heavyweight boxing title against “Krayze” Dave Levi in February this year, followed by his KI victory against Nosa in March, Graham will demonstrate his versatility again in Combat8 on 27 April 2013. The event features a new concept of cage fighting designed to pit boxers against mixed martial artists, with a unique set of rules. Graham’s opponent will be Tai Tuivasa, a former Sydney Roosters player turned MMA fighter who also had the honour of defeating Erik Nosa by TKO in Gladiators Cage Fighting 3 in November 2012. At

19 years old, Tuivasa is just over half Graham’s age, and at 140kg, will outweigh him by at least 20kg. Which is no mean feat. However, to say Graham is undeterred is an understatement. “Give me the biggest, the baddest, the scariest, the most padded up, undefeatable person you can find, and that’s the person I want to fight. Because it’s like a mountain climber, right? You want to climb Everest. I feel the same, I want to test myself against the best person I can find. And that’s the biggest rush, the best feeling... seeing if I can beat THAT person.” Combat sports are his vocation and livelihood, and he attributes his enduring success to an all consuming love for his craft. “I try to keep it real,” he says. “I don’t believe in the bullshit... I think that’s super important. If you’re a fighter for any other reason than you want to be a fighter, you’re going to find it very tough. I don’t just mean hard work. You’re going to get the shit beat out of you and it’s not going to be fun. You’ve got to love training and you’ve got to love fighting.” In 2012 Graham opened his own gym, International Martial Arts Centre (IMC) in Prospect in

Sydney’s west. It’s not a fallback plan, but yet another way to ensure that The Chief’s legacy as a world class fighter and athlete will inspire many a young fighter – and plenty of cheap Thai shorts-wearing newbies, like my former self - for the years to come. With this big ongoing project as well as his packed fight calendar, Pete is content with his lot in life, though world domination is definitely still on the cards. “If I could have anything, I’d love to end my career with a boxing world title, a kickboxing world title and an MMA world title. I don’t know anyone else who’s got that. I don’t even know if I should have said that,” he laughs. “But... I do what I love, on a daily basis. If I were to get cancer, and get told, ‘Pete, you’ll die in a week,’ I’d be upset because I couldn’t get to spend the rest of my life with my wife and daughter. I’ve been all over the world, I’ve done exactly what I wanted to do with my life. I don’t have any dreams to see India, or get a tattoo, or drive a race car. I’ve worked really hard not to have a ‘bucket list’. I don’t want to wait until I’m 65 to try and start doing things. Don’t want to be a ‘gonna’. I’m a doer.”

www.cornerman.com.au 41


DIVINE INSPIRATION

APRIL 2012

Capital Punishment 7 goes off with a bang!

Spiro Black’s body attack

I

NSPIRATION can come in many forms. For some it can be a song, a painting, your parents, a friend, a teacher - or it can come from someone or something you would least expect. Hakan Saglam explains why the fight game inspires him. Inspiration comes to me when I’m at fight events. I get the opportunity to surround myself with people releasing positive energy. I truly believe that behavior breeds behavior. I have been fortunate enough to meet some really interesting people within the fight game. Some of them superficial and some genuine. At Capital Punishment 7, you could feel the positive energy in the air. The venue – The National Convention Centre, created the perfect vibe to watch the best fighters in the country. Set out like a coliseum, you could feel the crowd roar right through to your internal organs. As I gazed over the fight card, I knew this was going to be a special night. Names such as Peter “The Chief” Graham, Paul Slowinski, Erik Nosa and local boy Ben Edwards played a definitive part in my life at one time or another. I, like many fight fans, would look up to these guys in awe and for inspiration. The main event was a heavyweight crowd pleaser with Canberra’s favourite fighter, Ben Edwards, taking on Adelaide’s bad boy Paul Slowinski in a 3x3 K1 bout. It was clear when Slowinski walked into the ring that he was not popular with the local crowd, with heckles and the odd obscenity thrown at him. Slowinski was pacing up and down with a deep rumble in his voice like a caged animal just before feeding time. Man, I felt the hairs on the back of my neck go stiff and was completely fixated on Slowinski. Michael Pedavoli, the referee for the main event,

42 www.cornerman.com.au

brought the fighters to centre ring for the customary stare down. Slowinski brought his forehead towards Edwards and pushed it in a head butting motion. Edwards showed no emotion, held his ground completely unfazed. Both fighters retreated back to their corner ready for the bell to announce the battle. Ding ding! At the sound of the bell Slowinski began the attack with his signature left head kick. Edwards blocked the kick and retaliated with jab-cross leg kick combo. Slowinski backed up against the ropes while Edwards was growing in confidence. Edwards kept close and connected with a well-executed uppercut and then broke out into a punching frenzy. Slowinski found himself on the canvas wondering how he got there. The crowd went crazy as Slowinski took the mandatory eight count. In round two, Slowinski wanted to keep his distance and turn it into a kicking game, believing that Edwards kicks wasn’t up to par. To his surprise, Edwards landed a clean body kick that took the wind out of him. Edwards closed in and continued with his fury. It wasn’t long after when Edwards started to tire. In K1 bouts, fighters are known to be explosive and give their all every round. The final round was all Slowinski. His experience started to prevail and executed his combos elegantly. He was working his levels and finishing with whopping leg kicks. But it all came too late for Slowinski as the judges awarded the victory to Edwards. The crowd was ecstatic. I can’t remember the last time I ever saw or heard such a crowd erupt in joy. In the co-main event Peter “The Chief” Graham took on Eric Nosa in a 3x3min K1 bout. Nosa came charging, making his intentions known to the Chief that he

Paul Slowinski vs Ben Edwards

was there for business. The Chief unfazed, brushed away Nosa’s punches with ease. It looked like both fighters were happy to box this one out but the Chief soon began with those lethal leg kicks. The very first leg kick executed by him brought Nosa down for an eight count. It was clear Nosa was hurt badly, but being the brave fighter that he is, he got up and carried on. The Chief ruthlessly jumped on Nosa, not giving him any chance to recover. He kept chopping away at the legs like a woodchopper, as though his life depended on it. The referee Michael Pedovoli made a smart decision by stopping the fight before any serious injury was caused to Nosa. A quick day at the office for the Chief. He won by TKO in round 1.

Another cracker fight was in the cruiserweight division. This one was for the South Pacific Title, to be fought out between Spiro Black and Eden McGrath. I’ve seen Black fight once before, very explosive fighter. I knew this was going to be a good fight. In the opening round Black kept it tidy and kept his hands up high, often leading in with a left hook. McGrath used his kicks to distance himself from Black but it didn’t prove too successful. Black was closing in and used his body shots effectively. Black started to mix it up a little, more so in the second round by adding the leading front kick along with low kicks. He tenderized McGrath’s leg and mid section until he moved in close once again unleashing those powerful body shots. BOOM! McGrath went to the ground after a right body shot that hit its mark. The referee with the mandatory eight count asked McGrath if he could continue. Without even thinking twice McGrath brought his hands back up to guard and nodded his head to indicate he will continue. It was all one-way traffic for Black in round three as he was getting on top of McGrath and even dropping him again with a low kick. The fight took an unexpected turn when McGrath finally opened up and connected with heavy hands, Spiro Black found himself on the wrong end of a combination. He managed to regain his composure and found the end of the round. The crowd erupted with applause and started really getting behind both fighters. In the final round, Black seemed to find his rhythm again and got back to business. Mixing it up with punch kick combos, once again finding that opening for the body shot. McGrath went down but this time was unable to beat the count. Black was the new Cruiserweight South Pacific Champion. There were many more great fights that are worth a mention and I could go on for hours explaining each and every one in great detail. Fortunately for fight fans the event was covered by Fox where one might be able to catch it on a re-run. Or you can check out the Cornerman website, www.cornerman.com.au for full results and photos from this event. At the end of the night I walked away with a divine feeling of being truly inspired. Nick Boutzos had put on another successful show. This is why I choose to be around the fight game, because this is what inspires me – it’s because of the sport, the fighters, their heart, their courage, all packaged up into a positive verve ready to be consumed by one who seeks it!

www.cornerman.com.au 43


APRIL 2013

kick boxing

The Fighters

Lightweights Running the Gauntlet PHIL TYQUIN

Weight: 68kg Fight Record: 28-17-11 Gym: TLG Thai Boxing Gym Biggest challenge preparing for this fight? Just getting my fitness up, tweaking a few little skills and preparing myself mentally. Why will you win this tournament? I feel like I have more drive than my opponent, I wanna win a lot more than they do and it’s in my home crowd and I feel I have the advantage there. What are you favourite weapons? I like big heavy leg kicks and fast hands. Who do you look up to? Nathan Corbett and my trainer because he’s pushed me so far and got me ahead for this.

RHYS “LIGHTNING WINDYSPORT”

4 T S E U CONQ Kampan with his trainer Phill Bennett

Conquest 4 will see another stacked card of some of the most experienced practitioners of the “art of the eight limbs” in New South Wales go head to head at Emu’s Rugby Club on Sunday, 21st April 2013.

F

EATURED in this promotion is the 4-man eliminator tournament between Rhys “Lightning Windysport” (WBKF World Champion), Phil Tyquin (WBC and WKA State Champion), Ben “Bullride” Burrage (WMC World Champion) and Gary Patterson (WMC, WKA State Champion and WBKF Australian champion). Fighting at full Muay Thai rules of 5 3 minute rounds, one of the key challenges most of the competitors will face coming into this tournament is to ensure their fitness is in top notch form in order to dominate until the very last round. With roots in Kyokushin Karate, Ben Burrage is a veteran of the tournament format matches and believes his experience will give him the upper hand however with a profusion of titles on the line, every contender is hungry to snag the ultimate glory. With paramount determination behind each competitor, spectators can expect a tidal wave of fast hands, heavy leg kicks and skull splitting elbows

which will satisfy the most avid of Muay Thai fans. As Rhys Lightning puts it, “I just wanna cause a ruckus” and that is a promise which is sure to be delivered. In addition to the eliminator, a further 6 Muay Thai bouts will include the return of WMC World Champion Ricky Campbell this time challenging former 2 time Lumpinee stadium champion Kampan Santaweesook for his world title as well as Nikita Campbell who will be defending her amateur NSW state title. Boxing fans have not been neglected by promoter Phil Bennett who has lined up 6 amateur boxing fights. Muay Thai fans will recognise WMC title holder Toby Wescott who will now be looking for success in the boxing ring in hope of advancing his chances to represent Australia in the Olympics. Conquest 4 will also feature Mathew Wade, Brock Campbell, Ginny Connors, Charlie Bubb, Patrick Junior Inapaya and Liam Slatter.

Weight: 68kg Fight Record: 20-16-3 1 draw Gym: Angel Gym Biggest challenge preparing for this fight? Probably just getting into the mental game as I don’t know anything about any of the other fighters and getting my techniques down pat. Why will you win this tournament? I’m just ready for it and ready to stand there and bang. I feel like I’ve got something to prove. What are you favourite weapons? I like my hands but I like my kicks better. I just wanna cause a ruckus really. Who do you look up to? Saiyok, Kampan Santaweesook and Nathan “Carnage” Corbett.

BEN “BULLRIDER” BURRAGE

Weight: 68kg Record: N/A** Gym: Tamworth Fighting Arts Biggest challenge preparing for this fight? Because I’m from the country, it’s hard to get quality sparring and have to travel to Sydney and other areas of NSW. Why will you win this tournament? I have experience and I’m used to the tournament fights due to coming from a Kyokushin background and having fought in the TUFF challenges. What are you favourite weapons? My boxing and low kicks. Who do you look up to? My trainers John halford and Ben Bagagry and also Thai fighters Nokweed Devy and Dean Devy. ** Wasn’t able to find on the internet, fighter declined to provide

GARY PATTERSON

Weight: 68kg Fight Record: 23-13-7 2 draws Gym: Rungchai M-60 Muay Thai Biggest challenge preparing for this fight? Getting fit after the Christmas break and getting back into it. Why will you win this tournament? I’ll be stronger than the other competitors. I have fought Phil Tyquin before and beat him and I’m pretty excited to fight the other fighters. What are you favourite weapons? My kicks – basically I like to land them anywhere I can get them. Who do you look up to? John Wayne Parr and Eli Madigan. I love watching his fights.

www.cornerman.com.au 45


APRIL 2012

Mixed martial arts

STORM DAMAGE 2

Brandon Sosoli

full results Matthew Wade vs Andrew Machin Renee Jones vs Michelle Peruzzi James Lane vs Brandon Sosoli

Zac Webbers vs Julian Anczewski

Winner (Pts)

Beau Jay-Peltier vs Liam Slatter

T

46 www.cornerman.com.au

up Machin against the fence working the clinch. Sosoli was throwing his knees against his opponent’s leg and at times executive the subtle but effective toe stomps. Two minutes into the first round and after a blow to the groin area by Sosoli, the action started picking up. Machin finding himself defending against Sosoli’s front kicks as well as low kick to the legs. The round finished with Sosoli on top guard. Sosoli opened the second round with a series of boxing strikes. Machin’s only option to negate this attack was to clinch. It wasn’t long before Sosoli was drawing blood from Machin nose resulting from a right overhand. Sosoli sealing second round along with the first. The third round saw a different opening compared to the first two. This time Machin came out strong with his strikes backing up Sosoli to the fence and then eventually working in his underhooks, giving him a taste of his own medicine with the subtle toe stomps. Sosoli escapes from Machin but soon finds himself on the back foot fending off Machin’s punches. This by far the best round for Machin. Machin once again tries to repeat his previous opening attack but this time Sosoli aware of his strategy draws in close clinches. Things aren’t looking too good for Sosoli as he loses a point for another blow to the groin. Sosoli coming to the

rude awakening that this might cost him the fight moves in aggressively with a spinning back fist. For the rest of the round Sosoli finds his rhythm like the two opening rounds and finishes the round dominantly. In the championship round Sosoli finds an early opportunity for an arm bar but couldn’t seem to lock it into place. He maintains top control throughout the round even after a number of attempts by Machin to get back to his feet. Not the most exciting finish to a fight especially after an entertaining start. Sosoli securing a majority decision and winning the Heavyweight Elimination Gauntlet scoring 48-46, 46-48, 48-46. With Machin and Sosoli now with 1 win and 1 loss each, lets see if they agree to a rubber match to decide who is the supreme heavyweight. Time will tell. There were a number of KO’s and TKO’s throughout the night and the most impressive KO came from the brother of the heavyweight eliminator champion – Benjamin Sosoli. Benjamin was fighting against a novice – Ugur Kocak in his debut fight. After an even first round where both fighters utilized their grappling skills, they both came into the second with the aim of standing and striking it out. Kocak leaving his guard way too low paid the ultimate price and wore a huge overhand by Sosoli. Kocak went stiff and hit the

canvass hard. As soon as he felt the canvas, his fighter instinct kicked in and forced him to get back up to his feet. It was evident that he was dazed and not possible to continue. A huge and impressive win for Benjamin Sosoli. Another entertaining and impressive bout was between Kevin Ryan and Sean Godkin. What made this so entertaining was that as soon as you though one fighter was winning and had the upper hand, the other would immediately counter and turn the game around. Most of the first round was fought on the ground with each fighter attempting choke holds from rear naked chokes to triangles. Towards the end of the round Ryan mounted his opponent and began his barrage of hummer fists and punches to the head. Godkin struggling to defend made a criticial mistake and turned his back on Ryan who kept with the onslaught. Godkin now unable to defend himself was waiting for the inevitable. Referee John Sharp jumping in when there was 1 sec left until the end of the round and stopped the fight. If Godkin lasted one more second would he have changed the outcome of the fight, I guess we’ll never know. One would wonder whether this would be good reason for a rematch. It was very apparent that Godkin was not happy with the outcome. Fight footage from Storm Damage 2 can be found on our website www.cornerman.com.au

TKO (Rnd 1)

TKO (Rnd 1)

Ben Sadler vs Dave Fowler

HE first eliminator was to be fought out between Matthew Wade and Andrew Machin. Wade with a Judo background started strong by taking down Machin with an “O-Goshi” Judo throw. Needless to say, Wade eager to finish him off made the ultimate mistake by rushing into the ground and pound whilst leaving the back door open. Machin saw the opening and turned the table around momentarily and executed a number of powerful yet effecting hammer blows, which eventually turned Wade’s lights out. The referee, John Sharp jumped in time to stop the fight, as Wade was clearly out cold. As this is a 4-man eliminator, Machin moves into the final. The second bout for the heavyweight eliminator was another short fight. Brendon Sosoli TKO’ed James Lane in 19secs with a combination of a right uppercut, followed by a right knee. The fact that Sosoli charged Lane with a flying knee reinstated that he meant business. Lane on the back foot from the start didn’t stand a chance. The final eliminator which is to be decided over 5x3 minute rounds, was now to be against Andrew Machin and Brendon Sosoli. These guys fought in the last Storm Damage where Machin won on points. Tonight, Machin was looking to repeat his success and take home the belt yet again. The first round started slow with Sosoli pushing

TKO (Rnd 1)

Nathan Banks vs Nick Schilling

Benjamin Sosoli vs Ugur Kocak

If we look back at the glory days of the original UFC and Pride FC, we will remember the “Kumite” themed eliminator bouts; whereby multiple fighters, fight multiple times on the same night. Storm Damage promotions have continued that tradition and featured a Heavyweight Eliminator Gauntlet consisting of 4 fighters – Matthew Wade, Andrew Machin, James Lane and Brendon Sosoli.

KO (Rnd 1)

KO (Rnd 2)

TKO (Rnd 1) SUB (Rnd 2)

Sean Pretty vs Jesse Maguer

SUB (Rnd 1)

Leo Diaz vs Rod Harris

TKO (Rnd 1)

Kevin Ryan vs Sean Godkin

TKO (Rnd 1)

Brandon Sosoli vs Andrew Machin

Winner (Pts)

Referee seen en ough, Kevin Ryan vic torious.

www.cornerman.com.au 47


APRIL 2013

kick boxing

UFC judge Sal D’Amato talks about his profession

You need to know the scoring criteria and system, but also the criteria on how it’s applied.

C

AN you tell us little bit about your training in combat sports? Sure, I’ve been in martial arts basically all my life. I have a 3rd degree blackbelt in Taekwondo and 1st degree in Escrima, which is a Pilipino martial art. I’ve been involved with judging since 1992 – I started judging kickboxing and it evolved into Muay Thai and eventually into MMA. So I’ve been doing strictly MMA since the early 2000s. When did you make the transition from competing and training into judging? Why did you make that transition? As I was getting older I wasn’t competing anymore, that’s why I started getting into judging. Actually the very first thing I did was as a kick counter for kickboxing, I was just counting kicks. I did a few shows and they asked me to judge, so I did it that way. There was no training at the time; no training as far as criteria and what we look for, all we knew was there was a 10-point mass system, which we are still using today. How long have you been judging UFC events?

I did my first UFC in 2006. I did an Ultimate Fighter reality show actually, it was a top finale. And then I did a number of other UFC events. Since UFC 90 I went through a streak of doing UFC 107, 108, 110, 112-116, 118, 119, 122, and 124 in Boston, I’ve been very, very fortunate to be doing it and I love doing it, it’s a passion, and they think I’m doing a good job so far, so I’m still doing it. Could you give us a quick breakdown of how it is judged? Sure, we have criteria we follow; it’s through the ABC (Association of Boxing Commission) in the US and the criteria we follow uses a 5 tier system – it’s effective striking, effective grappling, cage or ring control, effective aggression & effective defense. The first two are the most important. What qualities in your opinion does someone need to be a good judge? You need a background in martial arts or some sort of combat sport, but having said that, that only is not enough; you need to know the scoring criteria and system and also the criteria on how it’s applied. You need to evaluate the action that is happening. Just because I have a background in martial arts

doesn’t mean I’m a good judge, I have to do all those other things too. I have to be able to evaluate what is happening as well. Is every country’s scoring criteria the same? With MMA it is basically the same rules. Some of the countries I’ve been to – Australia, Canada, Brazil, Abu Dhabi – use ABC for boxing because the UFC is using it, so everybody is following the suit. Do you have a favorite moment from your judging experience? One of my good buddies, and fellow judge, Mark Collett both agree that the best part of an event is when Bruce Buffer says “We are live!” What advice could you give people wanting to become an MMA judge? They should definitely start in amateur ranks and do as many bouts as they can. And then obviously go into pros and get licensed by a commission and take courses. I teach courses with Herb Dean. We teach refereeing and judging (www.herbdean. com) and that’s how I would recommend getting certification.

KEEPING

SCORE 48 www.cornerman.com.au

www.cornerman.com.au 49


APRIL 2013

Mixed martial arts

WHATS INYOUR BAG? It’s always important to have the right gear when you’re training and take the time to be organised about it. It’s not just a question of having the right gear for the job; it’s about hygiene and safety, too. Whatever level you’re at, if you’re serious about martial arts, get your bag in order.

S” VACULIK THIS ISSUE: RICHIE “VA

KNEEPADS Knees can do a lot of accidental damage in training.

MMA GLOVES I’ve been using Fight Breed ones of late. They are a great Aussie brand.

If you are setting up a gym or would like information on how to increase your income through merchandising, please call SMAI for the most competitive quote.

GROIN PROTECTOR I don’t need to explain this one to the blokes out there.

16 OUNCE GLOVES I’ve been doing a lot of boxing lately, so I’ve been using these a lot.

VASELINE It always comes in handy for sparring.

EAR GUARDS – These are important so my cauliflowers don’t flare up.

MORE BAG ESSENTIALS SHIN GUARDS They protect me and my opponents. ELBOW PADS Elbows cut like knives. Safety first. HAND WRAPS I try to have a few pairs to rotate. SUPPLEMENTS FROM BODY SCIENCE I’ve usually got these in the bag somewhere for a quick snack

afterwards. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MEDS I don’t use them often, but they’re good to have around. STRAPPING TAPE You never know when it’ll be useful. WRESTLING SHOES Make sure you air these out afterwards.

As most of you would know, leaving your sweaty gym bag in the boot of your car or locker after a training session is a bad idea. My girlfriend won’t even let me bring my gear into her garage anymore, it can smell that bad. Take the time to air out your gear and give it a bit of sunlight.


APRIL 2012

Mixed martial arts

SO WE HEARD…

JUNIOR TALIPEAU

Former Australian middleweight champion Junior Talipeau is going to mix it up in the square cage for a change. After his unsuccessful bid for the IBF Pan Pacific Title in 2011 against Zac Awad, Talipeau has only had 2 fights since. He will be fighting all rounder Jon Leven on April 27th in Sydney under the Combat 8 rules. This type of MMA style should suit him more as each round consists of boxing only standup and 30 seconds on the ground.

ROBERT WHITTAKER

ALEX CHAMBERS

Recent winners of The Ultimate Fighter TV series Robert Whittaker (Cornerman #6 cover) and Colton Smith will battle each other at UFC 160 in May 25th on the same card as Mark Hunt and James Te Huna. Whittaker (10-2), who took TUF The Smashes series by storm, won his preliminary bouts all by KO in round 1 and final bout against Brad Scott by unanimous decision.

After an impressive win on Brace 17 last year, Alex Chambers had another victory on women’s only Invicta FC, where she won against undefeated Jodie Esquibel by rear-naked choke in just 95 seconds into the round 1. Chambers, who trains out of VT1 gym in Chatswood, improves her record to (4-1).

SOA “THE HULK” PALELEI

BERNARDO “TREKKO” MAGALHAES (P4) After his points loss in December last year Bernardo “Trekko”

Magalhaes is scheduled to fight former The Ultimate Fighter, The Smashes contender Ben Alloway at Combat 8 in Sydney. Alloway, who also lost his last fight and has a very similar record, will have odds slightly in his favor as under Combat 8 rules, we should see more stand-up fighting. This shapes up as a promising match.

52 www.cornerman.com.au

Soa “The Hulk” Palelei (18-3) has signed a 4 fight deal with UFC and is fighting on UFC 161 on June 15th in Canada against Stipe Miocic (9-1). Palelei is back with the organization after one fight in 2007 on UFC 79 when he lost to Eddie Sanchez. Since then Palelei has had 11 fights with only one loss, his last match being on AFC 4, defeating Sean McCorkle by TKO in round one. He is now up for a test as Miocic is no pushover, being both a good wrestler and a former Golden Gloves champion.

www.cornerman.com.au 53


APRIL 2013

Mixed martial arts

Many are dubbing him a real life Rocky Balboa.

HEAD HUNTING UFC fighter Mark Hunt is living a Cinderella story – and it’s not over yet

T

HERE was a time not long ago when the UFC didn’t want Kiwi-Samoan Mark Hunt. In fact, they offered to pay him to disappear. Hunt, who felt insulted and disrespected, decided to decline the offer and fight on. Now he’s one win away from a heavyweight title fight. It all began for Hunt in New Zealand when he was involved in an altercation outside of an Auckland nightclub. One of the bouncers was so impressed with Hunt’s ability, that he asked him to come and train at his gym. Hunt soon found himself living in Sydney and training as a kickboxer. It wasn’t long before he was competing in K1 events against some of the best stand-up strikers in the world. Hunt had notable fights against the likes of Ray Sefo, Jerome Le Banner, Ernesto Hoost and Mirko Filipovic. In 2001 he became the World K1 GP Champion with a decision victory over Francisco Filho.

54 www.cornerman.com.au

The “Super Samoan” had also started to train and compete in MMA. In 2004 he fought in a PRIDE event and went on to take on some of the best mixed martial artists on the planet. However, from 2006 – 2010 Hunt’s form was poor, losing five consecutive fights. When Hunt came to the UFC in 2010 after Zuffa’s purchase of PRIDE, it wasn’t surprising that critics weren’t overly excited about his prospects. His debut fight was against Sean McCorkle who finished him in a quick submission. Surely Mark Hunt’s glory days were behind him. Hunt proved he wasn’t a spent force, however. In his next fight he got KO of the Night against Chris Tuchscherer and then a decision victory against Ben Rothwell. Younger MMA fans started asking who this 38-year-old was. Hunt’s next two fights saw him brutally KO Cheick Kongo and Stephan Struve – people were certainly

talking about him now. Many started dubbing him a real life Rocky Balboa – which the uncomplicated Kiwi has taken in his stride. “My game plan is to knock my opponents head off,” he told reports before a fight. “That is my game plan.” UFC president Dana White is happy that Hunt has proved his organisation wrong by silencing all the doubters. “Even though we weren’t wrong, we ended up being wrong. He proved us wrong. He proved anyone who doubted him wrong,” said White. “Now imagine if we’d cut him. Hunt’s popularity in MMA right now is overwhelming. And it’s can’t be just put down to his rise from virtual obscurity – there’s more to it than that. Fans love Mark Hunt because he looks like the common man. In an age where fighters look like super heroes, along comes this competitor who’s built more like somebody you’d meet at the pub. He doesn’t look

particularly athletic or tall, but he possesses a punching power that’s becoming legendary. He’s the everyman. And he keeps winning. Hunt’s next fight is against Junior dos Santos at UFC 160. The winner is sure to become the number one contender for the title. Most are expecting a stand-up affair, but Dos Santos says he will take it to ground is he has to. “He (Hunt) has got a lot of power in his punches. I think it’s going to be pretty tough for me,” he told the press recently. “If I feel weird standing with him, I’m going to take him down.” Most UFC critics say that Junior dos Santos has the best striking skills in the division, but Hunt has been written off as an underdog plenty of times before. He’s also fought the likes of Alistair Overeem, Fedor Emelianenko, Wanderlei Silva and Melvin Manhoef and beaten the very best in the sport. It’d be foolish to underestimate the “Super Samoan” again.

Custom Rhino Mouthguard

www.cornerman.com.au 55


Mixed martial arts

101

1

h t i w

CHAMPION EVENT

I kick low on the inside leg, using my hips & core to sweep Paul’s foot right out to the side as I push his head down with my left hand. This leverage disrupts his base & lowers his whole body. People often drop their hands and look down also.

3

4 I keep the rolling momentum & rip to body with an uppercut to the solar plexus or liver. My intention is to “shape” him by crumpling him further down from the body shot.

5 UPCOMING EVENTS

DATE

VENUE

CITY/SUBURB

Corporate Fighter

19th April

George street IVY

Sydney

Amateur Boxing

J-N-I

19th April

Civic Centre

Hurstville NSW

David Levi, James Beard

Fitness Expo Titles

20-21st April

Convention Centre

Darling Harbor Sydney

Amateur Tournament

HIGHLIGHTS

4 men Lightweight gauntlet

Conquest 4

21st April

EMU’s Rugby Club

Orange NSW

No Bull Fight Night

21st April

Castle Hill RSL

Castle Hill NSW

TBA

Combat 8

27th April

Entertainment Centre

Sydney

Peter Graham vs Tai Tuivasa

Souths Juniors Boxing

9th May

South Sydney Juniors Leagues

Kingsford NSW

Amateur Boxing

Fight Club X

11th May

Cronulla Sharks

Cronulla NSW

Jack Brubaker

PCYC Masters Tournament

11th May

North Sydney Leagues

Cammeray NSW

TBA

First Fight Boxing

24th May

Georges River Sailing Club

Sandringham NSW

TBA

56 www.cornerman.com.au

Facing a much taller opponent in Paul, it’s important to get inside & unload quickly while chopping them down like a tree. So I start by exploding with a hard jab while switching my stance to distract him, block his vision & hide my next move. Timing and speed are crucial.

As I roll my hips back to the left after the sweep, I use that momentum to throw an overhand right to his jaw, further turning his head and keeping his hands off centre to me.

NADINE

2

I chamber my left foot across & chop a hard right leg kick to Paul’s extended leg to bring him further down. This also takes me further away from his weapons and puts me more to the outside.

6 I follow this kick in one rolling motion by planting my right foot and shin kick straight up from the floor to the front of Paul’s face as he is bent forward.

NADINE CHAMPION

7 If his head has come back down after the kick I would roll straight back into a hard elbow smash. Alternately I would look to clinch & jump knee to the face. Either way I’m looking to finish.

Nadine Champion’s 27 year training career has seen her accumulate titles in Muay Thai, kickboxing & martial arts, all with an undefeated record. She has multiple Black Belts, most notably under legendary World Champion Benny “the Jet” Urquidez since 1999. She currently teaches his Ukidokan system of striking and mixed martial arts at the newly opened UFC Gym in Alexandria, Sydney. facebook.com/ukidokanaustralia about.me/nadine.champion ufcgymsydney.com bennythejet.com


MATT SPOONER P: 0410 520 957 Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for UFC Gym, Hard Candy Fitness & Crunch Fitness, Australia Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for UFC Magazine, Australia. Head coach for Kickboxelite Fight Team

TRAINING EXERCISES

GET STRONG & FIT USING BODYWEIGHT STRENGTH ONLY

ROLLING PISTOL (1 LEGGED SQUAT) PERFORM 10 ALTERNATING LEFT AND RIGHT LEG PISTOLS FOR 5 SETS

1

Everyone knows Gymnasts are some of the greatest strength athletes on the planet. Their amazing feats of strength, power, agility, balance, timing and coordination have to be seen to be believed. I have a huge interest in gymnastics training and I really wish I had started this type of training at a much earlier age but none the less I am grateful that I did start as it has really helped me with my own athleticism. The great thing about gymnastics training is you can start at any age, any level of athleticism, you can practice it anywhere and it requires hardly any training equipment. In the photos below we demonstrate a whole body workout that can be performed anywhere. All you need is a pair of portable Olympic Rings or a simple chin up bar.

FRONT LEVER LOWERS

1

2

3

Simple to perform but hard to master ,attempt this exercise by standing on one leg then rolling onto your back, then (with out using your hands to assist if possible) roll back up to standing on the same one leg. Now repeat on the other side. This is a great lower body and core strength exercise as well as developing your balance and coordination.

PLYOMETRIC (CLAPPING) PUSHUP

PERFORM 5 SETS OF 5 REPS

2

3

Gymnasts have extremely strong core development and this exercise is a great way to develop this type of core strength.Grab the rings (or chin up bar) now keeping your legs together and squeezing your abs tight bring your knees to your chest and then invert (turn upside down) point your toes at the ceiling whilst you straighten out your legs, now try to slowly lower your legs back down towards the ground with straight arms . Thats one rep, now repeat for desired reps. Do not let go of the rings or bar whilst attempting!

THE CHIN UP

APRIL 2013

1

PERFORM 5 SETS OF 10 REPETITIONS

2

3

Everyone knows the pushup but by turning it into a “Clapping” Plyometric pushup we develop explosive power and agility. This is a great exercise for fighters who want to help develop their striking power and core strength.

THE HANDSTAND HOLD

ATTEMPT 5 SETS 0F 45 SECOND HOLDS

PERFORM 5 SETS OF 5 REPS

after

1

2

3

Again most people know how to perform this great upper body strength exercise, but if you squeeze your legs together, point your toes forward and keep your legs straight the whole time it becomes much harder (which makes your stronger) plus becomes a great core exercise as well. The above exercises may be performed for sets (with rest between) or done as a conditioning circuit, going from one exercise to the next with little to no rest between.

58 www.cornerman.com.au

1

2

VE BEEN CISES HA ONDS AND R E X E L L ONCE A EST FOR 60 SEC OR 5 ED, R AGAIN (F COMPLET PT THE CIRCUIT ITH ALL TRAINEM W THEN ATT IRCUIT SETS) AS E DANGEROUS C B E N T A E L C P S NDER COM CISE R E X E E MPTED U D S E T E T H A T , E B G E Y IN ULD ONL XPERIENC AND SHO ERVISION OF A E D CONDITHE SUP D STRENGTH AN QUALIFIE IONING COACH. T

Handstands are arguably the foundation exercise of male gymnastics training. Mere mortals can attempt the wall version (shown) and this will assist in the development of a free standing handstand. Make sure you lock out your elbows (so you dont fall on your head) whilst attempting. Another great upper body strength exercise as well as developing your body awareness and core.

www.cornerman.com.au 59


APRIL 2013

directory NAME

BUSINESS

ADDRESS

CONTACT

WEBSITE/EMAIL

PAGE

0411 182 907

rickpowell4@gmail.com www.rickpowell.com.au

Page 22

EVENT MC RICK POWELL

Event MC

JAMES WHITE

Event MC

NSW

0415 641 190

MICHAEL PEDAVOLI

Event MC

PO Box 4500, Lakehaven NSW 2263

0414 484 270

MC2 MANAGEMENT

Fighter management & marketing

Suite 2 125 Oxford St, Bondi Junction

Boxing, kickboxing and MMA gym

23 Pelican St, Darlinghurst, NSW

NAME

www.2mc2.com.au enquires@2mc2.com.au (02) 9267 7484

www.boxingworks.com.au

IGOR MMA

MMA Gym

32 Ebley St, Bondi Junction, NSW

(02) 9387 4446

www.igormma.com

ILLAWARRA KYOKUSHIN KARATE

Karate/ kickboxing gym

2/ 4–6 Third Avenue, Unandera, NSW

0421 284 825

www.illawarrakyokushin.com.au

KICKSTART BOXING & PT

Boxing/kickboxing gym

1/12 Rickard Rd, Narrabeen, NSW

0409 077 623

http://kickstart.net.au

NO CONTEST ACADEMY ST. MARYS

Boxing gym

5/6 Crana St, Blacktown, NSW

(02) 9623 3233

www.nocontestacademy.com.au

PITBULL GYM

Muay thai kickboxing gym

28a Hampden Rd, South Wentworthville, NSW

9688 3197 0417 446 438

www.pitbullkickboxing.com

THE BOXING SHOP

Boxing gym

170 Kessels Rd, Nathan, QLD

1300 66 00 17

www.theboxingshop.com.au

BULLDOG GYM BALMAIN

Thaiboxing Gym

276 A Norton street Leichhardt, NSW

0404 037 060

bulldoggymbalmain.com Gyms

JABOUT/TOE THE LINE BOXING

Gym

U15/30 Coombes drive Penrith NSW 2750

0409 691 308

www.jabout.com.au www.toethelineboxing.com.au ttlboxing@hotmail.com

Gym/ Promotions

STORM MMA

Gym/ Promotions

ANGEL GYM

Gym/ Promotions

BONDI BOXING & MUAY THAI GYM

Boxing and muay thai gym

BULLDOG GYM MANLY

36-38 Wentworth Ave, Surry Hills NSW 2010

www.corporatefightgym.com.au

Page 34

Windysport/P.J.Bennett angelgym1@hotmail.com

284 Bondi Rd, Bondi, NSW

0402 622 662

www.bondimuaythai.com.au

Thaiboxing Gym

4 Hayes st, Balgowlah, NSW

(02) 9949 3533 0417 239 843

www.thaiboxing.com.au

EVOLUTION FITNESS CENTRE

Muay thai kickboxing gym

2/9 Mildron Rd, Tuggerah NSW

0414 807 957

FITE 108 MUAY THAI KICKBOXING

Muay thai kickboxing gym

5/10 Bluegum Close, Tuggerah, NSW

0414 611 097

www.fite108.com.au

FULL FORCE BLACKTOWN

Thaiboxing Gym

40 Third Avenue, Blacktown, NSW

42580 0297

fullforcegym.com.au/Gyms/Promotions

JOE’S BOXING

Boxing gym

20/118 Queens Rd, Five Dock, NSW

(02) 9715 2083

www.joesboxing.com.au

MURDOCH’S WORKSHOP

Muay thai kickboxing gym

58 Medcalf St, Warners Bay, NSW

0408 508 474

BODYPUNCH BOXING GYM

Boxing gym

3rd Floor, 71-75 Wangee Road, Lakemba, NSW

0415 600 448

THUNDER BOXING

Promotions Corporate boxing NSW

FIRST FIGHT PROMOTIONS

Corporate boxing NSW

0447 002 141

0417 468 828 0412 819 033

PAGE

Photography NSW

0414 466 360

photographybyrockfingrz@gmail.com

SHADOW BOXOGRAPHY

Photography NSW

0400 815 001

shadowboxography@ gmail.com

SOUTHSIDE STUDIOS

Photography NSW

0408 118 860

www.southsidestudios.com.au

WAYNE TOLTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Photography QLD

0412 681 857

wtolton@bigbond.com

Back cover

ZETT

Combat sports equipment

5/38 Cantebury Rd, Bankstown, NSW

(02) 9793 8008

www.zettsport.com.au

ZOE’S MARTIAL ARTS

Combat sports equipment

810 Princes Highway, Tempe NSW

1300 750 061

www.boxingsupplies.com.au

RHINO MOUTHGUARDS

Custom Mouthguards

50 Burnie St, Clovelly, NSW

(02) 9664 9335

www.rhinomouthguards.com

Page 40

SMAI BOXING & MMA EQUIPMENT

Combat sports equipment

105-119 Jardine St, Fairy Meadow, NSW

(02) 4283 4363

www.smai.com.au

Page 50

Web solutions Worldwide

spikee1@gmail.com www.sawstudio. com.au

SUPPLEMENTS Page 2

ASN DARLINGHURST

Proteins

INTERNATIONAL PROTEIN

Proteins

79 Oxford st, Darlinghurst, NSW

02 9360 0222

www.australiansportsnutrition.com.au info@international-protein.com www.international-protein.com

Page 18-19

S E I R T N E 4 T E G Page 10

www.teamhussein.com

thunderboxing@hotmail.com www.corporatefighter.com.au info@corporatefighter.com.au

WEBSITE/EMAIL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROCKFINGRZ

SAW STUDIO

PROMOTIONS & RING HIRE CORPORATE FIGHTER

CONTACT

WEB SOLUTIONS

info@stormmma.com.au www.stormmma.com.au 0403 390 023

ADDRESS

MARTIAL ARTS SUPPLIES & MOUTH GUARDS

GYMS & PROMOTIONS CORPORATE FIGHT GYM

BUSINESS

PHOTOGRAPHY

boxingringhire@gmail.com

GYMS BOXING WORKS

BUSINESS directory

Page 48

IN THE PRINTED MAGAZINE & one year online subscription! When you list your business in the Cornerman Directory

firstfightpromotions@gmail.com

JNI PROMOTIONS

Promotions

0418 475 901

jni@optusnet.com.au

Page 48

CKO BOXING RING HIRE

Ring hire NSW

0400 978 428 0421 339 625

stefanandmegs@hotmail.com

Page 12

DYNAMITE ENTERTAINMENT

Ring Hire

PO Box 4500, Lakehaven NSW 2263

0414 484 270

boxingringhire@gmail.com

NO BULL FITE NITE

Promotions/ring hire

28a Hampden Rd, South Wentworthville, NSW

(02) 9688 3197 0417 446 438

www.pitbullkickboxing.com

BLACK TIE BOXING

Corporate boxing NSW

www.blacktieboxing.com.au j.dooner@blacktieboxing.com.au

Page 34

Email us at sales@cornerman.com.au or simply subscribe at www.cornerman.com.au/directory

BUSINESS directory


dvd catalogue DATE

TITLE

PRICE

MEMBERS

SOUTHS JUNIORS

$40

$36

February 22

JNI PERSONS OF INTEREST

$50

$45

February16

NEXT GENERATION KICKBOXING

$40

$36

February 15

WOOD VS LETOYA

$50

$45

February 12

SOUTHS JUNIORS

$40

$36

February 9

CONTROLLED AGGRESSION

$50

$45

February 2

STROM DAMAGE 2

$40

$36

DVD gue catalo

MARCH 2013 March 12

FEBRUARY 2013

SHADOWBOXER

$40

$36

CORPORATE FIGHTER

$40

$36

November 24

TSZYU ACADEMY NIGHT

$40

$36

November 23

JNI- MADE FOR WAR

$50

$45

November 16

FIGHT CLUB

$50

$45

November 16

SOUTHS JUNIORS

$40

$36

November 10

NEWCASTLE PCYC

$40

$36

November 3

MUSWELLBROOK PCYC

$40

$36

S H AD O W

December 8 December 7

NOVEMBER 2012

SubscriptionCard.pdf

1

4/01/12

Free DVD* of your choice for first 100 two-year subscribers

Over $200 value FOR ONLY $119 To subscribe go to www.cornerman.com.au/user/register or complete the form below and send to 3/20 Prince St, Randwick NSW 2031 Yes I would like to take up this special offer from Cornerman  1 year (4 issues) for $25  2 years (8 issues) for $48  1 year (4 issues) plus 1 year online access to all Cornerman onine content for $75  2 years (8 issues) plus 2 years online access to all Cornerman online content plus one free DVD* of your choice for $119 Mr/Miss/Ms/Mrs Address Email address  I enclose a cheque payable to Cornerman Card no *Excludes all state title and Olympic selection DVDs.

State /

Please debit my credit card

Expiry date

Amex

Cardholder signature

Diners

S p oMuay r tThai s PMMA hotography

Kickboxing

Hakan Saglam

B o x0400 i n g 815 001 Mob

M u a y Th a i MMA

shadowboxography@gmail.com shadowboxography@gmail.com

SUBSCRIBE NOW AND GET FREE DVD

Cornerman website Access to all content including all videos

Boxing

Kickboxing

10:52 PM

Eight issues of Cornerman Magazine Save more than 25% off newstand price

Hakan Saglam Mob 0419 333 606

Sports Photography HY

DECEMBER 2012

XO G R A O P B

Visa

Postcode

Mastercard

FOR ALL THE BEST FIGHT ACTION JOIN www.cornerman.com.au/videos Get instant access to all videos and online magazine

only

only

year 1 r fo

year for 2

r o 9 9 9 5 $ $

Subscribe to Cornerman magazine online and save!

s


64 www.cornerman.com.au


Cornerman Magazine April 2013