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2018


H E A LT H C A R E

M I L I TA R Y

VETER ANS

Wounds of War How the VA Delivers Health, Healing, and Hope to the Nation’s Veterans Suzanne Gordon

US military conflicts abroad have left nine million Americans dependent on the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) for medical care. Their “wounds of war” are treated by the largest hospital system in the country—one that has come under fire from critics in the White House, on Capitol Hill, and in the nation’s media. The resulting public debate about the future of veterans’ health care has pitted VHA patients and their care-givers against politicians and policy-makers who believe that former military personnel would be better served by private health care providers. This high stakes controversy led Suzanne Gordon, award-winning health care journalist and author, to seek insight from veterans and their families, VHA staff and administrators, advocates for veterans, and proponents of privatization. Gordon spent five years closely observing the VHA’s treatment of patients suffering from service-related injuries. In Wounds of War, Gordon describes how the VHA—tasked with a challenging patient population—does a better job than private-sector institutions offering primary and geriatric care, mental health and home-care services, and support for patients nearing the end of life. The VHA, Gordon argues, is an integrated health-care system worthy of wider emulation, rather than piece-meal dismantling for the benefit of private contractors. In the unusual culture of solidarity between patients and providers that the VHA has fostered, the author finds a working model for higher quality health care and a much-needed alternative to the practice of for-profit medicine. Suzanne Gordon has written, edited, or co-authored twenty books, including First Do No Harm. Gordon’s articles have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Boston Globe. She has been a commentator for CBS Radio and NPR’s Marketplace.

“Wounds of War is a significant contribution. It intersperses ‘boots on the ground’ stories from providers, volunteers, family members, and veterans receiving care— and enhances typically dry data about all aspects of VA care. I have never read something that so wonderfully ties it all together. It’s a true work of art.” —Amy Webb, National Legislative Policy Advisor, AMVETS “Suzanne Gordon’s book left me totally convinced that the VA healthcare system is a crucial resource for clinicians, policy makers, and hospital administrators everywhere. As a physician who has worked in university medical centers and community clinics I was deeply impressed by the front-line care-giving described in Wounds of War. Under increasingly difficult conditions, VA staff are helping and healing patients in ways not reproducible in the private sector.” —Dr. Edward Machtinger, University of California at San Francisco

T H E C U LT U R E A N D P O L I T I C S O F H E A LT H C A R E W O R K

$29.95 hardcover 978-1-5017-3082-5 296 pages, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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BUSINESS

HUMAN RESOURCES

H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N

Managing Risk in High-Stakes Faculty Employment Decisions Julee T. Flood and Terry L . Leap

Understanding the risks involved in hiring new faculty is becoming increasingly important. In Managing Risk in High-Stakes Faculty Employment Decisions Julee T. Flood and Terry L. Leap critically examine the landscape of US institutions of higher learning and the legal and human resource management practices pertinent to college and university faculty members. To help minimize the potential pitfalls in the hiring and promotion processes, Flood and Leap suggest ways that risk management principles can be applied within the unique culture of academia. Claims of workplace harassment and discrimination, violation of free speech and other First Amendment rights, social movements decrying unequal hiring practices, and the growing number of non-tenure track and adjunct faculty, require those involved in hiring and promotion decisions to be more knowledgeable about contract law, best practices in hiring, and risk management, yet many newly appointed administrators are often not sufficiently trained in these matters or in understanding how they might be applied in an academic setting. Human resource departments, hiring committees, department chairs, and academics seeking faculty jobs need resources such as Managing Risk in High-Stakes Faculty Employment Decisions now more than ever. Julee T. Flood is an attorney with experience in the private, nonprofit, and public sectors. Her publications include articles in the Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy, the Journal of College and University Law, the New Hampshire Bar Journal, and Theory Into Practice Terry L . Leap is the Lawson Professor of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is the author of Tenure, Discrimination, and the Courts and, most recently, of Phantom Billing, Fake Prescriptions, and the High Cost of Medicine.

$29.95 paperback 978-1-5017-2895-2 234 pages, 6 x 9 2

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“Flood and Leap have identified an issue that is critically important to the success of institutions of higher education and that has not received the attention it deserves. Every academic administrator could learn a number of useful things from this book.” —Paul F. Clark, author of Building More Effective Unions “Managing Risk in High-Stakes Faculty Employment Decisions is a significant work in the field of higher education law. Julee Flood and Terry Leap accomplish both a synthesis and description of faculty life and discuss how the future of this topic may develop. The authors tackling employment issues is a courageous undertaking; one that is needed.” —Matthew Fuller, Sam Houston State University “A comprehensive work that surveys the pitfalls of employment decisions for faculty. The authors have useful and nuanced advice for anyone who wants to know about these sad sagas. It will be an important resource for a variety of higher education readers.” —Michael Olivas, author of The Law and Higher Education (4th Edition) and Suing Alma Mater


UNIONS

EUROPE

Strong Governments, Precarious Workers Labor Market Policy in the Era of Liberalization Philip R athgeb

Why do some European welfare states protect unemployed and inadequately employed workers (“outsiders”) from economic uncertainty better than others? Philip Rathgeb’s study of labor market policy change in three somewhat-similar small states— Austria, Denmark, and Sweden—explores this fundamental question. He does so by examining the distribution of power between trade unions and political parties, attempting to bridge these two lines of research—trade unions and party politics—that, with few exceptions, have advanced without a mutual exchange. Inclusive trade unions have high political stakes in the protection of outsiders, because they incorporate workers at risk of unemployment into their representational outlook. Yet, the impact of union preferences has declined over time, with a shift in the balance of class power from labor to capital across the Western world. National governments have accordingly prioritized flexibility for employers over the social protection of outsiders. As a result, organized labor can only protect outsiders when governments are reliant on union consent for successful consensus mobilization. When governments have a united majority of seats, on the other hand, they are strong enough to exclude unions. Strong Governments, Precarious Workers calls into question the electoral responsiveness of national governments—and thus political parties—to the social needs of an increasingly numerous group of precarious workers. In the end, Rathgeb concludes that the weaker the government, the stronger the capacity of organized labor to enhance the social protection of precarious workers. Philip R athgeb is a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Konstanz. This is his first book.

$55.00 hardcover 978-1-5017-3058-0 234 pages, 6 x 9, 15 charts

“Philip Rathgeb’s book presents a novel and insightful interpretation of the role of unions and their interactions with governments in the crafting of labor-market reforms in contemporary Europe. The book is clearly structured and well written, presenting case studies of Austria, Denmark, and Sweden in a lively, engaging way.” —Jonas Pontusson, author of Inequality and Prosperity “Looking at three small European countries, Philip Rathgeb shows that dual labor markets result from trade union weakness, not strength. Governments, both left and right, tend to protect core workforces from neoliberal reform, concentrating cuts in protection at the bottom end of the labor market. But when governments are weak, strong unions can and do prevent this. The book challenges theories that blame precarious employment on union clientelism.” —Wolfgang Streeck, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies “Philip Rathgeb’s book is a highly innovative and thought-provoking study of labor market reform in European countries. In pointing to the continued role of inclusive trade unions in resisting precarious employment, it is a tremendously important contribution to recent debates about the driving forces of labor market dualization, which will have a significant impact on the field.” —Marius R. Busemeyer, University of Konstanz

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L AW

A Primer on Legal Reasoning Michael Evan Gold

After years of teaching law courses to undergraduate, graduate, and law students, Michael Evan Gold has come to believe that the traditional way of teaching—analysis, explanation, and example —is superior to the Socratic Method for students at the outset of their studies. In courses taught Socratically, even the most gifted students can struggle, and many others are lost in a fog for months. Gold offers a meta approach to teaching legal reasoning, bringing the process of argumentation to the fore. Using examples both from the law and from daily life, Gold’s book will help undergraduates and first-year law students to understand legal discourse. A Primer on Legal Reasoning analyzes and illustrates the principles of legal reasoning, such as logical deduction, analogies and distinctions, and application of law to fact, and even solves the mystery of how to spot an issue. In Gold’s experience, students who understand the principles of analytical thinking are able to understand arguments, to evaluate and reply to them, and ultimately to construct sound arguments of their own. Michael Evan Gold holds a BA from the University of California at Berkeley and a JD from the Stanford Law School. He is presently Associate Professor of Labor Relations, Law, and History in the ILR School at Cornell University. He is the author of A Dialogue on Comparable Worth, An Introduction to Labor Law, and An Introduction to the Law of Employment Discrimination.

$28.95 978-1-5017-2859-4 paperback 336 pages, 6 x 9, 11 charts 4

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ECONOMIC S

EUROPE

Workers without Borders Posted Work and Precarity in the EU Ines Wagner

How the European Union handles posted workers is a growing issue for a region with borders that really are just lines on a map. A 2008 story about the troubling working conditions of migrant meat and construction workers in Germany, dissected in Ines Wagner’s Workers without Borders, exposed a distressing dichotomy: how could a country with such strong employers’ associations and trade unions allow for the establishment and maintenance of such a precarious labor market segment? Wagner introduces an overlooked piece of the puzzle: re-regulatory politics at the workplace level. Workers without Borders concentrates on how local actors implement European rules and opportunities to analyze the balance of power induced by the EU around policy issues. Wagner examines the particularities of posted worker dynamics at the workplace level to reveal the problems and promises of European Union governance in regulating social justice. Using a bottom-up approach through in-depth interviews with posted migrant workers and administrators involved in the posting process, Workers without Borders shows that strong labor-market regulation via independent collective bargaining institutions at the workplace level is crucial to effective labor rights in marginal workplaces. Wagner identifies structures of access and denial to labor rights for temporary intra-EU migrant workers and the problems contained within this system for the EU more broadly.

“The theoretical underpinning and research methods of Workers without Borders are of very high quality and provide a greatly needed analysis of labor processes and transnational employment relationships in Europe. Ines Wagner has written a significant contribution to our understanding of the emerging European labor market, and to theoretical discussions on institutional change.” —Jörg Flecker, editor of Space, Place and Global Digital Work “Workers without Borders is an exceptionally thoughtful book on an important subject matter in Europe and beyond. Ines Wagner advances discussions on industrial and labor relations by combining empirical evidence and theoretical interpretations, pointing to implications that have not been discussed before.” —Anke Hassel, author of Wage Setting, Social Pacts, and the Euro: A New Role for the State

Ines Wagner is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Social Research in Oslo. She has published widely on the themes of posted work, intra-EU labor migration, and the changing patterns of work and labor market regulation in the European Union.

$49.95 hardcover 978-1-5017-2915-7 176 pages, 6 x 9

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SOCIO LOGY

ISR AEL

Labor in Israel Beyond Nationalism and Neoliberalism Jonathan Preminger

Using a comprehensive analysis of the wave of organizing that swept the country starting in 2007, Labor in Israel investigates the changing political status of organized labor in the context of changes to Israel’s political economy, including liberalization, the rise of non-union labor organizations, the influx of migrant labor, and Israel’s complex relations with the Palestinians. Through his discussion of organized labor’s relationship to the political community and its nationalist political role, Preminger demonstrates that organized labor has lost the powerful status it enjoyed for much of Israel’s history. Despite the weakening of trade unions and the Histadrut, however, he shows the ways in which the fragmentation of labor representation has created opportunities for those previously excluded from the labor movement regime. Organized labor is now trying to renegotiate its place in contemporary Israel, a society that no longer accepts labor’s longstanding claim to be the representative of the people. As such, Preminger concludes that organized labor in Israel is in a transitional and unsettled phase in which new marginal initiatives, new organizations, and new alliances that have blurred the boundaries of the sphere of labor have not yet consolidated into clear structures of representation or accepted patterns of political interaction. Jonathan Preminger is a lecturer in employment and labor relations at Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University.

$60.00 978-1-5017-1712-3 hardcover 238 pages, 6 x 9, 1 chart 6

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“I applaud this book for its case studies of organizing and NGO activities and the analysis of the limits of those activities, as well as the author’s point about the increasingly individualistic and legalistic nature of labor actions. Most importantly, the central point that citizen and labor interests no longer align in Israel and the many illustrations of that point are valuable and appreciated.” —Harry C. Katz, Cornell University “Labor in Israel performs an important service in reporting case studies and contextual data, based on a comprehensive analysis of about thirty interviews, mass media sources, and secondary literature, doing much to fill this informational gap. It also goes beyond mere description by providing a conceptual framework that justifies a multidimensional view of unions and quasi-union organizations that helps organize the book. And it utilizes concepts and frequently borrows insights from relevant international literature.” —Michael Shalev, Hebrew University of Jerusalem


WOMEN’S STUDIES

We’ll Call You If We Need You Experiences of Women Working Construction With a New Preface Susan Eisenberg

Susan Eisenberg began her apprenticeship with Local 103 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in 1978, the year president Jimmy Carter set goals and timetables for the hiring of women on federally assisted construction projects and for the inclusion of women in apprenticeship programs. Eisenberg expected not only a challenging job and the camaraderie of a labor union but also the chance to be part of a historic transformation, social and economic, that would make the construction trades accessible to women. That transformation did not happen. In this book, full of the raw drama and humor found on a construction site, Eisenberg gracefully weaves the voices of thirty women who worked as carpenters, electricians, ironworkers, painters, and plumbers to examine why their numbers remained small. Speaking as if to a friend, women recall their decisions to enter the trades, their first days on the job, and their strategies to gain training and acceptance. They assess with thought, passion, and twenty years’ perspective the affirmative action efforts. Eisenberg introduces this new edition with a preface that shows how things have changed and how they have stayed the same since the book’s original publication. She ends with a discussion of the practices and policies that would be required to uproot gender barriers where they are deeply embedded in the organization and culture of the workplace. Susan Eisenberg is a poet, visual artist, oral historian, licensed electrician, and Resident Artist/Scholar at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center. She is also curator of the online exhibition, On Equal Terms: gender and solidarity. Her most recent book is Stanley’s Girl: Poems. Visit  susaneisenberg.com for more information.

“Eisenberg makes a persuasive case for beefing-up affirmative action guidelines and revising archaic union apprenticeship programs that were designed with eighteen-year-old men in mind.” —Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air “We’ll Call You If We Need You . . . is an inspirational and life-affirming book. Eisenberg tells the story through interviews with thirty women—carpenters, electricians, ironworkers, painters, and plumbers.” —New York Times Book Review ”Eisenberg’s book engenders a new respect for the women in the trades and the difficult work they do.” —The Progressive ”We’ll Call You If We Need You is a truly inspirational account of the heroic women who broke down barriers, overcame obstacles and smashed stereotypes.” —IBEW International President Lonnie Stephenson

$19.95 978-1-5017-1976-9 paperback 252 pages, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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BUSINESS

TECH N O LOGY

Confronting Dystopia The New Technological Revolution and the Future of Work edited by Eva Paus

In Confronting Dystopia, a distinguished group of scholars analyze the implications of the ongoing technological revolution for jobs, working conditions, and income. Focusing on the economic and political implications of AI, digital connectivity, and robotics for both the Global North and the Global South, they move beyond diagnostics to seek solutions that offer better lives for all. Their analyses of the challenges of technology are placed against the backdrop of three decades of rapid economic globalization. The two in tandem are producing the daunting challenges that analysts and policymakers must now confront. The conjuncture of recent advances in AI, machine learning, and robotization portends a vast displacement of human labor, argues the editor, Eva Paus. As Confronting Dystopia shows, we are on the eve of—indeed we are already amid—a technological revolution that will impact profoundly the livelihoods of people everywhere in the world. Across a broad and deep set of topics, the contributors explore whether the need for labor will inexorably shrink in the coming decades, how pressure on employment will impact human well-being, and what new institutional arrangements—a new social contract, for example, will be needed to sustain livelihoods. They evaluate such proposals as a basic income, universal social services, and investments that address key global challenges and create new jobs. Eva Paus is Professor of Economics and Carol Hoffmann Collins Director of the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives at Mount Holyoke College. She is the author of Foreign Investment, Development, and Globalization: Can Costa Rica become Ireland?

$27.95 978-1-5017-1985-1 paperback 300 pages, 6 x 9, 1 chart, 10 graphs 8

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“Confronting Dystopia is a well-executed volume on an important topic, with wide-ranging coverage of both the Global North and the Global South. The contributors present original interpretations as well as a range of insightful policy prescriptions. The result is a significant contribution to the literature on our economic future.” —James Boyce, University of Massachusetts Amherst “Confronting Dystopia offers a rich, multidimensional analysis of the complex challenges posed by digitization, robots, and AI as they affect different countries and countries at different levels of economic development and per capita GDP.” —Eileen Appelbaum, University of Leicester Contributors Vandana Chandra, Mignon Duffy, Dieter Ernst, Vincent Ferraro, Martin Ford, Juliana Martinez Franzoni, Irmgard Nubler, Robert Pollin, David Rueda, Diego Sanchez-Ancochea, Guy Standing, Stefan Thewissen


POETRY

Stanley’s Girl Poems Susan Eisenberg

The fiercely lyrical poetry of Stanley’s Girl is rooted in Susan Eisenberg’s experience as one of the first women to enter the construction industry and from her decades gathering accounts of others to give scaffolding to that history. Eisenberg charts her own induction into the construction workplace culture and how tradeswomen from across the country grappled with what was required to become a team player and succeed in a dangerous workplace where women were unwelcome. The specifics of construction become metaphor as she explores resonances in other spheres—from family to other social and political issues—where violence, or its threat, maintains order. Prying open memory, her poems investigate how systems of discrimination, domination, and exclusion are maintained and how individuals and institutions accommodate to injustice and its agreed-on lies, including her own collusion. Poems in this collection probe workplace-linked suicide, sexual assault, and sometimes-fatal intentional accidents, as well as the role of bystander silence and the responsibility of witness. Susan Eisenberg is a poet, visual artist, oral historian, licensed electrician, and Resident Artist/Scholar at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center. She is also curator of the online exhibition, On Equal Terms: gender and solidarity. Her most recent book is the reissued We’ll Call You If We Need You: Experiences of Women Working Construction. Visit  susaneisenberg.com for more information.

$14.95 978-1-5017-1970-7 paperback 72 pages, 6 x 9

“Stanley’s Girl shows us once again that Susan Eisenberg is one of our most powerful voices writing poetry about working life. She draws us into her experiences as a pioneering woman in a male-dominated profession with the authority of a survivor and the eyes and ears of an experienced poet.” —Jim Daniels, author of The Middle Ages “Stanley’s Girl is a blast of poetic oxygen sorely needed in the current atmosphere of rampant sexism, racism, and xenophobia. Susan Eisenberg is the poet laureate of the labor movement. She takes the reader on a poetic journey that excites the mind and nourishes the soul.” —Elise Bryant, Executive Director, the Labor Heritage Foundation “Real threat permeates these intimate, bold poems, shorn of artifice and special effects, that take us inside ‘the first girl in work boots and hardhat.’ At the book’s center, pulling back ‘that curtain guarding/ the ward of long-forgottens,’ Eisenberg reveals the childhood generator of the will to thread these power lines, to dare the precarious path.” —Eleanor Wilner, author of Tourist in Hell

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MEDICINE

MEMOIR

N E W Y O R K S TAT E

Cancer Crossings A Brother, His Doctors, and the Quest for a Cure to Childhood Leukemia Tim Wendel Foreword by Martin Brecher, M.D.

When Eric Wendel was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 1966, the survival rate was 10 percent. Today, it is 90 percent. Even as politicians call for a “Cancer Moonshot,” this accomplishment remains a pinnacle in cancer research. The author’s daughter, then a medical student at Georgetown Medical School, told her father about this amazing success story. Tim Wendel soon discovered that many of the doctors at the forefront of this effort cared for his brother at Roswell Park in Buffalo, New York. Wendel went in search of this extraordinary group, interviewing Lucius Sinks, James Holland, Donald Pinkel, and others in the field. If there were a Mount Rushmore for cancer research, they would be on it. Despite being ostracized by their medical peers, these doctors developed modern-day chemotherapy practices and invented the blood centrifuge machine, helping thousands of children live longer lives. Part family memoir and part medical narrative, Cancer Crossings explores how the Wendel family found the courage to move ahead with their lives. They learned to sail on Lake Ontario, cruising across miles of open water together, even as the campaign against cancer changed their lives forever. A writer-in-residence at Johns Hopkins University, Tim Wendel is the author of Summer of ’68, Castro’s Curveball, Cancer Crossings, and High Heat, which was an Editor’s Choice selection by The New York Times Book Review. He lives outside of Washington, D.C.

“For as long as I have followed his work, Tim Wendel has always chosen a distinct path of intimate stories within big topics, those subjects revealed by his superb way of getting at the particular. This riveting book is no different. Bravo!” —Ken Burns “It’s amazing when an author can plumb the pain of his personal past and find in it a story of historical significance. [Wendel] found that the doctors who treated his brother were the very men who, at the very time, were pioneering the treatment of leukemia that virtually robbed the disease of its terrible, killing power.” —David Granger, former Editor-in-Chief, Esquire Magazine “Buttressed by his years as a journalist, Wendel weaves the skill of an investigative reporter with the artfulness and honesty of a memoirist.” —Cathy Alter, journalist and author of Crush

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$24.95 978-1-5017-1103-9 hardcover 264 pages, 5 x 8, 14 b&w halftones 10

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M E M O I R • J E W I S H S T U D I E S

Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century Matilda R abinowitz With Commentary and Original Dr awings by Robbin Légère Henderson Afterword by Ileen A. DeVault

Matilda Rabinowitz’s illustrated memoir challenges assumptions about the lives of early twentieth-century women. In Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman, Rabinowitz describes the ways in which she and her contemporaries rejected the intellectual and social restrictions imposed on women as they sought political and economic equality in the first half of the twentieth century. Rabinowitz devoted her labor and commitment to the notion that women should feel entitled to independence, equal rights, equal pay, and sexual and personal autonomy. Rabinowitz (1887–1963) immigrated to the United States from Ukraine at the age of thirteen. Radicalized by her experience in sweatshops, she became an organizer for the Industrial Workers of the World from 1912 to 1917 before choosing single motherhood in 1918. “Big Bill” Haywood once wrote, “a book could be written about Matilda,” but her memoir was intended as a private story for her grandchildren, Robbin Légère Henderson among them. Henderson’s black-and white-scratchboard drawings illustrate Rabinowitz’s life in the Pale of Settlement, the journey to America, political awakening and work as an organizer for the IWW, a turbulent romance, and her struggle to support herself and her child. Matilda R abinowitz wrote a regular column, “On the Left,” for the Socialist Newsletter, a Los Angeles publication of the Socialist Party. Robbin Légère Henderson is an artist and a freelance curator and exhibition consultant. Ileen deVault is Professor of Labor History at Cornell University’s ILR School. She is the author of United Apart, also from Cornell.

$29.95 978-1-5017-0984-5 paperback 280 pages, 161 drawings, 8 x 10

“Immigrant, socialist, labor organizer, feminist, Matilda Rabinowitz lived an extraordinary life, and this is an extraordinary document. Her memoirs, vivid and precise, are a vital contribution to the history of American radicalism, and more urgently relevant than ever. Robbin Légère Henderson’s illustrations are nothing less than a marvel.” —Ben Ehrenreich, author of The Way to the Spring “The unpublished memoir of Matilda Rabinowitz, early twentieth-century socialist and traveling IWW organizer, has been resurrected by her granddaughter, and the result has enough social and economic detail for any labor historian and enough heartache for any lover of romance.” —Meredith Tax, author of The Rising of the Women “This amazing project is a simultaneous reinvigoration of many cultural forms. This book is a precious history of an American, and Jewish, immigration experience. It is a partnership between a writer and a visual artist, and ultimately it is a collaboration between the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” —Renny Pritikin, Chief Curator, Contemporary Jewish Museum

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C U R R E N T E V E N T S  •  F O O D S T U D I E S

I Am Not a Tractor! How Florida Farmworkers Took On the Fast Food Giants and Won Susan L . Marquis

I am Not a Tractor! celebrates the courage, vision, and creativity of the farmworkers and community leaders who have transformed one of the worst agricultural situation in the United States into one of the best. Susan Marquis highlights past abuses workers suffered in Florida’s tomato fields: toxic pesticide exposure, beatings, sexual assault, rampant wage theft, and even, astonishingly, modern-day slavery. Marquis unveils how, even without new legislation, regulation, or government participation, these farmworkers have dramatically improved their work conditions. Marquis credits this success to the immigrants from Mexico, Haiti, and Guatemala who formed the Coalition of Immokalee Workers,a neuroscience major who takes great pride in the watermelon crew he runs, a leading farmer/grower who was once homeless, and a retired New York State judge who volunteered to stuff envelopes and ended up building a ground-breaking institution. Through the “Fair Food Program” that they have developed, fought for, and implemented, these people have changed the lives of more than thirty thousand field workers. I Am Not a Tractor! offers a range of solutions to a problem that is rooted in our nation’s slave history and that is worsened by ongoing conflict over immigration. Susan L . Marquis is Dean of the Pardee RAND Graduate School and Vice President of Innovation at the RAND Corporation. She is the author of Unconventional Warfare: Rebuilding U.S. Special Operation Forces.

$29.95 978-1-5017-1308-8 hardcover 304 pages, 22 halftones, 6 x 9 12

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“How on earth did a ragtag group of impoverished and marginalized farm workers bring true labor justice to the nation's fields? Susan L. Marquis provides answers in this masterful investigation—detailed, academically rigorous, and impossible to put down.” —Barry Estabrook, author of Tomatoland “I Am Not A Tractor! explores what today’s corporate giants fear the most: democracy. Marquis tells the extraordinary story of how some of the poorest people in America overcame some of the most powerful to obtain justice. If immigrant farm workers in Florida can do it, so can other workers throughout the United State—and this fine book shows how.” —Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation and Command and Control “A scholarly study of an effort by Florida farmworkers to improve working conditions by building partnerships along the supply chain... Marquis does good service with this exploration of labor organization in the tomato fields of Florida.... A solid work of labor history that offers valuable lessons for other activists and organizers.” —Kirkus Reviews


C U R R E N T E V E N T S  •  M E D I C I N E

Prescription for the People An Activist’s Guide to Making Medicine Affordable for All Fr an Quigley

In Prescription for the People, Fran Quigley diagnoses our inability to get medicines to the people who need them and then prescribes the cure. He delivers a clear and convincing argument for a complete shift in the global and U.S. approach to developing and providing essential medicines—and a primer on how to make that change happen. Globally, 10 million people die each year because they are unable to pay for medicines that would save them. The cost of prescription drugs is bankrupting families and putting a strain on state and federal budgets. Patients’ desperate need for affordable medicines clashes with the core business model of the powerful pharmaceutical industry, which maximizes profits whenever possible. It doesn’t have to be this way. Patients and activists are aiming to make all essential medicines affordable by reclaiming medicines as a public good and a human right, instead of a profit-making commodity. In this book, Quigley demystifies statistics and terminology, offers solutions to the problems that block universal access to medicines, and provides a road map for activists wanting to make those solutions a reality. Fr an Quigley is Clinical Professor and Director of the Health and Human Rights Clinic at Indiana University McKinney School of Law. He is the author of If We Can Win Here, also from ILR Press, How Human Rights Can Build Haiti, and Walking Together, Walking Far. He is the cofounder of People of Faith for Access to Medicines, pfamrx.org.

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$19.95 978-1-5071-1375-0 paperback 168 pages, 12 halftones, 6 x 9

“Prescription for the People details the human cost of market-driven medicine and illustrates how the global movement for health justice and access to medicine can shift the balance of power and make a powerful case for reclaiming medicines as public goods.” —RoseAnn DeMoro, Executive Director of National Nurses United and the California Nurses Association “Prescription for the People is refreshing in its ability to clearly, concisely and convincingly lay out the arguments about the causes and impacts of the structural barriers to access to medicines. Quigley has a very clear-eyed vision of what we need to do, and I love the human stories that weave through his book.” —Rachel Kiddell-Monroe, McGill University, Médecins Sans Frontières, and Universities Allied for Essential Medicines “Prescription for the People will become essential reading for understanding the global access to medicines movement and its teachings... It will be among the first items I pull from our shelf to share with new and prospective colleagues the world over.” —Peter Maybarduk, Access to Medicines Director, Public Citizen C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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M E D I C I N E   •   H E A LT H C A R E

The Informed Patient A Complete Guide to a Hospital Stay K aren A. Friedman, MD, and Sar a L . Merwin, MPH

Even the most capable individuals are challenged when confronted with the complexity of the modern hospital experience. The Informed Patient is a guide and a workbook, divided into topical, focused sections with step-by-step instructions, insights, and tips to illustrate what patients and their families can expect during a hospital stay. Anyone who will experience a hospital stay—or friends or family who may be in charge of a patient’s care—will find all the help and advice they could need in the detailed sections that cover every aspect of what they can expect. Karen A. Friedman, MD, and Sara L. Merwin, MPH, offer hands-on advice about how patients, health care providers, and medical staff can work together to achieve good outcomes. Through anecdotes, tips, sidebars, and clinical scenario vignettes, The Informed Patient presents ways to enhance and optimize a hospital stay, from practical advice on obtaining the best care to dealing with the emotional experience of being in the hospital. K aren A. Friedman, MD, is Vice Chair for Education, Residency Program Director, and Associate Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine. Sar a L . Merwin, MPH, is Director of Clinical Research and Assistant Professor of Research in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

T H E C U LT U R E A N D P O L I T I C S O F H E A LT H C A R E W O R K

$19.95 978-1-5017-0995-1 paperback 248 pages, 6 x 9 14

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“The entire book is devoted to supporting patients.... Every public, high school, community college, and university library should consider adding this book to resource collections.” —ARBAonline “In this immensely useful and readable volume, Karen A. Friedman and Sara L. Merwin demystify the hospital experience and provide patients and families the information they need to navigate the confusing swirl of a hospital stay. Bring this book with you to the hospital—it will make your stay more understandable, it will keep you more engaged, and it might just save your life.” —Robert Wachter, MD, author of The Digital Doctor “The Informed Patient is a must-read for anyone ever hospitalized, going to be hospitalized, or caring for a friend or family member who is, was, or will be hospitalized. The reader will be given the skills and confidence to approach a hospitalization in an informed manner, demystifying the experience.” —Nick Fitterman, MD, FACP, SFHM, Northwell Health and Hoftstra Northwell School of Medicine


U S H I S TO RY

Rights, Not Interests Resolving Value Clashes under the National Labor Relations Act James A. Gross

This provocative book by the leading historian of the National Labor Relations Board offers a reexamination of the NLRB and the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by applying internationally accepted human rights principles as standards for judgment. These new standards challenge every orthodoxy in U.S. labor law and labor relations. James A. Gross argues that the NLRA was and remains at its core a workers’ rights statute. Gross shows how value clashes and choices between those who interpret the NLRA as a workers’ rights statute and those who contend that the NLRA seeks only a “balance” between the economic interests of labor and management have been major influences in the evolution of the board and the law. Gross contends, contrary to many who would write its obituary, that the NLRA is not dead. Instead he concludes with a call for visionary thinking, which would include, for example, considering the U.S. Constitution as a source of workers’ rights. Rights, Not Interests will appeal to labor activists and those who are trying to reform our labor laws as well as scholars and students of management, human resources, and industrial relations. James A. Gross is Professor of Labor Relations, Law, and History at the ILR School, Cornell University. He is the author of A Shameful Business and editor of Workers’ Rights as Human Rights, both from ILR Press.

“Rights, Not Interests will appeal to professors and students of labor law, labor studies, labor history, and administrative law, trade union leaders and staff, and readers interested in the history of the Obama administration.” —Brishen Rogers, Beasley School of Law, Temple University “Rights, Not Interests explores in detail many Labor Board decisions to demonstrate the impact of more progressive Democratic boards and more conservative Republican boards. A great read for anyone interested in the NLRA.” —Charles B. Craver, George Washington University Law School “Gross’s clearly structured account provides a good overview and persuasive interpretation for experts and undergraduates alike.” —Choice

$45.00 978-1-5017-1425-2 hardcover 208 pages, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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H E A LT H   •   L A W

Dying to Work Death and Injury in the American Workplace Jonathan D. K armel

In Dying to Work, Jonathan Karmel raises our awareness of unsafe working condidtions with accounts of workers who were needlessly injured or killed on the job. Based on heart-wrenching interviews Karmel conducted with injured workers and surviving family members across the country, the stories in this book are introduced in a way that helps place them in a historical and political context and represent a wide survey of the American workplace, including, among others, warehouse workers, grocery store clerks, hotel housekeepers, and river dredgers. Karmel’s examples are portraits of the lives and dreams cut short and reports of the workplace incidents that tragically changed the lives of everyone around them. Dying to Work includes incidents from industries and jobs that we do not commonly associate with injuries and fatalities and highlights the risks faced by workers who are hidden in plain view all around us. While exposing the failure of safety laws that leave millions of workers without compensation and employers without any meaningful incentive to protect their workers, Karmel offers the reader some hope in the form of policy suggestions that may make American workers safer and employers more accountable. This is a book for anyone interested in issues of worker health and safety, and it will also serve as the cornerstone for courses in public policy, community health, labor studies, business ethics, regulation and safety, and occupational and environmental health policy. Jonathan D. K armel is the owner of the Karmel Law Firm.

$45.00 978-1-5017-0998-2 hardcover 212 pages, 1 table, 6 x 9 16

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“The book to read if you want to know what’s happening with worker health and safety in these difficult times.” —Labor Notes “Jonathan D. Karmel presents issues faced by workers in a full range of industries, many of which the general public doesn’t typically think of as hazardous. Using the powerful stories of individual fatality and injury cases is an effective way to introduce each worker health and safety topic.” —Celeste Monforton, The George Washington University “Dying to Work offers readable, powerful human stories of workplace injuries and illnesses. Jonathan D. Karmel also offers well-presented arguments for addressing the issues and preventing like tragedies.” —Don J. Lofgren, author of Dangerous Premises “Instead of provoking outrage and indignation, death and injury on the job are considered to be a condition of doing business and a necessary evil in the production process.... Karmel argues effectively for changing that narrative.... [Dying to Work] is a call to action.” —New Solutions


T R A D E U N I O N S   •  C H I L E

Building Power from Below Chilean Workers Take On Walmart Carolina Bank Muñoz

A story that involves as its main players “workers” and “Walmart” does not usually have a happy ending for labor, so the counternarrative offered by Building Power from Below is must reading for activists and union personnel as well as scholars. In 2008 Walmart acquired a controlling share in a large supermarket chain in Santiago, Chile. As part of the deal Walmart had to accept the unions that were already in place. Since then, Chilean retail and warehouse workers have done something that has seemed impossible for labor in the United States: they have organized even more successful unions and negotiated unprecedented contracts with Walmart. In Building Power from Below, Carolina Bank Muñoz attributes Chilean workers’ success in challenging the world’s largest corporation to their organizations’ commitment to union democracy and building strategic capacity. Chilean workers have spent years building grassroots organizations committed to principles of union democracy. Retail workers’ unions have less structural power, but have significant associational and symbolic power. Their most notable successes have been in fighting for respect and dignity on the job. Warehouse workers by contrast have substantial structural power and have achieved significant economic gains. While the model in Chile cannot necessarily be reproduced in different countries, we can gain insights from the Chilean workers’ approaches, tactics, and strategies. Carolina Bank Muñoz is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brooklyn College. She is the author of Transnational Tortillas, also from ILR Press.

“Carolina Bank Muñoz’s analysis of a success story in Chile’s retail industry, which is known to be particularly antiunion, is fascinating and important. The comparison of retail and logistics is particularly novel. Building Power from Below will draw interest from a wide range of readers both inside and outside the academy.” —Joel Stillerman, author of The Sociology of Consumption “Building Power from Below is a timely, fascinating, and highly readable book that provides insight into how it is possible to ‘beat the bully.’ It provides a well-written, well-documented, and theoretically informed account as to how, even under neoliberalism, workers are able to deploy their power to overcome incredible odds.” —Fernando Leiva, author of Latin American Neostructuralism

$22.95 978-1-5017-1289-0 paperback 192 pages, 1 halftone, 4 charts, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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HUMAN RESOURCES

High Tech and High Touch Headhunting, Technology, and Economic Transformation James E. Coverdill and William Finl ay

In High Tech and High Touch, James E. Coverdill and William Finlay invite readers into the dynamic world of headhunters, personnel professionals who acquire talent for businesses and other organizations on a contingent-fee basis. In a high-tech world where social media platforms have simplified direct contact between employers and job seekers, Coverdill and Finlay acknowledge, it is relatively easy to find large numbers of apparently qualified candidates. However, the authors demonstrate that headhunters serve a valuable purpose in bringing high-touch search into the labor market: they help parties on both sides of the transaction to define their needs and articulate what they have to offer. As well as providing valuable information for sociologists and economists, High Tech and High Touch demonstrates how headhunters approach practical issues such as identifying and attracting candidates; how they solicit, secure, and evaluate search assignments from client companies; and how they strive to broker interactions between candidates and clients to maximize the likelihood that the right people land in the right jobs. James E. Coverdill is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Georgia. William Finl ay is Professor of Sociology at the University of Georgia. He is the author of Work on the Waterfront and coauthor of The Sociology of Work. Finlay and Coverdill are coauthors of Headhunters, also from ILR Press.

“Are headhunters still the corporate kingmakers in the digital age? High Tech and High Touch shows that predictions of their demise at the hands of online recruiting have been vastly exaggerated. A mustread for anyone interested in careers and executives.” — Peter Cappelli, author of Talent on Demand “High Tech and High Touch tells a captivating story about how we are all such complicated creatures that not all jobs can be easily replaced by robots or search algorithms.” —Ilana Gershon, author of Down and Out in the New Economy “A worthy successor to Headhunters.” —David Bills, author of The Sociology of Education and Work

$21.95 978-1-5017-0281-5 paperback 200 pages, 6 x 9 18

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“High Tech and High Touch draws on rich qualitative data to tell the fascinating story of an occupation in turmoil. The book should be on the reading list of anyone interested in labor markets, recruitment and hiring processes, occupational change, or the effects of recessions or social media.” —Jeremy Reynolds, Purdue University


CURRENT EVENTS

Undoing Work, Rethinking Community A Critique of the Social Function of Work James A. Chamberl ain

This revolutionary book presents a new conception of community and the struggle against capitalism. In Undoing Work, Rethinking Community, James A. Chamberlain argues that paid work and the civic duty to perform it substantially undermines freedom and justice. Chamberlain believes that to seize back our time and transform our society, we must abandon the deep-seated view that community is constructed by work, whether paid or not. Chamberlain focuses on the regimes of flexibility and the unconditional basic income, arguing that while both offer prospects for greater freedom and justice, they also incur the risk of shoring up the work society rather than challenging it. To transform the work society, he shows that we must also reconfigure the place of paid work in our lives and rethink the meaning of community at a deeper level. Throughout, he speaks to a broad readership, and his focus on freedom and social justice will interest scholars and activists alike. Chamberlain offers a range of strategies that will allow us to uncouple our deepest human values from the notion that worth is generated only through labor. James A. Chamberl ain is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Mississippi State University.

“James A. Chamberlain advances a single and refreshingly simple thesis: the measure of good citizenship in our ‘work society’ is ‘gainful employment,’ and this significantly undermines both liberty and equality.” —Robyn Marasco, author of The Highway of Despair “In Undoing Work, Rethinking Community, James A. Chamberlain asserts that the assumption of paid employment being the basis for citizenship and community is detrimental to freedom, equality, and social justice. His command and synthesis of the writings of important theorists is impressive.” —Arne L. Kalleberg, author of Good Jobs, Bad Jobs

$39.95 978-1-5017-1486-3 hardcover 162 pages, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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BUSINESS

An Introduction to U.S. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations, 5th Edition Harry C. K atz, Thomas A. Kochan, and Alex ander J. S. Colvin

This comprehensive textbook provides an introduction to collective bargaining and labor relations with a focus on developments in the United States. It is appropriate for students, policy analysts, and labor relations professionals including unionists, managers, and neutrals. A three-tiered strategic choice framework unifies the text, and the authors’ thorough grounding in labor history and labor law assists students in learning the basics. In addition to traditional labor relations, the authors address emerging forms of collective representation and movements that address income inequality in novel ways. Harry C. K atz is Jack Sheinkman Professor and Director of the Scheinman Institute on Conflict Resolution at the ILR School, Cornell University. He is coauthor of The Transformation of American Industrial Relations and Converging Divergences and coeditor of Rekindling the Movement, all from Cornell, among many other books. Thomas A. Kochan is the George Maverick Bunker Professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Co-Director of the MIT Institute for Work and Employment Research. He is coauthor of Healing Together, Up in the Air, and The Transformation of American Industrial Relations, all from Cornell, and author or editor of many other books. Alex ander J. S. Colvin is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Diversity, and Faculty Development and the Martin F. Scheinman Professor of Conflict Resolution at the ILR School, Cornell University. Katz, Kochan, and Colvin are coauthors of Labor Relations in a Globalizing World, also from ILR Press.

$89.95 978-1-5017-1387-3 paperback 464 pages, 7 charts, 9 tables, 6.125 x 9.25 20

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“I have used a number of different labor relations and collective bargaining textbooks over the years, and the Katz, Kochan, and Colvin text stands out for its clarity and insight.” —Paul F. Clark, author of Building More Effective Unions “The leading experts have revised and improved the best book in the field. It is essential reading. Students, professors, and practitioners will appreciate its path-finding analysis of management and union strategies.” —Greg Bamber, coeditor of International & Comparative Employment Relations


M E D I C I N E   •   H E A LT H C A R E   •   I N D I A

India and the Patent Wars Pharmaceuticals in the New Intellectual Property Regime Murphy Halliburton

India and the Patent Wars contributes to an international debate over the costs of medicine and restrictions on access under stringent patent laws showing how activists and drug companies in low-income countries seize agency and exert influence over these processes. Murphy Halliburton contributes to analyses of globalization within the fields of anthropology, sociology, law, and public health by drawing on interviews and ethnographic work with pharmaceutical producers in India and the United States. India has been at the center of emerging controversies around patent rights related to pharmaceutical production and local medical knowledge. Halliburton shows that Big Pharma is not all-powerful, and that local activists and practitioners of ayurveda, India’s largest indigenous medical system, have been able to undermine the aspirations of multinational companies and the WTO. Halliburton traces how key drug prices have gone down, not up, in low-income countries under the new patent regime through partnerships between US- and India-based companies, but warns us to be aware of access to essential medicines in lowand middle-income countries going forward.

“In India and the Patent Wars, Murphy Halliburton addresses the question of how IP law and trade agreements should deal with sophisticated knowledge systems organized by principles quite unlike those of the West. Halliburton convincingly challenges the conventional view that pits Big Pharma and allopathic medicine against local knowledge-keepers and holistic healing.” —Michael F. Brown, author of Who Owns Native Culture?

Murphy Halliburton is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. He is the author of Mudpacks and Prozac.

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$24.95 978-1-5017-1347-7 paperback 168 pages, 4 halftones, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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M E D I C I N E   •   H E A LT H C A R E

Achieving Access Professional Movements and the Politics of Health Universalism Joseph Harris

At a time when the world’s wealthiest nations struggle to make health care and medicine available to everyone, why do resource-constrained countries make costly commitments to universal health coverage and AIDS treatment after transitioning to democracy? Joseph Harris explores the dynamics that made landmark policies possible in Thailand and Brazil but which have led to prolonged struggle and contestation in South Africa. Drawing on firsthand accounts of the people wrestling with these issues, Achieving Access documents efforts to institutionalize universal healthcare and expand access to life-saving medicines in three major industrializing countries. In comparing two separate but related policy areas, Harris finds that democratization empowers elite professionals, such as doctors and lawyers, to advocate for universal health care and treatment for AIDS. Harris’s analysis is situated at the intersection of sociology, political science, and public health and will speak to scholars with interests in health policy, comparative politics, social policy, and democracy in the developing world. In light of the growing interest in health insurance generated by implementation of the Affordable Care Act (as well as the coming changes poised to be made to it), Achieving Access will also be useful to policymakers in developing countries and officials working on health policy in the United States. Joseph Harris is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University.

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$29.95 978-1-5017-0997-5 paperback 280 pages, 1 chart, 6 x 9 22

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“Through an in-depth analysis of three countries from different continents, this excellent book deepens scholarly understanding of the health care improvements resulting from democratization. Joseph Harris highlights how heightened political competition empowers progressive professional movements.” —Kurt Weyland, author of Making Waves “Joseph Harris has written a masterful account about achieving access to health services and to AIDS medications in three countries—Thailand, Brazil, and South Africa. Achieving Access offers both theoretical and practical lessons, and will be welcomed by policymakers, academics, and activists.” —Michael R. Reich, coauthor of Getting Health Reform Right “The excellent Achieving Access is very timely, and it helps us understand how specific policies came about (or didn’t) in Brazil, Thailand and South Africa. The reader feels intimately connected to the events that Joseph Harris describes. This is not just an account of lawyers and doctors, but of individual people.” —Joseph Wong, author of Betting on Biotech


ECONOMIC S

The Contradictions of Pension Fund Capitalism Edited by Kevin Skerret t, Johanna Weststar, Simon Archer, and Chris Roberts

It is often hoped and assumed that union stewardship of pension investments will produce tangible and enduring benefits for workers and their communities while minimizing the negative effects of what are now global and intensely competitive capital markets. At the core of this book is a desire to question the proposition that workers and their organizations can exert meaningful control over pension funds in the context of current financial markets. The Contradictions of Pension Fund Capitalism is an engaging and readable text that will be of specific interest to members of the labor movement, pension activists, pension trustees, fund administrators, environmental activists, and employers/managers, as well as academics involved in pension or labor research. The contents and arguments of the book are applicable across the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, because these countries experience a similar macroeconomic context and face a similar pension landscape. Kevin Skerret t is Senior Research Officer (Pensions) with the Canadian Union of Public Employees in Ottawa. Chris Roberts is the National Director of Social and Economic Policy at the Canadian Labour Congress in Ottawa. He is the author of Pension Confidential. Johanna Weststar is Associate Professor in the Department of Management and Organizational Studies at Western University in London, Ontario. Simon Archer is co-director of the Centre for Research in Comparative Law and Political Economy at Osgoode Hall Law School and practices law with Koskie Minsky LLP. Chris Roberts is the National Director of Social and Economic Policy at the Canadian Labour Congress in Ottawa. He is the author of Pension Confidential.

L A B O R A N D E M P L OY M E N T R E L AT I O N S A S S O C I AT I O N R E S E A R C H VO L U M E

$29.95 978-0-913447-14-7 paperback 348 pages, 5.5 x 8.5 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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H I S TO RY

MEDICINE

M I L I TA R Y

Doctors at War Life and Death in a Field Hospital Mark de Rond Foreword by Chris Hedges

Doctors at War is a candid account of a trauma surgical team based, for a tour of duty, at a field hospital in Helmand, Afghanistan. Mark de Rond tells of the highs and lows of surgical life in hard-hitting detail, bringing to life a morally ambiguous world in which good people face impossible choices and in which routines designed to normalize experience have the unintended effect of highlighting war’s absurdity. With stories that are at once comical and tragic, de Rond captures the surreal experience of being a doctor at war. He lifts the cover on a world rarely ever seen, let alone written about, and provides a poignant counterpoint to the archetypical, adrenaline-packed, macho tale of what it is like to go to war. Here the crude and visceral coexist with the tender and affectionate. The author tells of well-meaning soldiers at hospital reception, there to deliver a pair of legs in the belief that these can be reattached to their comrade, now in mid-surgery; of midsummer Christmas parties and pancake breakfasts and late-night sauna sessions; of interpersonal rivalries and banter; of caring too little or too much; of tenderness and compassion fatigue; of hell and redemption; of heroism and of playing God. While many good firsthand accounts of war by frontline soldiers exist, this is one of the first books ever to bring to life the experience of the surgical teams tasked with mending what war destroys. Mark de Rond is a professor of organizational ethnography at Cambridge University. Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and the author of many books, including War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning and Wages of Rebellion.

T H E C U LT U R E A N D P O L I T I C S O F H E A LT H C A R E W O R K

$21.95 978-1-5017-0548-9 hardcover 176 pages, 6 x 9 24

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“Doctors at War is a tale of considerable power. It’s an impressionistic account of a British field hospital told in an emotive voice; it is hardly dispassionate, but that is its strength. Mark de Rond depicts the workaday life of army surgeons on field deployment brilliantly and without glamor. He brings the Afghanistan war into sharp focus by highlighting the human costs of the conflict.” —John Van Maanen, MIT Sloan School of Management “Doctors at War is an amazing, wonderful book. This is a vivid, extraordinary ethnography that addresses central questions of what it means to be human in situations that allow for very little transcendent meaning.” —Jean M. Bartunek, Boston College “A page-turner, Doctors at War is not for the faint-hearted. De Rond’s masterful narrative brings into sharp focus the absurdities of clashing organizational, professional, and cultural values and practices.” —Dvora Yanow, author of Interpretive Research Design


CURRENT EVENTS

POLITICS

The One Percent Solution How Corporations Are Remaking America One State at a Time Gordon L afer

In the aftermath of the 2010 Citizens United decision, it’s become commonplace to note that politics has become dominated by a small slice of the economic elite. But what exactly are those members of the elite doing with their newfound influence? The One Percent Solution provides, for the first time, an answer to this question. Gordon Lafer’s book is a comprehensive account of the legislation promoted by the nation’s biggest corporate lobbies across all fifty state legislatures, encompassing a wide range of labor and economic policies. In an era of growing economic insecurity, it turns out that one of the prime forces making life harder for American workers is a relentless offensive by the best-funded and most powerful political forces in the country, corporate lobbies who have been empowered by the Supreme Court to influence legislation with an endless supply of cash. They have successfully championed hundreds of new laws that lower wages, eliminate paid sick leave, undo the right to sue over job discrimination, and cut essential public services. Lafer shows how corporate strategies have been shaped by twenty-first-century conditions—including globalization, economic decline, and the populism reflected in both the Trump and Sanders campaigns. Finally, Lafer shows how the corporate legislative agenda has come to endanger the scope of democracy itself. Gordon L afer is Professor at the Labor Education and Research Center at the University of Oregon. He is the author of The Job Training Charade, also from Cornell.

“Gordon Lafer’s The One Percent Solution seeks to explain several puzzling aspects of American politics today. Why do people of modest means continue to vote for candidates who promise to privatize or get rid of those very programs? Why do pepole who are poor vote for politicians who promise to cut corporate taxes?... [Lafer] meticulously demonstrates how the Koch brothers and the Supreme Court’s Citizen’s United decision of 2010 have influenced elections and public policy in the states.” —The New York Review of Books “The One Percent Solution should be a wake-up call to anyone concerned about the economic well-being of working Americans.” —Dissent “I commend Lafer for shining a light on the manipulations of corporate special interests. Workers simply cannot wait any longer. Now more than ever, every American should read this book.” —U.S. Representative Rosa DeLauro

$29.95 978-1-5017-0306-5 hardcover 272 pages, 22 illustrations, 6 x 9

“The One Percent Solution is a must-read for all who want to ensure the revival and survival of American democracy.” —Margaret Levi, Stanford University C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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E D U C AT I O N

CURRENT EVENTS

Selling Hope and College Merit, Markets, and Recruitment in an Unranked School Alex Posecznick

Admission to selective institutions, where extremely fine distinctions are made, is characterized by heated public debates about whether standardized exams, high school transcripts, essays, recommendation letters, or interviews best indicate which prospective students are "worthy." But what goes into less-selective college admissions in an era when everyone feels compelled to go, regardless of preparation or life goals? “Ravenwood College,” where Alex Posecznick spent a year doing ethnographic research, was a small, private, nonprofit institution dedicated to social justice and serving traditionally underprepared students from underrepresented minority groups. To survive in the higher education marketplace, the college had to operate like a business and negotiate complex categories of merit while painting a hopeful picture of the future for its applicants. Selling Hope and College is a snapshot of a particular type of institution as it goes about the business of producing itself and justifying its place in the market. Admissions staff members were burdened by low enrollments and worked tirelessly to fill empty seats, even as they held on to the institution's special spirit. Posecznick documents what it takes to keep a “mediocre” institution open and running, and the struggles, tensions, and battles that members of the community tangle with daily as they carefully walk the line between empowering marginalized students and exploiting them. Alex Posecznick manages the programs in Education, Culture, and Society, and International Education Development at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, where he also serves as a member of the Associated Faculty.

$19.95 978-1-5017-0982-1 paperback 256 pages, 3 tables, 1 chart, 6 x 9 26

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“Alex Posecznick's topic and argument are timely and compelling and his voice is readable and interesting. I feel like I know this school and its people and troubles as well as its specialness. The stories linger with me when I put the book aside.” —Jane Jensen, coauthor of Piecing It Together: A Guide to Academic Success “Alex Posecznick successfully demonstrates that the notion of mediocrity in higher education is not an objective reality in and of itself but rather is a function of the way higher education institutions have generally become systematized. I know of no other ethnography of a college serving mostly adult working-class women of color, and Posecznick rightfully puts the focus on the precarity of the students' experiences in and outside the classroom. Selling Hope and College is an excellent—and poignant— read, and a book that I hope will be widely taught.” —Bonnie Urciuoli, author of Exposing Prejudice: Puerto Rican Experiences of Language, Race, and Class


MEDICINE

POLITICAL SCIENCE

HAITI

Deadly River Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti R alph R. Frerichs

In October 2010, nine months after the massive earthquake that devastated Haiti, a second disaster began to unfold—soon to become the world's largest cholera epidemic in modern times. In a country that had never before reported cholera, the epidemic mysteriously and simultaneously appeared in river communities of central Haiti, eventually triggering nearly 800,000 cases and 9,000 deaths. In Deadly River, Ralph R. Frerichs tells the story of the epidemic—of a French disease detective determined to trace its origins so that he could help contain the spread and possibly eliminate the disease—and the political intrigue that has made that effort so difficult. The story involves political maneuvering by powerful organizations such as the United Nations and its peacekeeping troops in Haiti, as well as by the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Frerichs explores a quest for scientific truth and dissects a scientific disagreement involving world-renowned cholera experts who find themselves embroiled in intellectual and political turmoil in a poverty-stricken country. Frerichs's narrative highlights how the world’s wealthy nations, nongovernmental agencies, and international institutions respond when their interests clash with the needs of the world’s most vulnerable people. The story poses big social questions and offers insights not only on how to eliminate cholera in Haiti but also how nations, NGOs, and international organizations such as the UN and CDC deal with catastrophic infectious disease epidemics. Ralph R. Frerichs is Professor Emeritus of Epidemiology at UCLA.

“All public health students should read this book for two reasons: first, for the indepth story of the scientific investigation of the source of the epidemic; and second, for the story of the political resistance and barriers, both powerful and subtle, that Piarroux encountered. . . . The description of Piarroux's investigation is fascinating.” —International Quarterly of Community Health Education “A damning new book.” —Jonathan M. Katz, “The Killer Hiding in the CDC Map,” Slate “Ralph R. Frerichs’s book is a fascinating read that also provides many insights into the strengths and weaknesses of human nature—curiosity, skepticism, stubbornness, ignorance, pride, denial, deception—all framed by a tragic event that has changed the lives of millions of impoverished people.” —John J. Mekalanos, Harvard Medical School

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$19.95 978-1-5017-1358-3 paperback 320 pages, 1 image, 10 maps, 5 charts, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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URBAN STUDIES

C YC L I N G

Urban Flow Bike Messengers and the City Jeffrey L . Kidder

In Urban Flow, Jeffrey L. Kidder (a sociologist who spent several years working as a bike messenger) introduces readers to this fascinating subculture, exploring its appeal as well as its uncertainties and dangers. Through interviews with and observation of messengers at work and play, Kidder shows how many become acclimated to the fast-paced, death-defying nature of the job, often continuing to ride with the same sense of purpose off the clock. In chaotic bike races called alleycats, messengers careen through the city in hopes of beating their peers to the finish line. Some messengers travel the world to take part in these events, and the top prizes are often little more than bragging rights. Taken together, the occupation and the messengers' after-hours pursuits highlight a creative subculture inextricably linked to the urban environment. The work of bike messengers is intense and physically difficult. It requires split-second reflexes, an intimate knowledge of street maps and traffic patterns, and a significant measure of courage in the face of both bodily harm and job insecurity. Urban Flow gives readers a rare opportunity to catch more than a fleeting glimpse of these habitués of city streets. Jeffrey Kidder is Associate Professor of Sociology at Northern Illinois University

“Urban Flow's principle contribution is a call to sociologists of culture to more thoroughly examine emotions, space, and the relationship between the two; emotions are emplaced, and physical structures significantly shape interaction. Through what Kidder calls the 'affective appropriation of space' messengers resist the conformist, rationalized world of the city, affording moments, however small, of creativity and liberation.” —Qualitative Sociology “Urban Flow is a view of the cool urban culture that messengers have grown on the barren soil of the service economy, and reverberates with cycling's visceral pleasure.” —American Journal of Sociology “Jeffrey L. Kidder's first-person account explains the allure of delivering packages, the importance of alleycat races, and the use of fixed- gear bikes. This exciting look at an understudied aspect of urban life explains the symbols and the skill sets of a highly developed, often misunderstood subculture.” —Gregory Snyder, author of Graffiti Lives

$26.95 978-1-5017-1359-0 paperback 320 pages, 1 image, 10 maps, 5 charts, 6 x 9 28

C H A N G I N G T H E WO R L D O N E B O O K AT A T I M E


POLITICAL SCIENCE

C A P I TA L I S M

Dismantling Solidarity Capitalist Politics and American Pensions since the New Deal Michael A. McCarthy

Drawing on rich archival data that covers more than fifty years of American history, Michael A. McCarthy argues that the critical driver was policymakers' reactions to capitalist crises and their political imperative to promote capitalist growth. Dismantling Solidarity mounts a forceful challenge to common understandings of America’s private pension system and offers an alternative political economy of the welfare state. McCarthy weaves together a theoretical framework that helps to explain pension marketization with structural mechanisms that push policymakers to intervene to promote capitalist growth and avoid capitalist crises and contingent historical factors that both drive them to intervene in the particular ways they do and shape how their interventions bear on welfare change. By emphasizing the capitalist context in which policymaking occurs, McCarthy turns our attention to the structural factors that drive policy change. Dismantling Solidarity is both theoretically and historically detailed and superbly argued, urging the reader to reconsider how capitalism itself constrains policymaking. It will be of interest to sociologists, political scientists, historians, and those curious about the relationship between capitalism and democracy. Michael A. McCarthy is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Marquette University.

“This book advances our knowledge of recent political history and offers a model of how to understand the interaction of legislative and class politics.” —Richard Lachmann, author of Capitalists in Spite of Themselves “Michael A. McCarthy shows how Social Security, originally a public, nonmarket institution, is gradually penetrated by market forces and turned market-compatible in a capitalist context. The book makes an important contribution to the political economy of the welfare state and its transformation under the impact of liberalization.” —Wolfgang Streeck, coeditor of The End of Diversity? “When a fresh voice is open to surprise reports on original research about a subject of fundamental importance, intellectual and political illumination can follow, as it does in this challenging and compelling book. This is policy history of the first rank.” —Ira Katznelson, author of Fear Itself

$29.95 978-1-5017-1317-0 paperback 240 pages, 3 tables, 18 charts, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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LABOR STUDIES

Informal Workers and Collective Action A Global Perspective Edited by Adrienne E. Eaton, Susan J. Schurman, Martha A. Chen

Informal Workers and Collective Action features nine cases of collective action to improve the status and working conditions of informal workers. Adrienne E. Eaton, Susan J. Schurman, and Martha A. Chen set the stage by defining informal work and describing the types of organizations that represent the interests of informal workers and the lessons that may be learned from the examples presented in the book. Cases from a diverse set of countries—Brazil, Cambodia, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Georgia, Liberia, South Africa, Tunisia, and Uruguay—focus on two broad types of informal workers: "waged" workers, including port workers, beer promoters, hospitality and retail workers, domestic workers, low-skilled public sector workers, and construction workers; and self-employed workers, including street vendors, waste recyclers, and minibus drivers. Adrienne E. Eaton is Associate Dean of the School of Management and Labor Relations and Associate Professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. She is the coauthor of Healing Together: The Labor-Management Partnership at Kaiser Permanente and coeditor of Employment Dispute Resolution and Worker Rights in the Changing Workplace, both from Cornell. Susan J. Schurman is Distinguished Professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. She is coauthor of Teaching for Change: Popular Education and the Labor Movement and coeditor of Transforming the U.S. Workforce Development System: Lessons from Research and Practice. Martha A. Chen is Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, an affiliated professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Cofounder and International Coordinator of the Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) network. She is coauthor of The Progress of the World’s Women 2005: Women, Work and Poverty and coeditor of Bridging Perspectives: Labour, Informal Employment, and Poverty.

$29.95 978-1-5017-0557-1 paperback 296 pages 4 tables, 1 chart, 6 x 9 30

C H A N G I N G T H E WO R L D O N E B O O K AT A T I M E

“Informal Workers and Collective Action is a wonderful and extremely rich collection of case studies of informal workers' movements that covers an impressive range of countries and industries. It offers a truly comparative view of informal workers’ movements across countries and industries. This book will make an enormous contribution to our budding understanding of informal workers’ movements at a global level.” —Rina Agarwala, author of Informal Labor, Formal Politics, and Dignified Discontent in India Contributors Gocha Aleksandria, Georgian Trade Union Confederation; Martha A. Chen, Harvard University and WIEGO; Sonia Maria Dias, WIEGO and Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Adrienne E. Eaton, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Mary Evans, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Janice Fine, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Mary Goldsmith, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco Daniel Hawkins, National Trade Union School of Colombia; Elza Jgerenaia, Labor and Employment Policy Department for the Ministry of Labour, Health and Social Affairs, Republic of Georgia; Stephen J. King, Georgetown University; Allison J. Petrozziello, UN Women and the Center for Migration Observation and Social Development; Pewee Reed, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Republic of Liberia; Sahra Ryklief, International Federation of Workers’ Education Associations; Susan J. Schurman, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Vera Alice Cardoso Silva, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Milton Weeks, Devin Corporation


SOCIAL SCIENCE

ECONOMIC S

CONSU M ERISM

Shopping for Change Consumer Activism and the Possibilities of Purchasing Power Edited by Louis Hyman and Joseph Tohill

Consuming with a conscience is one of the fastest growing forms of political participation worldwide. Every day we make decisions about how to spend our money and, for the socially conscious, these decisions matter. Political consumers "buy green" for the environment or they "buy pink" to combat breast cancer. They boycott Taco Bell to support migrant workers or Burger King to save the rainforest. But can we overcome the limitations of consumer identity, the conservative pull of consumer choice, co-optation by corporate marketers, and other pitfalls of consumer activism in order to marshal the possibilities of consumer power? Can we, quite literally, shop for change? Shopping for Change brings together the historical and contemporary perspectives of academics and activists to show readers what has been possible for consumer activists in the past and what might be possible for today's consumer activists. Louis Hyman is Associate Professor of History at the ILR School of Cornell University and the director of ILR’s Institute for Workplace Studies in New York City. He is the author of Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink and Borrow: The American Way of Debt. Joseph Tohill teaches twentieth-century American and Canadian history at York University and Ryerson University. Contributors Kyle Asquith, University of Windsor; Dawson Barrett, Del Mar College; Lawrence Black, University of York; Madeline Brambilla, Northeastern University; Joshua Carreiro, Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield, MA; H. Louise Davis, Miami University; Jeffrey Demsky, San Bernardino Valley College; Tracey Deutsch, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities; Mara Einstein, Queens College, CUNY; Bart Elmore, University of Alabama; Sarah Elvins, University of Manitoba; Daniel Faber, Northeastern University; Julie Guard, University of Manitoba; Louis Hyman, ILR School, Cornell University; Meredith Katz, Virginia Commonwealth University; Randall Kaufman, Miami Dade College–Homestead Campus; Larry Kirsh, IMR Health Economics, Portland, OR; Katrina Lacher, University of Central Oklahoma; Bettina Liverant, University of Calgary; Amy Lubitow, Portland State University; Robert N. Mayer, University of Utah; Michelle McDonald, Stockton University; Wendy Wiedenhoft Murphy, John Carroll University; Mark W. Robbins, Del Mar College; Jessica Stewart, Cornell University; Joseph Tohill, York University and Ryerson University; Allison Ward, Queen's University and McMaster University; Philip Wight, Brandeis University

“Shopping for Change is replete with the documented beliefs that individual and collective political purchasing reduce and redirect the basic reservoir of giant corporate power—the dollars we give them that they use against the people and the planet. Read this book and shop wisely, sometimes shop less, and, increasingly, shop together for your democratic voice.” —Ralph Nader “Hyman and Tohill have produced a valuable collection that belongs on the short shelf of essential histories of North American consumer culture. This book will become a go-to resource for scholars and activists alike.” —Lawrence Clickman, author of Buying Power “This book could not be more timely. Smarter, more active, and more restrained buying is what is called fo. Shopping for Change provides an outstandingly detailed guide for how to proceed.” —Amitai Etzioni, author of The New Normal

$26.95 978-1-5017-0925-8 paperback 392 pages, 11 images, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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URBAN STUDIES

The City Is the Factory New Solidarities and Spatial Strategies in an Urban Age Edited by Miriam Greenberg, Penny Lewis

Urban public spaces, from the streets and squares of Buenos Aires to Zuccotti Park in New York City, have become the emblematic sites of contentious politics in the twenty-first century. As the contributors to The City Is the Factory argue, this resurgent politics of the square is itself part of a broader shift in the primary locations and targets of popular protest from the workplace to the city. Thus, “the city”—from the town square to the banlieu—is becoming like the factory of old: a site of production and profit-making as well as new forms of solidarity, resistance, and social reimagining. Miriam Greenberg is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Penny Lewis is Associate Professor of Labor Studies at the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, CUNY. Contributors Melissa Checker, Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Daniel Aldana Cohen, University of Pennsylvania; Els de Graauw, Baruch College, City University of New York; Kathleen Dunn, Loyola University Chicago; Shannon Gleeson, Cornell University; Miriam Greenberg, University of California, Santa Cruz; Alejandro Grimson, Universidad de San Martín (Argentina); Andrew Herod, University of Georgia; Penny Lewis, Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, City University of New York; Stephanie Luce, Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, City University of New York; Lize Mogel, artist and coeditor of An Atlas of Radical Cartography; Gretchen Purser, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

$29.95 978-1-5017-0554-0 paperback 264 pages, 17 illustrations, 1 map 2 tables, 1 chart, 6 x 9 32

C H A N G I N G T H E WO R L D O N E B O O K AT A T I M E

“The City Is the Factory brings together and updates the interdisciplinary scholarly research on urban politics, critical geography, neoliberalism, and social and labor movements. The editors and contributors examine and theorize about how contemporary social and labor activists form alliances that respond to neoliberal urban politics in novel ways and how they relate to urban spaces through collective action.” —Ellen Reese, author of They Say Cut Back, We Say Fight Back! “This book makes clear the importance of community- or city-based unionism and social movements. The future of organizing is going to have to take into account the centrality of the urban in capital accumulation processes, because it is through such processes that exploitation and oppression often work. The city is now indeed the factory.” —Don Mitchell, author of The Right to the City


SOCIAL SCIENCE

ECONOMIC S

CONSU M ERISM

Unions and the City Negotiating Urban Change Edited by Ian Thomas MacDonald

Unions and the City serves as a road map toward both a stronger labor movement and a socially just urbanism. The book presents the findings of a collaborative project in which a team of labor researchers and labor geographers based in New York City and Toronto investigated how and why labor unions were becoming more involved in urban regulation and urban planning. The contributors assess the effectiveness of this involvement in terms of labor goals—such as protecting employment levels, retaining bargaining relationships with employers, and organizing new workforces—as well as broader social consequences of union strategies, such as expanding access to public services, improving employment equity, and making neighborhoods more affordable. Ian Thomas MacDonald is Assistant Professor in the School of Industrial Relations at the University of Montreal. Contributors Simon Black, Brock University; Maria Figueroa, Cornell University; Lois S. Gray, Cornell University; Ian Thomas MacDonald, University of Montreal; James Nugent, University of Toronto; Susanna F. Schaller, City College Center for Worker Education; Steven Tufts, York University; K. C. Wagner, Cornell University; Mildred Warner, Cornell University; Thorben Wieditz, York University

“Unions and the City is a welcome addition to the growing field of 'labor revitalization.' It pursues the important theme of labor’s successful urban strategies in the contemporary neoliberal era of austerity, declining union memberships, and increasing antiunion political action. This book will appeal to a readership in search of strategies for revitalizing labor in urban areas.” —Daniel B. Cornfield, coeditor of Labor in the New Urban Battlegrounds “Unions and the City addresses an important topic within both labor studies and urban politics—namely the potential for labor's engagement in urban development to be an important pathway for renewing labor's power (and implicitly also for developing more equitable cities).” —Chris Benner, University of California, Santa Cruz

$29.95 978-1-5017-0682-0 paperback 272 pages, 1 illustration, 2 maps, 4 charts, 6 x 9 C O R N E L L P R E S S .C O R N E L L . E D U

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NOTES

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C H A N G I N G T H E WO R L D O N E B O O K AT A T I M E

ILR Press 2018 Catalog  

Recent, new, and forthcoming books published in the fields of labor studies, workplace studies, health care, and medicine by ILR Press, an i...

ILR Press 2018 Catalog  

Recent, new, and forthcoming books published in the fields of labor studies, workplace studies, health care, and medicine by ILR Press, an i...

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