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U N I T E D S TAT E S

RELIGION

N E W Y O R K S TAT E

Dagger John Archbishop John Hughes and the Making of Irish America John Loughery

Acclaimed biographer John Loughery tells the story of John Hughes, son of Ireland, friend of William Seward and James Buchanan, founder of St. John’s College (now Fordham University), builder of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue, pioneer of parochial-school education, and American diplomat. As archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York in the 1840 and 1850s and the most famous Roman Catholic in America, Hughes defended Catholic institutions in a time of nativist bigotry and church burnings and worked tirelessly to help Irish Catholic immigrants find acceptance in their new homeland. His galvanizing and protecting work and pugnacious style earned him the epithet Dagger John. In Dagger John, Loughery reveals Hughes’s life as it unfolded amid turbulent times for the religious and ethnic minority he represented. Hughes the public figure comes to the fore, illuminated by Loughery’s retelling of his interactions with, and responses to, every major figure of his era, including his critics (Walt Whitman, James Gordon Bennett, and Horace Greeley) and his admirers (Henry Clay, Stephen Douglas, and Abraham Lincoln). To know “Dagger” John Hughes is to understand the United States during a painful period of growth as the nation headed toward civil war. Dagger John’s successes and failures, his public relationships and private trials, and his legacy in the Irish Catholic community and beyond provide context and layers of detail for the larger history of a modern culture unfolding in his wake. John Loughery is the author of three books, Alias S. S. Van Dine, John Sloan: Painter and Rebel, and The Other Side of Silence: Men’s Lives and Gay Identities, a Twentieth Century History, the last two of which were New York Times Notable Books. His biography of John Sloan was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography.

“Dagger John puts Hughes squarely in the middle of the political, social, and ecclesiastical context of his times. The result is an engagingly written and fair appraisal of the feisty archbishop.” —Thomas J. Shelley, author of Fordham: A History of the Jesuit University of New York, 1841–2003 “This delightfully written book introduces the transformational Catholic figure, John Hughes. Anyone who wants to understand the place of the Irish in nineteenth-century America must read Dagger John.” —Catherine O’Donnell, author of Elizabeth Seton: A Life “Archbishop Hughes, a major player in nineteenthth-century U.S. history, finally receives his due in John Loughery’s fascinating, wide-ranging, richly informative, and insightful biography.” —Daniel Walker Howe, author of Pulitzer-Prize-winning What Hath God Wrought

THREE HILLS

$32.95 978-1-5017-0774-2 hardcover 420 pages, 6 x 9, 16 b&w halftones, 1 map U S E CO D E 0 9 H I S TO RY TO S AV E 3 0 % O N YO U R O R D E R

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U N I T E D S TAT E S

W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E S   •   N E W Y O R K S TAT E

Women Will Vote Winning Suffrage in New York State Susan Goodier and K aren Pastorello

Women Will Vote celebrates the 2017 centenary of women’s right to full suffrage in New York State. Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello highlight the activism of rural, urban, African American, Jewish, immigrant, and European American women, as well as male suffragists, both upstate and downstate, that led to the positive outcome of the 1917 referendum. Goodier and Pastorello argue that the popular nature of the women’s suffrage movement in New York State and the resounding success of the referendum at the polls relaunched suffrage as a national issue. If women had failed to gain the vote in New York, Goodier and Pastorello claim, there is good reason to believe that the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment would have been delayed. Women Will Vote makes clear how actions of New York’s patchwork of suffrage advocates heralded a gigantic political, social, and legal shift in the United States. Readers will discover that although these groups did not always collaborate, by working in their own ways toward the goal of enfranchising women they essentially formed a coalition. Together, they created a diverse social and political movement that did not rely solely on the motivating force of white elites and a leadership based in New York City. Goodier and Pastorello convincingly argue that the agitation and organization that led to New York women’s victory in 1917 changed the course of American history. Susan Goodier is Lecturer in History at SUNY Oneonta. She is the author of No Votes for Women. Karen Pastorello is Professor of History at Tompkins Cortland Community College (SUNY). She is the author of The Progressives and A Power Among Them is Professor of History at Tompkins Cortland Community College (SUNY). She is the author of The Progressives and A Power Among Them.

THREE HILLS

$29.95 978-1-5017-0555-7 hardcover 312 pages, 23 halftones, 2 maps, 2 tables, 6 x 9

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“This fascinating narrative of the struggle to expand women’s rights in New York is a timely reminder about the crucial role grassroots activism has played in changing national politics. Women Will Vote is an important and splendid book.” —Melanie Gustafson, author of Women and the Republican Party “A timely and deeply moving history of the several-decade-long struggle women and their male allies undertook in New York State to win the right to vote. An important and compelling piece of scholarship.” —Devin Lander, New York State Historian “Women Will Vote is an important book that fills in a glaring absence in the literature, ensuring that students and scholars today will have a really strong sense of New York's suffrage experience.” —Laura Free, author of Suffrage Reconstructed “At last! We have a fine history of the women’s suffrage movement in New York State. Women Will Vote will make you think about how democracy really works. Read it!” —Judith Wellman, author of The Road to Seneca Falls


U N I T E D S TAT E S

CO LO N I A L ER A

TRUE CRIME

The Poison Plot A Tale of Adultery and Murder in Colonial Newport El aine Forman Cr ane

An accusation of attempted murder rudely interrupted Mary Arnold’s dalliances with working men and her extensive shopping sprees. When her husband Benedict fell deathly ill and then asserted she had tried to kill him with poison, the result was a dramatic petition for divorce. The case before the Rhode Island General Assembly and its tumultuous aftermath, during which Benedict died, made Mary a cause célèbre in Newport through the winter of 1738 and 1739. Elaine Forman Crane invites readers into the salacious domestic life of Mary and Benedict Arnold and reveals the seamy side of colonial Newport. The surprise of The Poison Plot, however, is not the outrageous acts of Mary or the peculiar fact that attempted murder was not a convictable offense in Rhode Island. As Crane shows with style, Mary’s case was remarkable precisely because adultery, criminality and theft, and even spousal homicide were well known in the New England colonies. Assumptions of Puritan propriety are overturned by the facts of rough and tumble life in a port city: money was to be made, pleasure was to be had, and if marriage became an obstacle to those pursuits a woman had means to set things right. The Poison Plot is an intimate drama constructed from historical documents and informed by Crane’s deep knowledge of elite and common life in Newport. Her keen eye for telling details and her sense of story bring Mary, Benedict, and a host of other characters—including her partner in adultery, Walter Motley, and John Tweedy the apothecary who sold Mary toxic drugs—to life in the homes, streets, and shops of the port city. The result is a vivid tale that will change minds about life in supposedly prim and proper New England. El aine Forman Cr ane is the author of Witches, Wife Beaters, and Whores: Common Law and Common Folk in Early America and Killed Strangely: The Death of Rebecca Cornell.

$32.95 978-1-5017-2131-1 hardcover 264 pages, 6 x 9, 17 b&w halftones

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“Elaine Forman Crane knows Newport, Rhode Island, like no other historian. The Poison Plot is a process of discovery for this author and her readers, and drawing on her deep research Crane has created a vivid, ‘on-the-ground’ feel to this fascinating story, in which the characters are rounded and alive.” —John Demos, author of The Heathen School and The Unredeemed Captive “The Poison Plot is a riveting tale, combining my two favorite literary features: a fascinating mystery mixed with littleknown history. Elaine Forman Crane’s narrative non-fiction is as compulsively readable as a novel. I loved this book.” —Linda Fairstein, author of the Alex Cooper crime novels “Replete with adulterated drugs and tainted foods, fake news and racy novels, and counterfeiters and rampant consumerism, The Poison Plot is meticulously documented history that produces the excitement of a gossip column from the colony once called “Rogue’s Island.”” —Marilynne K. Roach, author of Six Women of Salem

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U N I T E D S TAT E S

ENVIRONMENT

N E W Y O R K S TAT E

Embattled River The Hudson and Modern American Environmentalism David Schuyler

In Embattled River, David Schuyler describes the efforts to reverse the pollution and bleak future of the Hudson River that became evident in the 1950s. Through his investigative narrative, Schuyler uncovers the critical role of this iconic American waterway in the emergence of modern environmentalism in the United States. Writing fifty-five years after Consolidated Edison announced plans to construct a pumped storage power plant at Storm King Mountain, Schuyler recounts how a loose coalition of activists took on corporate capitalism and defended the river. Led by Scenic Hudson, later joined by groups such as Riverkeeper, Clearwater, the Hudson River Valley Greenway, and the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area, the coalition won the first of many legal and publicity battles that would halt pollution of the river, slowly reverse the damage of years of discharge into the river, and protect hundreds of thousands of acres of undeveloped land in the river valley. The environmental victories on the Hudson had broad impact. The immediate result was the creation in 1970 of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. At the national level, the environmental ferment in the Hudson Valley contributed directly to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972, and the creation of the Superfund in 1980 to fund the cleanup of toxic-dumping sites. The struggle to control the uses and maintain the ecological health of the Hudson River persists and the stories of the pioneering advocates told by Schuyler provide lessons, reminders, and inspiration for today’s activists.

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“For more than fifty years, the Hudson River has been a key front in the fight to protect and restore our environment, and David Schuyler brings to life the river’s many defenders. More than ever, we need the kind of long-haul activism that Embattled River portrays so well.” —Adam Rome, author of The Genius of Earth Day “A fluent, comprehensive account of the people’s unremitting fifty-year defense of a spectacular natural and cultural treasure. Embattled River provides the reader with a source of hope and an abiding gratitude to the defenders.” —J. Winthrop Aldrich, former New York State Deputy Commissioner for Historic Preservation

David Schuyler is Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of the Humanities and American Studies, Franklin & Marshall College. Schuyler is author of numerous books, including the award-winning Sanctified Landscape: Writers, Artists, and the Hudson River Valley, 1820–1909.

“Embattled River captures the moment in time when the modern environmental movement found its voice. David Schuyler reminds us that science and civic action are still our best hopes for a sustainable future.” —Paul Gallay, Hudson Riverkeeper

$29.95 978-1-5017-1805-2 hardcover 232 pages, 6 x 9, 20 b&w halftones, 1 map

“Embattled River is environmental history at its best.” —Tom Lewis, author of The Hudson

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U N I T E D S TAT E S

I N T E R N AT I O N A L R E L AT I O N S

B OY S CO U T S

Our Frontier Is the World The Boy Scouts in the Age of American Ascendancy Mischa Honeck

Mischa Honeck’s Our Frontier Is the World is a provocative account of how the Boy Scouts echoed and enabled American global expansion in the twentieth century. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has long been a standard bearer for national identity. The core values of the organization have, since its founding in 1910, shaped what it means to be an American boy and man. As Honeck shows, those masculine values had implications that extended far beyond the borders of the United States. Our Frontier Is the World details how the BSA operated as a vehicle of empire from the Progressive Era up to the countercultural moment of the 1960s. American boys and men wearing the Scout uniform never simply hiked local trails to citizenship; they forged ties with their international peers, camped in foreign lands, and started troops on overseas military bases. Scouts traveled to Africa and even sailed to icy Antarctica, hoisting the American flag and standing as models of loyalty, obedience, and bravery. Innocent fun and earnest commitment to doing a good turn, of course, were not the whole story. Honeck argues that the good-natured Boy Scout was a ready means for soft power abroad and gentle influence where American values, and democratic capitalism, were at stake. In other instances the BSA provided a pleasant cover for imperial interventions that required coercion and violence. At Scouting’s global frontiers the stern expression of empire often lurked behind the smile of a boy. Mischa Honeck is Senior Lecturer in History at Humboldt University of Berlin. He is the author of We Are the Revolutionists: German-Speaking Immigrants and American Abolitionists after 1848 and coeditor of War and Childhood in the Era of the Two World Wars.

“This wonderful, deeply researched book describes the growth of the Boy Scouts with a respectful, but critical eye. Anyone interested in the history of American democracy, politics, and foreign policy will learn a lot from this groundbreaking book.” —Jeremi Suri, author of The Impossible Presidency “Our Frontier Is the World is a study of the cultural underpinnings of the distinctive type of empire that the United States became in the twentieth century. Honeck’s work is an important addition to the historiography of American imperialism.” —Ian Tyrrell, coauthor of Empire’s Twin and author of Crisis of the Wasteful Nation “Working at the intersection of the histories of American masculinity, leisure, age, and imperialism, Our Frontier is the World shows powerfully and engagingly how American Boy Scouts and their leaders participated in the cultural work of American power, both abroad and at home.” —Leslie Paris, Associate Professor of History, University of British Columbia

T H E U N I T E D S TAT E S I N T H E W O R L D

$39.95 978-1-5017-1618-8 hardcover

384 pages, 6 x 9, 20 b&w halftones

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EUROPE

JEWISH STUDIES

H O LOC AUS T

Intimate Violence Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wit tenberg

Why do pogroms occur in some localities and not in others? Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg examine a particularly brutal wave of violence that occurred across hundreds of predominantly Polish and Ukrainian communities in the aftermath of the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union. The authors note that while some communities erupted in anti-Jewish violence, most others remained quiescent. In fact, fewer than 10 percent of communities saw pogroms in 1941, and most ordinary gentiles never attacked Jews. Intimate Violence is a novel social-scientific explanation of ethnic violence and the Holocaust. It locates the roots of violence in efforts to maintain Polish and Ukrainian dominance rather than in anti-Semitic hatred or revenge for communism. In doing so, it cuts through painful debates about relative victimhood that are driven more by metaphysical beliefs in Jewish culpability than empirical evidence of perpetrators and victims. Pogroms, they conclude, were difficult to start, and local conditions in most places prevented their outbreak despite a general anti-Semitism and the collapse of the central state. Kopstein and Wittenberg shed new light on the sources of mass ethnic violence and the ways in which such gruesome acts might be avoided. Jeffrey S. Kopstein is Professor and Chair of Political Science at University of California, Irvine. His books include The Politics of Economic Decline in East Germany, 1945–1989 and Growing Apart?: America and Europe in the 21st Century. Jason Wit tenberg is Associate Professor of Political Science at University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Crucibles of Political Loyalty: Church Institutions and Electoral Continuity in Hungary.

$29.95 978-1-5017-1525-9 hardcover

184 pages, 6 x 9, 2 maps, 4 graphs

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“Intimate Violence is a piece of scholarship of supreme quality, and is a significant contribution to Holocaust history and studies of interethnic violence. Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg skillfully apply statistical methods, and they offer insights that reach well beyond the specific time and region of the events.” —Dariusz Stola, Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences “Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg, outstanding political scientists representing different approaches, have collaborated on this subject for a decade, mining archives, refining data, and considering interpretations. The result is a work that opens a new era in this field of study. Scholars of the Holocaust not only should but will read it.” —Timothy Snyder, Yale University “This book is essential reading for all those interested in the Holocaust in Eastern Europe and, indeed, of Europe in the twentieth century.” —Antony Polonsky, Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies, Brandeis University


U N I T E D S TAT E S

CO LD WA R

BIOGRAPHY

Democracy in Exile Hans Speier and the Rise of the Defense Intellectual Daniel Bessner

Anyone interested in the history of US foreign relations, Cold War history, and twentieth century intellectual history will find this impressive biography of Hans Speier, one of the most influential figures in American defense circles of the twentieth century, a must-read. In Democracy in Exile, Daniel Bessner shows how the experience of the Weimar Republic’s collapse and the rise of Nazism informed Hans Speier’s work as an American policymaker and institution builder. Bessner delves into Speier’s intellectual development, illuminating the ideological origins of the expert-centered approach to foreign policymaking and revealing the European roots of Cold War liberalism. Democracy in Exile places Speier at the center of the influential and fascinating transatlantic network of policymakers, many of them German émigrés, who struggled with the tension between elite expertise and democratic politics. Speier was one of the most prominent intellectuals among this cohort, and Bessner traces his career, in which he advanced from university intellectual to state expert, holding a key position at the RAND Corporation and serving as a powerful consultant to the State Department and Ford Foundation, across the mid-twentieth century. Bessner depicts the critical role Speier played in the shift in American intellectual history in which hundreds of social scientists left their universities and contributed to the creation of an expert-based approach to US foreign relations. As Bessner writes: to understand the rise of the defense intellectual, we must understand Hans Speier. Daniel Bessner is the Anne H. H. and Kenneth B. Pyle Assistant Professor in American Foreign Policy in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington.

“This biography of Hans Speier is of unusual interest. Daniel Bessner argues incisively for the role of ideas in foreign affairs and resists the conclusion that Speier was a creature of American Cold War politics. Highly recommended.” —Bruce Kuklick, author of Blind Oracles “Daniel Bessner is one of our most exciting emerging commentators on American foreign policy past and present. His Democracy in Exile is a pioneering study of Hans Speier and his milieu, and casts new light on the Weimar German sources of the American Century.” —Samuel Moyn, author of The Last Utopia “Democracy in Exile is a fascinating account of Hans Speier’s rise as leading researcher at the RAND Corporation and his deepening belief that democracy could only survive through, in essence, undemocratic means. Daniel Bessner offers us an important and sobering assessment of the role of intellectuals in building the military-industrial complex.” —Mary L. Dudziak, author of War-Time

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$35.00 978-0-8014-5303-8 hardcover

312 pages, 6 x 9, 12 b&w halftones, 1 chart

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SOCIAL SCIENCE

L I T E R AT U R E

History Is a Contemporary Literature Manifesto for the Social Sciences Ivan Jablonk a tr ansl ated by Nathan J. Br acher

Ivan Jablonka’s History Is a Contemporary Literature offers highly innovative perspectives on the writing of history, the relationship between literature and the social sciences, and the way that both social-scientific inquiry and literary explorations contribute to our understanding of the world. Jablonka argues that the act and art of writing, far from being an afterthought in the social sciences, should play a vital role in the production of knowledge in all stages of the researcher’s work and embody or even constitute the understanding obtained. History (along with sociology and anthropology) can, he contends, achieve both greater rigor and wider audiences by creating a literary experience through a broad spectrum of narrative modes. Challenging scholars to adopt investigative, testimonial, and other experimental writing techniques as a way of creating and sharing knowledge, Jablonka envisions a social science literature that will inspire readers to become actively engaged in understanding their own pasts and to relate their histories to the present day. Lamenting the specialization that has isolated the academy from the rest of society, History Is a Contemporary Literature aims to bring imagination and audacity into the practice of scholarship, drawing on the techniques of literature to strengthen the methods of the social sciences. Ivan Jablonk a is Professor of History at Université Paris 13 and a researcher at Collège de France. He is the author of A History of the Grandparents I Never Had, winner of the Prix du Sénat du livre d’histoire, Prix Guizot de l’Académie française, and Prix Augustin-Thierry des Rendez-vous de l’histoire de Blois; and of Laëtitia ou la fin des hommes (Laetitia or the end of men), winner of the Le Monde’s 2016 Prix littéraire, the 2016 Prix Médicis, and the 2016 Prix des prix. Nathan J. Br acher is Professor of French at Texas A & M University.

$39.95 978-1-5017-0987-6 hardcover 272 pages, 6 x 9

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“Ivan Jablonka’s History Is a Contemporary Literature is an ambitious undertaking that would be suitable for undergraduates, graduates, and scholars in history, the social sciences, and literature. Jablonka’s approach is intellectually stimulating and well informed, and it touches on a vast array of material in a highly readable and well-formulated manner.” —Dominick LaCapra, Cornell University “With boldness and lucidity, Ivan Jablonka calls on historians to rethink how they write about the past. In order to devise new modes of knowing, he argues, historians must imagine a creative history that is rigorous and playful, hybrid and self-reflexive, steeped in reason and open to emotion. I cannot think of a more bracing, urgent book about the changing contours of history.” —Stéphane Gerson, New York University


U N I T E D S TAT E S   •   P O L I T I C S

The Populist Persuasion An American History Revised Edition with a New Preface Michael K azin

In The Populist Persuasion, the distinguished historian Michael Kazin guides readers through the expressions of conflict between powerful elites and “the people” that have run through our civic life, filling it with discord and meaning from the birth of the United States until the present day. Kazin argues persuasively that the power of populism lies in its adaptable nature. Across the political spectrum, commentators paste the label on forces and individuals who really have just one big thing in common: they are effective at blasting “elites” or “the establishment” for harming the interests and betraying the ideals of “the people” in nations that are committed, at least officially, to democratic principles. Kazin’s classic book has influenced debates over populism since its publication. The new preface to this edition brings the story up to date by charting the present resurgence of populist discourse, which was front and center in the 2016 elections and in the Brexit debate. Michael K azin is Professor of History at Georgetown University and coeditor of Dissent. His many books include War Against War, American Dreamers, and A Godly Hero.

“A perceptive and passionately liberal book. Beginning with the antislavery crusade of the 1840s, Kazin skillfully surveys more than a century of mass protests, using imagery and symbolism as his guides.” —New York Times “Kazin shows populism’s canny ability to mix homespun rhetoric and political savvy. The book explains something very important in American life with scrupulous fairness and a keen eye for the humanizing detail. It is as good a road map as we have to the politics of the people who work hard and play by the rules.” —Wall Street Journal “The important questions raised by the success of the populist right in the United States are illuminated in Kazin’s splendid and timely book.” —The Nation

$23.95 978-1-5017-1453-5 paperback 408 pages, 11 halftones, 6 x 9

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JA PA N

Resurrecting Nagasaki Reconstruction and the Formation of Atomic Narratives Chad Diehl

In Resurrecting Nagasaki, Chad R. Diehl examines the reconstruction of Nagasaki City after the atomic bombing of August 9, 1945. Diehl illuminates the genesis of narratives surrounding the bombing by following the people and groups who contributed to the city’s rise from the ashes and shaped its postwar image in Japan and the world. Municipal officials, survivor-activist groups, the Catholic community, and American occupation officials interpreted the destruction and envisioned the reconstruction of the city from different and sometimes disparate perspectives. Each group’s narrative situated the significance of the bombing within the city’s postwar urban identity in unique ways, informing the discourse of reconstruction as well as its physical manifestations in the city’s revival. Diehl’s analysis reveals how these atomic narratives shaped both the way Nagasaki rebuilt and the ways in which popular discourse on the atomic bombings framed the city’s experience for decades. Chad R. Diehl is Assistant Professor of History at Loyola University Maryland. You can follow him @ProfDiehlLoyola.

“Diehl immerses the reader deeply in the look, sound, and feel of the city via his ‘social cartography’ of reconstruction in the first twenty-five years after the bombing. He makes the city and its inhabitants come to life by showing the interactions of real people, the dovetailing of unlikely interests and interpretations, indeed the collusions that produced Nagasaki’s relationship with its atomic past in ways that are significantly different from Hiroshima’s.” —Franziska Seraphim, Boston College “Diehl poses a deceptively simple question and, in answering it, succeeds in telling a stimulating and complex history of responses to the bomb in Nagasaki in the broader context of postwar Japan.” —Lori Watt, Washington University in St. Louis

S T U D I E S O F T H E W E AT H E R H E A D E A S T A S I A N I N S T I T U T E , COLUMBIA UNIVER SIT Y

$39.95 978-1-5017-1496-2 hardcover 232 pages, 6 x 9, 15 b&w halftones

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ASIAN STUDIES

CHINA

The Teahouse under Socialism The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000 Di Wang

To understand a city fully, writes Di Wang, we must observe its most basic units of social life. In The Teahouse under Socialism, Wang does just that, arguing that the teahouses of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, are some of the most important public spaces—perfect sites for examining the social and economic activities of everyday Chinese. Wang looks at the transformation of these teahouses from private businesses to collective ownership and how state policy and the proprietors’ response to it changed the overall economic and social structure of the city. He uses this transformation to illuminate broader trends in China’s urban public life from 1950 through the end of the Cultural Revolution and into the post-Mao reform era. In doing so, The Teahouse under Socialism charts the fluctuations in fortune of this ancient cultural institution and analyzes how it survived, and even thrived, under bleak conditions. Throughout, Wang asks such questions as: Why and how did state power intervene in the operation of small businesses? How was “socialist entertainment” established in a local society? How did the well-known waves of political contestation and struggle in China change Chengdu’s teahouses and public life? In the end, Wang argues, the answers to such questions enhance our understanding of public life and political culture in the Communist state.

“Di Wang’s latest book puts his exceptional research skills on display. The Teahouse under Socialism makes a vital contribution to PRC and urban history. Since Wang layers his narration with beautiful details and personal stories, it should be widely assigned in undergraduate and graduate classes.” —Fabio Lanza, author of The End of Concern: Maoist China, Activism, and Asian Studies “The Teahouse under Socialism affirms Di Wang’s position as an authority on China’s social and cultural history. His book should be read by anyone studying modern Chinese history, anthropologists working on China, and urban historians working on cities around the world.” —Aminda Smith, author of Thought Reform and China’s Dangerous Classes: Reeducation, Resistance, and the People

Di Wang is Distinguished Professor and Head of the Department of History, University of Macau. Among his many books are The Teahouse: Small Business, Everyday Culture, and Public Politics in Chengdu, 1900-1950 and Street Culture in Chengdu: Public Space, Urban Commoners, and Local Politics, 1870-1930.

$29.95 978-1-5017-1549-5 paperback 330 pages, 6 x 9, 33 b&w halftones

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A RCH A EO LOGY

EUROPE

Incidental Archaeologists French Officers and the Rediscovery of Roman North Africa Bonnie Effros

In Incidental Archaeologists, Bonnie Effros examines the archaeological contributions of nineteenth-century French military officers, who, raised on classical accounts of warfare and often trained as cartographers, developed an interest in the Roman remains they encountered when commissioned in the colony of Algeria. By linking the study of the Roman past to French triumphant narratives of the conquest and occupation of the Maghreb, Effros demonstrates how Roman archaeology in the forty years following the conquest of the Ottoman Regencies of Algiers and Constantine in the 1830s helped lay the groundwork for the creation of a new identity for French military and civilian settlers. Effros uses France’s violent colonial war, its efforts to document the ancient Roman past, and its brutal treatment of the region’s Arab and Berber inhabitants to underline the close entanglement of knowledge production with European imperialism. Significantly, Incidental Archaeologists shows how the French experience in Algeria contributed to the professionalization of archaeology in metropolitan France. Effros demonstrates how the archaeological expeditions undertaken by the French in Algeria and the documentation they collected of ancient Roman military accomplishments reflected French confidence that they would learn from Rome’s technological accomplishments and succeed, where the Romans had failed, in mastering the region. Bonnie Effros is Professor of History at the University of Liverpool. She is author of, most recently, Uncovering the Germanic Past: Merovingian Archaeology in France, 1830-1914.

$49.95 978-1-5017-0210-5 hardcover 384 pages, 6 x 9, 42 b&w halftones, 1 map

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“In this fascinating new book, Bonnie Effros challenges the too often triumphal narrative of French archaeology in North Africa and reminds us of the violence that accompanied archaeological exploration.” —Éric Rebillard, author of Christians and their Many Identities in Late Antiquity “Incidental Archaeologists shows how nineteenth-century French colonizers explored and exploited some remnants of North African antiquity while erasing other layers of history, including long-established local Muslim communities and their histories. Effros’s deep and rich contextualization of these highly consequential military and cultural ‘campaigns’ is history of archaeology at its finest.” —Suzanne Marchand, Louisiana State University “It’s rare for an author to handle classical evidence and its modern interpreters with equal skill, but Bonnie Effros does in Incidental Archaeologists. It’s a compelling, and at times disturbing, portrait of colonial archaeologists who combined a respect for the Maghreb’s ancient past with the violent suppression and expropriation of its nineteenth-century present.” —Michael Kulikowski, Pennsylvania State University


M E D I E VA L S T U D I E S

RELIGION

Dark Age Nunneries The Ambiguous Identity of Female Monasticism, 800–1050 Steven Vanderput ten

In Dark Age Nunneries, Steven Vanderputten dismantles the common view of women religious between 800 and 1050 as disempowered or even disinterested witnesses to their own lives. It is based on a study of primary sources from forty female monastic communities in Lotharingia—a politically and culturally diverse region that boasted an extraordinarily high number of such institutions. Vanderputten highlights the attempts by women religious and their leaders, as well as the clerics and the laymen and -women sympathetic to their cause, to construct localized narratives of self, preserve or expand their agency as religious communities, and remain involved in shaping the attitudes and behaviors of the laity amid changing contexts and expectations on the part of the Church and secular authorities. Rather than a “dark age” in which female monasticism withered under such factors as the assertion of male religious authority, the secularization of its institutions, and the precipitous decline of their intellectual and spiritual life, Vanderputten finds that the post-Carolingian period witnessed a remarkable adaptability among these women. Through texts, objects, archaeological remains, and iconography, Dark Age Nunneries offers scholars of religion, medieval history, and gender studies new ways to understand the experience of women of faith within the Church and across society during this era.

“Dark Age Nunneries is a thought-provoking and paradigm-changing book. By reimagining the very ‘ambiguity’ of female monastic communities as a strength, Steven Vanderputten’s book allows us to look at the scant sources for female monasticism in this period with new clarity and insight and, in doing so, changes the way that we think about religious practice in the central Middle Ages.” —Scott G. Bruce, University of Colorado Boulder “Dark Age Nunneries is top-of-the-line work by one of the world’s greatest experts on medieval monasticism. I have no doubt that it will be received as fundamental in the field of women’s monasticism in the central Middle Ages and become the go-to book on the subject for scholars of all linguistic or national backgrounds in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere.” —Walter P. Simons, Dartmouth College

Steven Vanderput ten is Professor in the History of the Early and Central Middle Ages at Ghent University. He is the author of Monastic Reform as Process: Realities and Representations in Medieval Flanders, 900–1100 and Imagining Religious Leadership in the Middle Ages: Richard of Saint-Vanne and the Politics of Reform.

$32.95 978-1-5017-1595-2 paperback 320 pages, 6 x 9, 2 tables, 11 b&w halftones, 3 maps

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

EUROPE

Twilight of the Titans Great Power Decline and Retrenchment Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent

In this bold new perspective on the United States–China power transition, Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent examine all great power transitions since 1870. They find that declining and rising powers have strong incentives to moderate their behavior at moments when the hierarchy of great powers is shifting. How do great powers respond to decline? they ask. What options do great powers have to slow or reverse their descent? In Twilight of the Titans, MacDonald and Parent challenge claims that policymakers for great powers, unwilling to manage decline through moderation, will be pushed to extreme measures. Tough talk, intimidation, provocation, and preventive war, they write, are not the only alternatives to defeat. Surprisingly, retrenchment tends not to make declining states tempting prey for other states nor does it promote domestic dysfunction. What retrenchment does encourage is resurrection. Only states that retrench have recovered their former position. Using case studies that include Great Britain in 1872 and 1908, Russia in 1888 and 1903, and France in 1893 and 1924, Twilight of the Titans offers clear evidence that declining powers have a wide array of options at their disposal and offers guidance on how to use the right tools at the right time. The result is a comprehensive rethinking of power transition and hegemonic war theories and a different approach to the policy problems that declining states face. Paul K. MacDonald is associate professor of political science at Wellesley College. He is author of Networks of Domination. Joseph M. Parent is associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. He is author of Uniting States and coauthor of American Conspiracy Theories.

C O R N E L L S T U D I E S I N S E C U R I T Y A F FA I R S

$42.95 978-1-5017-1709-3 hardcover 276 pages, 6 x 9, 3 tables, 2 charts, 2 graphs

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“Twilight of the Titans provides perhaps the strongest counter to current pessimistic conventional wisdom on the dangers and challenges of the United States’s decline vis-à-vis China as well as overall pessimism on the ability of major powers to act rationally and prudently. In lively prose, the authors provide comprehensive empirical evaluation and are appropriately transparent about their methods. Twilight of the Titans will be relevant to a large swath of academic literature and has general implications for policy debates.” —William C. Wohlforth, Dartmouth College “Twilight of the Titans is an important contribution to the literature on the grand strategies of great powers. It is a must read for those participating, or interested, in the debate about America’s 21st century grand strategic options.” —Christopher Layne, Texas A & M University


M I L I TA R Y

A NTH RO P O LOGY

EUROPE

Objects of War The Material Culture of Conflict and Displacement edited by Leor a Ausl ander and Tar a Zahr a

Historians have become increasingly interested in material culture as both a category of analysis and as a teaching tool. And yet the profession tends to be suspicious of things; words are its stock-in-trade. What new insights can historians gain about the past by thinking about things? A central object (and consequence) of modern warfare is the radical destruction and transformation of the material world. And yet we know little about the role of material culture in the history of war and forced displacement: objects carried in flight; objects stolen on battlefields; objects expropriated, reappropriated, and remembered. Objects of War illuminates the ways in which people have used things to grapple with the social, cultural, and psychological upheavals wrought by war and forced displacement. Chapters consider theft and pillaging as strategies of conquest; soldiers’ relationships with their weapons; and the use of clothing and domestic goods by prisoners of war, extermination camp inmates, freed people and refugees to make claims and to create a kind of normalcy. While studies of migration and material culture have proliferated in recent years, as have histories of the Napoleonic, colonial, World Wars, and postcolonial wars, few have focused on the movement of people and things in times of war across two centuries. This focus, in combination with a broad temporal canvas, serves historians and others well as they seek to push beyond the written word. Leor a Ausl ander is Professor of European Social History and Arthur and Joann Rasmussen Professor of Western Civilization at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Cultural Revolutions and Taste and Power. Tar a Zahr a is Professor of East European History at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Kidnapped Souls, The Lost Children, and The Great Departure.

“This volume offers readers a fresh perspective on war, displacement, and the significance of materiality to those who flee, those who fleece them, and to the objects themselves.” —Leslie Moch, Michigan State University “An inspiring, well written volume that explores, through fascinating case studies, the symbolic meaning that objects—from things as little as a piece of textile, to those as grand as a palace—gain in times of war and forced migration.” —Gregor Thum, University of Pittsburgh Contributors Noah Benninga, Sandra H. Dudley, Bonnie Effros, Cathleen M. Giustino, Alice Goff, Gerdien Jonker, Aubrey Pomerance, Iris Rachamimov, Brandon M. Schechter, Jeffrey Wallen, and Sarah Jones Weicksel

$29.95 978-1-5017-2007-9 paperback 344 pages, 6 x 9, 32 b&w halftones

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MEDICINE

Civilization and Disease With a new foreword Henry E. Sigerist foreword by Elizabeth Fee

Originally published in 1943, Civilization and Disease was based on a series of lectures that the medical historian Henry E. Sigerist delivered at Cornell University in 1940. Now back in print, the book is a wide-ranging account of the importance of social factors on health and illness and the impact that disease has had on societies throughout human history. Despite considerable advances in both medicine and historiography, Civilization and Disease remains a landmark work in the history of medicine and a fascinating look at, first, civilization as a factor in the genesis and spread of disease, and second, the effects of disease on such aspects of civilization as economics, social life, law, philosophy, religion, science, and the arts. In a new foreword written for this edition, Elizabeth Fee outlines Sigerist’s life, works, and legacy as a historian, a teacher, and an advocate for universal health care, hailing Civilization and Disease as “an excellent introduction to Sigerist’s work.” Henry E. Sigerist (1891–1957) was born in Switzerland and received an MD from the University of Zurich. Between 1932 and 1947, he served as Director of the Institute of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University. The author of twenty-seven books, including American Medicine (1934), Socialized Medicine in the Soviet Union (1937), and two volumes of A History of Medicine (1951 and 1961), and over 450 articles, Sigerist was also a staunch advocate for “compulsory health insurance” and his research helped to shape Canada’s national health care system. Elizabeth Fee is Chief Historian at the National Library of Medicine at the National Institute for Health. She has co-edited numerous books and is author of Disease and Discovery: A History of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, 1916–1939.

MESSENG ER LEC TURES

$19.95 978-1-5017-2343-8 paperback 264 pages, 6 x 9, 52 b&w halftones

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“A thoroughly readable book in one of the most fascinating fields in human history. . . . Sigerist treats his rich material with admirable organization and selection, and writes clearly, urbanely, and unpretentiously.” —Chicago Sun “Sigerist makes clear, most interestingly and impressively, the great importance of social factors in health and in disease.” —New York Times “It is a far cry from the Black Death to women’s corsets, but Sigerist gets both into the compass of his book. It is a fascinating story, told with rare skill.” —Montreal Daily Star “Sigerist examines with deep comprehension and admirable erudition which conditions have been and are favorable and which detrimental to the health of the individuals and the community.” —American Historical Review


SOVIET U NION

Laboratory of Socialist Development Cold War Politics and Decolonization in Soviet Tajikistan Artemy K alinovsky

Artemy Kalinovsky’s Laboratory of Socialist Development investigates the Soviet effort to make promises of decolonization a reality by looking at the politics and practices of economic development in central Asia between World War II and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Focusing on the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic, Kalinovsky places the Soviet development of central Asia in a global context. Connecting high politics and intellectual debates with the life histories and experiences of peasants, workers, scholars, and engineers, Laboratory of Socialist Development shows how these men and women negotiated Soviet economic and cultural projects in the decades following Stalin’s death. Kalinovsky’s book investigates how people experienced new cities, the transformation of rural life, and the building of the world’s tallest dam. Kalinovsky connects these local and individual moments to the broader context of the Cold War, shedding new light on how paradigms of development change over time. Throughout the book, he offers comparisons with experiences in countries such as India, Iran, and Afghanistan, and considers the role of intermediaries who went to those countries as part of the Soviet effort to spread its vision of modernity to the postcolonial world. Laboratory of Socialist Development offers a new way to think about the post-war Soviet Union, the relationship between Moscow and its internal periphery, and the interaction between Cold War politics and domestic development. Kalinovsky’s innovative research pushes readers to consider the similarities between socialist development and its more familiar capitalist version. Artemy K alinovsky is Assistant Professor of East European Studies, University of Amsterdam. He is the author of A Long Goodbye: The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan, and co-editor of five books, among them The End of the Cold War and the Third World.

“Kalinovsky’s work offers rich illustration through the voices of the Tajiks who lived through and participated in the Nurek dam project, and in Tajikistan’s wider efforts at development. Laboratory of Socialist Development is an opening salvo for a new focus in central Asian studies— examining the final forty years of Soviet rule in central Asia.” —Marianne R. Kamp, Indiana University ”Artemy Kalinovsky has achieved what other scholars have only talked about: using development to link international, domestic political, and social history. A true tour de force.” —David C. Engerman, Brandeis University “Kalinovsky foregrounds the competing emotional, as well as ideological and economic, impulses that went into the industrialization effort. His comparison of development in Tajikistan with Third World developmental campaigns is innovative and points to similarities in assumptions and goals between capitalist and communist development economists, which contemporary ideological blinders concealed.” —Shoshana Keller, author of To Moscow, Not Mecca

$42.95 978-1-5017-1556-3 hardcover 320 pages, 6 x 9, 16 b&w halftones, 2 maps

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POLITICS

EUROPE

Venice’s Intimate Empire Family Life and Scholarship in the Renaissance Mediterranean Erin Magl aque

Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family in the Venetian Mediterranean. Maglaque elaborates an intellectual history of Venice’s Mediterranean empire by examining how Venetian humanist education related to the task of governing. Taking that relationship as her cue, Maglaque unearths an intimate view of the emotions and subjectivities of imperial governors. In their writings, it was the affective relationships between husbands and wives, parents and children, humanist teachers and their students that were the crucible for self-definition and political decision making. Venice’s Intimate Empire thus illuminates the experience of imperial governance by drawing connections between humanist education and family affairs. From marriage and reproduction to childhood and adolescence, we see how intimate life was central to the Bembo and Coppo families’ experience of empire. Maglaque skillfully argues that it was within the intimate family that Venetians’ relationships to empire—its politics, its shifting social structures, its metropolitan and colonial cultures—were determined. Erin Magl aque is a teaching fellow of early modern European history at the University of St. Andrews.

$55.00 978-1-5017-2165-6 hardcover 232 pages, 6 x 9, 5 b&w halftones, 2 line drawings, 1 map

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“Venice’s Intimate Empire is a fresh and innovative work. Advancing discussions about the role of families in empire building, as well as the abilities and limitations of humanism as an imperial ideology, it will transform the way that historians view the structures of early modern empires.” —Monique O’Connell, coauthor of The Mediterranean World: From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Napoleon “A wonderful book and a real tour de force. Meticulously researched and vividly written, broadly accessible yet making important analytical interventions, Venice’s Intimate Empire turns much received wisdom about humanist culture on its head, bringing family history and critical imperial studies seamlessly together.” —Natalie Rothman, author of Brokering Empire: Trans-imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul


U N I T E D S TAT E S

EUROPE

Realm between Empires The Second Dutch Atlantic, 1680–1815 Wim Klooster and Gert Oostindie

Wim Klooster and Gert Oostindie present a fresh look at the Dutch Atlantic in the period following the imperial moment of the seventeenth century. This epoch (1680–1815), the authors argue, marked a distinct and significant era in which Dutch military power declined and Dutch colonies began to chart a more autonomous path. The loss of Brazil and New Netherland were twin blows to Dutch imperial pretensions. Yet the Dutch Atlantic hardly faded into insignificance. Instead, the influence of the Dutch remained, as they were increasingly drawn into the imperial systems of Britain, Spain, and France. In their synthetic and comparative history, Klooster and Oostindie reveal the fragmented identity and interconnectedness of the Dutch in three Atlantic theaters: West Africa, Guiana, and the insular Caribbean. They show that the colonies and trading posts were heterogeneous in their governance, religious profiles, and ethnic compositions and were marked by creolization. Even as colonial control weakened, the imprint of Dutch political, economic, and cultural authority would mark territories around the Atlantic for decades to come. Realm between Empires is a powerful revisionist history of the eighteenth-century Atlantic world and provides a much-needed counterpoint to the more widely known British and French Atlantic histories. Wim Klooster is Professor of History at Clark University. He is author of, among other books, The Dutch Moment: War, Trade, and Settlement in the Seventeenth-Century Atlantic World. Gert Oostindie is Professor of Colonial and Postcolonial History at the University of Leiden and Director of the KITLV/Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies.

“Wim Klooster and Gert Oostindie’s marvellous wide-ranging history provides the definitive treatment of this vital nation in Atlantic history. This is a brilliant—but more important, a necessary—book.” —Trevor Burnard, University of Melbourne “With a detail hitherto unavailable, they reveal how the Dutch could simultaneously possess a marginal Atlantic empire and act as the suppliers of the essential commerce and resources for the Atlantic world. This book is a major contribution to the history of that world.” —Jan de Vries, University of California, Berkeley ”Realm between Empires will be a crucial reference point for students and scholars of Dutch history, the Atlantic world, slavery, early modern trade, and the Caribbean.” —Evan Haefeli, Texas A&M University

$39.95 978-1-5017-0526-7 hardcover 308 pages, 6 x 9, 9 b&w halftones, 4 maps, 3 charts

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U N I T E D S TAT E S

POLITICS

BIOGRAPHY

The Revolution of ’28 Al Smith, American Progressivism, and the Coming of the New Deal Robert Chiles

The Revolution of ’28 explores the career of New York governor and 1928 Democratic presidential nominee Alfred E. Smith. Robert Chiles peers into Smith’s work and uncovers a distinctive strain of American progressivism that resonated among urban, ethnic, working-class Americans in the early twentieth century. The book charts the rise of that idiomatic progressivism during Smith’s early years as a state legislator through his time as governor of the Empire State in the 1920s, before proceeding to a revisionist narrative of the 1928 presidential campaign, exploring the ways in which Smith’s gubernatorial progressivism was presented to a national audience. As Chiles points out, new-stock voters responded enthusiastically to Smith’s candidacy on both economic and cultural levels. Chiles offers a historical argument that describes the impact of this coalition on the new liberal formation that was to come with Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, demonstrating the broad practical consequences of Smith’s political career. In particular, Chiles notes how Smith’s progressive agenda became Democratic partisan dogma and a rallying point for policy formation and electoral success at the state and national levels. Chiles sets the record straight in The Revolution of ’28 by paying close attention to how Smith identified and activated his emergent coalition and put it to use in his campaign of 1928, before quickly losing control over it after his failed presidential bid. Robert Chiles is a lecturer in the department of history at the University of Maryland.

$55.00 978-1-5017-0550-2 hardcover 290 pages, 6 x 9, 10 b&w halftones, 1 map, 4 charts

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“Dispensing with the too-simple dichotomies on which scholars have so often relied, Chiles demonstrates that Smith was both a machine politician and a Progressive, a social and a structural reformer, a cultural symbol and a champion of working-class interests.” —James J. Connolly, Ball State University “The Revolution of ’28 is an engaging, boldly argued critique of Albert Smith’s influence on American politics and policy making.” —Daniel O. Prosterman, Salem College


U N I T E D S TAT E S

CO LD WA R

The Control Agenda A History of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks Mat thew J. Ambrose

The Control Agenda is a sweeping account of the history of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT), their rise in the Nixon and Ford administrations, their downfall under President Carter, and their powerful legacies in the Reagan years and beyond. Matthew Ambrose pays close attention to the interplay of diplomacy, domestic politics, and technology, and finds that the SALT process was a key point of reference for arguments regarding all forms of Cold War decision making. Ambrose argues elite US decision makers used SALT to better manage their restive domestic populations and to exert greater control over the shape, structure, and direction of their nuclear arsenals. Ambrose also asserts that prolonged engagement with arms control issues introduced dynamic effects into nuclear policy. Arms control considerations came to influence most areas of defense decision making, while the measure of stability SALT provided allowed the examination of new and potentially dangerous nuclear doctrines. The Control Agenda makes clear that verification and compliance concerns by the United States prompted continuous reassessments of Soviet capabilities and intentions; assessments that later undergirded key US policy changes toward the Soviet Union. Through SALT’s many twists and turns, accusations and countercharges, secret backchannels and propaganda campaigns the specter of nuclear conflict loomed large.

“Matthew Ambrose has written a superb account of the history of the SALT process of arms control. I know of no book that tells this story from Nixon through Reagan. The Control Agenda fills a huge gap in the literature and I predict it will stand the test of time.” —Thomas Schwartz, Vanderbilt University “The Control Agenda makes an important contribution to the field of diplomatic history. Ambrose’s work will appeal to policy schools and the strategic studies community.” —James Wilson, Historian in the Office of the Historian at the US Department of State

Mat thew J. Ambrose is Defense Analyst at the US Government Accountability Office. He previously worked in the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Historical Office. He lives with his family in Arlington, Virginia.

$45.00 978-1-5017-1374-3 hardcover 280 pages, 6 x 9

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U N I T E D S TAT E S

CO LD WA R

BIOGRAPHY

Mr. X and the Pacific George F. Kennan and American Policy in East Asia Paul J. Heer

George F. Kennan is well known for articulating the strategic concept of containment, which would be the centerpiece of what became the Truman Doctrine. During his influential Cold War career he was the preeminent American expert on the Soviet Union. In Mr. X and the Pacific, Paul J. Heer explores Kennan’s equally important impact on East Asia. Heer chronicles and assesses Kennan’s work in affecting U.S. policy toward East Asia. By tracing the origins, development, and bearing of Kennan’s strategic perspective on the Far East during and after his time as director of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff from 1947 to 1950, Heer shows how Kennan moved from being an ardent and hawkish Cold Warrior to, by the 1960s, a prominent critic of American participation in the Vietnam War. Mr. X and the Pacific provides close examinations of Kennan’s engagement with China (both the People’s Republic and Taiwan), Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Country-by-country analysis paired with considerations of the ebb and flow of Kennan’s global strategic thinking result in a significant extension of our estimation of Kennan’s influence and a deepening of our understanding of this key figure in the early years of the Cold War. In Mr. X and the Pacific Heer offers readers a new view of Kennan, revealing his importance and the totality of his role in East Asia policy, his struggle with American foreign policy in the region, and the ways in which Kennan’s legacy still has implications for how the United States approaches the region in the twenty-first century. Paul J. Heer is Adjunct Professor in the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University. He is a veteran analyst of East Asia and spent three decades within the US intelligence community.

$37.95 978-1-5017-1114-5 hardcover 320 pages, 6 x 9, 6 b&w halftones, 1 map

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“Paul Heer has made an important contribution to Kennan-ology and the study of American statecraft in the early Cold War. As the United States approaches present-day problems of Asia-Pacific security, US officials would benefit from reading this book for an insightful take on the origins of America’s postwar primacy in the region.” —Hal Brands, author of Making the Unipolar Moment “This fascinating book by Paul Heer is a must-read for anyone interested in American foreign policy. Heer provides invaluable insights into the thought processes of George Kennan, one of America’s most renowned strategic thinkers.” —J. Stapleton Roy, former U.S. Ambassador to China “Until Mr. X and the Pacific, no historian has adequately examined Kennan’s beliefs and strategies about East Asia. This is a necessary book for readers interested in the Cold War in Asia as well as Kennan’s interests beyond the Soviet Union.” —Frank Costigliola, editor of The Kennan Diaries


U N I T E D S TAT E S   • L A B O R S T U D I E S

Rights, Not Interests Resolving Value Clashes under the National Labor Relations Act James A. Gross

This provocative book by the leading historian of the National Labor Relations Board offers a reexamination of the NLRB and the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by applying internationally accepted human rights principles as standards for judgment. These new standards challenge every orthodoxy in U.S. labor law and labor relations. James A. Gross argues that the NLRA was and remains at its core a workers’ rights statute. Gross shows how value clashes and choices between those who interpret the NLRA as a workers’ rights statute and those who contend that the NLRA seeks only a “balance” between the economic interests of labor and management have been major influences in the evolution of the board and the law. Gross contends, contrary to many who would write its obituary, that the NLRA is not dead. Instead he concludes with a call for visionary thinking, which would include, for example, considering the U.S. Constitution as a source of workers’ rights. Rights, Not Interests will appeal to labor activists and those who are trying to reform our labor laws as well as scholars and students of management, human resources, and industrial relations. James A. Gross is Professor of Labor Relations, Law, and History at the ILR School, Cornell University. He is the author of A Shameful Business and editor of Workers’ Rights as Human Rights, both from ILR Press.

“Rights, Not Interests will appeal to professors and students of labor law, labor studies, labor history, and administrative law, trade union leaders and staff, and readers interested in the history of the Obama administration.” —Brishen Rogers, Beasley School of Law, Temple University “Rights, Not Interests explores in detail many Labor Board decisions to demonstrate the impact of more progressive Democratic boards and more conservative Republican boards. A great read for anyone interested in the NLRA.” —Charles B. Craver, George Washington University Law School

ILR PRESS

$45.00 978-1-5017-1425-2 hardcover 208 pages, 6 x 9

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F I L M S T U D I E S  • U S S R

Not According to Plan Filmmaking under Stalin Maria Belodubrovsk aya

In Not According to Plan, Maria Belodubrovskaya reveals the limits on the power of even the most repressive totalitarian regimes to create and control propaganda. Belodubrovskaya’s revisionist account of Soviet filmmaking between 1930 and 1953 highlights the extent to which the Soviet film industry remained stubbornly artisanal in its methods, especially in contrast to the more industrial approach of the Hollywood studio system. Not According to Plan shows that even though Josef Stalin recognized cinema as a “mighty instrument of mass agitation and propaganda” and strove to harness the Soviet film industry to serve the state, directors such as Eisenstein, Alexandrov, and Pudovkin had far more creative control than did party-appointed executives and censors. The Stalinist party-state, despite explicit intent and grandiose plans to build a “Soviet Hollywood” that would release a thousand features per year, failed to construct even a modest mass propaganda cinema. Belodubrovskaya’s wealth of evidence shows that the regime’s desire to disseminate propaganda on a vast scale was consistently at odds with its compulsion to control quality and with Stalin’s intolerance of imperfection. Not According to Plan is a landmark in Soviet cultural history and the global history of cinema. Maria Belodubrovsk aya is Assistant Professor of Film in the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

$49.95 978-1-5017-0994-4 hardcover 266 pages, 6 halftones, 1 chart, 6 x 9

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““Not According to Plan is a clearly and engagingly written book on the mechanisms of film production under Stalin that offers invaluable insights into the mechanisms of film production and screenwriting.” —Birgit Beumers, author of A History of Russian Cinema “Rich, thoughtful, and information-packed, Not According to Plan will be widely used in academia and beyond. It’s a wonderfully detailed, faultlessly argued, groundbreaking book.” —Yuri Tsivian, author of Lines of Resistance “Maria Belodubrovskaya provides a compelling argument that runs counter to received wisdom. Instead of focusing on the top-down organizational structures of the industry, Belodubrovskaya convincingly locates the source in a bottom-up paradigm that stresses the industry’s failure in developing professional and efficient middle management, on the one hand, and the power of individual director-masters in controlling the entire production process, on the other.” —Vladimir Padunov, University of Pittsburgh


E A S T E R N E U R O P E  •  S O C I A L I S M

From Stalin to Mao Albania and the Socialist World Elidor Mëhilli

Elidor Mëhilli has produced a groundbreaking history of communist Albania that illuminates one of Europe’s longest but least understood dictatorships. From Stalin to Mao, which is informed throughout by Mëhilli’s unprecedented access to previously restricted archives, captures the powerful globalism of post-1945 socialism, as well as the unintended consequences of cross-border exchanges from the Mediterranean to East Asia. After a decade of vigorous borrowing from the Soviet Union— advisers, factories, school textbooks, urban plans—Albania’s party clique switched allegiance to China during the 1960s Sino-Soviet conflict, seeing in Mao’s patronage an opportunity to keep Stalinism alive. Mëhilli shows how socialism created a shared transnational material and mental culture—still evident today around Eurasia—but it failed to generate political unity. Combining an analysis of ideology with a sharp sense of geopolitics, he explores the profound fascination with the Soviets and demonstrates the contradictions of the dramatic anti-Soviet turn. Richly illustrated with never-before-published photographs, From Stalin to Mao draws on a wealth of Albanian, Russian, German, British, Italian, Czech, and American archival sources, in addition to fiction, interviews, and memoirs. Mëhilli’s fresh perspective on the Soviet-Chinese battle for the soul of revolution in the global Cold War also illuminates the paradoxes of state planning in the twentieth century. Elidor Mëhilli is Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College of the City University of New York.

“This important and much-needed book explores Albanian realities in the long and painful communist period as no other history I know. A lively and brilliantly researched study.” —Norman M. Naimark, author of Stalin’s Genocides “In From Stalin to Mao, Elidor Mëhilli effectively places the story of Albania in the context of its consistent interaction with larger states, systems, and demands. His fascinating story is never Albania itself, but Albania and the different ‘windows into the world’ of the twentieth century.” —Austin Jersild, author of The Sino-Soviet Alliance “For the first time, a source-based history of Communist Albania, the little eastern European country that built, by its own efforts, one of the world’s most sectarian and cruel Stalinist dictatorships. It is a remarkable tale, well told.” —OA Westad, author of The Cold War

$39.95 978-1-5017-1415-3 hardcover 344 pages, 30 halftones, 6 x 9

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U S S R  •  CO M M U N I S M

Raised under Stalin Young Communists and the Defense of Socialism Seth Bernstein

In Raised under Stalin, Seth Bernstein shows how Stalin’s regime provided young people with opportunities as members of the Young Communist League or Komsomol even as it surrounded them with violence, shaping socialist youth culture and socialism more broadly through the threat and experience of war. Informed by declassified materials from post-Soviet archives, as well as films, memoirs, and diaries by and about youth, Raised under Stalin explains the divided status of youth for the Bolsheviks: they were the “new people” who would someday build communism, the potential soldiers who would defend the USSR, and the hooligans who might undermine it from within. Bernstein explains how, although Soviet revolutionary youth culture began as the preserve of proletarian activists, the Komsomol transformed under Stalin to become a mass organization of moral education; youth became the targets of state repression even as Stalin’s regime offered them the opportunity to participate in political culture. Raised under Stalin follows Stalinist youth into their ultimate test, World War II. Even as the war against Germany decimated the ranks of Young Communists, Bernstein finds evidence that it cemented Stalinist youth culture as a core part of socialism. Seth Bernstein is Assistant Professor of History at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. He is the translator and editor of Agents of Terror by Alexander Vatlin.

$55.00 978-1-5017-0988-3 hardcover 272 pages, 14 halftones, 6 x 9

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“Raised under Stalin is an excellent book. Seth Bernstein highlights new information on the Komsomol during high Stalinism and thus makes a contribution to the field of Stalinism and to the history of the Komsomol and Soviet youth in general.” —Isabel Tirado, author of Young Guard! “Seth Bernstein offers new insights that add to our understanding of Soviet youth rather than rehashing what is known.” —William Husband, author of “Godless Communists”


U S S R  •  D I S A B I L I T Y S T U D I E S

Deaf in the USSR Marginality, Community, and Soviet Identity, 1917–1991 Cl aire L . Shaw

In Deaf in the USSR, Claire L. Shaw asks what it meant to be deaf in a culture that was founded on a radically utopian, socialist view of human perfectibility. Shaw reveals how fundamental contradictions inherent in the Soviet revolutionary project were negotiated—both individually and collectively— by a vibrant and independent community of deaf people who engaged in complex ways with Soviet ideology. Deaf in the USSR engages with a wide range of sources from both deaf and hearing perspectives—archival sources, films and literature, personal memoirs, and journalism—to build a multilayered history of deafness. This book will appeal to scholars of Soviet history and disability studies as well as those in the international deaf community who are interested in their collective heritage. Deaf in the USSR will also enjoy a broad readership among those who are interested in deafness and disability as a key to more inclusive understandings of being human and of language, society, politics, and power. Cl aire L . Shaw is a Lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol.

“Engagingly written and impeccably researched, this history of the deaf community in the USSR is a welcome addition to the history of the Soviet Union, to the history of welfare, and to disability studies.” —Diane P. Koenker, author of Club Red “Deaf in the USSR offers a fresh critical lens to examine concepts of citizenship, Soviet identity, political organization, and social status through the contested meanings of deaf and the lived experiences of deaf people. A splendid addition to deaf studies and Soviet studies.” —Susan Burch, author of Signs of Resistance

$49.95 978-1-5017-1366-8 hardcover 312 pages, 12 halftones, 6 x 9

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POLITICS

Rural Radicals Righteous Rage in the American Grain With a New Preface Catherine McNicol Stock

Through its history, populism has meant hope and progress, as well as hate and a desire to turn back the clock on American history. In her new preface, Catherine McNicol Stock provides an update and overview of the conservative face of rural America. She paints a comprehensive portrait of a long line of rural activists whose crusades against big government, big business, and big banks sometimes spoke in a language of progressive populism and sometimes in a language of hate and bigotry. Rural Radicals breaks down the populism expressed by activists, confronts our conventional notions of right and left, and allows us to understand political factionalism differently. Catherine McNicol Stock is Barbara Zaccheo Kohn ’72 Professor of History at Connecticut College. She is coeditor of The Countryside in the Age of the Modern State, also from Cornell, and the author of Main Street in Crisis.

“Catherine McNicol Stock traces the lineage of extremist white rural politics. She draws clear links between contemporary hate groups and a long tradition of rural political movements characterized by a fierce commitment to the rights of small landowners and family farmers, and by a culture of vigilantism. Rural Radicals is a wild ride.” —Publishers Weekly “A first-rate and highly accessible history of radicalism in rural America.” —Kirkus Reviews

$19.95 978-1-5017-1403-0 paperback 192 pages, 6 x 9

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U N I T E D S TAT E S •   E D U C AT I O N

Losing Hearts and Minds American-Iranian Relations and International Education during the Cold War Mat thew K. Shannon

Matthew K. Shannon provides readers with a reminder of a brief and congenial phase of the relationship between the United States and Iran. In Losing Hearts and Minds, Shannon tells the story of an influx of Iranian students to American college campuses between 1950 and 1979 that globalized U.S. institutions of higher education and produced alliances between Iranian youths and progressive Americans. Losing Hearts and Minds is a narrative rife with historical ironies. Because of its superpower competition with the USSR, the U.S. government worked with nongovernmental organizations to create the means for Iranians to train and study in the United States. The stated goal of this initiative was to establish a cultural foundation for the official relationship and to provide Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi with educated elites to administer an ambitious program of socioeconomic development. Despite these goals, Shannon locates the incubation of at least one possible version of the Iranian Revolution on American college campuses, which provided a space for a large and vocal community of dissident Iranian students to organize against the Pahlavi regime and earn the support of empathetic Americans. Together they rejected the Shah’s authoritarian model of development and called for civil and political rights in Iran, giving unwitting support to the rise of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Mat thew K. Shannon is Assistant Professor of History at Emory & Henry College.

“Losing Hearts and Minds is a compelling revisionist interpretation that explains the fall of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi as the unintended consequence of the modernization theories and human rights discourse that Iranians educated in Cold War America brought home with them to Iran.” —Douglas Little, Clark University, author of Us versus Them “This important book features much fresh scholarship, an alternative approach to standard diplomatic fare, and a focus on matters that remain at the center of US policy toward Iran, revolutionary Islam, the Middle East, nuclear weapons, and democratic reformism.” —Mark H. Lytle, Bard College, author of The Origins of the Iranian-American Alliance, 1941–1954

$49.95 978-1-5017-1313-2 hardcover 248 pages, 8 halftones, 6 x 9

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P O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E  •  H U M A N R I G H T S

Brutality in an Age of Human Rights Activism and Counterinsurgency at the End of the British Empire Brian Drohan

In Brutality in an Age of Human Rights, Brian Drohan demonstrates that British officials’ choices concerning counterinsurgency methods have long been deeply influenced or even redirected by the work of human rights activists. To reveal how that influence was manifested by military policies and practices, Drohan examines three British counterinsurgency campaigns—Cyprus (1955–1959), Aden (1963–1967), and the peak of the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland (1969–1976). This book is enriched by Drohan’s use of a newly available collection of 1.2 million colonial-era files, International Committee of the Red Cross files, the extensive Troubles collection at Linen Hall Library in Belfast, and many other sources. Drohan argues that when faced with human rights activism, British officials sought to evade, discredit, and deflect public criticism of their actions to avoid drawing attention to brutal counterinsurgency practices such as the use of torture during interrogation. Some of the topics discussed in the book, such as the use of violence against civilians, the desire to uphold human rights values while simultaneously employing brutal methods, and the dynamic of wars waged in the glare of the media, are of critical interest to scholars, lawyers, and government officials dealing with the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and those to come in the future. Brian Drohan is a Major in the U.S. Army.

$45.00 978-1-5017-1465-8 hardcover 256 pages, 6 x 9

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“A work of real historical originality and significance, this fascinating piece of scholarship substantially enhances our understanding of British counterinsurgency and the relationship between war and law.” —Huw Bennett, author of Fighting the Mau Mau “Brutality in an Age of Human Rights links significant historical topics to recent conflict scenarios and legal developments. Brian Drohan raises important questions about the uses of massive force by democratic states in the context of counterinsurgency campaigns.” —Fabian Klose, author of Human Rights in the Shadow of Colonial Violence “The much-touted myth of postwar British counterinsurgency as clean, honorable, and above all successful war tumbles first in Brian Drohan’s account. What follows, though, is truly eye-opening and worth sustained reflection and discussion. A truly sobering inquiry!” —Michael Geyer, Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago


G E N D E R S T U D I E S   •  M E D I E VA L S T U D I E S

Her Father’s Daughter Gender, Power, and Religion in the Early Spanish Kingdoms Lucy K. Pick

In Her Father’s Daughter, Lucy K. Pick considers a group of royal women in the early medieval kingdoms of the Asturias and of León-Castilla; their lives say a great deal about structures of power and the roles of gender and religion within the early Iberian kingdoms. Pick examines these women, all daughters of kings, as members of networks of power that work variously in parallel, in concert, and in resistance to some forms of male power, and contends that only by mapping these networks do we gain a full understanding of the nature of monarchical power. Pick’s focus on the roles, possibilities, and limitations faced by these royal women forces us to reevaluate medieval gender norms and their relationship to power and to rethink the power structures of the era. Well illustrated with images of significant objects, Her Father’s Daughter is marked by Pick’s wide-ranging interdisciplinary approach, which encompasses liturgy, art, manuscripts, architecture, documentary texts, historical narratives, saints’ lives, theological treatises, and epigraphy. Lucy K. Pick is Senior Lecturer in the History of Christianity at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Conflict and Coexistence and the novel Pilgrimage.

“In Her Father’s Daughter, Lucy K. Pick looks to a much-neglected aspect of the history of the Spanish kingdoms in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Her book is novel and original.” —Teofilo Ruiz, author of A King Travels “Her Father’s Daughter will contribute to and enrich ongoing discussions regarding the role and evolution of the medieval monarchy.” —Nuria Silleras-Fernandez, author of Chariots of Ladies

$65.00 978-1-5017-1432-0 hardcover 272 pages, 8 halftones, 2 maps, 6 charts, 6 x 9

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M I L I TA R Y H I S T O R Y   •   F R A N C E

The Military Enlightenment War and Culture in the French Empire from Louis XIV to Napoleon Christ y Pichichero

The Military Enlightenment brings to light a radically new narrative both on the Enlightenment and the French armed forces from Louis XIV to Napoleon. Christy Pichichero makes a striking discovery: the Geneva Conventions, post-traumatic stress disorder, the military “band of brothers,” and soldierly heroism all found their antecedents in the eighteenth-century French armed forces. From Louis XIV through Napoleon, from Canada to the Caribbean and India, the military was one of the few institutions of the Old Regime to transform progressive theories into practice, actually operationalizing the Enlightenment. Pichichero isolates and examines a crisis in consciousness that has characterized attitudes toward war from the eighteenth century until today. The demands of global political power warrant an ever more formidable and efficient fiscal-military state, and at the same time, awareness of the “human factor” generates the desire to minimize the devastation of war on cities and landscapes, and civilians, as well as the mind, body, and heart of the soldier. Readers of The Military Enlightenment will be startled to learn of the many ways in which French military officers, administrators, and medical personnel advanced ideas of human and political rights, military psychology, and social justice. Christ y Pichichero is Assistant Professor of French at George Mason University.

$49.95 978-1-5017-0929-6 hardcover 312 pages, 16 halftones, 2 maps, 6 x 9

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“The Military Enlightenment is comprehensive, original, and significant. It has so many virtues, I hardly know where to begin. It is impressively sweeping in the source material, daring in its chronology, and beautifully written. It will command the attention of scholars in a wide range of disciplines, including history, literature, philosophy, and psychology.” —Rafe Blaufarb, author of The Great Demarcation “An ambitious, wide-ranging, engaging, and informative book about what she calls the ‘military Enlightenment’ in eighteenth-century France. It will be read avidly by historians, scholars of eighteenth-century French literature and philosophy, and military historians.” —David A. Bell, author of Shadows of Revolution “Christy Pichichero’s thought-provoking work should inspire, or compel, us all to reconsider eighteenth-century military thought in a much broader context. Her study marvelously demonstrates that the consideration of military topics both by professionals and by civilians infuses as well as reflects the intellectual tenor of an age.” —John A. Lynn II, author of Battle


U N I T E D S TAT E S   •   N E W Y O R K S TAT E

Oneida Utopia A Community Searching for Human Happiness and Prosperity Anthony Wonderley

Oneida Utopia is a fresh and holistic treatment of a long-standing social experiment born of revival fervor and communitarian enthusiasm. The Oneida Community of upstate New York was dedicated to living as one family and to the sharing of all property, work, and love. Anthony Wonderley is a sensitive guide to the things and settings of Oneida life from its basis in John H. Noyes’s complicated theology, through experiments in free love and gender equality, to the moment when the commune transformed itself into an industrial enterprise based on the production of silverware. Rather than drawing a sharp boundary between spiritual concerns and worldly matters, Wonderley argues that commune and company together comprise a century-long narrative of economic success, innovative thinking, and abiding concern for the welfare of others. Oneida Utopia seamlessly combines the evidence of social life and intellectual endeavor with the testimony of built environment and material culture. Wonderley shares with readers his intimate knowledge of evidence from the Oneida Community: maps and photographs, quilts and furniture, domestic objects and industrial products, and the biggest artifact of all, their communal home. Wonderley also takes a novel approach to the thought of the commune’s founder, examining individually and in context Noyes’s reactions to interests and passions of the day, including revivalism, millennialism, utopianism, and spiritualism. Anthony Wonderley is the former Curator of Collections and Interpretation at the Oneida Community Mansion House. He is the author of Oneida Iroquois Folklore, Myth, and History and At the Font of the Marvelous and editor of The Days of My Youth and John Humphrey Noyes on Sexual Relations in the Oneida Community.

“Oneida Utopia offers a fresh new reading of this fascinating American experiment, freed of the sociological and religious assumptions that have guided more traditional studies of the topic. An eye-opener.” —Ellen Wayland-Smith, author of Oneida “Anthony Wonderley’s fresh insights and wealth of knowledge illuminate the realities of communal life at Oneida, where the members created a work environment that combined fun, flirtation, and opportunity for personal and social development.” —Carol Faulkner, author of Lucretia Mott’s Heresy “This well-rounded and scholarly account of Oneida takes us past the original free love communal phase and into the modern corporation. Brilliant work.” —Robert S. Fogarty, editor of The Antioch Review

$35.00 978-1-5017-0270-9 hardcover 304 pages, 24 halftones, 6 x 9

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U N I T E D S TAT E S •   S P O R T S

They Will Have Their Game Sporting Culture and the Making of the Early American Republic Kenneth Cohen

In They Will Have Their Game, Kenneth Cohen explores how sports, drinking, gambling, and theater produced a sense of democracy while also reinforcing racial, gender, and class divisions in early America. Pairing previously unexplored financial records with a wide range of published reports, unpublished correspondence, and material and visual evidence, Cohen demonstrates how investors, participants, and professional managers and performers from all sorts of backgrounds saw these “sporting” activities as stages for securing economic and political advantage over others. They Will Have Their Game tracks the evolution of this fight for power from 1760 to 1860, showing how its roots in masculine competition and risk-taking gradually developed gendered and racial limits and then spread from leisure activities to the consideration of elections as “races” and business as a “game.” Compelling narratives about individual participants illustrate the processes by which challenge and conflict across class, race, and gender lines produced a sporting culture that continued to grant unique freedoms to a wide range of society even as it also provided a basis for the normalization of systematic inequality. The result reorients the standard narrative about the rise of commercial popular culture to question the influence of ideas such as “gentility” and “respectability,” and to put men like P. T. Barnum at the end instead of the beginning of the process, unveiling a new take on the creation of the white male republic of the early nineteenth century in which sporting activities lie at the center and not the margins of economic and political history. K enne t h Cohen is Associate Professor of History at St. Mary’s College of Maryland.

$55.00 978-1-5017-0549-6 hardcover 352 pages, 25 halftones, 6 x 9

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“Kenneth Cohen does far more than simply read sporting culture as a metaphor for American politics. He interrogates how this culture emerged as a means to identify insiders and outsiders in the nation’s political landscape.” —Heather Nathans, Tufts University, author of Slavery and Sentiment on the American Stage, 1787–1861 “Kenneth Cohen reassesses American politics and society in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries by using sporting culture as a lens through which to view the rise of democracy, capitalism, and cultural notions of respectability, citizenship, self-making, risk-taking, and rough play that became the cornerstones of white American manhood.” —Brian Luskey, West Virginia University, author of On the Make “Kenneth Cohen reconstructs a lost world of sporting contests—at taverns, race tracks, and theaters—that will be strangely familiar to contemporary readers. They Will Have Their Game brings sports history into the mainstream, offering a fresh and provocative account of the origins and development of democracy in America.” —Peter S. Onuf, coauthor of “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”


A N T H R O P O LO G Y   •  S O C I O LO G Y   •  C H I N A

Banished to the Great Northern Wilderness Political Exile and Re-education in Mao’s China Ning Wang

After Mao Zedong’s Anti-Rightist Campaign of 1957–58, Chinese intellectuals were subjected to “re-education” by the state. In Banished to the Great Northern Wilderness, Ning Wang draws on labor farm archives, interviews, and memoirs to provide a remarkable look at the suffering and complex psychological world of these banished Beijing intellectuals. Wang’s use of newly uncovered Chinese-language sources challenges the concept of the intellectual as renegade martyr, showing how exiles often declared allegiance to the state for self-preservation. While Mao’s campaign victimized the banished, many of those same people also turned against their comrades. Wang describes the ways in which the state sought to remold the intellectuals, and he illuminates the strategies the exiles used to deal with camp officials and improve their chances of survival. Ning Wa ng is Associate Professor of History at Brock University.

“In this important, nuanced, and humane account of life within Chinese penal camps, Ning Wang complicates our picture of banished intellectuals by portraying them as complex human beings forced by circumstances to make some very difficult moral compromises.” —Frank Dikötter, author of Mao’s Great Famine “This is the best scholarly book I’ve read about the experiences of those banished to penal camps in Mao’s China. Wang reveals the dynamic interplay between rightists, camp guards, camp officials, and local and central authorities. He also illuminates the long-term human toll of banishment in all of its complexity.” —Jeremy Brown, coeditor of Maoism at the Grassroots

$29.95 978-1-5017-1318-7 paperback 288 pages, 6 x 9

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F R A N C E  •  I N D I A

A Colonial Affair Commerce, Conversion, and Scandal in French India Danna Agmon

A Colonial Affair traces the 1716 conviction of Nayiniyappa, a Tamil commercial agent employed by the French East India Company, for tyranny and sedition, and his subsequent public torture, the loss of his wealth, the exile of his family, and his ultimate exoneration. Danna Agmon’s gripping microhistory is a vivid guide to the “Nayiniyappa Affair” in the French colony of Pondicherry, India. The surprising and shifting fates of Nayiniyappa and his family form the basis of this story of global mobilization, which is replete with merchants, missionaries, local brokers, government administrators, and even the French royal family. Agmon’s compelling account draws readers into the social, economic, religious, and political interactions that defined the European colonial experience in India and elsewhere. Her portrayal of imperial sovereignty in France’s colonies as it played out in the life of one beleaguered family allows readers to witness interactions between colonial officials and locals. Students and scholars of the history of colonialism, religion, capitalism, and law will find Agmon’s narrative of European imperialism of great interest. Danna Agmon is Assistant Professor of History and ASPECT at Virginia Tech.

$55.00 978-1-5017-0993-7 hardcover 240 pages, 5 halftones, 1 map, 6 x 9

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“Highly readable and just the perfect length for a course book. It will generate fruitful discussions not just of substance, such as the respective natures of colonies and empires, but also of method.” —Catherine Desbarats, McGill University “A lively microhistory founded in legal records, A Colonial Affair animates and analyzes the larger problem of imperial authority in an intricate and often overlooked corner of empire. An informative and engaging read!” —Sue Peabody, author of “There Are No Slaves in France” “Danna Agmon’s dazzling study of French India at the turn of the eighteenth century highlights facets of the encounter between Europe and India that we have often missed. It also tells a rattling good yarn.” —David Washbrook, Cambridge University “A compelling illustration of the ways in which insights from other disciplines, in this case anthropology, can deepen our understanding of the dynamics of the colonial experience in India and elsewhere.” —Richard B. Allen, author of European Slave Trading in the Indian Ocean, 1500–1850


F I L M S T U D I E S   •  J A PA N

Promiscuous Media Film and Visual Culture in Imperial Japan, 1926–1945 Hik ari Hori

In Promiscuous Media, Hikari Hori makes a compelling case that the visual culture of Showa-era Japan articulated urgent issues of modernity rather than serving as a simple expression of nationalism. Hori makes clear that the Japanese cinema of the time was in fact almost wholly built on a foundation of Russian and British film theory as well as American film genres and techniques. Hori provides a range of examples that illustrate how maternal melodrama and animated features, akin to those popularized by Disney, were adopted wholesale by Japanese filmmakers. Emperor Hirohito’s image, Hori argues, was inseparable from the development of mass media; he was the first emperor whose public appearances were covered by media ranging from postcards to radio broadcasts. Worship of the emperor through viewing his image, Hori shows, taught the Japanese people how to look at images and primed their enjoyment of early animation and documentary films alike. Promiscuous Media links the political and the cultural closely in a way that illuminates the nature of twentieth-century Japanese society. Hik ari Hori is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Letters at Toyo University. She is coeditor of Censorship, Media and Literary Culture in Japan.

“This book is a tour de force of enthralling historical scholarship that covers an astonishing array of texts, events, people, and issues. Hikari Hori’s work is a refreshing and timely reminder of the staggering breadth and depth of visual media culture in Japan’s wartime empire as well as how it might have been received by its intended audiences.” —Michael Baskett, author of The Attractive Empire “Promiscuous Media puts the film culture of World War II Japan in an entirely new light. It will be an important resource for Japan scholars in various disciplines and for film studies and visual culture scholars who are not in the Japan field.” —Sharalyn Orbaugh, author of Propaganda Performed

A S T U DY O F T H E W E AT H E R H E A D E A S T A S I A N I N S T I T U T E , COLUMBIA UNIVER SIT Y

$55.00 978-1-5017-1454-2 hardcover 304 pages, 23 halftones, 6 x 9

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W O M E N S ’ S T U D I E S  • S E X U A L I T Y

Sexual Politics and Feminist Science Women Sexologists in Germany, 1900–1933 Kirsten Leng

In Sexual Politics and Feminist Science, Kirsten Leng restores the work of female sexologists to the forefront of the history of sexology. While male researchers who led the practice of early-twentieth-century sexology viewed women and their sexuality as objects to be studied, not as collaborators in scientific investigation, Leng pinpoints nine German and Austrian “women sexologists” and “female sexual theorists” to reveal how sex, gender, and sexuality influenced the field of sexology itself. Leng’s book makes it plain that women not only played active roles in the creation of sexual scientific knowledge but also made significant and influential interventions in the field. Sexual Politics and Feminist Science provides readers with an opportunity to rediscover and engage with the work of these pioneers. Leng highlights sexology’s empowering potential for women, but also contends that in its intersection with eugenics, the narrative is not wholly celebratory. By detailing gendered efforts to understand and theorize sex through science, she reveals the cognitive biases and sociological prejudices that ultimately circumscribed the transformative potential of their ideas. Ultimately, Sexual Politics and Feminist Science helps readers to understand these women’s ideas in all their complexity in order to appreciate their unique place in the history of sexology. Kirsten Leng is Assistant Professor in the Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

S I G N A L E : M O D E R N G E R M A N L E T T E R S , C U LT U R E S , A N D T H O U G H T C O R N E L L U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S S A N D C O R N E L L U N I V E R S I T Y L I B R A RY

$29.95 978-1-5017-0931-9 paperback 312 pages, 6 x 9

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“Sexual Politics and Feminist Science is a highly original, exceedingly well-researched, historically significant, and beautifully written book.” —Dagmar Herzog, Graduate Center, City University of New York “Leng makes important new claims about the right to pleasure and desire in the creation of modern personhood. Not only is it written in clean and crisp prose, with flawless structure and organization, but it is a model of interdisciplinarity, marrying close textual reading with persuasive historical reconstruction.” —Jennifer V. Evans, Carleton University


M E D I E VA L S T U D I E S

I TA LY

Where Three Worlds Met Sicily in the Early Medieval Mediterranean Sar ah Davis-Secord

Sicily is a lush and culturally rich island at the center of the Mediterranean Sea. Throughout its history, the island has been conquered and colonized by successive waves of peoples from across the Mediterranean region. In the early and central Middle Ages, the island was ruled and occupied in turn by Greek Christians, Muslims, and Latin Christians. In Where Three Worlds Met, Sarah Davis-Secord investigates Sicily’s place within the religious, diplomatic, military, commercial, and intellectual networks of the Mediterranean by tracing the patterns of travel, trade, and communication among Christians (Latin and Greek), Muslims, and Jews. By looking at the island across this long expanse of time and during the periods of transition from one dominant culture to another, Davis-Secord uncovers the patterns that defined and redefined the broader Muslim-Christian encounter in the Middle Ages.

“Where Three Worlds Met is an ambitious and intelligent portrait of Sicily’s place in Mediterranean life, a topic well worth undertaking. Located at the center of the Mediterranean, the island was not surprisingly the center of the various commercial, diplomatic, and cultural networks that spread throughout the basin.” —Clifford R. Backman, author of The Decline and Fall of Medieval Sicily

Sar ah Davis-Secord is Associate Professor of History at the University of New Mexico.

$59.95 978-1-5017-0464-2 hardcover 320 pages, 10 halftones, 4 maps, 6 x 9

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H E A LT H

•

CO LD WA R

Cold War Triangle How Scientists in East and West Tamed HIV Renilde Loeck x

A small group of scientists were doggedly working in the field of antiviral treatments when the AIDS epidemic struck. Faced with one of the grand challenges of modern biology of the twentieth century, scientists worked across the political divide of the Cold War to produce a new class of antivirals. Their molecules were developed by a Californian start-up together with teams of scientists at the Rega Institute of KU Leuven and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (IOCB) of the Academy of Sciences in Prague. These molecules became the cornerstone of the blockbuster drugs now used to combat and prevent HIV. Cold War Triangle gives an insight into the human face of science as it recounts the extraordinary story of scientists in East and West who overcame ideological barriers and worked together for the benefit of humanity. Renilde Loeck x is member of the EORTC Cancer Research Fund and former Ambassador of Belgium.

LEUVEN UNIVERSITY PRESS

$29.50 978-94-6270-113-7 paperback 192 pages, 6.3 x 9.4, 18 b&w halftones

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EUROPE

Cultural Mediation in Europe, 1800–1950 edited by Reine Meyl aerts, Lieven D’hulst, and Tom Verschaffel

From the early nineteenth century till the middle of the twentieth century, cultures in Europe were primarily national. They were organized and conceived of as attributes of the nation states. Nonetheless, these national cultures crossed borders with an unprecedented intensity even before globalization transformed the very concept of culture. During that long period, European cultures have imported and exported products, techniques, values, and ideas, relying on invisible but efficient international networks. The central agents of these networks are considered mediators: translators, publishers, critics, artists, art dealers and collectors, composers. These agents were not only the true architects of intercultural transfer, they also largely contributed to the shaping of a common canon and of aesthetic values that became part of the history of national cultures. Cultural Mediation in Europe, 1800-1950 analyses the strategic transfer roles of cultural mediators active in large parts of Western Europe in domains as varied as literature, music, painting, or art design.

Contributors Amélie Auzoux (Université Paris IV-Sorbonne), Christophe Charle (Université Paris I-PanthéonSorbonne), Kate Kangaslahti (KU Leuven), Vesa Kurkela (University of the Arts, Helsinki), Anne O’Connor (University of Galway), Saijaleena Rantanen (University of the Arts, Helsinki), Ágnes Anna Sebestyén (Hungarian Museum of Architecture, Budapest), Inmaculada Serón Ordóñez (University of Málaga), Renske Suijver (Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam), Tom Toremans (KU Leuven), Dirk Weissmann (Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès)

Reine Meyl aerts is professor of comparative literature and translation Studies at KU Leuven and Chair of the EST Doctoral Studies Committee. Lieven D’hulst is professor of Francophone literature and translation studies at KU Leuven and head of the Research Group Translation and Intercultural Transfer. Tom Verschaffel is professor of cultural history at KU Leuven.

LEUVEN UNIVERSITY PRESS

$59.00 978-94-6270-112-0 paperback 240 pages, 6.3 x 9.4, 18 b&w halftones

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A N AT O M Y

Bodies Beyond Borders Moving Anatomies, 1750-1950 Edited by K a at Wils, R af de Bont, and Sokhieng Au

Bodies Beyond Borders analyzes the notion of circulation in anatomy. The essays in this collection focus on a wide variety of circulating ideas and objects, ranging from models and body parts to illustrations and texts. Together, the essays enable readers to rethink the relations between metropolis and colony, university and fairground, and scientific and artistic representations of the human body. K a at Wils is Professor in European Cultural History and head of the research group Cultural History since 1750 at KU Leuven. R af De Bont is Lecturer of History at Maastricht University. Sokhieng Au is program staff in the Analysis and Advocacy unit of Médecins Sans Frontières and a research fellow in history at KU Leuven. Contributors Sokhieng Au (KU Leuven), Margaret Carlyle (University of Minnesota), Tinne Claes (KU Leuven), Veronique Deblon (KU Leuven), Raf De Bont (Maastricht University), Stephen C. Kenny (University of Liverpool), Helen MacDonald (University of Melbourne), Natasha Ruiz-Gómez (University of Essex), Kim Sawchuk (Concordia University), Naomi Slipp (Auburn University-Montgomery), Joris Vandendriessche (KU Leuven), Kaat Wils (KU Leuven)

LEUVEN UNIVERSITY PRESS

$79.50 978-94-6270-094-9 paperback 304 pages, color and black-and-white illustrations, 6.5 x 9

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R E L I G I O N  •  S C I E N C E

Sign or Symptom? Exceptional Corporeal Phenomena in Religion and Medicine in the 19th and 20th Centuries Edited by Tine Van Ossel aer, Henk de Smaele, and K a at Wils

Described as “the hand of God,” as “pathological,” or even as “a clever trick,” exceptional corporeal phenomena such as miraculous cures, stigmata, and incorrupt corpses have triggered heated debates in the past. These enigmatic occurrences have been defined as supernatural, psychosomatic, or fraudulent, and different authorities have sought to explain them by stimulating inquiries and claiming jurisdiction over them. Sign or Symptom? explores how religious and scientific reactions to these phenomena had a mutual influence. Tine Van Ossel aer is Research Professor at Universiteit Antwerpen (Ruusbroec Institute). Henk de Smaele is Associate Professor of History and member of the research unit Power in History: Centre for Political History at Universiteit Antwerpen. K a at Wils is Professor in European Cultural History and head of the research group Cultural History since 1750 at KU Leuven. Contributors Ellen Amster (McMaster University), Nicole Edelman (Université de Paris-Ouest-Nanterre), Maria Heidegger (Universität Innsbruck), Mary Heimann (Cardiff University), Paula Kane (University of Pittsburgh), Sofie Lachapelle (University of Guelph), Tiago Pires Marques (Universidade de Coimbra), Tine Van Osselaer (Universiteit Antwerpen)

LEUVEN UNIVERSITY PRESS K A D O C- S T U D I E S O N R E L I G I O N , C U LT U R E A N D S O C I E T Y 19

$59.00 978-94-6270-107-6 paperback 256 pages, 6.7 x 9.4

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RELIGION

Universalism and Liberation Italian Catholic Culture and the Idea of International Community, 1963–1978 Jacopo Cellini

After decades of a problematic, if not plainly hostile, approach to modernity by Catholic culture, the 1960s marked the beginning of a new era. As the Church employed a more positive approach to the world, voices in the Catholic milieu embraced a radical perspective, channeling the need for social justice for the poor and the oppressed. The alternative and complementary worldviews of “universalism” and “liberation” would drive the engagement of Catholics for generations to come, shaping the idea of international community in Catholic culture. Because of its traditional connection with the papacy and because of its prominent role in European progressive Catholicism, Italy stands out as an ideal case study to follow these dynamics. By locating the Italian scenario in a broader geographical frame, Universalism and Liberation offers a new vantage point from which to investigate the social and political relevance of religion in an age of crisis. Jacopo Cellini is currently working in the Archives of the Scuola Normale Superiore.

LEUVEN UNIVERSITY PRESS K A D O C- S T U D I E S O N R E L I G I O N , C U LT U R E A N D S O C I E T Y 20

$69.50 978-94-6270-108-3 paperback 336 pages, 6.7 x 9.4

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CHRISTIAN IMPERIALISM Converting the World in the Early American Republic Emily Conroy-Krutz THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD

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DANGEROUS GUESTS Enemy Captives and Revolutionary Communities during the War for Independence Ken Miller $25.00

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• Journal of the American Revolution 2014 Book of the Year

CAULDRON OF RESISTANCE Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and 1950s Southern Vietnam Jessica M. Chapman THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD

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EMPIRE OF WATER An Environmental and Political History of the New York City Water Supply David Soll $19.95

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• Winner, Public Works Historical Society Abel Wolman Award

• Co-winner, New York Academy of History Herbert H. Lehman

Award

SPEAKING OF SLAVERY Steven A. Epstein

$25.00 978-1-5017-2512-8 PAPERBACK

THE SECRET WITHIN Hermits, Recluses, and Spiritual Outsiders in Medieval England Wolfgang Riehle Translated by Charity Scott-Stokes $29.95

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THE OTHER WELFARE Supplemental Security Income and U.S. Social Policy Edward D. Berkowitz and Larry DeWitt $29.95 978-1-5017-0212-9 PAPERBACK

FROM DEVELOPMENT TO DICTATORSHIP Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era Thomas C. Field Jr. THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD

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• Winner, Thomas McGann Award, Rocky Mountain Council on

Latin American Studies

• Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title

THE TIE THAT BOUND US The Women of John Brown’s Family and the Legacy of Radical Abolitionism Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz $19.95 978-1-5017-1377-4 PAPERBACK Winner, Kansas Notable Book award

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Oval Office at the height of the kidnapping, torture, and murder of tens of thousands

FOR COU R SE A DOPTION

h i Sto ry/ U n ite d State S hiStory/SoUth america

of Argentines by the military government,

tH e Fate o F FR E E dom

Carter set out to dramatically shift U.S. policy from subtle support to public condemnation of human rights violation. But could the administration elicit human rights improvements in the face of a zealous military dictatorship, rising Cold War

including civil rights activists, second-wave feminists, Chicano/a activists, religious

it makes an important contribution to history. William Michael Schmidli investigates the nature of U.S. human rights policy in the 1970s, mostly during the Carter administration and mostly toward Argentina, and in a broader sense illuminates the impact of the Cold War on human rights policy and vice versa.” —a l a n m c P h e r S o n, Associate Professor in International and

progressives, members of the New Right,

Area Studies and ConocoPhillips Petroleum Chair

conservative cold warriors, and business

of Latin American Studies, University of Oklahoma,

leaders and utilizes unique interviews with

author of Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in

U.S. and Argentine actors as well as newly

U.S.–Latin American Relations

declassified archives to offer a telling analysis of the rise, efficacy, and limits of human rights in shaping U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War. W i l l i a m m i c h a e l S c h m i d l i is Assistant Professor of History at

“The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere is a very strong book based on excellent research that expands our understanding of U.S. relations with Argentina and President Jimmy Carter’s foreign policy. William Michael Schmidli provides extensive context for the changes in U.S. foreign policy and the emergence of

Jacket photograph: The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, holding their weekly human rights demonstration on a rainy Thursday in 1983. Photograph copyright Daniel García. Epígrafe. Archivo Fotográfico Memoria Abierta.

the human rights movement in the 1970s.” —d a v i d S c h m i tz , Robert Allen Skotheim Chair of History, Whitman College, author of The United States and Right-Wing dictatorships, 1965–1989

Jacket design: Lou Robinson.

Cornell University Press Ithaca and London www.cornellpress.cornell.edu

Human RigHts and u.s. Cold WaR PoliCy toWaRd Arg e nti nA

Bucknell University.

William michael Schmidli

tH e Fate o F FR E E dom

Schmidli grapples with the disparate actors engaged in the struggle over human rights,

search and writing on U.S.–Latin American relations that I have read in a while;

E ls E w h E r E

tension, and domestic political opposition?

“The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere is one of the most impressive feats of re-

E ls E w h E r E

H u man R i g Hts an d u.s. C o ld WaR Po li Cy to WaR d aR g e nti na

William michael Schmidli

D

uring the first quarter century of the Cold War, upholding human rights was

rarely a priority in U.S. policy toward Latin America. Seeking to protect U.S. national security, American policymakers quietly cultivated relations with politically ambitious Latin American militaries—a strategy clearly evident in the Ford administration’s tacit support of state-sanctioned terror in Argentina following the 1976 military coup d’état. By the mid-1970s, however, the blossoming human rights movement in the United States posed a serious threat to the maintenance of close U.S. ties to anticommunist, right-wing military regimes. The competition between cold warriors and human rights advocates culminated in a fierce struggle to define U.S. policy during the Jimmy Carter presidency. In The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere, William Michael Schmidli argues that Argentina emerged as the defining test case of Carter’s promise to bring human rights to the center of his administration’s foreign policy. Entering the

THE FATE OF FREEDOM ELSEWHERE Human Rights and U.S. Cold War Policy toward Argentina William Michael Schmidli $29.95 978-1-5017-1377-4 PAPERBACK

Foreign Affairs Magazine Best Book of the Year

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CHILDREN OF RUS’ Right-Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation Faith Hillis

AFTERLIVES The Return of the Dead in the Middle Ages Nancy Mandeville Caciola

Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title

TO FOLLOW IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS The Crusades and Family Memory in the High Middle Ages Nicholas L. Paul

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CLUB RED Vacation Travel and the Soviet Dream Diane P. Koenker $26.95 978-1-5017-1067-4 PAPERBACK

THE PEACE PUZZLE America’s Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace, 1989–2011 Daniel C. Kurtzer, Scott B. Lasensky, William B. Quandt, Steven L. Spiegel, and Shibley Z. Telhami $24.95 978-1-5017-1068-1 PAPERBACK

FEARFUL SPIRITS, REASONED FOLLIES The Boundaries of Superstition in Late Medieval Europe Michael D. Bailey $29.95 978-1-5017-1473-3 PAPERBACK

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MONASTIC REFORM AS PROCESS EVIDENCE Realities and Representations in Medieval Flanders, 900–1100 Steven Vanderputten

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Co-winner, John Nicholas Brown Prize, Medieval Academy of America

THE MIND OF THUCYDIDES Jacqueline de Romilly Translated by Elizabeth Trapnell Rawlings CORNELL STUDIES IN CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY

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Cornell University Press History Catalog 2018  
Cornell University Press History Catalog 2018  

New and recent history books published by Cornell University Press, ILR Press, Three Hills Press, and Leuven University Press

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