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Table of Contents, Quick Facts ....................................... 1 Media Information/Directory .......................................... 2 THE COACHING STAFF Head Coach Jenny Graap ............................................. 4-5 Assistant Coaches Phil Barnes/Laurie Tortorelli/Beth Calder . 6 MEET THE BIG RED 2003 Season Preview .................................................. 8-9 Meet the Captains Rachel Friedman ...................................................... 10 Erica Holveck .......................................................... 11 Meet the Returning Letter Winners Sarah Averson ......................................................... 12 Abby Beyer ............................................................. 13 Sarah Fischer ........................................................... 14 Kate Hirschfield/Julia Hughey ..................................... 15 Katie Lavin .............................................................. 16 Jaime Quinn ............................................................ 17 Meet the Veterans Annie Berkery/Ashley Charron/Danielle Friedman ......... 18 Kristen Smith/Lindsay Steinberg/Jessica Williams .......... 19 Meet the Newcomers Katherine Butler/Maggie Fava/Lisa Giugliano ............... 20 Kate Harrold/Jenn Malm/Lyndsay Robinson ................. 21 Allison Schindler/Liz Shaner/Rachel Spoonhower .......... 22 2003 Roster ............................................................... 23 Lacrosse Support Staff ................................................. 24 2002 SEASON REVIEW 2002 Season Review ............................................... 26-27 2002 Game Summaries .......................................... 28-30 2002 Statistics and Results ...................................... 31-32 HISTORY AND RECORDS Individual Honors ........................................................ 34 All-Time Results ..................................................... 35-36 All-Time Letter Winners ................................................ 36 Individual Records ....................................................... 37 Team and Year-By-Year Records/All-Time Opponents ...... 38 Athletic Hall of Fame ................................................... 39 2002 Ivy League Standings ........................................... 40 THIS IS CORNELL The Cornell Experience ................................................ 42 Playing Facilities ......................................................... 43 The Friedman Center ................................................... 44 University Administration ............................................. 45 Cornell/Realizing a Bold Dream ................................ 46-47 Student Support Services .............................................. 48 Applying To Cornell .................................................... 49 Prominent Cornell Alumni ....................................... 50-51 Commitment to Excellence .......................................... 52 2003 Schedule ............................................... Back Cover Credits: The 2003 Cornell women’s lacrosse media guide is a publication of the Cornell Athletic Communications Office. The guide was written and edited by Jeremy Hartigan, assistant director of athletic communications. Editorial contributions from Laura Stange, Elli Harkness and Leah Hultenschmidt. Photography: Tim McKinney, Patrick Shanahan, Beverly Schaefer, Charles Berch, Ivy Group/David Silverman Photo, Laura Stange and Cornell University Photography.

www.CornellBigRed.com

The Big Red defense — ranked among the nation’s top four in scoring defense each of the last three years.

Cornell Quick Facts

Location ..................................................... Ithaca, N.Y. 14853 Founded ...................................................................... 1865 Enrollment ................................................................. 13,600 President ............................................... Hunter R. Rawlings III Colors ............................................... Carnelian Red and White Affiliation .................................................................. NCAA I Conference ............................................................ Ivy League Athletic Administration Athletic Director ........................................... J. Andrew Noel Jr. Associate AD/Senior Woman Admin. ..................... Anita Brenner Associate AD/Business & Finance ........................... Frank Araneo Dir. of Athletic Alumni Affairs/Development ............ John Webster Lacrosse Coaching Staff Head Coach ..................................... Jenny Graap (Cornell ‘86) E-Mail ................................................. jlg42@cornell.edu Phone ..................................................... (607)255-4979 Fax ......................................................... (607)255-2969 Cornell Record ............................ 56-23; 22-13 Ivy (5 years) Career Record ........................................... 77-67 (9 years) Assistant Coach ............................. Phil Barnes (Assumption ‘95) E-Mail ............................................... peb26@cornell.edu Phone ..................................................... (607)254-7485 Assistant Coach ......................... Laurie Tortorelli (Delaware ‘02) E-Mail ................................................. lat33@cornell.edu Phone ..................................................... (607)255-0104 Volunteer Assistant Coach .................... Beth Calder (Cornell ‘03) E-Mail ................................................. ejc32@cornell.edu Administrative Assistant .................................... Renee Milligan E-Mail ............................................... ram25@cornell.edu Phone ..................................................... (607)255-1591 Athletic Communications Staff Director ............................................................ Laura Stange Office Phone ............................................ (607)255-5627 Assistant (Women’s Lacrosse Contact) ............... Jeremy Hartigan E-mail ................................................. jh295@cornell.edu Office Phone ............................................ (607)255-9788 Home Phone ............................................ (607)257-7146 FAX ........................................................ (607)255-9791 Assistant ............................................................. Brian Kelley Office Phone ............................................ (607)255-4688 Intern .................................................................. Seth Dohrn Administrative Assistants ............ Marlene Crockford, Elli Harkness Website ........................................... www.CornellBigRed.com Hotline .......................................................... (607)255-2385

On the front cover: (right, from top) Seniors Sarah Averson, Erica Holveck and Rachel Friedman will lead the Big Red into the 2003 season looking to build on the success of its run to the national semifinals in 2002. On the back cover: (left, from top) Seniors Katie Lavin, Sarah Fischer and Abby Beyer look to prove the Big Red can remain among the nation’s elite against a daunting schedule that features five games against teams that earned bids to the 2002 NCAA tournament. 2003 Cornell 1 Women’s Lacrosse


MEDIA INFORMATION/DIRECTORY Postgame Interviews Following a 10-minute cooling off period, Coach Jenny Graap and selected players will be available to the media at the field. Media wishing to speak with the visiting coach and players should make arrangements with the visiting SID. The locker rooms are closed. Availability of Coach Graap Coach Graap will accept interviews in her office by appointment and over the phone. All interviews must be arranged via theAthleticCommunicationsOffice. Player Interviews All player interviews must be arranged through the Athletic Communications Office so we can arrange a time that will not interfere with the student’s academic schedule. World Wide Web For information on all of Cornell’s 36 varsity sports, go to www.CornellBigRed.com. Information on Cornell women’s lacrosse can be found under the “varsity sports” banner.

Laura Stange

Director Office: (607) 255-5627 E-Mail: lls15@cornell.edu

Seth Dohrn

Intern Office: (607) 255-3753 E-Mail: sdd24@cornell.edu

Jeremy Hartigan

Brian Kelley

Assistant Director Office: (607) 255-9788 E-Mail: jh295@cornell.edu Home: (607) 257-7146

Assistant Director Office: (607) 255-4688 E-Mail: bmk25@cornell.edu

Elli Harkness

Marlene Crockford

Admin. Assistant Office: (607) 255-5626 E-Mail: emh9@cornell.edu

Accounts Rep. Office: (607) 255-3752 E-Mail: mmc7@cornell.edu

Athletic Communications Main Phone ......................... 255-3752 Athletic Communications Fax ..................................... 255-9791 Big Red Hot Line ....................................................... 255-2385

Women’s Lacrosse Staff Head Coach Assistant Coach Assistant Coach Volunteer Assistant Coach Administrative Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach Athletic Trainer (Women’s Lacrosse) Director, Student-Athlete Support Services

Jenny Graap Phil Barnes Laurie Tortorelli Beth Calder Renee Milligan Tom Howley Allison Sampson Chris Wlosinski

jlg42@cornell.edu peb26@cornell.edu lat33@cornell.edu ejc32@cornell.edu ram25@cornell.edu tkh1@cornell.edu ams234@cornell.edu cmw32@cornell.edu

(607) 255-4979 254-7485 254-7485 254-7485 255-1591 255-3953 255-4237 254-7472

Administration Athletic Director Associate Director/Senior Woman Administrator Associate Director/Business & Finance Director of Athletic Alumni Affairs & Development Compliance Coordinator Director of Tickets, Events and Sports Schools Director of Facilities Equipment Manager Cornell Sports Marketing

J. Andrew Noel Jr. Anita Brenner Frank Araneo John Webster Patty Weldon Gene Nighman Pat Graham Dale Strauf Jeff Hall

(607) 255-8832 255-8283 255-1317 255-5631 255-8874 255-3175 255-1321 255-4115 255-6680

Directions To Cornell From Binghamton, Binghamton follow Route 81 North and take Exit 8 at Whitney Point. Pick up Route 79 West in Whitney Point and follow into Ithaca city limits. At stop sign, turn right onto Route 366 (Ithaca Road); bear left at “Y” intersection which is Route 366. At second stoplight (flashing red), turn left onto Hoy Road. The parking garage is on your right and Bartels Hall is just a short walk up the hill. Buses must turn right at flashing red light, then take left onto Tower Road. Take next left onto Campus Road and follow to Schoellkopf Field. From Syracuse, Syracuse follow Route 81 South and take Exit 12 at Cortland. Turn left onto Route 281 and follow until Route 13 South. Take Route 13 South and follow until Route 366 (by the New York State Electric & Gas Plant). Turn left onto Route 366. At the second stoplight go straight onto Hoy Road. The parking garage is on your right and Bartels Hall is just a short walk up the hill. Buses must turn right at Tower Road. Take next left onto Campus Road and follow to Schoellkopf Field. From Buffalo, Buffalo follow Interstate 90 East until Geneva and take Exit 42. Pick up Route 96 South and follow into city of Ithaca. Once over bridge, follow signs for Route 79 East (Green Street). Follow Route 79 East (up Green Street and State Street hill) and veer left onto Route 366 at the intersection of Routes 366 and 79. Follow Route 366 (Ithaca Road) until second stoplight (flashing red). Turn left onto Hoy Road. The parking garage is on your right and Bartels Hall is just a short walk up the hill. Buses must turn right at flashing red light, then take left onto Tower Road. Take next left onto Campus Road and follow to Schoellkopf Field. From Elmira, Elmira follow Route 13 North into Ithaca and turn right onto Route 79 East (Green Street). Follow Route 79 East (up Green Street and State Street Hill) and veer left onto Route 366 at the intersection of Routes 366 and 79. Follow Route 366 (Ithaca Road) until second stoplight (flashing red). Turn left onto Hoy Road. The parking garage is on your right and Bartels Hall is just a short walk up the hill. Buses must turn right at flashing red light, then take left onto Tower Road. Take next left onto Campus Road and follow to Schoellkopf Field.

2003 Cornell 2 Women’s Lacrosse

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2003 Cornell 3 Women’s Lacrosse


HEAD COACH Jenny Graap ‘86

Head Coach of Women’s Lacrosse ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Jenny Graap returned to her alma mater in 1997 with one goal in mind: to build the Cornell women’s lacrosse team into a championship contender. If she had a five-year plan, it was right on schedule. The 2002 Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association Coach of the Year, Graap has turned around the fortunes of an entire program, building an Ivy League and national title contender in just five years. She has posted a 5623 record (.709) in five seasons at Cornell and a 77-67 mark (.535) in nine years as a head coach. Graap’s ability to motivate and devise game plans has put her name among the nation’s elite coaches. After building the George Mason program from scratch, she has built a consistent winner at her alma mater and has established a tradition of national competitiveness that had been lacking on East Hill prior to her arrival. A strong recruiter with a good eye for hidden talent, Graap takes pride in the fact that her players develop every year. Cornell has become a national title contender on the field with players other top schools did not recruit. In her five seasons at Cornell, Graap has had 25 All-Ivy selections, 17 IWLCA Regional All-Americans, nine IWLCA national All-Americans, three Verizon/CoSIDA Academic All-Americans, one Ivy League

The Career of Jenny Graap At Williams Smith (assistant coach) Year W L Pct. 1990 9 5 .643 At Penn State (assistant coach) Year W L Pct. 1991 14 4 .778 1992 11 5 .688 1993 11 5 .688 1990-93

36

14

.720

NCAA Semifinals NCAA Quarterfinals NCAA Quarterfinals

3 NCAA Tournaments

At George Mason (head coach) Year W L Pct. 1994 3 12 .250 1995 5 12 .294 1996 7 10 .412 1997 6 10 .375

1994-97

21

44

.323

At Cornell (head coach) Year W L Pct. 1998 7 7 .500 1999 9 6 .600 2000 13 4 .765 2001 11 4 .733 2002 16 2 .889

Ivy 3-4 3-4 5-2 5-2 6-1

Finish t-4th 5th 3rd t-3rd 2nd

ECAC Finalist ECAC Champion NCAA 1st round NCAA Semifinal

1998-02 56 23 .709 22-13 2 NCAA Tournaments As a head coach (9 seasons) G. Mason 21 44 .323 Cornell 56 23 .709 2 NCAA Tournaments Totals

77

67

.535

2003 Cornell 4 Women’s Lacrosse

2 NCAA Tournaments

Player of the Year and one national player of the year finalist. Her teams have reached postseason play each of the last four years an has won at least 10 games three consecutive seasons. The 2002 season will go down as unquestionably the greatest season so far in Big Red women’s lacrosse history. Cornell finished the campaign 16-2, with its two losses coming on the road against the two national finalists, and setting nearly a dozen school records, including wins (16), winning percentage (.889) and highest Ivy League finish (second). The team finished in the top seven nationally in scoring offense, scoring defense, scoring margin, winning percentage and ground balls. Cornell completed an undefeated season at home (8-0), topped eight ranked opponents and ended Maryland’s seven-year run as national champions with a 14-4 victory over the Terps in the NCAA quarterfinals. The team’s success earned her IWLCA and Inside Lacrosse Regional Coach of the Year honors. In all, seven players were named All-Ivy and four earned AllAmerica status, with Jaimee Reynolds earning Ivy League Player of the Year and becoming a finalist for national player of the year. The 2001 season was the breakout year, as the team finished with a record of 11-4 and received its first NCAA tournament invitation. The Big Red used a balanced offense and a stingy defense to go 5-2 in Ivy League play, good for a third-place tie, ranking fourth in the country in scoring defense (7.00 goals allowed per game), while averaging nearly 10 goals per game. Five players were honored when All-Ivy League teams were announced, and two were named All-Americans. Graap’s 2000 squad set numerous records, including wins in a season (13), most goals (210) and most points scored (318), all since broken by the 2002 team, while ending the year at 13-4. The team capped the seasonwiththeEastern College Athletic Conference title, running through Sacred Heart 17-4 and Johns Hopkins 164. In 1999, the Big Red made its first ECAC tournament appearance since 1993 and wrapped up the season with a 9-6 mark. Graap is used to meeting challenges that are presented to her. Prior to returnwww.CornellBigRed.com


HEAD COACH

ing to Cornell, she had been the head lacrosse coach at George Mason for four years. In 1994, the first year the Patriots sponsored the sport, the team went 3-12 and under Graap’s tutelage, they improved to 6-10 in 1997 with a significantly stronger schedule. A 1986 graduate of Cornell’s College of Human Ecology, Graap was an assistant women’s lacrosse coach at Penn State from 1990-93, while completing a master’s degree in exercise and sport science. During her time with the Nittany Lions, they made three NCAA tournament appearances. Graap was also a field hockey and lacrosse intern at William Smith College from 1989-90, helping the Herons lax team go 9-5. She received her first coaching experience as the head lacrosse mentor at the Oak Knoll School of the Holy Child in Summit, N.J., in 1989. During her undergraduate days, Graap captained both the field hockey and lacrosse teams as a junior and senior, and earned a total of eight varsity letters in the two sports. She was second-team All-Ivy in field hockey as a senior, and is tied for 14th on the Cornellall-timecareerlistwith24points on 11 goals and two assists. Her 11 goals in field hockey tied her for 12th place on the Big Red’s list for career www.CornellBigRed.com

goals. Cornell Coaching Records In 1986, Graap (entering 2003 season) was named to the Career Wins Brine Regional All1. Cheryl Wolf (1977-97) 133 America lacrosse 2. Jenny Graap (1998-pr.) 56 team and ranks among the top 15 Career Winning Percentage on the all-time 1. Jenny Graap (1998-pr.) .709 school points list 2. Cheryl Wolf (1977-97) .479 with 91 (61 goals, Career Ivy League Wins 30 assists). She is 1. Jenny Graap (1998-pr.) 22 still ranked on the Cheryl Wolf (1977-97) 22 career goals and Career Ivy Winning Percentage career assists lists 1. Jenny Graap (1998-pr.) .629 with the Big Red 2. Cheryl Wolf (1977-97) .204 women laxers. While at Cornell, she also served as secretary of the Red Key Athletic Honorary Society. She was joined by her younger sister, Ellen, on both the field hockey and lacrosse teams during the 1985-86 seasons. Ellen was inducted into Cornell’s Athletic Hall of Fame in November 2000. From 1991-93, Graap remained active as a player, representing the Graap vs. All Opponents Philadelphia Club at the USWLA na(as head coach) First meeting Last meeting Record tional tournament. She also particiAmerican 1994 1997 4-0 Boston College 1998 2000 2-1 pated in the Vail Lacrosse Shoot-Out Boston University 2002 2002 1-0 as a Team Ripple player from 1992Brown 1998 2002 3-2 97 and 1999. Bucknell 1998 1998 1-0 Graap served as the Intercollegiate California 2000 2000 1-0 Colgate 1994 2002 4-3 Women’s Lacrosse Coaches’ AssociaColumbia 1998 2002 5-0 tion Division I vice president and was Dartmouth 1998 2002 1-4 a member of the NCAA South reDavidson 1994 1996 3-0 Delaware 1994 2002 1-2 gional selection committee. She was Duke 1996 1997 1-1 responsible for the design and launch Georgetown 1994 2002 0-5 of the ILWCA’s web site Harvard 1998 2002 4-1 (www.iwlca.org). She is currently a Hood 1994 1994 1-0 James Madison 1994 1997 0-4 member of the IWLCA’s media comJohns Hopkins 2000 2002 3-0 mittee, the Northeast regional AllLafayette 1998 1999 2-0 America committee and the NCAA’s Lehigh 1995 1996 0-2 Northeast regional ranking commitLoyola (Md.) 1994 1997 0-4 Maryland 2002 2002 1-0 tee. Graap is also on the nomination Massachusetts 2000 2000 1-0 board for the Tewaaraton trophy for Monmouth 1995 1996 2-0 the collegiate lacrosse player of the North Carolina 1996 1997 0-2 Notre Dame 2002 2002 1-0 year. Ohio State 1999 1999 1-0 Graap has also worked with the Old Dominion 1994 1997 0-6 NCAA lacrosse championships, asPenn State 2001 2001 1-0 sisting with the national selection Pennsylvania 1998 2002 5-0 Princeton 1998 2002 0-6 committee and serving as a NCAA Richmond 1994 1997 1-3 representative at the Division III chamRutgers 2000 2002 3-0 pionships. She served as a clinician Sacred Heart 2000 2000 1-0 St. Joseph’s (Pa.) 1994 1997 3-1 for the NCAA’s Youth Education in Stanford 1997 2002 5-0 Sport (YES) program in 1996, 1997 Syracuse 1998 2002 3-3 and 2000. Towson 1997 1997 0-1 A native of West Chester, Pa., Graap UMBC 1994 1997 2-2 Vanderbilt 1998 2001 2-2 attended East High School, where she Villanova 1994 1997 0-4 lettered three times in basketball and Virginia Tech 1995 1998 4-0 played on the state runner-up field William & Mary 1994 1997 0-6 hockey team in addition to the undeYale 1998 2002 4-2 feated Chesmont lacrosse champion2003 opponents in BOLD ship squad. 2003 Cornell 5 Women’s Lacrosse


ASSISTANT COACHES Phil Barnes

Assistant Coach ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Phil Barnes begins his first year with the Cornell women’s lacrosse program looking to add his experience into what has already proven to be a winning formula for the Big Red. Barnes comes to Ithaca with extensive assistant and head coaching experience. He spent the last three seasons as the head coach of the women’s lacrosse team at the University of Massachusetts, directing the team to the 2000 Atlantic 10 regular season and tournament crowns. That squad finished the year ranked first nationally in scoring defense, while his starting goalkeeper led the country in save percentage and goals against average. He took over the head coaching duties after spending two years as an assistant coach at UMass, helping the Minutewomen to a 1998 ECAC tournament appearance and ranking in the top 10 nationally in scoring defense.

Barnes went to UMass from Holy Cross, where he served as head coach for two seasons. During his tenure, he was named Patriot League Coach of the Year in 1996 and recruited the school’s all-time leading scorer and three All-Patriot team members. A 1995 graduate of Assumption College, Barnes began his coaching career as an assistant coach at his alma mater. He also served as the men’s varsity assistant coach at Souhegan High School in Amherst, N.H. Barnes played collegiate lacrosse while at Assumption. He has served as an instructor at lacrosse camps at the University of North Carolina, Syracuse and Maryland. Barnes was a member of the 1997 Northeast region All-America committee. He was also a selector for the 2000 and 2001 North/South All-Star games. Barnes chaired the NCAA Northeast Regional Ranking Committee in 2001 and 2002 and was a member of the Northeast Regional All-America Committee both of those years.

Laurie Tortorelli

Assistant Coach ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Laurie Tortorelli, a former AllAmerica goalkeeper at the University of Delaware, was named assistant women’s lacrosse coach at Cornell in August of 2002. Tortorelli will have a hand in all aspects of the program, from recruiting and travel planning to developing and implementing practice and gameday strategy. Tortorelli, a 2002 graduate of Delaware, joined the Big Red staff after finishing a stellar career for the Blue Hens. The four-year starter and team captain was a three-time first-

team all-region selection, while earning third-team IWLCA All-America and first team Academic All-America honors as a senior for the Blue Hens. A first-team America East selection in 2001 and conference Rookie of the Year in 1999, Tortorelli finished her career ranked second in career saves (754), goals allowed average (9.35), save percentage (.560) and minutes played (3,797). She was named most valuable player by her teammates in 2002. Besides her extensive playing experience, Tortorelli has been a clinician and counselor at numerous elite summer lacrosse camps, including USA Goalkeeping Camp, the Cornell, Delaware, Penn State and Loyola (Md.) camps.

Beth Calder

Volunteer Assistant Coach ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Beth Calder moves from the field to the sidelines as the team’s volunteer assistant coach after earning two letters for the Big Red and helping the team to an NCAA semifinal appearance in 2002. Calder will work with the midfielders and will lend her expertise in both the transition game and draw control technique. She will also be instrumental in assisting with the implementation of practice and game strategy. 2003 Cornell 6 Women’s Lacrosse

Calder appeared in 32 games with 17 starts in two seasons after transferring from Davidson College. She finished tied for fifth on the team in scoring as a senior, tallying 16 goals and 10 assists for 26 points. A major weapon on the draw, Calder pulled down 20 draw controls while causing six turnovers and scooping up 19 ground balls. During her two seasons, Cornell combined to go 27-6 with a pair of NCAA tournament appearances. Calder is completing her degree in nutritional sciences and is enrolled in the College of Human Ecology. www.CornellBigRed.com


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2003 Cornell 7 Women’s Lacrosse


2003 SEASON PREVIEW 2003 Big Red Looks To Build Own Identity After graduating seven starters from last year’s NCAA semifinal squad, Cornell will turn to its senior class

The names change, but the goals remain the same. The time to look back on the 2002 season, unquestionably the greatest campaign in the annals of Big Red women’s lacrosse, has past. In its wake is national recognition and expectations unlike any the team has ever faced. Undoubtedly, though, the biggest expectations are from within its own locker room.

Six seniors, five of whom were regular starters on last season’s national semifinal squad, will step up to the plate to replace a class of seven accomplished graduates who lifted the Big Red program out of the depths of mediocrity and into the national spotlight. And unfortunately for Cornell opponents, last year’s freshman class have become sophomores ... and all six will be asked to contribute this season. Cornell enters the 2003 season with high expectations and lofty goals. After advancing to the national semifinals a season ago, two All-Americans and three All-Ivy selections return on offense. Talk of competing for a national title doesn’t come with snickers. It makes people take heed. “It’s a new challenge,” said head coach Jenny Graap, the 2002 IWLCA national coach of the year. “This year we go from being the hunter to being the hunted. We can’t sneak up on anyone. It’s a brand new team with new challenges. We have to establish our own identity and try not to live in the past. You can’t move forward if you’re looking backwards.” The offense returns five doublefigure scorers from a team that set school records for goals and total points. The Big Red’s strength a season ago was that it could win games with good defense, strong midfield play, tough goalkeeping … or by simply outscoring its opponent. Cornell recorded at least 10 goals in 15 of the team’s 18 contests. Despite the loss of the Big Red’s top two all-time leading scorers in Jaimee Reynolds and Lori Wohlschlegel, Cornell will look to be a potent attack again in 2003. The defense, which has ranked in the top four nationally in scoring defense each of the last three years, took the biggest hit with the loss of three-year starter Carrie Giancola in goal, as well as All-Ivy caliber defenders Sarah Graham, Katie McCorry and Kari Zarzecki. Add in Reynolds, arguably the top defensive midfielder in the country a season ago, and the new-look defense will need to quickly build its own identity. Graap has put together a schedule that will provide challenges throughout the season. Along with its treacherous Ivy League season, which includes a home game against reigning national champion Princeton, Cornell will 2003 Cornell 8 Women’s Lacrosse

welcome 2002 NCAA tournament squads Notre Dame, Vanderbilt and Ohio State to SchoellkopfField.TheBigRedwillalsoentertain RutgersandStanfordinnon-conferenceaction at home, where Cornell has won 12 in a row, and will visit Fairfield, Delaware, and 2002 tournament squad Syracuse.

THE ATTACK Cornell returns a bulk of its top scorers from 2002, with nine of last year’s top 13 back on East Hill. Among them are All-Ivy selections Sarah Averson and Sarah Fischer. The two Sarahs combined for 66 goals and 80 total points between them during Cornell’s run to the national semifinals. Averson begins the season as a legitimate national player of the year candidate after ranking second on the team in goals (34), points (43) and draw controls (28) while setting career highs in ground balls and caused turnovers. After starting all 18 contestsenroutetosecond-teamIWLCA All-America honors a season ago, Averson will be looked upon to be the team’s go-to scorer on the attack. A first-team All-Ivy and IWLCA AllRegion pick in 2002, Averson’s confidence should be sky-high after spending the summer and fall competing on the U.S. Developmental team. Fischer earned Jaime Quinn honorable mention All-Ivy status after recording 32 goals as a junior. Using her combination of speed and strength, Fischer is a dominant one-on-one player who can take the ball to the cage on any defender. Fischer possesses a strong and accurate shot, and after setting career highs in every statistical category a season ago, has the confidence to lift her game even more in her final campaign. The rest of the attack will be by committee, combining newcomers and former reserves who are hungry to earn playing time. Sophomore Kristen Smith and freshmen Katherine Butler, Lisa Giugliano, Jenn Malm and Allison Schindler.

Smith showed a nose for the ball in her limited minutes as a freshman, scoring two goals, including a score in her first collegiate contest. Smith also recorded six draw controls and five ground balls. Smith’s role will be to provide energy and instant offense off the bench. She will also be a key component in Cornell’s draw control schemes. Butler, Giugliano and Malm all bring different skill sets to the position. Butler is a high-energy player with solid stick skills. Giugliano’s speed and quickness are keys to her ability to see playing time. Malm is a candidate to play feeder from behind the net thanks to her excellent field vision and accurate s h o t . Sarah Averson Schindler also has been labeled as a player with outstanding potential on the offensive end. She can score or distribute equally well. Juniors Jaime Quinn and Kate Hirschfield will also slide up from the midfield to attack. THE MIDFIELD A talented and versatile group returns in the midfield, which even after losing Reynolds to graduation, is still one of the team’s strong points. Included among the returners are senior All-American Erica Holveck and All-Ivy candidate Jaime Quinn. Holveck had a tremendous junior campaign, earning second-team All-Ivy and All-America status after recording 12 points and a teamhigh 30 caused turnovers. A versatile midfielder Sarah Fischer who is as capable on defense as she is on the offensive end, Holveck’s strength is in her speed. The Denville, N.J., native has been able to concentrate more on disrupting opponents’ offenses as more of her teammates have picked up the offensive slack, and her ability to force the issue has led to increased scoring opportunities on the ride. A dominating presence on the field, Quinn had a breakthroughseason

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2003 SEASON PREVIEW Spoonhower has been the biggest surprise of the preseason. A hard worker who played attack in high school and is quickly learning the defense, Spoonhower has the size and strength to not be overmatched physically by older players. Seniors Rachel Friedman and Katie Lavin and sophomore Jessica Williams can also move up from defense to play in the midfield.

Lindsay Steinberg in 2002. She ranked fifth on the team in goals (23) and points (26) and was among the team leaders in ground balls, draw controls and caused turnovers. After seeing limited action as a rookie, Quinn’s height and aggressive play on both sides of the field necessitated a move into the starting lineup. She started 17 matches a season ago, and came on strong at the end of the year, netting four goals in a win at No. 18 Johns Hopkins in the season finale and adding a hat trick in the first round NCAA win over Syracuse. Junior Kate Hirschfield has been a quiet scorer over her career, and that steady production will be rewarded this season. After starting 11 contests a season ago, Hirschfield’s speed and stick skills, as well as her tenacious defense, will mean an even bigger role in 2003. The Oyster Bay, N.Y., native improved in the caused turnover and ground ball departments. She will again play a key role as a scoring midfielder in the rotation this season. Sophomore Julia Hughey possesses the natural instincts and skills to earn league and national honors. A strong presence on the field with great height (5-10) and stick skills, Hughey should step right into the starting lineup after seeing action in 13 contests as a freshman. Hughey is an accomplished scorer who has also shown the ability to be one of the top defensive midfielders to play at Cornell. Sophomore Lindsay Steinberg made the most of her time as a freshman, showing a knack for scoring with nine points in 17 contests off the bench as a rookie. Steinberg’s combination of strength and quickness will give her an opportunity to start regularly. Freshmen Lyndsay Robinson, Allison Schindler, Liz Shaner and Rachel Spoonhower will all battle the returners for playing time, and each brings different attributes to the midfield mix. Robinson is a natural midfielder who will see time right away thanks to her feel for the game andhercomposurewiththeball.Shepossesses unlimited potential on both sides of the field and has the desire to improve and excel. Shaner is a tenacious defender who brings tremendous speed to Cornell’s transition game. Her aggressiveness, particularly on scooping ground balls has set her apart from other midfield candidates. www.CornellBigRed.com

season getting acquainted with the defensive philosophies. Annie Berkery and Danielle Friedman will compete for a starting spot in the back. Berkery brings deceptive speed and solid stick skills to the position. The Osterville, Mass., native saw action in just two games a season ago, but was impressive enough in practices and in the fall season to help her compete for a spot in the rotation. Danielle Friedman, no relation to her senior teammate, is a cerebral player with good poise who understands and reacts to the Big Red’s defensive strategies. A natural defender who continues to hone her skills, Friedman’s energy and steady play will help in her quest for a starting position. Freshman Kate Harrold will also look to get in the mix. After recovering from an ACL tear last spring, the Elverson, Pa., native brings good size (5-9) and a feel for defending the cage to the table. Her quickness and aggressiveness will be keys to earning time. Sliding in from the midfield to solidify the backfield will be Holveck, Hirschfield, Shaner and Spoonhower, giving Cornell tremendous depth.

THE DEFENSE Cornell has been ranked among the top four nationally in scoring defense each of the past three years, and there’s no reason to think that opponents will have an easier time this season. Leading the charge in the back will be senior co-captain Rachel Friedman. One of the fiercest competitors and top markup defenders in the Ivy League, Friedman played in 17 games with 14 starts, missing one contest due to a separated shoulder that she played with during the NCAA tournament run. Her poise and ball control will give Cornell’s otherwise young defense someone to look to when opponents are applying pressure. Friedman recorded career highs in ground balls and caused turnovers a season ago and will be expected to give even more THE GOALKEEPERS Despite the loss of Giancola, the Big Red this year with her leadership. Senior Katie Lavin has been the ultimate defense is confident in its last line of defense. role player on defense for the Big Red, and this After two years as an understudy, it’s junior season she will be thrust into a starting role. Ashley Charron’s time to shine. Charron played sparingly, though Lavin is a fundamentally sound player with a strong feel for the game and is also one of the impressively, in her first two seasons on East team’s most fit athletes. Her endurance keeps Hill.The5-9keeperposteda5.45goalsagainst her fresh long after opponents have started to average and an impressive .615 save fade. Lavin is expected to provide offense out percentage in six contests, improving on those of the back after scoring three goals a season marks to 4.36 and .636 in Ivy contests. A ago, matching her career high. She also will confident and aggressive performer, Charron see time in the midfield in certain situations. gives the Big Red a different dimension in goal After three years of watching most of the this year thanks to her size and athleticism. action from the sideline, senior Abby Beyer She gained the confidence of the will become a mainstay on defense. One of upperclassmen a season ago when she came the hardest working players on the squad, off the bench to record her first collegiate win, stopping five shots Beyer brings a and allowing just dimension of size (5-8) two goals in 42 and athleticism to the minutes of play in a back line. A key reserve comeback win at a season ago, she will Harvard. be asked to mark taller Freshman opponents and cause Maggie Fava will disruptions with the serve as the backup double team. after a successful Sophomore Jessica prep career at the Williams is a player Garrison Forest capable of having a School in Owings breakout season. A Mills, Md. An strong presence on the h o n o r a b l e field, Williams has mention Allgained valuable America pick as a international senior, Fava has experience playing for great quickness Team Canada. around the cage. Williams’s size and her She was one of the ability to slide up to the most improved midfield to provide a players during the scoring punch are her fall thanks to her greatest assets. desire to learn and A pair of ability to sophomores will also implement new be asked to increase Ashley Charron techniques. their contributions after spending a 2003 Cornell 9 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET

THE

CAPTAINS

Rachel Friedman*** 5 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Defense

••••••••••••• Senior ••••••••••••• Syosset, N.Y.

••••••••••••• 5-4 ••••••••••••• Sociology

At Cornell Cornell: Entering the 2003 season as team co-captain, Friedman’s leadership and steady play in the back will be key in helping Cornell maintain its winning ways. Friedman’s poise and ball control, combined with her speed and quickness, will help anchor the defense as well as give her some opportunities to make an impact on the offensive end. Although small for a defender, she positions herself well and has a big presence on the field. She makes good decisions with the ball which is crucial to the Big Red’s transition game. She also proved her toughness during the 2002 season, playing in the three NCAA tournament games with a separated shoulder. Friedman was selected to the all-star team at the Prague Cup during the team’s trip to Europe in the summer of 2000. She is a dean’s list student in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

As a junior: Friedman played in 17 contests with 14 starts, missing one game due to a shoulder injury. She registered 27 ground balls, 11 caused turnovers and eight draw controls for a defense that ranked fourth nationally in scoring defense. As a sophomore: Friedman started 11 games for a team that ranked among the national leaders in scoring defense. She added 17 ground balls, seven caused turnovers and five draw controls. As a freshman: Friedman played in every game with 14 starting assignments. She recorded one assist to go along with 21 ground balls, eight draw controls and seven caused turnovers. At Syosset Syosset: Rachel earned four letters in lacrosse and three in basketball at Syosset HS, where she was a two-year team MVP in both sports. An AllAmerica honorable mention selection, Rachel was twice named all-county in

Friedman’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 17-14 14-11 17-14 48-39

G 0 0 0 0

A 1 0 0 1

Pts. 1 0 0 1

2003 Cornell 10 Women’s Lacrosse

Shots 1 4 1 6

FPS 0x1 0x0 0x0 0x1

GB 21 17 27 65

CT 7 7 11 25

DC 8 5 8 21

lacrosse. She also played in the North-South game and participated in the USWLA National Tournament. She was a two-year all-conference selection in basketball. Personal Personal: Rachel Mara Friedman is the daughter of Joseph and Cheryl Friedman and has an older sister and a younger sister, Lauren, who will play lacrosse for the Big Red next season. Born: 12-11-81.

RAPID FIRE

WITH RACHEL ... The thing I like most about Cornell is ... its unbelievably friendly atmosphere. I chose Cornell because ... it combined an Ivy League education with a top-notch athletic program. My goals for the season are ... to break new barriers in Cornell lacrosse history and to have fun while I’m doing it. My most memorable sports moment is ... defeating the seven-time defending national champion Maryland by 10 goals on our own turf. The thing I appreciate most about the coaching staff is ... their ability to work well together and to feed off each other. Before a game I ... always try to eat a big bowl of frosted mini wheats cereal.

Ivy 0-1-1 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-1

Friedman’s Career Highs Points — 1, at Brown (4/15/00) Goals — none Assists — 1, at Brown (4/15/00) Ground Balls — 6, at Rutgers (3/9/02) Draw Controls — 3, at Boston U. (4/14/02)

www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET

THE

CAPTAINS

Erica Holveck*** 32 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Midfield/Defense

••••••••••••• Senior ••••••••••••• Denville, N.J.

••••••••••••• 5-5 ••••••••••••• Psychology

At Cornell: A co-captain and preseason second-team Inside Lacrosse All-American for the 2003 season, Holveck hopes to build on a junior campaign in which she earned second-team IWLCA All-America honors for her play in the midfield. A consistent contributor who is equally adept on offense or defense, Holveck triggers the team’s transition game with her speed and decision making. Her endurance, coupled with her controlled and poised ball-handling skills, make her the prototype midfielder. Holveck is a very physical and strong player, and was recognized on the Wall of Power in the Friedman Strength and Conditioning Center for her outstanding performances in the weight room. Holveck is also a member of the 400 Club for student-athletes who post a semester grade point average of 4.0. She is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

As a junior: A second-team IWLCA All-America selection, Holveck led the team in caused turnovers (30) and ranked among the team leaders in ground balls (41) and assists (8). The second-team All-Ivy and firstteam IWLCA All-Region selection added four goals on the year. Holveck posted a career-best five points in the season opener at Stanford and recorded six caused turnovers against Delaware. Holveck was a two-time Ivy League Honor Roll selection and was named Academic All-Ivy. As a sophomore: Holveck scored 19 points on 12 goals and seven assists while starting 14 of 15 games in 2001. She scored two goals off the bench in an 11-7 win over No. 7 Yale and twice was credited with a pair of assists. As a freshman: An AllIvy second-team selection, Holveck played in all 17 games with 15 starting assignments. She scored 28 points on 20 goals and eight assists in her rookie campaign, including three goals in wins vs. Penn and Brown.

Holveck’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 17-15 15-14 18-17 50-46

G 20 12 4 36

www.CornellBigRed.com

A 8 7 8 23

Pts. 28 19 12 59

Shots 57 43 16 116

FPS 3x8 3x7 1x2 7x17

GB 31 33 41 105

CT 15 18 30 63

DC 16 11 9 36

At Mountain Lakes: Lakes Holveck earned four letters in soccer, three in lacrosse and two in swimming at Mountain Lakes HS. She was a two-year first-team all-area and third-team all-state selection. Holveck was named MVP of the Tri-State Indoor Lacrosse League and qualified for the Garden State Games two years. She was named first-team all-conference three years in soccer. Personal Personal: Erica Beth Holveck is the daughter of Paul and Sheila Holveck and has an older brother who played sprint football at Princeton. Born: 12-26-80.

RAPID FIRE

WITH ERICA ... The thing I like most about Cornell is ... All the people I have met along the way... especially my teammates. My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... Cherish every moment of your lacrosse experience here at Cornell, from the sweetest victories to the hardest most painful workouts, because before you know it, it will be over. Most people don’t know I ... Watch Animal Planet for multiple hours a day. The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... Their dedication to the players and the program. The coaches are committed to bringing out the strenghts of each player and making them play with confidence which has ultimately led to the great success of this team.

Ivy 12-3-15 6-0-6 0-2-2 18-5-23

Holveck’s Career Highs

Points — 5, at Stanford (3/2/02) Goals — 3, two times Assists — 3, at Stanford (3/2/02) Ground Balls — 6, vs. Delaware (5/11/02) Draw Controls — 4, two times 2003 Cornell 11 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET

THE

RETURNING LETTER WINNERS

Sarah Averson*** 26 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Attack

••••••••••••• Senior ••••••••••••• Manlius, N.Y.

••••••••••••• 5-4 ••••••••••••• Rural Sociology

At Cornell: After a successful summer that included a stint with the U.S. lacrosse developmental team, Averson will be looked to as the team’s go-to player as a senior. A preseason second-team Inside Lacrosse All-American, Averson opens the season ranked among the school’s career leaders in scoring (116 points) and goals scored (10th, 91). A first-team All-Ivy and IWLCA All-Region pick in 2002, Averson has precise stick skills and is equally strong right- or left-handed. A well-rounded and versatile player, she also has strong defensive skills. Averson is a rural sociology student in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

As a junior: A second-team IWLCA All-American, Averson ranked second on the team in scoring (43 points), goals scored (34) and draw controls (28) while setting career highs with 35 ground balls and eight caused turnovers. The first-team All-Ivy and IWLCA All-Region pick started all 18 games in helping Cornell to a national quarterfinal appearance. Averson scored at least one point in 16 games, including hat tricks in NCAA tournament wins over Syracuse and Maryland. Her 21 points in Ivy games also ranked second on the squad. As a sophomore: Averson scored in 12 of the 14 games she competed in during the 2001 campaign, netting 22 goals to rank third on the team, and was voted the team’s top offensive player by her teammates. She paced all scorers with four goals in the win over Colgate and had six multiple-goal games. As a freshman: Averson started all 17 games and tallied 51 points on 35 goals and 16 assists. She was voted the MVP of the ECAC tournament, scoring 14 points in two games. Averson scored at least one point in 13

Averson’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 17-17 14-12 18-18 49-47

G 35 22 34 91

A 16 0 9 25

Pts. 51 22 43 116

2003 Cornell 12 Women’s Lacrosse

Shots 95 49 100 244

FPS 3x11 4x8 12x20 19x39

GB 19 19 35 73

CT 6 4 8 18

DC 19 8 28 55

games as a rookie, including a five-goal, two-assist performance against both Harvard and Sacred Heart. In the championship game of the ECAC tournament, she scored seven points on six goals and one assist. At Fayetteville-Manlius Fayetteville-Manlius: Averson earned four letters in lacrosse, two in soccer, and one each in field hockey and track at Fayetteville-Manlius HS. Playing on the same team as former Big Red All-America goalkeeper Carrie Giancola, Averson earned AllAmerica, All-Central New York, all-county and allleague honors in lacrosse. She also played on the Empire team in the national tournament and was part of Team Central New York at the Empire State Games. Personal Personal: Sarah Beth Averson is the daughter of Peter and Patricia Averson and has an older brother and a younger sister. Born: 8-1-81.

RAPID FIRE

WITH SARAH ... My goals for the season are ... to play together and win together. My most memorable sports moment was ... de-throning seven-time national champion Maryland in the quarterfinals of the NCAA tournament. Before a game I ... dance.

Ivy 11-7-18 9-0-9 17-4-21 37-11-48

Averson’s Career Highs

Points — 7, three times Goals — 6, vs. Johns Hopkins (5/14/00) Assists — 2, five times Ground Balls — 5, two times Draw Controls — 3, three times www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET

THE

RETURNING LETTER WINNERS

Abby Beyer 31 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: Beyer has become a strong defender after transitioning from offense after her freshman season. She is asked to mark taller opponents because of her height and athleticism. Beyer was a key reserve a season ago, helping limit opponents to seven goals or less eight times and ranking in the top five nationally in scoring defense. She is a science and technology studies major in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

Defense

••••••••••••• Senior ••••••••••••• Phoenixville, Pa.

••••••••••••• 5-8 ••••••••••••• Science and Technology Studies

As a junior: Beyer competed in 12 games off the bench, recording three ground balls, two caused turnovers and two draw controls. Her contributions helped Cornell finish among the top five nationally in scoring defense. As a sophomore: Beyer saw action in five games as a sophomore on defense, recording five caused turnovers. As a freshman: Beyers scored four points on a goal and three assists in 10 games from the midfield. Her first career points came against Columbia with a goal and an assist. In the ECAC tournament semifinal victory over Sacred Heart, she recorded two assists. At Owen J. Roberts: Beyer earned four letters in basketball and three each in lacrosse and field hockey at Owen J. Roberts HS. The athlete of the year in high school, Beyer was named to the All Pac-10 second team for lacrosse and was honorable mention for field hockey. Personal: Abigail Morgan Beyer is the daughter of Richard and Georgine Beyer. Born: 12-28-80.

RAPID FIRE

WITH ABBY ... The thing I like most about Cornell is ... it’s Gorges! I chose Cornell because ... It was perfect. Most people don’t know I ... love rats. My goal for the season is ... to be the best defender on the field. After graduation I would like to ... save the environment singlehandedly. Before a game I ... eat lots of good stuff.

Beyer’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 10-0 5-0 12-0 27-0

G 1 0 0 1

www.CornellBigRed.com

A 3 0 0 3

Pts. 4 0 0 4

Shots 4 0 0 4

FPS 0x1 0x0 0x0 0x1

GB 3 1 3 7

CT 3 5 2 10

DC 0 2 2 4

Ivy 1-1-2 0-0-0 0-0-0 1-1-2

Beyer’s Career Highs

Points — 1, two times Goals — 1, vs. Columbia (4/28/00) Assists — 2, vs. Sacred Heart (5/13/00) Ground Balls — 3 vs. Sac. Heart (5/13/00) Draw Controls — 1, four times 2003 Cornell 13 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET THE RETURNING LETTER WINNERS

Sarah Fischer** 3 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell:An All-Ivy and All-America candidate, Fischer has the ability to take the ball to the cage on any defender. She uses her quickness and strength to create one-on-one chances, and she has the field vision to find an open teammate for a score. Fischer posseses a powerful shot and continues to improve her placement. She is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology.

Attack

••••••••••••• Senior •••••••••••••

Cleveland Hgts., Ohio

••••••••••••• 5-5 ••••••••••••• Policy Analysis and Management

As a junior: An honorable mention All-Ivy pick, Fischer ranked among the team’s leading goal scorers (third, 32) while starting all 18 games for the Red. Fischer finished fourth in scoring overall (37) and in Ivy games (14). She recorded seven hat tricks, including a career-best four goals in a 9-5 win over Rutgers. Fischer tallied one of Cornell’s great goals in program history, rushing down the field after a turnover and putting the ball past the Georgetown goalkeeper with 17 seconds left, sending the national semifinal game with the top-ranked Hoyas into overtime. She set career highs in every major category, including ground balls (39), draw controls (12) and caused turnovers (6). As a sophomore:Fischer bounced back from an injuryshortened freshman season to start 12 games on the attack. She totaled 19 points on 16 goals and three assists to rank sixth on the squad in scoring. Fischer also recorded 28 ground balls to rank among the team leaders, and she had six games with multiple points, includingtwo-goal,one-assist efforts against Stanford and Colgate. As a freshman: Fischer was a mainstay in the starting lineup before missing the second half of the 2000 season with a stress fracture in her leg. She registered eight points on six goals and two assists in her first six games, recording a pair of goals and an assist in her first career game, a win over Rutgers.

Fischer’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 6-5 15-12 18-18 39-35

G 6 16 32 54

A 2 3 5 10

Pts. 8 19 37 64

2003 Cornell 14 Women’s Lacrosse

Shots 19 56 93 168

FPS 2x3 2x7 2x12 6x22

GB 5 28 39 72

CT 1 3 6 10

DC 4 8 12 24

At Cleveland Heights: Fischer earned four letters each in lacrosse and soccer at Cleveland Heights HS. A twoyear All-American in lacrosse, she was also named firstteam Northeast Ohio. In soccer, she was named AllOhio and first-team all-league. She was the league MVP for soccer. Personal: Sarah M. Fischer is the daughter of Lawrence and Marlene Fischer and has two younger sisters. Born: 1-2-81.

RAPID FIRE

WITH SARAH ... I chose Cornell bacuse ... the balance between academics and athletics is perfect. My most memorable sports moment is ... scoring the game-tying goal against Georgetown in the 2002 Final Four with just 17 seconds left. Most people don’t know I ... have a sister who plays lacrosse at Ohio State. The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... their understanding of the importance of academics. The thing I like most about Cornell is ... the women’s lacrosse team.

Ivy 0-0-0 8-0-8 12-2-14 20-2-22

Fischer’s Career Highs

Points — 5, at Rutgers (3/9/02) Goals — 4, at Rutgers (3/9/02) Assists — 1, 10 times Ground Balls — 4, two times Draw Controls — 2, at Stanford (3/2/02) www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET THE RETURNING LETTER WINNERS Kate Hirschfield* 12 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Midfield/Attack

••••••••••••• Junior ••••••••••••• Oyster Bay, N.Y.

••••••••••••• 5-5 ••••••••••••• Human Biology, Health and Society

At Cornell:An emerging scoring threat with quickness, speed and solid stick skills, Hirschfield will look to make an even greater contribution in the midfield offense. She is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology.

country at Sacred Heart Academy. She was a three-time All-Long Island selection and a two-time MVP in lacrosse. She was a member of the all-academic team for lacrosse, basketball and cross country.

As a sophomore: Hirschfield set career highs in every category while playing a key role in the midfield and on attack for the Big Red. She was one of nine players to reach double figures in the scoring column with 14 points (12 goals, two assists), including a three-goal, one-assist effort against Columbia. She also netted a pair of goals in the season opener against Stanford. In all, Hirschfield saw action in all 18 games with 11 starts.

Personal: Kathryn Mary Hirschfield is the daughter of Robert and Rita Hirschfield and has a brother and two sisters. Her brother, Michael, plays baseball at Yale. Her father also played baseball in college and was a member of the U.S. national team. Born: 8-3-82.

As a freshman: Hirschfield recovered from a torn anterior cruciate ligament the previous spring to score six points on four goals and two assists in eight games off the bench. Hirschfield scored her first career goal in the win over Colgate and had a four-point day (two goals, two assists) against nationally ranked Yale. At Sacred Heart Academy: Hirschfield lettered three times in lacrosse and twice each in basketball and cross

Hirschfield’s Career Stats Year 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 8-0 18-11 26-11

G 4 12 16

A 2 2 4

Pts. 6 14 20

Shots 13 33 46

FPS 2x7 1x4 3x11

GB 5 35 40

CT 0 5 5

DC 1 11 12

RAPID FIRE

WITH KATE ... The thing I like most about Cornell is ... the people. Cornell is such a diverse place that you can meet and become friends with people outside your athletic circle. The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... their focus. They pay attention to details and bring the right amount of intensity to practice everyday. I truly appreciate and respect all the endless hours they put into making our team successful.

Ivy 3-2-5 5-0-5 8-2-10

Hirschfield’s Career Highs Points — 4, two times Goals — 3, vs. Columbia (3/15/02) Assists — 2, at Yale (4/21/01) Ground Balls — 4, two times Draw Controls — 2, two times

Julia Hughey* 24 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: Possessing the size and speed to become Cornell’s next All-America midfielder, Hughey is expected to step into the starting lineup and replace some of the lost offense in the midfield. She is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Engineering.

As a freshman: One of the team’s top reserves, Hughey came off the bench in 13 games to score six points (42), while also recording 10 draw controls and nine ground balls. Hughey netted a pair of scores against Dartmouth and had a three-game scoring streak before missing five games with shin splints.

Midfield

••••••••••••• Sophomore ••••••••••••• Cockeysville, Md.

••••••••••••• 5-10 ••••••••••••• Engineering

At Dulaney:Hughey helped her Dulaney HS squad to the Marylandstatefinalasacaptainin2001. ATowsonTimes honorable mention all-star, Hughey was a three-year starter and first-team all-division pick as a senior when she served as team captain. She also lettered four seasons in soccer, earning first-team all-conference honors two consecutive years and leading her club team to the State Cup finals each season from 1998-2001.

Hughey’s Career Stats Year 2002 Career

GP-GS 13-0 13-0

G 4 4

www.CornellBigRed.com

A 2 2

Pts. 6 6

Shots 16 16

FPS 0x1 0x1

GB 9 9

CT 1 1

DC 10 10

Personal: Julia Anne Hughey is the daughter of William and Deborah Hughey and has an older brother and younger sister. Born: 12-2-83.

RAPID FIRE

WITH

JULIA ...

I chose Cornell because ... it was just what I was looking for in a school... prestigious academics, a highly respected lacrosse program, and the best dining halls in the country. What more could you want? My goal for the season are ... to earn a second trip the Final Four and a debut in the national championship game. I’d also love to continue our home winning streak. Most people don’t know I ... watch civil war doucmentaries in my spare time. The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... their ability to recruit athletes who fit the personality of our team and program... team unity on and off the field is what brought Cornell this far and is what keeps us competitive.

Ivy 2-1-3 2-1-3

Hughey’s Career Highs

Points — 2, vs. Dartmouth (4/6/02) Goals — 2, vs. Dartmouth (4/6/02) Assists — 1, two times Ground Balls — 2, four times Draw Controls — 4, at J. Hopkins (5/4/02) 2003 Cornell 15 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET

THE

RETURNING LETTER WINNERS

Katie Lavin** 20 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: An intelligent and fundamentally sound player, Lavin is a versatile option for the Big Red in the midfield and on defense. Her height and endurance are important assets, as is her constant drive to improve and succeed. Lavin is a member of the Red Key Athletic Honorary Society and the Sphinx Head Honorary Society. She is a student in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, majoring in applied economics and management.

Midfield/Defense

••••••••••••• Senior •••••••••••••

Fort Washington, Pa.

••••••••••••• 5-9 ••••••••••••• Applied Economics and Management

As a junior: A key component in the midfield and on defense, Lavin saw action in all 18 games, starting five times. She made quite an impact, scoring three goals, causing six turnovers and scooping up 22 ground balls. She also tallied six draw controls. Lavin’s goals came in victories over Rutgers, Colgate and nationally ranked Johns Hopkins. As a sophomore: Lavin served as a part-time starter and a key reserve in the midfield, recording a pair of goals and picking up 23 ground balls. She saw action in all 15 games with four starts, recording scores against Penn and Colgate. As a freshman: Lavin saw playing time in 12 games, scoring four points on two goals and two assists. Her first career point was an assist in a victory over California. She also scored points against Brown, Boston College and Colgate. Lavin was the recipient of the 2001 Cheryl Wolf Award, given to the player who exhibits anoutstandingpassion for the game of lacrosse.

Lavin’s Career Stats Year 2000 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 12-0 15-4 18-5 45-9

G 3 2 3 8

A 2 0 0 2

Pts. 5 2 3 10

2003 Cornell 16 Women’s Lacrosse

Shots 7 6 7 20

FPS 0x2 0x1 0x0 0x3

GB 3 23 22 48

CT 6 7 6 19

DC 6 6 6 18

At Upper Dublin: Lavin earned three letters in lacrosse, and two each in field hockey and basketball at Upper Dublin HS. She was named firstteam all-league and first-team all-area in lacrosse and was named to the All-Record team in 1998 and 1999. Personal: Kaitlin Anne Lavin is the daughter of Gerry and Jeanne Lavin and has an older brother. Born:12-1-81.

RAPID FIRE

WITH KATIE ... I chose Cornell because ... the team. We have a unique comraderie and friendship that is more like a family than simply classmates. My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... to take into account everything a school has to offer. Really look at the structure of the team and how the players get along. Also, it is important to be on a team where you will continue to grow as a player. After graduation I would like to ... work as a sports marketer for a footwear/apparel company to gain the necessary business experience to eventually pursue my MBA. The thing I like most about Cornell is ... the large and diverse student population, as well as the competitive lacrosse program and the challenging academics.

Ivy 2-0-2 1-0-1 0-0-0 3-0-3

Lavin’s Career Highs

Points — 2, at California (3/21/00) Goals — 1, eight times Assists — 1, two times Ground Balls — 4, two times Draw Controls — 3, vs. Colgate (4/4/01) www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET

THE

RETURNING LETTER WINNERS

Jaime Quinn* 16 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Midfield/Attack

••••••••••••• Junior ••••••••••••• Wantagh, N.Y.

••••••••••••• 5-11 ••••••••••••• Nutrition, Food and Agriculture

At Cornell: A potential All-Ivy and All-America selection, Quinn came into her own as a scoring threat for the Big Red a season ago. At 5-11, her height is a tremendous asset and she has a strong presence on the field. She is expected to start in the midfield and can be used as a specialist on the center draws. Quinn is a nutrition, food, and agriculture major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

three in basketball and two in volleyball at Wantagh HS. She was a two-time all-county pick in lacrosse, captaining the team as a junior and senior. In volleyball, she was voted to the all-state and all-county teams and served as team captain, helping her squad win the league title in 1998. Quinn was also an all-division, allconference and all-county selection in basketball, as well as a two-time captain.

As a sophomore: Quinn ranked fifth on the team in scoring (26) and goals scored (23). She also picked up her all-around game, ranking third on the team in ground balls (41) and fourth in draw controls (19) while also causing nine turnovers. Quinn scored three goals or more four times, including a four-goal outburst against No. 18 Johns Hopkins and three goals in the NCAA first round win over Syracuse.

Personal: Jaime C. Quinn is the daughter of Christopher and Karen Quinn and has two younger brothers and two younger sisters. Born: 3-16-82

As a freshman: Quinn scored a goal in eight games as a reserve, notching her lone score against Stanford. She added four draw controls, three caused turnovers and two ground balls. At Wantagh: Quinn earned four letters in lacrosse,

Quinn’s Career Stats Year 2001 2002 Career

GP-GS 8-0 18-17 26-17

G 1 23 24

A 0 3 3

Pts. 1 26 27

Shots 4 53 57

FPS 0x0 2x3 2x3

GB 2 41 43

CT 3 9 12

DC 4 19 23

RAPID FIRE

WITH JAIME ... My most memorable sports moment was ... going into overtime with Georgetown in the Final Four... just being at the Final Four was an amazing experience. People came from everywhere to see us play — I felt like a celebrity. The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... their dedication and never-ending enthusiasm for lacrosse... they personify “LAX OR DIE!”

Ivy 0-0-0 6-1-7 6-1-7

Quinn’s Career Highs

Points — 4, at Johns Hopkins (5/4/02) Goals — 4, at Johns Hopkins (5/4/02) Assists — 1, three times Ground Balls — 5, two times Draw Controls — 4, at Boston U. (4/14/02)

DKNY Active and STX

For the second year in a row, the Cornell women’s lacrosse team will draw attention with their play on the field, but they will also get some second looks because of their exclusive line of uniforms designed by DKNY Active in collaboration with STX. So how does a university that conjures images of waterfalls and outdoor adventures land a sponsorship deal with a chic New York clothing designer? Like with all deals, circumstances converged, and as a result, the lacrosse team is the first Cornell women’s team to enjoy the benefits of a generous sponsor. The pivotal players in this deal were Paul Charron, father of Ashley Charron ’04, a goalie on the team, and head coach Jenny Graap ’86, a graduate of the College of Human Ecology who majored in apparel design and textiles and once worked as an assistant buyer for Bloomingdale’s. During one of the many conversations between the Charrons and Coach Graap, the seed was planted that ultimately grew into a project that would benefit some of Cornell’s most successful women athletes. Jenny happened to mention that it would be fun to help design lacrosse uniforms for women. And she mentioned her idea to the right man — Paul Charron, CEO of Liz Claiborne, Inc. As if it were meant to be, Jenny learned that DKNY and DKNY Active are marks affiliated with Donna Karan International, and Liz Claiborne, Inc. licenses DKNY Active for sportsErica Holveck wear and performance wear from www.CornellBigRed.com

Donna Karan International. In August of 2000, Graap made the first of many trips to Manhattan where she met with a DKNY Active design team for a brainstorming session focused on the look and function for the new Cornell lacrosse uniforms. There were sketches and patterns and color boards and prototypes and models. Then there was the need to bring a real lacrosse player — 5-5 Erica Holveck — to NYC to model the prototypes. Her appearance led to the creation of Kate Hirschfield a new size scale that is appropriate for the athlete’s body type. The uniforms are not only breaking the mold, they are also sized for athletic women’s bodies. The lacrosse team launched its 2001 season on March 3 with an 11-9 victory over perennial power Penn State. On that day in State College, Pa., the new DKNY Active uniforms also made their debut. What was the reaction from the players and fans alike? “For us as players, the uniforms contribute to our desired image as a high profile, competitive team,” concluded Holveck. “It’s always good to intimidate another team, and when we dressed for that first game of the season, we all stood in the locker room wearing these slick new uniforms and there was no doubt that we were ready to play. The DKNY Active gear is just one more sign of what we’re all about – creating an exciting new tradition for women’s lacrosse at Cornell.” 2003 Cornell 17 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET THE VETERANS

Annie Berkery

Defense • Sophomore • Osterville, Mass.• 5-7 • Undecided

13

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell Cornell: A promising defender, Berkery will attempt to play a bigger role after spending last season as an understudy on a senior-laden defense. Berkery had a chance to learn from some of the best during her rookie year, helping her teammates rank among the top five nationally in scoring defense. Possessing excellent footwork and solid stick skills, Berkery should continue to develop into a solid contributor for the Big Red. She is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

RAPID FIRE WITH ANNIE ... I chose Cornell because ... of the strong academic reputation, the stunningly beautiful campus, and great lacrosse program

As a freshman: Berkery saw action against both Columbia and Colgate, recording a ground ball. At Middlesex Middlesex: Berkery was a three-time honorable mention All-American at Middlesex School, serving as

Ashley Charron

team captain her senior year. She lettered four seasons in lacrosse and was a New England all-star selection as a senior. Berkery also lettered three times in both field hockey and basketball.

Personal Personal: Anne Marie Berkery is the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Berkery and has four older brothers and five older sisters. All nine siblings played college lacrosse for at least two seasons, with her sister Liz earning All-America status at Harvard. Her brother Ted lettered in lacrosse at Cornell in 1990. Her brother-inlaw, Ted Drury, has played eight seasons in the NHL, most recently for the Columbus Blue Jackets. Born: 44-83.

Goalkeeper • Junior • Darien, Conn. • 5-9 • American Studies

22

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RAPID FIRE WITH ASHLEY ... My goal for the season is ... for the team to play competitive, aggressive, top-level lacrosse every game (and to win the Ivy Leagueandanationalchampionship, of course!).

At Cornell Cornell: Charron has shown flashes of what made her one of the most highly recruited keepers to attend Cornell the last two years, and now with the graduation of two-time All-Ivy selection Carrie Giancola, will have the opportunity to take over the position full-time. Charron plays with confidence and has a strong clear, while she has improved her fundamental techniques between the pipes. A quick and athletic goalie, she has excellent skills outside the crease and will hustle after ground balls. Charron is enrolled in the Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences. As a sophomore: She saw action in six contests, posting a .615 save percentage and a 5.45 goals against average. Those numbers were even better in two Ivy League contests, recording a .636 save percentage and a 4.36 goals against average. Charron came off the bench to pick up a comeback win at Harvard,

making five saves and allowing just two goals over the final 42 minutes of play. That came on the heels of a career-high six saves in a win at Colgate.

As a freshman: Charron saw time in five games off the bench, making six saves in 52 minutes of play. She had four saves as a reserve against Colgate. AtDarien Darien:Charronearnedthreeletterseachinfieldhockey and lacrosse and two in basketball at Darien HS. An honorablementionAll-Americanandanall-stateandallconferencepick,shewasamemberofthefour-timestate championship lacrosse team. In field hockey, she was a first-teamall-state,all-conferenceandall-divisionpick. CharronwasalsoanacademicAll-Americaselection. Personal Personal:AshleyAnneCharronisthedaughterofPauland Kathy Charron and has an older brother. Born: 7-17-82.

Danielle Friedman Defense • Sophomore • Setauket, N.Y. • 5-6 • Industrial and Labor Relations 23 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell Cornell: A smart and versatile athlete, Friedman will develop into a strong two-way player. A hard-working player, she has a natural ability to play defense and continues to fine tune her offensive skills. She is a student in Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

As a freshman: Friedman saw action in three contests, recording a ground ball.

RAPID FIRE WITH DANIELLE ... My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... be ready to have more fun than you’veeverhadbefore.Cornellisa greatplaceandbeingamemberof thisteamissomethingreallyspecial thatfewpeoplegettoexperience.

At Ward Melville: Melville Friedman was a two-time all-county selection and a three-year starter at Ward Melville HS. She was selected to play for the Long Island Elite Lacrosse Club in both 2000 and 2001 and participated

2003 Cornell 18 Women’s Lacrosse

in the Empire State Games in 2001 for the Suffolk County team. Her teams played for two county championships in her three varsity seasons. Friedman was a three-year letter winner in indoor track, earning allleague accolades for two seasons, and competed for two seasons in soccer. She was named the school’s outstanding athlete as both a junior and senior and was a member of both the National Honor Society and the Spanish Honor Society.

Personal Personal: Danielle Elizabeth Friedman is the daughter of Madelon and the late Richard Friedman and has an older brother. Born: 5-9-83.

www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET THE VETERANS

Kristen Smith

Midfield/Attack • Sophomore • Manlius, N.Y. • 5-4 • Undecided

25

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RAPID FIRE WITH KRISTEN ... My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... tospendasmuchtimeaspossible atCornellsoyouunderstandwhat a great fit it really will be for you.

As a freshman: Smith played in nine contests, scoring a pair of goals. She opened her collegiate career with a goal at Stanford and added a tally at Colgate. Smith also recorded six draw controls and five ground balls in limited action.

At Fayetteville-Manlius Fayetteville-Manlius: Smith was a high school AllAmerican as a senior at Fayetteville-Manlius HS after leading Section 3 in scoring and helping her team to its third consecutive league title. A four-sport athlete who also lettered in track, soccer and field hockey, Smith earned first team all-league lacrosse honors each of her final two seasons. Personal Personal: Kristen Elizabeth Smith is the daughter of Rick and Janet Smith and has a younger brother and sister. Born: 7-2-83.

Lindsay Steinberg Attack/Midfield• Soph. • Suffern, N.Y. • 5-6 • Applied Economics and Management 11 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell Cornell: A quick and strong midfielder who can play on either side of the field, Steinberg showed a knack for scoring off the bench as a rookie and will play a larger role on offense this season. Steinberg combines speed and power, along with the ability to drive to the goal and unleash her rocket shot. She is an applied economics and management major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

RAPID FIRE WITH LINDSAY ... My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... to choose Cornell because it is important not only to have a talented team, but to have one that can get along. Our team is fun,kindandquirky,whichmakes every practice awesome.

As a freshman: Steinberg scored nine points while seeing action in 17 contests off the bench. She had two-point games against Colgate, Delaware and Johns Hopkins, with two-goal efforts in each of the first two contests. She also scooped up 13 ground balls, was credited with nine draw controls and four caused turnovers.

Jessica Williams

At Suffern Suffern: Steinberg received honorable mention AllAmerica honors as a senior after helping her Suffern HS squad go 18-1-1. A four-year starter, she was a twotime all-league, all-county and all-section pick. She participated in the Empire State Games for the Hudson Valley team as a freshman and a sophomore before spending two seasons on New York’s National Lacrosse Team 1 squad. Steinberg also lettered for four seasons in tennis and one year in basketball. Personal Personal: Lindsay F. Steinberg is the daughter of Rick and Mindi Steinberg and has a younger brother and two younger sisters. Born: 3-18-83.

Midfield • Sophomore • Whitby, Ont. • 5-8 • Communication

18

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell Cornell: After a season of serving as a key reserve on defense, Williams will be asked to step up and take on a larger role. A strong defender who has good footwork and positioning, Williams gained valuable experience with Team Canada at the World Cup two years ago. A natural defender who also possesses a rocket shot, Williams will bring versatility to the Big Red lineup with her ability to contribute on both ends of the field. She is a communication major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

RAPID FIRE WITH JESSICA ... My advice to future Big Red recruits is ... to weigh options carefully, and consider the academic support, and the alumni connections and career opportunities that an Ivy League school can offer.

www.CornellBigRed.com

As a freshman: Williams saw action in seven contests as a reserve defender, recording a ground ball. She saw action in six of the team’s first eight contests, helping Cornell to a fourth-place national ranking in scoring defense.

At Henry Street High: High Williams competed on the World Cup circuit as one of the youngest members of the Canadian National Team, which competed at the World Cup in England in the summer of 2001. Prior to that summer, Williams was co-captain of the Canadian Under-19 World Cup Team that competed in Australia in 1999. Personal Personal: Jessica Madelaine Williams is the daughter of Bill and Jennifer Williams and has a younger brother and sister. Born: 5-16-82.

2003 Cornell 19 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET THE NEWCOMERS

Katherine Butler

Attack • Freshman • Richboro, Pa. • 5-6 • Undecided

30

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RAPID FIRE WITH KATHERINE ... I chose Cornell because ... I wanted a school with a great academic reputation where I had many options in course work and majors.Ialsowantedtoplayinawell established,successfulprogram.

At Cornell: A line attacker with good stick skills, Butler will fight for playing time in a crowded and talented front line. A great teammate who brings a positive attitude to each practice, Butler posseses the potential to be a contributor down the road for the Big Red. Butler is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

sophomore and the team’s most valuable player as a senior. Butler also captained the field hockey squad, earning all-conference honors each of her final two seasons. The attacker was given the school’s Class of 1980 Award as the student who does the most to bring about unity among the senior class.

At Penn Charter: Butler was a three-year allconference selection and the team’s top scorer as a senior at Penn Charter High. She was named the team’s most improved player as a

Personal: Katherine A. Butler is the daughter of Paul and Roberta Butler and has a younger brother and two younger sisters. Born: 3-22-84.

Maggie Fava

Goalkeeper • Freshman • Timonium, Md. • 5-4 • Undecided

28

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: An athletic keeper, Fava has rapidly developed as a potential starter for the Big Red. With her quickness and reflexes, she can make up for a lack of size in the cage and is extremely quick off her line. Fava is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

At Garrison Forest: An honorable mention AllAmerica selection as a senior, Fava was a two-

time all-conference selection at Garrison Forest High. She earned honor roll status all four years of high school and was given the team’s Butch Darrell Unsung Hero Award.

Personal: Maggie Wallhofer Fava is the daughter of Don and Cheryl Fava and has an older brother who was a four-year letter winner in lacrosse at Hampden-Sydney College. Born: 3-30-84.

RAPID FIRE WITH MAGGIE ... The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... the individual attention they are willing to give me, in and out of practice.

Lisa Giugliano

Attack • Freshman • Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. • 5-2 • Communication

4

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RAPID FIRE WITH LISA ... The thing I like most about Cornell is ... ThediversityofCornellasawholeis wonderful.Cornellpridesitselfonthe notionthateverypersonshouldfeel comfortablebeingthemselves,and that is the standard at our school.

At Cornell: Giugliano brings exceptional speed and quickness to the attack. Her strong stick skills and ability to see the field will be a plus for the Big Red on offense and she brings instant energy to the field. Giugliano is a communication major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

seasons and played for the Long Island team at the 2001 Empire State Games. A four-sport athlete, Giugliano also competed in track and field, cross country and soccer. Her soccer team won three state crowns before she switched to cross country as a senior and earned all-conference honors.

At Cold Spring Harbor: A five-year letter winner and two-year captain at Cold Spring Harbor HS, Giugliano is a two-year member of the New York State national lacrosse team. She earned all-conference accolades each of the past three

Personal: Lisa Anne Giugliano is the daughter of William and Paula Giugliano and has two brothers and a younger sister, Lauren, who will play lacrosse for the Big Red next season. Born: 11-2183.

2003 Cornell 20 Women’s Lacrosse

www.CornellBigRed.com


MEET THE NEWCOMERS

Kate Harrold

Defense • Freshman • Elverson, Pa. • 5-9 • Fine Arts

29

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RAPID FIRE WITH KATE ... I chose Cornell because ... it offered a well-rounded education and an awesome lacrosse program. Also, the people I met here were amazing.

At Cornell: Coming off ACL surgery last year, Harrold has made strides in her return to the field. A tall and quick defender, she has good positioning on defense and is aggressive with the ball. Harrold is a fine arts major in Cornell’s College of Architecture, Art, and Planning.

her squad to the finals both years. After leading her squad to a state crown as a junior, Harrold earned first-team all-conference accolades. She was the recipient of several postgraduate scholarships, including honors for departmental excellence in art.

At Owen J. Roberts: A three-year letter winner and all-league defender at Owen J. Roberts HS, Harrold has participated in Pennsylvania’s Keystone Games each of the last two years, helping

Personal: Katherine R. Harrold is the daughter of Andrew and Lois Harrold and has two younger brothers.Born:1-25-84.

Jenn Malm

Attack • Freshman • Centreville, Va. • 5-8 • Communication

10

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: Malm is a candidate to feed the offense from behind the net, possessing an accurate shot and good field vision. Malm’s playing time will increase as she gets stronger because of her feel for the game. Malm is a communication major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

RAPID FIRE WITH JENN ... After graduation I would like to ... live in New York City and work for ESPN or another major sports magazine.

At Centreville: A three-time All-American and the career scoring leader in Northern Virginia (191 goals, 71 assists), Malm helped her

Lyndsay Robinson

Centreville HS team to a pair of state titles, earning all-district honors all four seasons. Malm was a tri-captain and regional player of the year in 2002. Her father, Gary, was part of the 1976 and 1977 Big Red national championship men’s lacrosse teams.

Personal: Jennifer Lynn Malm is the daughter of Gary and Barbara Malm and has a younger sister.Born:11-7-83.

Midfield • Freshman • Marlton, N.J. • 5-8 • Undecided

19

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RAPID FIRE WITH LYNDSAY ... The things I like most about Cornell is ... the great people I’ve met here, because I know that these are the people I will be friends with for the rest of my life.

www.CornellBigRed.com

At Cornell: An ever-improving player with unlimited potential, Robinson is an instinctive player on the field. With good size and strength, Robinson is an immediate weapon on both offense and defense. Her competitiveness has also been instrumental in working her way up the depth chart. Robinson’s savvy and composure with the ball will also help key Cornell’s transition game. Robinson is enrolled in Cornell’s College of Engineering.

At Cherokee: A four-year letter winner at Cherokee HS, Robinson led her school to a pair of division crowns. Robinson was two-year captain and three-time all-conference pick who was selected All-South Jersey as a senior. She was honored as a Super Chief Award recipient all four seasons for maintaining a grade point average of 3.5 or above while also playing a varsity sport. Personal: Lyndsay M. Robinson is the daughter of Dennis and Mary Robinson and has an older brother and younger sister. Born: 6-15-84.

2003 Cornell 21 Women’s Lacrosse


MEET THE NEWCOMERS Allison Schindler

Midfield/Attack • Freshman • Lutherville, Md. • 5-6 • Human Development

21

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: A versatile player who can see time at any position, Schindler is the complete package. Deceptively strong and quick, she has the potential to be a top scorer and defender in the Big Red’s schemes. She will play a larger role as she picks up nuances of the Division I game. Schindler is a human development major in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology.

RAPID FIRE WITH ALLISON ...

At St. Paul’s School For Girls: A three-sport letter winner at St. Paul’s School, Schindler was a

four-year Baltimore All-Star Lacrosse team member. Schindler was a Towson Times honorable mention all-star in lacrosse as a senior and also competed in basketball and field hockey. She helped lead her field hockey team to a league title as a senior en route to earning first-team allcity and all-county honors.

Personal: Allison Marie Schindler is the daughter of Howard and Liz Schindler and has an older brother.Born:10-12-83.

The thing I appreciate most about Cornell’s coaching staff is ... Their dedication to the team, and their understanding of academic demands.

Liz Shaner

Midfield/Defense • Freshman • Gwynedd Valley, Pa. • 5-3 • Biology and Society

7

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• At Cornell: Shaner brings tenacious defense and a tremendous work ethic to the midfield. She uses her composure with the ball and field vision to trigger Cornell’s transition game, while her exceptional speed will help in defending quicker players on defense. Shaner is a biology and society major in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

RAPID FIRE WITH LIZ ... My goals for the season are ... to learn from the coaching staff and the upper classmen, while improving my defensive skills.

At Germantown Academy: A two-sport star at Germantown Academy, Shaner served as captain for both the soccer and lacrosse teams.

Rachel Spoonhower

Shaner was also a two-time all-league pick in lacrosse. Off the field, Shaner earned the Osborne Memorial Award as a sophomore and the Blazer Pin Award as a junior, symbolizing the top female student-athlete at Germantown.

Personal: Elizabeth Moody Shaner is the daughter of Robert and Eileen Shaner. Her older brother played four seasons of hockey at Penn State, while her older sisters played lacrosse at Princeton and Franklin and Marshall. Born: 10-19-83.

Midfield • Freshman • Webster, N.Y. • 5-8 • Biological Sciences

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RAPID FIRE WITH RACHEL ... I chose Cornell beacuse ... of its wide variety of subjects to study, numerous activities to do, and its diversity in people and cultures.

At Cornell: Spoonhower impressed the coaches right from the beginning of the fall with her work ethic and eagerness to learn. That will pay off as Spoonhower moves from attack to midfield to take advantage of her aggressiveness on defense.Aversatileplayerblessedwithgoodstrength and size, she brings boundless energy to the field. Spoonhower is a biological sciences major in Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. At Webster: An All-America selection as a senior, Spoonhower was a three-time all-county pick

2003 Cornell 22 Women’s Lacrosse

at Webster HS. She was a member of the Western team at the 2001 Empire State Games, helping her team to a bronze medal. A four-year letter winner and team captain as a senior, Spoonhower played for the New York State Lacrosse Team at the National School Girls’ Tournament each of the last three years.

Personal: Rachel Elizabeth Spoonhower is the daughter of Thomas and Susan Spoonhower. Her brother, Ben, is a member of the Big Red men’s lacrosse team. Born: 12-31-83.

www.CornellBigRed.com


2003 CORNELL ROSTERS Numerical Roster

No. Name 3 ** Sarah Fischer 4 Lisa Giugliano 5 *** Rachel Friedman 7 Liz Shaner 10 Jenn Malm 11 Lindsay Steinberg 12 * Katie Hirschfield 13 Annie Berkery 16 * Jamie Quinn 18 Jessica Williams 19 Lyndsay Robinson 20 ** Katie Lavin 21 Allison Schindler 22 Ashley Charron 23 Danielle Friedman 24 * Julia Hughey 25 Kristen Smith 26 *** Sarah Averson 28 Maggie Fava 29 Kate Harrold 30 Katherine Butler 31 Abby Beyer 32 *** Erica Holveck 35 Rachel Spoonhower

Pos. A A D M/D A A/M M/A D M/A M M M/D M/A G D M M/A A G D A D M/D M

Cl. Sr. Fr. Sr. Fr. Fr. So. Jr. So. Jr. So. Fr. Sr. Fr. Jr. So. So. So. Sr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Sr. Sr. Fr.

Ht. 5-5 5-2 5-4 5-3 5-8 5-6 5-5 5-7 5-11 5-8 5-8 5-9 5-6 5-9 5-6 5-10 5-4 5-4 5-4 5-9 5-6 5-8 5-5 5-8

School Cleveland Heights HS Cold Spring Harbor HS Syosset HS Germantown Academy Centreville HS Suffern HS Sacred Heart Academy Middlesex School Wantagh HS Henry Street HS Cherokee HS Upper Dublin HS St. Paul’s School for Girls Darien HS Ward Melville HS Dulaney HS Fayetteville-Manlius HS Fayetteville-Manlius HS Garrison Forest HS Owen J. Roberts HS Penn Charter HS Owen J. Roberts HS Mountain Lakes HS Webster HS

Hometown Cleveland Heights, Ohio Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. Syosset, N.Y. Gwynedd Valley, Pa. Centreville, Va. Suffern, N.Y. Oyster Bay, N.Y. Osterville, Mass. Wantagh, N.Y. Whitby, Ont. Marlton, N.J. Fort Washington, Pa. Lutherville, Md. Darien, Conn. Setauket, N.Y. Cockeysville, Md. Manlius, N.Y. Manlius, N.Y. Timonium, Md. Elverson, Pa. Richboro, Pa. Phoenixville, Pa. Denville, N.J. Webster, N.Y.

*letters won Head Coach: Jenny Graap (Cornell ‘86), sixth year Assistant Coaches: Phil Barnes (Assumption ‘95), Laurie Tortorelli (Delaware ‘02) Volunteer Assistant Coach: Beth Calder (Cornell ‘03) Athletic Trainer: Allison Sampson Captains: Rachel Friedman ‘03, Erica Holveck ‘03

Alphabetical Roster No. 26 13 31 30 22 28 3 23 5 4 29 12 32 24 20 10 16 19 21 7 25 35 11 18

Name Averson, Sarah Berkery, Annie Beyer, Abby Butler, Katherine Charron, Ashley Fava, Maggie Fischer, Sarah Friedman, Danielle Friedman, Rachel Giugliano, Lisa Harrold, Kate Hirschfield, Kate Holveck, Erica Hughey, Julia Lavin, Katie Malm, Jenn Quinn, Jaime Robinson,Lyndsay Schindler, Allison Shaner, Liz Smith, Kristen Spoonhower, Rachel Steinberg, Lindsay Williams, Jessica

www.CornellBigRed.com

Pos. A D D A G G A D D A D M/A M/D M M/D A M/A M M/A M/D M/A M A/M M

Breakdown By Class:

Cl. Sr. So. Sr. Fr. Jr. Fr. Sr. So. Sr. Fr. Fr. Jr. Sr. So. Sr. Fr. Jr. Fr. Fr. Fr. So. Fr. So. So.

Senior (6)—Sarah (6) Averson, Abby Beyer, Sarah Fischer, Rachel Friedman, Erica Holveck, Katie Lavin. Junior (3)—Ashley (3) Charron, Kate Hirschfield, Jaime Quinn. Sophomore (6)—Annie (6) Berkery, Danielle Friedman, Julia Hughey, Kristen Smith, Lindsay Steinberg, Jessica Williams. Freshman (9)—Katherine (9) Butler, Maggie Fava, Lisa Giugliano, Kate Harrold, Jenn Malm, Lyndsay Robinson, Allison Schindler, Liz Shaner, Rachel Spoonhower.

Breakdown By Position:

Attack (6)—Sarah (6) Averson, Katherine Butler, Sarah Fischer, Lisa Giugliano, Jenn Malm, Lindsay Steinberg. Midfield (11)—Kate (11) Hirschfield, Erica Holveck, Julia Hughey, Katie Lavin, Jaime Quinn, Lyndsay Robinson, Allison Schindler, Liz Shaner, Kristen Smith, Rachel Spoonhower, Jessica Williams. Defense (5)—Annie (5) Berkery, Abby Beyer, Danielle Friedman, Rachel Friedman, Kate Harrold. Goalkeepers (2)—Ashley (2) Charron, Maggie Fava.

pro-nun-see-AY-shun Guide Berkery ........................ BURKE-ery Charron ......................... SHARON Fava ............................... FAH-vah Giugliano .................. julee-AH-no

Graap ................................. GRAP Lavin ............................... LAH-vin Shaner ........................... SHAY-ner Spoonhower ............. SPOON-hour 2003 Cornell 23 Women’s Lacrosse


LACROSSE SUPPORT STAFF Allison Sampson Athletic Trainer

Allison Sampson begins her third year as the athletic trainer for Cornell women’s lacrosse. A certified athletic trainer, Sampson began working as a graduate assistant at Cornell four years ago, overseeing the field hockey and women’s ice hockey teams. She was hired as an assistant athletic trainer in August 2000 and continues to work with field hockey along with women’s lacrosse. A graduate of Merrimack College with a degree in sports medicine, Sampson was the head student trainer for volleyball and men’s basketball and also assisted with the men’s soccer and lacrosse teams. Additionally, she worked as a certified nursing assistant for Healthsouth Braintree Rehabilitation Hospital during the summers from 1995-99. She interned at Duke University during summer of 2000, doing research for the Smart Heart study, which examines the relationship between mental stress and coronary artery disease. The study was designed to evaluate the benefits of exercise training and stress management programs. Sampson completed her master’s degree in exercise and sport science at Ithaca College in the spring of 2001and is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.

Bobbi Peckarsy Faculty Adviser

Professor Bobbi Peckarsky begins her fifth year as the faculty adviser for Cornell women’s lacrosse. A Cornell faculty member in the Department of Entomology since 1979, she teaches courses in stream ecology, freshwater invertebrate biology and aquatic ecology. Her research, which focuses on the behavior, ecology and evolution of stream invertebrates and their use in monitoring stream habitat quality, is conducted in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Western Colorado during the summer and in central New York streams during the academic year. Peckarsky earned her bachelor’s (1969), master’s (1971) and Ph.D. (1979) in zoology from the University of WisconsinMadison. A native of Milwaukee, Wis., Peckarsky and her husband, Steve Horn, reside in Ithaca with their children, Bryan and Alison, both of whom are active lacrosse players.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE OPERATIONS STAFF Renee Milligan

Administrative Assistant

Jaime Quinn

Matt Coats

Operations Manager

2003 Cornell 24 Women’s Lacrosse

www.CornellBigRed.com


www.CornellBigRed.com

2003 Cornell 25 Women’s Lacrosse


2002 SEASON REVIEW Some teams are special. They exude inner confidence and find a way to win no matter what the odds. Any season that ends in a Final Four appearance is one to remember, but for the 2002 Cornell women’s lacrosse team, the season was so much more than advancing through the NCAA tournament. A team that featured seven seniors who changed the fortunes of a program was rewarded with the greatest season in school history. There are so many reasons to call the 2002 season simply the best ever: a 16-2 record, blitzing the previous record for wins in a season (13). An undefeated home record (80); four All-Americans; seven All-Ivy selections; an Ivy Player of the Year and national player of the year finalist, and the national coach of the year. While accomplishments and accolades resound, numbers and awards can’t fully recognize the toughness of a team that won four one-goal games, the talent to win eight games over ranked teams and the boldness to snap Maryland’s seven-year stretch of national titles, by 10 goals no less, for just its second NCAA tournaWith help from this goal by Sarah Averson, the Big Red ended Maryland’s ment win. reign of seven consecutive NCAA titles with a 14-4 win over the Terps The Big Red’s run to the final four was a memoto advance to the national semifinals. The win also closed out the rable one … one that won’t soon be forgotten. program’s first perfect home record, going 8-0 at Schoellkopf Field.

2003 Cornell 26 Women’s Lacrosse

Jaimee Reynolds

Carrie Giancola

Second Team Sarah Averson

Second Team

GRAAP NAMED NATIONAL COACH OF THE YEAR Head coach Jenny Graap was named national coach of the year by the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) in a vote of the organization’s membership. Graap was also honored as the North Region coach of the year by the IWLCA and InsideLacrosse magazine. The 2002 Big Red team set school records for wins (16), consecutive wins (11), victories over ranked opponents (8), winning percentage (.889), conference wins (6) and highest conference finish (second). Utilizing her first full recruiting class (including seven senior starters) as the core of the squad, Graap guided Cornell to four one-goal victories. Graap won her 50th game at Cornell during the 2002 season, becoming the second coach in the Big Red’s 30-year history to reach that milestone. Her .709 winning percentage in five seasons currently ranks at the top of the school chart.

Four Big Red players earned All-America honors, including first-team selection for Jaimee Reynolds, making her just the third Big Red student-athlete to earn All-America honors for four consecutive seasons.

First Team

WOHLSCHLEGEL SETS CAREER ASSIST RECORD Lori Wohlschlegel’s three assists in the win over Brown on April 12 pushed her past Linda Miller ‘84 as the school’s career leader with 60. She ended her career with 69 in her four seasons. Wohlschlegel led the team with 18 assists, while her four-assist performance against Syracuse in the NCAA first round was the most by a Big Red player in 2002. Wohlschlegel finished her career ranked third in career points (177) and fourth in career goals (108).

Cornell’s 2002 AllAmerica Selections

Second Team

AVERSON NAMED TO U.S. DEVELOPMENTAL TEAM Sarah Averson earned a spot on the United States Women’s Lacrosse Developmental team last summer. A total of 86 players participated in the tryouts. U.S. Elite head coach Sue Stahl (current head coach at Old Dominion) and U.S. Developmental head coach Sue Murphy (current head coach at Richmond) and a committee of selectors madethefinaldecisions.

Erica Holveck www.CornellBigRed.com


2002 SEASON REVIEW Jaimee Reynolds

The true definition of a scholar-athlete, Jaimee Reynolds graduated as one of the all-time greats in Cornell athletics history. A four-time All-American (just the third Cornellian in any sport to achieve that honor) and national player of the year candidate as a senior, Reynolds lettered in both lacrosse and volleyball, all the while maintaining her academic excellence. Reynolds earned her degree in agricultural and biological engineering, earning firstteam Verizon Academic All-America honors twice and Academic All-Ivy three times. The Ivy League Lacrosse Player of the Year in 2002, Reynolds graduated as the holder of 11 individual school records. Listed below are the records and awards won by Reynolds in her four seasons of Big Red lacrosse. Reynolds’ Awards

NCAA Woman of the Year finalist (2002) NCAA New York Woman of the Year (2002) Tewaaraton Player of the Year Watch List (2002) Honda Award Finalist (2002) IWLCA All-America first team (2002) IWLCA All-America third team (1999-01) Inside Lacrosse All-America first team (2002) IWLCA All-Region first team (1999-02) Ivy League Player of the Year (2002) All-Ivy first team (2000-02) All-Ivy second team (1999) NCAA All-Tournament (2002) Ivy Defensive POW (4 times) Reynolds receiving the Richie Ivy Offensive POW (2 times) Moran Red Key Leadership Verizon Academic All-America first team (2001-02) Award from Richie Moran. Verizon Academic All-District (2000-02) Academic All-Ivy (1999-02) IWLCA North-South All-Star Game (2002) Cornell’s Charles H. Moore Outstanding Senior Varsity Athlete Award (2002) Cornell Daily Sun Female Athlete of the Year (2002) Ithaca Journal Female Athlete of the Year (2002) Cornell’s Richie Moran Red Key Leadership Award Winner (2001)

Reynolds’ Records

Career Most points (204) Most goals (144) Most ground balls (275) Most draw controls (141) Most caused turnovers (113) Consecutive games with a point (65)

NCAA tournament Most goals in a game (tied-7 vs. Maryland)

Final (prior to NCAA tourney) 1. Princeton .............. 15-1 2. North Carolina ...... 15-2 3. Georgetown .......... 14-1 4. Virginia ................ 14-3 5. Loyola (Md.) .......... 15-3 6. CORNELL ............. 14-1 7. Notre Dame .......... 12-4 8. Duke ....................... 9-7 9. Maryland .............. 10-9 10. Vanderbilt ............. 10-5 11. Old Dominion ....... 13-5 12. James Madison ...... 8-10 13. Ohio State ............ 11-4 14. Syracuse ................ 10-5 15. Yale ...................... 11-5 16. Dartmouth ............ 10-6 17. Penn State .............. 8-9 18. Johns Hopkins ........ 10-7 19. George Mason ......... 9-9 20. Temple ................. 14-4

www.CornellBigRed.com

1. 2. 3.

Year 2002 1987 2001 1999

Games 11 games win vs. Dartmouth-loss vs. Georgetown 7 games win at Yale-loss vs. Harvard 6 games win at Penn State-loss vs. Princeton 6 games win vs. Ohio State-loss vs. Princeton

Cornell Win Streaks (overall) 1. 3.

Games 11 games 11 games 10 games

Dates 4/22/00 win vs. Yale-3/31/01 loss vs. Princeton 4/6/02 win vs. Dartmouth-5/17 loss vs. Georgetown 5/2/86 win vs. Oneonta-4/18/87 loss vs. Harvard

GIANCOLA SETS CAREER SAVES MARK GoalkeeperCarrieGiancolaenteredher“Senior Day” game against Yale needing one save to match Lori Wick ‘81 as the school’s all-time leader in saves. Instead of quietly recording that one save to break the record, Giancolaputonashow,registeringacareerbest20stopsandendedhercareerwith471. Thetwo-timefirst-teamAll-Ivyselectionalso ranks sixth in goals against average (7.50) and ninth in save percentage (.542). BIG RED SEE SIX EARN ALL-REGION HONORS The Big Red placed a school-record six players on the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association North Region teams, including four on the first team. Midfielder Jaimee Reynolds made her fourth consecutive appearance on the first team and was joined by junior attack Sarah Averson, senior goalkeeper Carrie Giancola and junior defender Erica Holveck. Senior attack Lori Wohlschlegel and senior defender Kari Zarzecki each made appearances on the second team. ... AND SEVEN NAMED ALL-IVY Senior midfielder Jaimee Reynolds was named Ivy League Player of the Year, headlining seven Cornell women’s lacrosse players who were honoredinavotebytheleague’seightheadcoaches.Reynoldsbecomes the first Big Red player to earn Player of the Year and the second Cornell player(joiningTinaHennessey’93)tobenamedfirst-teamAll-Ivythree times. Joining Reynolds on the first-team from Cornell were junior attacker Sarah Averson and senior goalkeeper Carrie Giancola. Junior defenderEricaHolveckearnedsecond-teamstatus,whileseniorattack LoriWohlschlegel,juniorattackSarahFischerandseniordefenderKari ZarzeckiwerenamedhonorablementionAll-Ivy.

Season Most points (74) Most goals (57) Most ground balls (78) Most draw controls (43) Most caused turnovers (tie) 31

Inside Lacrosse Magazine Top 20

Cornell Win Streaks (one season)

IWLCA/ Brine Top 20

Final (prior to NCAA tourney) 1. Princeton .............. 15-1 2. Georgetown .......... 14-1 3. North Carolina ...... 15-2 4. Virginia ................ 14-3 5. Loyola (Md.) .......... 15-3 6. CORNELL ............. 14-1 7. Notre Dame .......... 12-4 8. Maryland .............. 10-9 9. Duke ....................... 9-7 10. Vanderbilt ............. 10-5 11. Yale ...................... 11-5 12. Ohio State ............ 11-4 13. Old Dominion ....... 13-5 14. James Madison ...... 8-10 15. Penn State .............. 8-9 16. Syracuse ................ 10-5 17. Dartmouth ............ 10-6 18. Johns Hopkins ........ 10-7 19. Temple ................. 14-4 20. George Mason ......... 9-9

BIG RED CLOSES 2002 UNBEATEN HOME SLATE Cornell’s 14-4 victory over Maryland in the NCAA quarterfinals put an exclamation point on the 2002 home slate as the Big Red advanced to its first Final Four and clinched its first-ever undefeated home schedule. Cornell went 8-0 at Schoellkopf Field, extending its home win streak to 12 games, the longest in the school’s annals. The Red went 6-0 against top 20 teams and won both games it hosted in the NCAA tournament. In all, the Big Red outscored its opponents 106-51 at home.

2003 Cornell 27 Women’s Lacrosse


2002 GAME SUMMARIES Game NO. 11 1

CORNELL 20, STANFORD 6

MARCH 2, 2002 — PALO ALTO, CALIF.

PALO ALTO, Calif. - Beth Calder had three goals and added two assists as Cornell easily won its season-opener, dropping Stanford 20-6. Jaimee Reynolds, Sarah Averson and Erica Holveck each added five points apiece as Cornell won its opener for the fourth consecutive year. Calder put on a career performance to lead seven Big Red players who talleid multi-point games. The Cardinal opened the scoring in the first half a little less than two minutes into the game, but the Big Red responded with four consecutive goals and never lost that lead. Cornell cruised to an 11-4 first half lead and never let the Cardinal back into the contest in the second half. Also coming up big for the Red on offense was Sarah Fischer (3 goals, 1 assist) and Jaime Quinn (3 goals). Cornell’s defense bottled up the Cardinal, holding Stanford to 12 shots on goal and forcing 16 turnovers. Carrie Giancola played a majority of the minutes in goal, stopping five shots and allowing five goals in 47 minutes of play. March 2 at Palo Alto, Calif. Cornell 11 9 — Stanford 4 2 —

20 6

Scoring: (C) Averson 4-1, Calder 3-2, Holveck 2-3, Reynolds 2-3, Fischer 3-1, Quinn 3-0, Hirschfield 2-0, Smith 1-0, Steinberg 0-1. (S) Pantano 2-0, Twist 1-1, Britt 1-0, C. Calzonetti 1-0, Pettit 1-0, J. Calzonetti 0-1, Scott 0-1.

CORNELL10,NO.15NOTREDAME9

Game NO.10 4

MARCH 19 19,, 2002 — SOUTH BEND BEND,, IND.

SOUTH BEND, Ind. - The Big Red raced out to an 8-3 halftime lead and the defense held off a late rally as No. 10 Cornell posted a 10-9 victory over No. 15 Notre Dame at Meyo Field. Jaimee Reynolds scored three goals and added an assist to lead seven Cornell goal scorers in the victory. Jaime Quinn was the only other multi-goal scorer with a pair to go along with an assist. Beth Calder and Sarah Averson each scored a goal and assisted on another. Carrie Giancola led the defense with six saves in the game, including several key stops during Notre Dame’s second half comeback. After a scoreless 10 minutes of play for both teams after the break, Notre Dame went on a 5-1 run to bring the Irish within 9-8 with 10 minutes remaining. Reynolds added an insurance goal to extend the lead to 10-8, but UND cut the deficit to one with 15 seconds left and called timeout. The Fighting Irish pulled their goalie in hopes of winning the draw control and putting a final shot on net, but the Big Red came up with the loose ball and ran out the clock for the victory. March 19 at South Bend, Ind. Cornell 8 2 — Notre Dame 3 6 —

10 9

Scoring: (C) Reynolds 3-1, Quinn 2-1, Averson 1-1, Calder 1-1, Fischer 1-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Steinberg 1-0. (N) Delano 2-1, Shearer 2-0, Simon 2-0, Fischer 1-0, Moser 1-0, Weille 1-0, Henwood 0-1, Loftus 0-1.

2003 Cornell 28 Women’s Lacrosse

Game 2

NO. 10

CORNELL 9, RUTGERS 5

MARCH 9, 2002 — PISCATAWAY PISCATAWAY,, N.J.

PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Sarah Fischer scored four goals and the Big Red used a stifling defensive effort to hold off a stubborn Rutgers squad, 9-5 at Rutgers Stadium Complex. Cornell extended its lead in the all-time series between the two teams to 6-0. Fischer also tallied an assist for a career-best fivepoint day. Jaimee Reynolds posted two second-half goals to extend her streak of consecutive games with least one point to 49. Sarah Averson and junior Katie Lavin also scored, while freshman Julia Hughey posted her first collegiate goal with a first-half tally. Carrie Giancola stopped seven shots in goal, and one goal allowed was an empty-net score after the senior was called for a foul outside the crease. Kate Slotman had a pair of goals to lead the Scarlet Knights on offense, but it was goalie Lauren Gulotta who kept Rutgers in the game. The school’s all-time leader in saves allowed just seven goals despite constant pressure, making 16 saves. The Big Red dominated possession throughout of the game, but struggled to find the back of the net despite its 34-13 advantage in shots. March 9 at Piscataway, N.J. Cornell 5 4 — Rutgers 2 3 —

9 5

Scoring: (C) Fischer 4-1, Reynolds 2-0, Averson 1-0, Hughey 1-0, Lavin 1-0, Holveck 0-1. (R) Slotman 2-0, Curiale 1-0, Mosey 1-0, Wojdyla 1-0.

Game 5

NO. 10

CORNELL 9, NO. 18 PENN 8

MARCH 23 23,, 2002 — ITHACA ITHACA,, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Sarah Fischer scored with just 32 seconds remaining as the Big Red held off No. 18 Pennsylvania 9-8 at Schoellkopf Field. The goal was the last of seven goals by the two teams in the final 10 minutes of play and the fourth in a span of two minutes. Fischer ended the afternoon with a pair of scores, while Sarah Averson led the squad with three goals and two assists and Jaimee Reynolds notched two goals and assisted on another. Seven different players tallied at least one point in the victory. Carrie Giancola stopped eight shots in goal while playing all 60 minutes for the Big Red. Cornell outshot Pennsylvania 2524 on the afternoon and won 12 of the 19 draw controls. The Big Red defense caused seven turnovers and hustled to 24 ground balls as Cornell knocked off its second consecutive top 20 opponent. Penn’s Jen Hartman had three goals to lead the Quakers, while Crissy Book had a pair of scores and Traci Marabella had two helpers in the loss. March 23 at Ithaca, N.Y. Pennsylvania 1 7 Cornell 5 4

— —

8 9

Scoring: (P) Hartman 3-0, Book 2-0, Marabella 0-2, Fishman 1-0, Murray 10, Polk-WIlliams 1-0, Cassidy 0-1. (C) Averson 3-2, Reynolds 2-1, Fischer 2-0, Hirschfield 1-0, McCorry 1-0, Calder 01, Graham 0-1.

Game NO. 10 3

CORNELL 16, COLUMBIA 4

MARCH 15 15,, 2002 — ITHACA ITHACA,, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - The Big Red came out fired up in its home opener, scoring five times in the first five minutes to put away Columbia early in a 16-4 victory at Schoellkopf Field. Jaimee Reynolds scored four goals and assisted on another, while Kate Hirschfield netted three goals and four total points. Cornell cruised to its largest margin of victory in a conference game since topping the Lions 15-3 during the 2000 campaign. Reynolds also extended her school-record streak of consecutive games with at least one point to 50 games with her five-point effort. The victory moved the Big Red’s alltime record to 6-0 against Columbia. Beth Calder contributed a pair of goals and an assist and both Katie McCorry and Sarah Averson found the back of the net twice. Cornell outshot the Lions 32-12 and converted on four of the seven free position shots it attempted. The Big Red also won 15 of the 22 draw controls. Carrie Giancola stopped three shots for Cornell and allowed two goals before being lifted for Ashley Charron. March 15 at Ithaca, N.Y. Columbia 1 3 Cornell 9 7

— —

4 16

Scoring: (Col) Moll 3-0, Via 1-1, Gilroy 0-1. (Cor) Reynolds 4-1, Hirschfield 31, Calder 2-1, Averson 2-0, McCorry 20, Champagne 1-0, Fischer 1-0, Wasson 1-0, Holveck 0-1, Zarzecki 0-1.

Game NO.2 6

PRINCETON16,NO.9CORNELL12 MARCH 30 30,, 2002 — PRINCETON PRINCETON,, N.J.

PRINCETON, N.J. - In a battle of top 10 teams, No. 2 Princeton went on an 11-3 run spanning the final 20 minutes of the first half and the first three minutes of the second period to go on to a 16-12 victory over No. 9 Cornell at the Class of 1952 Field. Sarah Averson and Jaimee Reynolds each scored four goals to lead the Big Red, while Sarah Fischer found the back of the net twice and Lori Wohlschlegel, in her second game back from a knee injury, recorded a pair of assists. Carrie Giancola stopped eight shots in goal for Cornell in the loss. The Tigers moved to 7-1 on the season thanks to four-goal, oneassist performances from both Theresa Sherry and Kim Smith. Lauren Simone added three goals. Sarah Kolodner and Megan McInnis split time in goal, stopping nine shots. Cornell jumped out to a 3-1 lead, but the Tigers responded with a run of their own, scoring eight of the last 11 goals to take a 9-6 lead into the locker room. Princeton came out eager to put the game away in the second period, scoring the first three goals to up its lead to an insurmountable 12-6 advantage. March 30 at Princeton, N.J. Cornell 6 6 — Princeton 9 7 —

12 16

Scoring: (C) Averson 4-0, Reynolds 4-0, Fischer 3-0, Wohlschlegel 0-2, Quinn 10. (P) Sherry 4-1, Smith 4-1, Hammerberg 2-2, Simone 3-0, Biles 10, Kenworthy 1-0, Miller 1-0, Pillion 01.

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2002 GAME SUMMARIES CORNELL14,NO.14DARTMOUTH6

Game NO.6 7

APRIL 66,, 2002 — ITHACA ITHACA,, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - The Big Red’s eight seniors have won 39 games in their careers, more than any other class at Cornell. They had set records, reached milestones, but had never defeated Dartmouth. And it was the seniors who decided they wouldn’t graduate without knowing that feeling, combining a quickstrike offense and a suffocating defense into a 14-6 victory over No. 14 Dartmouth at Schoellkopf Field. Carrie Giancola stopped 10 shots between the pipes, while Jaimee Reynolds and Lori Wohlschlegel each scored three goals and added an assist on the offensive end. Seniors Beth Calder assisted on a score, and the trio of Sarah Graham, Katie McCorry and Kari Zarzecki combined to force six turnovers on the defensive end. Jen Newitt scored four of the six goals for Dartmouth, while Whitney Jamison assisted on a pair of scores. Sarah Hughes made eight saves while playing all 60 minutes in goal. Cornell held advantages in nearly every major statistical category, including shots (22-15), ground balls (32-23) and caused turnovers (12-5). April 6 at Ithaca, N.Y. Dartmouth 2 Cornell 6

4 8

— —

6 14

Scoring: (D) Newitt 4-0, Jamison 0-2, Moulin 1-0, Smith 1-0. (C) Fischer 3-1, Reynolds 3-1, Wohlschlegel 3-1, Averson 2-1, Hughey 2-0, Quinn 1-1, Calder 0-1

Game NO. 6 10

CORNELL13, NO. 16 SYRACUSE6 APRIL 17 17,, 2002 — ITHACA ITHACA,, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell used a stifling defense to pull away from No. 16 Syracuse in the second half in a 13-6 victory over the Orangewomen at Schoellkopf Field. The Big Red had three different players record hat tricks and watched the defense force 16 turnovers to register the team’s fourth consecutive win. Jaimee Reynolds, Lori Wohlschlegel and Sarah Fischer each scored three goals, while Beth Calder chipped in with two scores. Carrie Giancola made five saves on the evening, moving her within one of tying Lori Wick’s career record of 404. Leigh-Ann Zimmer had two goals and an assist, while Jessica Trombley netted a pair of scores for the Orangewomen. Carla Gigon stopped 12 shots on the night to spearhead the SU defense. Syracuse’s leading goal scorer, All-American candidate Carrie Soults, was held scoreless for the first time this season. The Big Red outshot Syracuse 30-23, but put 25 shots on goal compared to just 11 for the Orangewomen. SU recorded more ground balls (33-26) and draw controls (1110). April 17 at Ithaca, N.Y. Syracuse 3 3 Cornell 5 8

— —

6 13

Scoring: (S) Zimmer 2-1, Trombley 20, Doran 1-0, Lillis 1-0, Wayne 0-1. (C) Fischer 3-0, Reynolds 3-0, Wohlschlegel 3-0, Calder 2-0, Averson 1-0, Quinn 10, Hirschfield 0-1.

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Game 8

NO. 5

CORNELL 13, BROWN 9

APRIL 12 12,, 2002 — PROVIDENCE PROVIDENCE,, R.I.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Cornell dominated after halftime as the Big Red held off a pesky Brown squad 13-9 at Stevenson Field. After trailing at halftime, the Big Red used an 83 advantage in the second 30 minutes to claim its fourth win in five road games this year. Lori Wohlschlegel posted a seasonhigh five points (2 goals, 3 assists) to lead the Big Red, while Sarah Averson tallied three goals and an assist. Jaime Quinn and Jaimee Reynolds also each recorded hat tricks. Carrie Giancola stopped five shots, including each of the last three shots she faced to claim the victory between the pipes. Cornell earned a season-high 40 ground balls and forced 15 turnovers in the contest, nearly double its season average. The Big Red earned possession after possession in the second half due to its ability to win the draw, earning 15-of-24 on the night, including 9of-12 after halftime. Sarah Graham and Katie McCorry each forced three turnovers to lead the defense, which allowed just over its average of 7.7 goals per game. April 12 at Providence, R.I. Cornell 5 8 Brown 6 3

— —

13 9

Scoring: (C) Wohlschlegel 2-3, Averson 3-1, Quinn 3-0, Reynolds 3-0, Calder 20, Hughey 0-1. (B) Russell 2-1, Goodell 2-0, Anneberg 1-0, Carlson 1-0, Pierpont 1-0, Rottenberg 1-0, Zabel 10, Bosich 0-1.

Game NO. 6 11

CORNELL 10, NO. 8 YALE 9 (OT)

APRIL 20, 2002 — ITHACA ITHACA,, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Sarah Averson scored on a free position goal with 11 seconds remaining in the first overtime to lift Cornell to a 10-9 victory over Yale at Schoellkopf Field. The Big Red saw a 94 lead with nine minutes remaining in regulation evaporate before righting itself in the extra period to collect the victory. Averson’s second goal of the contest made a winner out of goalkeeper Carrie Giancola, who dominated in stretches en route to becoming the school’s all-time leader in saves. She stopped a careerbest 20 shotsontheafternoon,pushingherpast Lori Wick’s previous total of 404. She ended the evening with 423. Jaimee Reynolds tallied six points on four goals and two assists, while Lori Wohlschlegel moved into third behind her classmate on the all-time scoring list with four points, giving her 158 for her career. Yale’s Katie Sargent scored five of the Bulldogs’ nine goals, including its first three of the contest. Sarah Queener notched a goal and two assists, while Sarah Driscoll scored twice. Yale’s leading goal scorer, Miles Whitman, was held off the scoreboard for the first 55 minutes and finished with just one goal. April 20 at Ithaca, N.Y. Yale 4 5 0 Cornell 5 4 1

— —

9 10

Scoring: (Y) Sargent 5-0, Queener 1-2, Driscoll 2-0, Cobbett 0-2, WHitman 10, Petrovick 0-1. (C) Reynolds 4-2, Wohlschlegel 3-1, Averson 2-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Fischer 0-1.

Game NO. 5 9

CORNELL11,BOSTONUNIV.8

APRIL 14 14,, 2002 — BOSTON BOSTON,, MASS.

BOSTON, Mass. - The Big Red received a big boost from goalkeeper Carrie Giancola in an 11-8 victory over Boston University at Nickerson Field. Giancola stopped a seasonhigh 14 shots, including nine in the decisive second half. Giancola stopped five shots in the first half as Cornell entered halftime with a slim 5-4 advantage. She came back in the second half and helped Cornell hold off an emotional BU team, which was playing on Senior Day. Her 14 saves on the day moved her within six of Lori Wick ’81 for the career saves record, currently at 398. She also scooped up a pair of ground balls. Lori Wohlschlegel led Cornell with three goals and three assists, her second consecutive three-assist game. Jaimee Reynolds and Beth Calder also chipped in with a pair of goals, as did Jamie Quinn. Goalkeepers were on display all afternoon, as senior keeper Brooke Barrett, the school’s all-time saves leader, stopped 11 shots. Ericka Hergenroeder tallied five of the Terriers’ eight goals and assisted on another. April 14 at Boston, Mass. Cornell 5 6 Boston Univ. 4 4

— —

11 8

Scoring: (C) Wohlschlegel 3-3, Calder 2-0, Quinn 2-0, Reynolds 2-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Hughey 1-0, Graham 0-1, Steinberg 0-1. (B) Hergenroeder 5-1, Abruzzese 2-0, Trahon 0-1, Trudel 0-1.

Game 12

CORNELL13,COLGATE 4 APRIL 23, 2002 — HAMILTON HAMILTON,, N.Y.

NO. 6

HAMILTON, N.Y. - Cornell raced out to an 80 lead just before halftime and cruised to a 13-4 win over Colgate at Tyler’s Field. The Big Red substituted liberally over the final 40 minutes of the contest on a freezing evening as all 27 Cornell players who dressed saw action and 11 different players scored. Lori Wohlschlegel scored three goals and added an assist, while both Lindsay Steinberg and Jaimee Reynolds each tallied a pair of goals. Sarah Averson added a goal and two assists. Cornell controlled the first half, jumping out to an 8-0 lead before the Raiders got their first shot on goal. Wohlschlegel scored three goals and assisted on another as six different Big Red players scored in the run. The lead climbed to 13-2 in the second half with 10 minutes remaining before Colgate scored the final two goals of the contest. Cornell outshot the Raiders 33-13 and won 14 of the 19 draw controls to dominate time of possession. April 23 at Hamilton, N.Y. Cornell 8 5 Colgate 1 3

— —

13 4

Scoring: (Cor) Wohlschlegel 3-1, Averson 1-2, Reynolds 2-0, Steinberg 2-0, Fischer 1-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Lavin 1-0, Quinn 1-0, Smith 1-0, Calder 0-1, Holveck 0-1. (Col) Houck 1-0, Manning 1-0, Sandler 1-0, Wilde 1-0, Hill 0-1.

2003 Cornell 29 Women’s Lacrosse


2002 GAME SUMMARIES Game 13

NO. 6

CORNELL9,HARVARD 8

APRIL 27, 2002 — BOSTON BOSTON,, MASS.

BOSTON, Mass. - Jaimee Reynolds showed why she is a three-time All-American, scoring four of the team’s five second-half goals and assisting on the other to bring Cornell back from a 7-4 halftime deficit for a 9-8 win over Harvard at Jordan Field. Reynolds added a pair of caused turnovers and five ground balls in the victory, while Sarah Fischer scored three times. The Big Red also received an outstanding effort from backup goalkeeper Ashley Charron, who played the final 42 minutes, allowing two goals while making five saves to collect her first career win between the pipes. Harvard exploded out of the gates to take a 4-1 lead just 4:05 into the contest with the Crimson connecting on its first four shots. Fischer single-handedly kept the Big Red in the contest with three first-half scores before Reynolds took over in the second half, netting three consecutive goals, the final coming with 9:14 remaining. Charron and the Cornell defense did the rest, holding Harvard scoreless for the final 17:13, including a point-blank save on a shot by the host’s Katie Shaughnessy as time expired. April 27 at Boston, Mass. Cornell 4 5 Harvard 7 1

— —

9 8

Scoring: (C) Reynolds 4-1, Fischer 3-0, Averson 1-0, Quinn 1-0, Holveck 0-1. (H) Kutner 3-0, Christino 0-2, Belitsos 1-0, Clark 1-0, O’Brien 1-0, Shaughnessy 1-0, Walton 1-0.

NCAA NO. 6 1st Rd.

CORNELL16,NO.16SYRACUSE8 MAY 9, 2002 — ITHACA, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Jaimee Reynolds scored four goals and assisted on two others as Cornell answered a quick Syracuse start with a stronger finish, advancing to the 2002 NCAA women’s lacrosse quarterfinals with a 16-8 victory over the Orangewomen at Schoellkopf Field. Reynolds’ four goals pushed her to a pair of Cornell records, setting marks for season (48) and career (135) goals. She added three ground balls, three draw controls and a pair of caused turnovers to the cause. Lori Wohlschlegel added a goal and four assists, and Sarah Averson and Jaime Quinn each tallied hat tricks. Carrie Giancola made nine saves and allowed seven goals before being lifted with three minutes left. Senior Carrie Soults led the Orange offense with four goals, including the first two tallies of the game for Syracuse. Kim Wayne added a goal and an assist as the only other multipoint scorer. Carla Gigon played all 60 minutes in goal, making 10 saves and allowing all 16 scores. May 9 at Ithaca, N.Y. Syracuse 3 Cornell 7

5 9

— —

8 16

Scoring: (S) Soults 4-0, Wayne 1-1, Palladino 1-0, Trombley 1-0, Zimmer 1-0, Lillis 0-1. (C) Reynolds 4-2, Wohlschlegel 1-4, Averson 3-0, Quinn 3-0, McCorry 2-0, Calder 1-1, Fischer 1-0, Holveck 1-0.

2003 Cornell 30 Women’s Lacrosse

Game NO. 6 14

CORNELL 14, DELAWARE 6 MAY 1, 2002 — ITHACA, N.Y.

ITHACA, N.Y. -Jaimee Reynolds scored a season-high five goals and chipped in with an assist to set the school’s career points record as Cornell defeated Delaware 14-6 at Schoellkopf Field. With her six-point effort, Reynolds surpassed Cari Hills’ record of 180 and ended the contest with 184. In the process, she helped the Big Red tie the school record for most wins in school history (13), set the program’s longest win streak in a season (8) and cap the school’s first undefeated home slate (6-0). Reynolds added six ground balls and three caused turnovers to the cause as nine different Big Red players tallied at least one point. Sarah Averson scored a pair of goals and recorded an assist, while Beth Calder had a goal and two helpers. Carrie Giancola made eight saves, including stopping six of the first eight shots as Cornell built a comfortable lead over the Blue Hens. Delaware was led by Corinne Shuck’s twogoal, one-assist performance and goalkeeper Laurie Tortorelli’s 14 saves. May 1 at Ithaca, N.Y. Delaware 2 Cornell 6

4 8

— —

6 14

Scoring: (D) Shuck 2-1, Edell 1-1, Zane 1-1, Campolettano 1-0, O’Connor 1-0. (C) Reynolds 5-1, Averson 2-1, Calder 1-2, Steinberg 2-0, Fischer 1-0, McCorry 1-0, Quinn 1-0, Hughey 0-1, Wohlschlegel 0-1.

NCAA NO. 6 Qtrs.

CORNELL14,NO.8MARYLAND4 MAY 12, 2002 — ITHACA, N.Y.

CORNELL15,NO.18JOHNSHOPKINS8

Game NO.6 15

MAY 4, 2002 — BALTIMORE, MD.

BALTIMORE, Md. - The Big Red jumped out to a 10-1 halftime lead and coasted to a 158 victory at No. 18 Johns Hopkins. The win improved Cornell’s record to 14-1, setting a school record for most triumphs in a season, and extended the team’s school-record win streak to nine games. Jamie Quinn notched a career-best four goals, including the final three goals of the game after Hopkins cut Cornell’s lead to six with seven minutes remaining. Sarah Fischer chipped in with three goals and an assist and Lori Wohlschlegel netted a pair of scores. Katie McCorry and Lindsay Steinberg each had a goal and an assist in the win. Jaimee Reynolds, in her return to her hometown, scored a goal and added two assists. Reynolds dominated on both ends of the field during the first half and ended the afternoon with seven ground balls and four caused turnovers. The Big Red held advantages in nearly every statistical category, including shots (31-24), draw controls (13-11) and caused turnovers (11-4). May 4 at Baltimore, Md. Cornell 10 5 Johns Hopkins 1 7

— —

15 8

Scoring: (C) Quinn 4-0, Fischer 3-1, Reynolds 1-2, Wohlschlegel 2-0, McCorry 1-1, Steinberg 1-1, Averson 10, Holveck 1-0, Lavin 1-0. (J) Barcomb 3-0, Pearce 1-2, Burnett 1-0, Holland 1-0, Riordan 1-0, Wellner 1-0, Larrimore 0-1.

GEORGETOWN12,NO.6CORNELL10

NCAA NO.2 Semis

MAY 17, 2002 — BALTIMORE, MD.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Jaimee Reynolds blitzed the Terrapins for seven goals and two assists as the Big Red knocked off Maryland 14-4 at Schoellkopf Field to advance to its first-ever women’s lacrosse Final Four. Reynolds, who added eight ground balls and a caused turnover, broke the school’s single-season scoring total and ended the afternoon with 72 points for the season. She also became the first Cornell player to surpass the 200-point career mark with 202 points. The 2002 Ivy League Player of the Year extended her streak of consecutive games with a point to 64 and both her goal and point total fell one shy of Cornell single-game records. Her seven goals is tied for second in NCAA tournament history. While Reynolds was dominant, she was by no means alone. Sarah Averson had three goals and Lori Wohlschlegel had a goal and two assists. Carrie Giancola stood behind an aggressive defense and was an intimidating last line of defense, saving 12 of the 16 shots Maryland put on goal. May 12 at Ithaca, N.Y. Maryland 3 1 — 4 Cornell 7 7 — 14

BALTIMORE, Md. - The Big Red showed the heart of a champion, but the breaks went to the top-seeded Georgetown Hoyas, as the Big East champion won 12-10 in overtime at Curley Field. In arguably one of the most exciting games in the history of the national tournament, Cornell trailed 3-0 early and faced a two-goal deficit on six occasions, but rallied to tie the game five times. Unfortunately, the Red couldn’t come back a sixth. Lori Wohlschlegel led the Big Red with three first-half goals to bring the squad into a 4-4 tie at the half. Wohlschlegel missed much of the second half with an ankle injury. She attempted to play after the injury, but was taken off the field and did not return. Sarah Fischer and Jaimee Reynolds also scored two goals apiece, while Katie McCorry had three caused turnovers and four ground balls to go along with a goal and an assist. McCorry and Reynolds were named to the NCAA AllTournament team. In goal, Carrie Giancola stopped eight shots.

Scoring: (M) Leggio 2-0, Hobbs 1-0, Judd 1-0, Collins 0-1, Coppedge 0-1. (C) Reynolds 7-2, Averson 3-0, Wohlschlegel 1-2, Calder 1-0, Fischer 1-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Holveck 0-1, McCorry 0-1.

Scoring: (C) Wohlschlegel 3-0, Fischer 2-0, Reynolds 2-0, McCorry 1-1, Calder 1-0, Hirschfield 1-0, Quinn 0-1. (G) Ahearn 2-0, Lozano 2-0, Peters 2-0, Stanwick 2-0, Ryan 1-1, Bernier 1-0, Elbe 1-0, Ellers 1-0, Weickel 0-1.

May 17 at Baltimore, Md. Cornell 4 6 0 — Georgetown 4 6 2 —

10 12

www.CornellBigRed.com


2002 RESULTS Result W, 20-6 W, 9-5 W, 16-4 * W, 10-9 W, 9-8 * L, 12-16 * W, 14-6 * W, 13-9 * W, 11-8 W, 13-6 W, 10-9 (OT) * W, 13-4 W, 9-8 * W, 14-6 W, 15-8 W, 16-8 $ W, 14-4 $ L,10-12(OT) #

Opponent at Stanford (March 2) at Rutgers (March 9) COLUMBIA (March 15) at No. 15 Notre Dame (March 19) No. 18 PENNSYLVANIA (March 23) at No. 2 Princeton (March 30) No. 14 DARTMOUTH (April 6) at Brown (April 12) at Boston University (April 14) No. 16 SYRACUSE (April 17) No. 8 YALE (April 20) at Colgate (April 23) at Harvard (April 27) DELAWARE (May 1) at No. 18 Johns Hopkins (May 4) No. 16 SYRACUSE (May 9) No. 8 MARYLAND (May 12) No. 2 vs. Georgetown (May 17)

AND

STATISTICS

Scoring Leader(s) four players with five points Fischer (4-1) Reynolds (4-1) Reynolds (3-1) Averson (3-2) Averson (4-0) three players with four points Wohlschlegel (2-3) Wohlschlegel (3-3) three players with three points Reynolds (4-2) Wohlschlegel (3-1) Reynolds (4-1) Reynolds (5-1) Quinn (4-0), Fischer (3-1) Reynolds (4-2) Reynolds (7-2) Wohlschlegel (3-0)

Saves Leader(s) Giancola - 6, Charron - 2 Giancola - 8 Giancola - 3, Charron - 2 Giancola - 6 Giancola - 8 Giancola - 8 Giancola - 9 Giancola - 5 Giancola - 14 Giancola - 5 Giancola - 20 Charron - 6, Giancola - 1 Charron - 5, Giancola - 3 Giancola - 8 Giancola - 7, Charron - 1 Giancola - 9, Charron - 1 Giancola - 12 Giancola - 8

* - Ivy League games $ - NCAA first round and quarterfinal (Schoellkopf Field, Ithaca, N.Y.) # - NCAA semifinal (Curley Field, Baltimore, Md.)

Individual Statistics

Name Jaimee Reynolds Sarah Averson Lori Wohlschlegel Sarah Fischer Jaime Quinn Beth Calder KateHirschfield Erica Holveck Katie McCorry Lindsay Steinberg Julia Hughey Katie Lavin Kristen Smith Sarah Graham Lauren Champagne Kristy Wasson Kari Zarzecki Carrie Giancola RachelFriedman Abby Beyer Jessica Williams Ashley Charron Heather Galey Danielle Friedman Annie Berkery Allison Bisset Sara Simmons Cornell Totals Opponent Totals

GP-GS 18-18 18-18 14-12 18-18 18-17 18-15 18-11 18-17 18-18 17-0 13-0 18-5 9-0 18-18 2-0 3-0 18-18 18-18 17-14 12-0 7-0 6-0 4-0 3-0 2-0 2-0 2-0 18-18 18-18

G 57 34 25 32 23 16 12 4 8 6 4 3 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 228 136

A Pts. 17 74 9 43 18 43 5 37 3 26 10 26 2 14 8 12 3 11 3 9 2 6 0 3 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 311 45 181

FPS Sh 7x13 101 12x20 100 5x13 57 2x12 93 2x3 53 4x5 37 1x4 33 1x2 16 1x1 14 0x3 16 0x1 16 0x0 7 1x4 9 0x0 0 1x1 4 1x2 4 0x0 0 0x0 0 0x0 1 0x0 0 0x0 3 0x0 0 0x0 0 0x0 0 0x0 0 0x0 0 0x0 0 44x96 564 25x61 382

GB 78 35 37 39 41 19 35 41 42 13 9 22 5 21 0 2 36 41 27 3 1 6 2 1 1 1 0 558

DCh SCh I n t 4 15 6 0 8 0 0 1 1 0 6 0 1 7 1 0 5 1 0 4 1 1 27 2 3 12 2 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 1 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 21 1 0 0 1 1 8 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 138 21

TO 25 30 18 35 21 20 16 18 11 8 5 7 6 9 0 0 9 11 9 4 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 266

FL 8 21 8 15 10 14 4 31 23 1 4 14 1 23 0 0 42 1 15 6 1 1 2 3 1 0 0 249

DR Ivy 38 24-6-30 28 17-4-21 0 8-7-15 12 12-2-14 19 6-1-7 20 4-3-7 11 5-0-5 9 0-2-2 17 3-0-3 9 0-0-0 10 2-1-3 6 0-0-0 6 0-0-0 6 0-1-1 0 1-0-1 0 1-0-1 8 0-1-1 0 0-0-0 8 0-0-0 2 0-0-0 0 0-0-0 0 0-0-0 1 0-0-0 0 0-0-0 0 0-0-0 1 0-0-0 0 0-0-0 211 83-29-112 190 60-21-81

FPS=free position shots; SH=shots; GB=ground balls; DCh=drawn charge; SCh=stick check; Int=interceptions; TO=turnovers; FL=fouls; DR=draw controls

Goalie Statistics

Name Carrie Giancola Ivy League Ashley Charron Ivy League Cornell Totals Ivy League Opponent Totals Ivy League

GP-GS 18-18 7-7 6-0 2-0 18-18 7-7 18-18 7-7

www.CornellBigRed.com

Min.* 982 371 110 55 1092:00 426:00 1092:00 426:00

Svs. 140 57 16 7 156 64 171 61

GA 126 56 10 4 136 60 228 83

GA Avg. 7.70 9.06 5.45 4.36 7.47 8.45 12.53 11.69

Save % .526 .504 .615 .636 .534 .516 .429 .424

W 15 5 1 1 16 6 2 1

L 2 1 0 0 2 1 16 6

*-roundedtothenearestminute Returnees in Italics

2003 Cornell 31 Women’s Lacrosse


2002 GAME-BY-GAME SCORING Individual Highs Goals:

Team Highs 7, Reynolds vs. Maryland

Goals:

Assists:

4, Wohlschlegel vs. Syracuse (NCAA)

Assists:

11, at Stanford

Points:

9, Reynolds vs. Maryland

Points:

31, at Stanford

Goalie Saves:

20, Giancola vs. Yale

Goalie Saves:

20, vs. Yale

Shots:

12, Fischer at Rutgers

Shots:

38, vs. Syracuse (NCAA)

Ground Balls:

8, Reynolds vs. Maryland

Ground Balls:

40, at Brown

Draw Controls:

8, Reynolds at Stanford

Draw Controls:

18, at Stanford

Game-By-Game Scoring

Averson Berkery Beyer Bisset Calder Champagne Charron Fischer D.Friedman R.Friedman Galey Giancola Graham Hirschfield Holveck Hughey Lavin McCorry Quinn Reynolds Simmons Smith Steinberg Wasson Williams Wohlschlegel Zarzecki

Stn

4-1 DNP 0-0 DNP 3-2 DNP 0-0 3-1 DNO 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-0 2-3 0-0 0-0 0-0 3-0 2-3 DNP 1-0 0-1 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0

Rut

Col

1-0 2-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 2-1 DNP 1-0 DNP 0-0 4-1 1-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 3-1 0-1 0-1 1-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 2-0 0-0 0-0 2-0 4-1 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 DNP 1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 0-0 0-1

ND

1-1 DNP DNP DNP 1-1 DNP DNP 1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-1 3-1 DNP DNP 1-0 DNP DNP DNP 0-0

Pen

3-2 DNP DNP DNP 0-1 DNP DNP 2-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-1 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 2-1 DNP 0-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0

Goalie Statistics (saves-goals allowed) Charron Giancola

Stn

1-1 6-5

Rut DNP 8-5

Col

2-2 3-2

ND DNP 6-9

Pen DNP 8-8

Pri

Dar

Brn

BU

Syr

Yal

Clg

20, at Stanford

Har

Del

JHU

Syr

Mar

Geo

4-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 3-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 4-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-2 0-0

2-1 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-1 DNP DNP 3-1 0-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-0 0-0 0-0 1-1 3-1 DNP DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 3-1 0-0

3-1 DNP DNP DNP 2-0 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 3-0 3-0 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 2-3 0-0

0-0 DNP DNP DNP 2-0 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-1 1-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 2-0 2-0 DNP 0-0 0-1 DNP DNP 3-3 0-0

1-0 DNP DNP DNP 2-0 DNP DNP 3-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 3-0 DNP 0-0 DNP DNP DNP 3-0 0-0

2-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 0-1 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 4-2 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 3-1 0-0

1-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-1 DNP 1-0 0-0 1-0 2-0 0-0 1-0 2-0 0-0 0-0 3-1 0-0

1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 3-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 DNP 0-0 0-0 1-0 4-1 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 0-0 0-0

2-1 DNP 0-0 DNP 1-2 DNP DNP 1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 1-0 1-0 5-1 DNP DNP 2-0 DNP DNP 1-1 0-0

1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 3-1 DNP DNP DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 1-0 1-1 4-0 1-2 DNP DNP 1-1 DNP DNP 2-0 0-0

3-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 1-1 DNP 0-0 1-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-0 DNP 0-0 2-0 3-0 4-2 DNP 0-0 0-0 DNP DNP 1-4 0-0

3-0 DNP DNP DNP 1-0 DNP DNP 1-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-1 DNP 0-0 0-1 0-0 7-2 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 1-2 0-0

0-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 1-0 DNP DNP 2-0 DNP 0-0 DNP 0-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-1 0-1 2-0 DNP DNP 0-0 DNP DNP 3-0 0-0

Pri DNP 8-16

Dar DNP 10-6

Brn DNP 5-9

BU DNP 14-8

Syr DNP 5-6

Yal DNP 20-9

Clg

Har

Del DNP 8-6

JHU

Syr

Mar DNP 12-4

Geo DNP 8-12

6-4 1-0

5-2 3-6

1-0 7-8

1-1 9-7

OPPONENT KEY: Stn=Stanford; Rut=Rutgers; Col=Columbia; ND=Notre Dame; Pen=Pennsylvania; Pri=Princeton; Dar=Dartmouth; Brn=Brown; BU=Boston University; Syr=Syrcause; Yal=Yale; Clg=Colgate; Har=Harvard; Del=Delaware; JHU=Johns Hopkins; Mar=Maryland; Geo=Georgetown

=starters

2003 Cornell 32 Women’s Lacrosse

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2003 Cornell 33 Women’s Lacrosse


INDIVIDUAL HONORS Honda Player of the Year Finalist 2002 Jaimee Reynolds Tewaaraton Award Candidate 2002 Jaimee Reynolds NCAA Woman of the Year Finalist 2002 Jaimee Reynolds NCAA New York Woman of the Year 2002 Jaimee Reynolds All-Americans 1983 Linda Miller (Honorable men.) 1987 Mary-Beth DeLaney (Honorable men.) 1988 Mary-Beth DeLaney (Second team) 1991 Tina Hennessey (Third team) 1992 Tina Hennessey (First team) 1993 Tina Hennessey (First team) 1995 Jen Bass (Third team) 1996 Cari Hills (Third team) 1998 Cari Hills (Third team) 1999 Jaimee Reynolds (Third team) 2000 Jaimee Reynolds (Third team) 2001 Katie McCorry (Third team) Jaimee Reynolds (Third team) 2002 Sarah Averson (Second team) Carrie Giancola (Second team) Erica Holveck (Second team) Jaimee Reynolds (First team) Regional All-Americans 1982 Leane Sinicki (Third team) 1983 Linda Miller (First team) 1986 Mary-Beth DeLaney (First team) Jenny Graap (First team) 1987 Karla Griffin (First team) Mary-Beth DeLaney (First team) Nadia Glucksburg (First team) Ellen Graap (First team) Beth Paciello (Honorable men.) 1988 Meg Bantley (First team) Mary-Beth DeLaney (First team) Ellen Graap (First team) Nadia Glucksburg (First team) 1989 Nadia Glucksburg (First team) Ellen Graap (Honorable mention) Ria Tascoe (Honorable mention) 1990 Ria Tascoe (First team) 1991 Tina Hennessey (First team) Ria Tascoe (First team) Melissa Teitelman (First team) Diane Tormey (First team) 1992 Tina Hennessey (First team) Ria Tascoe (First team) Melissa Teitelman (First team) Diane Tormey (First team) Tiffy Zachos (Honorable mention) 1993 Mary Collins (First team) Tina Hennessey (First team) Suzanne Caruso (First team) 1994 Jen Bass (First team) 1995 Jen Bass (Second team) Stephanie Murray (Second team) Cari Hills (Second team) 1996 Cari Hills (First team) 1997 Cari Hills (First team) 1998 Cari Hills (First team) Marissa Perman (Second team) 1999 Amy Chong (Second team) Ginny Miles (First team) Marissa Perman (Second team) Jaimee Reynolds (First team) 2000 Ginny Miles (Second team) Jaimee Reynolds (First team) 2001 Katie McCorry (First team) Ginny Miles (Second team) Jaimee Reynolds (First team)

2003 Cornell 34 Women’s Lacrosse

2002

Sarah Averson (First team) Carrie Giancola (First team) Erica Holveck (First team) Jaimee Reynolds (First team) Lori Wohlschlegel (Second team) Kari Zarzecki (Second team)

IWLCA Coach of the Year 2002 Jenny Graap IWLCA Regional Coach of the Year 1992 Cheryl Wolf 2002 Jenny Graap Verizon/CoSIDA Academic All-District 2000 Jaimee Reynolds (Second team) 2001 Jaimee Reynolds (First team) 2002 Jaimee Reynolds (First team) Verizon/CoSIDA Academic All-America 2001 Jaimee Reynolds (First team) 2002 Jaimee Reynolds (First team) IWLCA Academic All-Americans 1996 Amy Carpenter 1998 Marissa Perman Kim Regan 1999 Marissa Perman Kim Regan 2001 Jaimee Reynolds 2002 Jaimee Reynolds Kari Zarzecki Women’s College North-South All-Star Game 1988 Mary-Beth DeLaney 1992 Ria Tascoe 1993 Tina Hennessey 1995 Jen Bass 1998 Abigail Friedland 1999 Marissa Perman Jen Bass Jenny Graap (coach) 2002 Sarah Graham Jaimee Reynolds USWLA All-Star Championship 1977 Sue Hartwell Alison Locke Gwen Pusey 1979 Robyn Ewing Carol Johnson Joanne Powell 1980 Robyn Ewing 1982 Leane Sinicki Ivy League Player of the Year 2002 Jaimee Reynolds Ivy League Rookie of the Year 1981 Linda Miller All-Ivy League First Team 1984 Kathy Milmoe 1985 Lyn Reitenbach 1987 Mary-Beth DeLaney 1988 Mary-Beth DeLaney Ellen Graap 1991 Tina Hennessey 1992 Tina Hennessey Diane Tormey 1993 Mary Collins Tina Hennessey 1994 Jen Bass 1995 Jen Bass 1998 Cari Hills 1999 Ginny Miles 2000 Ginny Miles Jaimee Reynolds Kathy Milmoe

2001 2002

Carrie Giancola Jaimee Reynolds Sarah Averson Carrie Giancola Jaimee Reynolds

All-Ivy League Second Team 1981 Robyn Ewing 1982 Linda Miller Joy Quinton 1983 Linda Miller 1984 Linda Miller Lyn Reitenbach 1985 Leane Sinicki 1986 Meg Bantley Karla Griffin 1987 Karla Griffin 1989 Ellen Graap 1990 Ria Tascoe Diane Tormey 1991 Ria Tascoe 1992 Ria Tascoe 1996 Cari Hills Lori Wohlschlegel 1997 Cari Hills 1998 Marissa Perman 1999 Jaimee Reynolds 2000 Erica Holveck Lori Wohlschlegel 2001 Katie McCorry Ginny Miles 2002 Erica Holveck All-Ivy League Honorable Mention 1980 Carol Johnson Cate Snow 1981 Dana Cooperson Linda Miller Lori Wick 1982 Robyn Ewing 1983 Lucia Gil Leane Sinicki 1984 Leane Sinicki 1985 Mary-Beth DeLaney 1987 Nadia Glucksberg Julie Infurna Beth Paciello 1988 Nadia Glucksberg 1991 Diane Tormey 1992 Tiffy Zachos 1993 Suzanne Caruso 1995 Christine Grandolfo Amy Meldrim 1996 Amy Carpenter Liz Robertson 1998 Jen Chong 1999 Amy Chong Marissa Perman 2000 Carrie Giancola Kathy Knapp 2001 Lori Wohlschlegel 2002 Sarah Fischer Lori Wohlschlegel Kari Zarzecki NCAA All-Tournament Team 2002 Katie McCorry Jaimee Reynolds

Katie McCorry

current players in bold www.CornellBigRed.com


ALL-TIME RESULTS 1972 (3-2) Head Coach: Sue Tyler Captain: NA Ithaca College ......................... L Brockport ............................. W Penn State .............................. L Hartwick ............................... W William Smith ......................... W

4-7 13-3 5-6 10-1 21-1

1973 (1-3) Head Coach: Sue Tyler Captain: NA Ithaca .................................. L Hartwick ................................ L Cortland ............................... W Ithaca .................................. L

1-13 6-12 10-0 3-12

1974 (1-5) Head Coach: Sue Tyler Captain: NA Colgate ................................. W Penn State .............................. L Cortland ................................ L Brockport .............................. L Hartwick ................................ L Ithaca .................................. L

7-4 1-21 7-19 2-17 2-11 4-18

1975 (3-4) Head Coach: Judy Kosstrin Captain: NA Hartwick ............................... W Pennsylvania .......................... W Penn State .............................. L Brockport .............................. L Cortland ................................ L Ithaca .................................. L Colgate ................................. W

17-7 8-7 2-20 6-10 7-8 10-14 9-5

1976 (1-6) Head Coaches: Judy Kosstrin/Happy Horgan Captain: NA Ithaca .................................. L 7-11 Cortland ................................ L 5-10 Brockport .............................. L 1-11 Pennsylvania ........................... L 4-12 Northeastern .......................... L 3-9 Colgate .................................. L 8-11 Hartwick ............................... W 10-3 1977 (3-6) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captain: ......... Gwynne Kennedy Sue Hartwell Pennsylvania ........................... L 1-14 Brockport .............................. L 5-9 William Smith ......................... W 11-4 Hartwick ............................... W 16-0 Ithaca ................................. W 13-12 Colgate .................................. L 4-10 vs. Cortland# .......................... L 6-10 vs. Brockport# ........................ L 2-8 vs. Cortland# .......................... L 2-14 # - N.Y.S. Tournament (Ithaca, N.Y.) 1978 (7-2-2) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: .................. Anne Moss Sue Hartwell 4/12 ITHACA ...................... W 12-5 4/18 at Bucknell .................. T 5-5 4/20 at Hartwick ................. W 15-1 4/22 PENNSYLVANIA ............ L 4-10 4/27 COLGATE .................... T 6-6 4/29 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 14-3 5/1 BROCKPORT ................ W 9-6 5/3 at Cortland ................. W 12-2 5/6 WILLIAM SMITH# ......... W 14-0 5/6 COLGATE# .................. W 11-5 5/7 BROCKPORT# ............... L 4-10 # - N.Y.S. Tournament (Ithaca, N.Y.) 1979 (7-4-1) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ............. Carol Johnson Lynn Vacca 4/11 ITHACA ...................... W 10-5 4/14 ONEONTA .................. W 7-4 4/17 BUCKNELL .................. W 10-5 4/19 at William Smith .......... W 16-8 4/21 at Pennsylvania ............ L 3-20 4/23 ST. LAWRENCE ............. W 10-9 4/26 at Colgate ................... L 0-13 4/30 at Brockport ................ L 3-5 5/2 CORTLAND .................. T 2-2 5/5 vs. Cortland* ................ L 4-5 5/6 vs. William Smith* ........ W 12-1 5/7 vs. Oneonta* ............... W 9-5 # - N.Y.S. Tournament (Hempstead, N.Y.)

www.CornellBigRed.com

1980 (6-9, 0-6 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ............. Carol Johnson Terry Rider 4/5 YALE* .......................... L 4-20 4/7 ITHACA ....................... L 5-6 4/9 at Cortland .................. L 1-4 4/12 at Brown* .................... L 5-7 4/14 ST. LAWRENCE ............. W 10-1 4/18 at Princeton* ............... L 4-12 4/19 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 0-17 4/23 COLGATE ................... W 5-3 4/26 at Harvard* .................. L 3-18 4/27 at Dartmouth* ............. L 3-18 4/29 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 11-2 4/30 BROCKPORT ................ W 13-1 5/3 ST. LAWRENCE# ............ L 4-6 5/4 ONEONTA# ................ W 8-2 5/5 HARTWICK# ................ W 7-1 # - N.Y.S. Championships (Ithaca, N.Y.)

1985 (5-8-1, 1-5 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ................ Jenny Graap Kate Howard-Johnson Leane Sinicki 3/30 at Yale* ........................ L 2-17 4/2 at Ithaca ..................... W 7-6 4/4 at St. Lawrence ............. T 5-5 4/6 PENNSYLVANIA* ........... L 4-12 4/10 at William Smith .......... W 15-10 4/13 BROWN* ...................... L 7-10 4/17 at Colgate ................... L 7-12 4/21 HARVARD* ................... L 4-14 4/26 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 6-7 4/28 at Princeton* .............. W 11-10 4/30 CORTLAND .................. L 4-9 5/3 vs. Hamilton# ............. W 12-2 5/4 vs. Ithaca# ................... L 10-13 5/5 vs. St. Lawrence# ......... W 13-6 # - NYSAIAW Tournament (Ithaca, N.Y.)

1981 (6-8, 1-5 Ivy League) New York State Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ................ Joy Quinton Terry Rider 3/28 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 8-14 4/4 at Yale* ........................ L 5-10 4/6 at Ithaca ...................... L 8-9 4/8 CORTLAND ................. W 8-7 4/11 PENNSYLVANIA* ........... L 3-15 4/15 at William Smith .......... W 5-3 4/18 BROWN * .................... W 10-5 4/21 at Colgate ................... L 3-7 4/25 Harvard* ..................... L 2-20 4/26 at St. Lawrence ............. L 7-9 5/2 vs. Rochester# ............. W 4-0 5/3 vs. William Smith# ....... W 8-1 5/4 vs. Cortland# .............. W 3-2 5/9 Princeton .................... L 3-6 # - NYSAIAW Championships (Oneonta, N.Y.)

1986 (6-8, 0-6 Ivy League) New York State Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains:6 .............. Jenny Graap Kate Howard-Johnson 3/29 YALE* .......................... L 6-10 4/1 ITHACA ...................... W 14-7 4/5 at Brown* .................... L 7-12 4/7 ST. LAWRENCE ............. W 15-7 4/8 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 11-10 4/12 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 10-16 4/19 at Dartmouth* ............. L 3-19 4/20 at Harvard* .................. L 9-19 4/24 COLGATE .................... L 8-9 4/26 PRINCETON* ................. L 10-11 4/29 at Cortland .................. L 9-10 5/2 vs. Oneonta# .............. W 12-6 5/3 at William Smith# ........ W 17-12 5/4 vs. Colgate# ................ W 10-9 # - N.Y.S. Championships (Geneva, N.Y.)

1982 (5-9, 1-5 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ............... Robyn Ewing Joy Quinton 4/3 YALE* .......................... L 3-12 4/5 ITHACA ....................... L 6-7 4/10 at Brown* .................... L 8-13 4/13 ST. LAWRENCE ............. W 9-8 4/14 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 7-3 4/17 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 2-16 4/19 at Cortland .................. L 3-11 4/21 COLGATE .................... L 5-6 4/24 at Harvard* .................. L 3-20 4/25 at Dartmouth* ............ W 5-4 4/30 at Oneonta# ............... W 9-1 5/1 vs. William Smith# ....... W 9-3 5/2 vs. Ithaca# ................... L 3-5 5/8 PRINCETON* ................. L 7-9 # - NYSAIAW Championships (Oneonta, N.Y.)

1987 (11-3, 3-3 Ivy League) New York State Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ................. Karla Griffin Lisa Kolongowski 3/28 at Yale* ....................... W 8-7 3/31 at Ithaca ..................... W 8-7 4/4 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 5-4 4/5 at St. Lawrence ............ W 5-4 4/8 at William Smith .......... W 8-5 4/11 at Brown* ................... W 6-5 4/16 at Colgate .................. W 6-4 4/18 HARVARD* ................... L 5-14 4/24 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 3-8 4/26 at Princeton* ............... L 5-6 4/28 CORTLAND ................. W 6-5 5/1 vs. Union# .................. W 9-4 5/2 vs. William Smith# ....... W 12-9 5/3 vs. Colgate# ................ W 5-4 # - N.Y.S. Championships (Cortland, N.Y.)

1983 (6-8, 1-5 Ivy League) New York State Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ................. Linda Miller Susan Sheldon 4/2 at Yale* ........................ L 5-6 4/4 at Ithaca ...................... L 3-6 4/6 CORTLAND .................. L 4-5 4/9 PENNSYLVANIA* ........... L 3-6 4/10 at St. Lawrence ............ W 8-6 4/13 at William Smith .......... W 10-4 4/16 BROWN* ..................... W 9-5 4/23 Harvard* ..................... L 4-15 4/30 Princeton* ................... L 4-16 5/1 Dartmouth* ................. L 6-11 5/3 Colgate ....................... L 3-5 5/6 at Union* ................... W 12-4 5/7 vs. William Smith* ........ W 6-2 5/8 vs. Colgate* ................ W 10-4 # - N.Y.S. Championships (Schenectady, N.Y.) 1984 (8-6, 1-5 Ivy League) New York State Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: .......... Jacqui Hathaway Anne Sharbaugh 3/31 YALE* .......................... L 8-11 4/7 at Brown* .................... L 6-10 4/9 ST. LAWRENCE ............. W 12-2 4/10 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 12-4 4/14 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 7-8 4/20 at Harvard* .................. L 5-18 4/21 at Dartmouth* ............ W 12-9 4/24 ITHACA ...................... W 15-7 4/26 COLGATE ................... W 4-2 4/28 PRINCETON* ................. L 9-12 5/1 at Cortland .................. L 5-8 5/4 vs. Oneonta# .............. W 13-9 5/5 vs. St. Lawrence# ......... W 13-2 5/6 at William Smith# ........ W 14-6 *N.Y.S. Championships (Geneva, N.Y.)

1988 (7-6, 2-4 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ...... Mary-Beth DeLaney Julie Infurna 3/26 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 6-12 3/29 ITHACA ...................... W 8-5 3/31 at Lafayette .................. L 1-12 4/2 BROWN* ...................... L 2-4 4/6 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 6-3 4/9 YALE* ......................... W 4-2 4/15 at Dartmouth* ............. L 2-9 4/17 at Harvard* .................. L 2-14 4/21 COLGATE ................... W 12-11 4/23 PRINCETON* ................ W 8-2 4/24 BUCKNELL .................. W 6-0 4/26 at Cortland ................. W 11-6 4/29 VIRGINIA ..................... L 4-5 1989 (1-12, 0-6 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ........ Nadia Glucksberg Sarah Mixter Julia Stern 3/25 PENNSYLVANIA* ........... L 3-4 3/28 at Ithaca ...................... L 3-4 4/1 at Brown* .................... L 2-7 4/5 at William Smith ........... L 4-5 4/8 at Yale* ........................ L 2-10 4/15 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 1-12 4/16 LAFAYETTE ................... L 3-7 4/20 at Colgate ................... L 7-8 4/22 HARVARD* ................... L 2-8 4/23 at Bucknell ................. W 6-5 4/29 at Princeton* ............... L 3-13 4/30 BOSTON COLLEGE ........ L 3-7 5/2 CORTLAND .................. L 4-7

1990 (8-6, 1-5 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ..................... Julie Han Elizabeth Kuo 3/24 at Lehigh ................... W 10-5 3/27 ITHACA ...................... W 7-5 3/31 at Pennsylvania* .......... W 9-5 4/7 BROWN* ...................... L 6-18 4/8 at Lafayette .................. L 7-8 4/11 WILLIAM SMITH ........... W 14-5 4/14 YALE* .......................... L 4-10 4/18 COLGATE ................... W 7-6 4/21 at Dartmouth* ............. L 3-9 4/22 BUCKNELL .................. W 14-5 4/28 at Harvard* .................. L 1-13 4/29 at Boston College ........ W 8-4 5/2 PRINCETON* ................. L 5-14 5/8 CORTLAND ................. W 14-6 1991 (8-5, 3-3 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ..................... Liz Clisby Ria Tascoe Melissa Teitelman 3/23 at Rutgers ................... W 12-2 3/26 at Ithaca ..................... W 7-2 3/29 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 6-5 4/3 at William Smith .......... W 5-3 4/6 at Brown* .................... L 5-14 4/13 at Yale* ....................... W 6-5 4/17 at Colgate ................... L 9-10 4/20 DARTMOUTH* ............. W 8-6 4/21 BOSTON COLLEGE ....... W 11-0 4/27 HARVARD* ................... L 6-13 4/28 LAFAYETTE ................... L 4-5 5/1 at Princeton* ............... L 6-10 5/4 at Bucknell ................. W 14-4 1992 (11-5, 3-3 Ivy League) ECAC Champion Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ..................... Liz Clisby Ria Tascoe Melissa Teitelman 3/21 at Delaware ................ W 9-3 3/22 at Drexel .................... W 7-4 3/24 ITHACA ...................... W 11-3 3/28 at Pennsylvania* .......... W 10-4 4/4 BROWN* ..................... W 10-3 4/5 at Lafayette .................. L 8-9 4/8 BUCKNELL .................. W 14-4 4/11 YALE* ......................... W 5-2 4/12 NEW HAMPSHIRE .......... L 4-6 4/15 COLGATE ................... W 14-3 4/20 at Dartmouth* ............. L 3-11 4/25 at Harvard* .................. L 2-5 4/26 at Boston College ........ W 10-5 4/29 PRINCETON* ................. L 7-8 5/2 vs. New Hampshire# .... W 7-4 5/3 vs. Towson# ................ W 6-3 # - ECAC Tournament (Easton, Pa.) 1993 (7-6, 3-3 Ivy League) ECAC Tournament Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: .......... Catherine Hardy Tina Hennessey 3/27 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 7-6 3/28 BUCKNELL .................. W 15-2 4/3 at Brown* ................... W 7-6 4/4 vs. New Hampshire ....... L 5-8 4/10 at Yale* (3 OT) ............. W 12-11 4/11 at Rutgers ................... W 7-3 4/14 VERMONT .................... L 8-10 4/17 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 2-3 4/18 BOSTON COLLEGE ....... W 9-5 4/24 HARVARD* ................... L 8-18 4/25 LAFAYETTE .................. W 11-8 4/28 at Princeton* ............... L 9-11 5/1 vs. Vermont# ............... L 7-8 # - ECAC Tournament (Durham, N.H.) 1994 (4-10, 0-6 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ..................... Sara Gur Michele Mallardi 3/26 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 7-16 3/27 vs. Lafayette ................. L 6-12 4/2 BROWN* (3 OT) ............ L 10-11 4/7 BUCKNELL .................. W 13-10 4/9 YALE* (2 OT) ................ L 7-10 4/10 NEW HAMPSHIRE .......... L 7-11 4/13 COLGATE (2 OT) ........... L 12-13 4/17 at Dartmouth* ............. L 7-18 4/18 at Vermont ................. W 11-8 4/23 at Harvard* .................. L 5-10 4/24 vs. Boston College (2 OT) L 9-11 4/27 PRINCETON* ................. L 6-18 4/30 DREXEL ...................... W 15-13 5/1 RUTGERS .................... W 22-11

2003 Cornell 35 Women’s Lacrosse


ALL-TIME RESULTS/LETTER WINNERS 1995 (7-6, 2-4 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ................ Jennifer Bass Christine Grandolfo 3/25 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 10-8 3/26 VERMONT ................... W 16-6 3/29 at Bucknell ................. W 11-5 4/1 at Brown* ................... W 10-9 4/2 at New Hampshire ........ L 9-10 4/8 at Yale* ........................ L 2-5 4/9 at Drexel .................... W 15-6 4/12 BOSTON COLLEGE (OT) . W 9-8 4/15 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 7-17 4/19 at Colgate (4 OT) ......... L 11-12 4/22 HARVARD* ................... L 9-11 4/23 LAFAYETTE .................. W 14-8 4/26 at Princeton* ............... L 6-15 1996 (5-9, 0-6 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: ............ Amy Carpenter Stephanie Murray 3/12 BUCKNELL .................. W 16-5 3/23 at Pennsylvania* ........... L 9-10 3/24 at Lafayette .................. L 8-9 3/30 BROWN* ...................... L 9-12 3/31 NEW HAMPSHIRE ......... W 15-7 4/6 YALE* .......................... L 7-14 4/10 COLGATE ................... W 13-7 4/13 at Dartmouth* ............. L 8-19 4/14 at Vermont ................. W 14-6 4/20 at Harvard* .................. L 11-18 4/21 at Boston College ......... L 7-8 4/24 PRINCETON* ................. L 6-12 4/27 DELAWARE ................... L 8-11 4/28 DREXEL ...................... W 19-5 1997 (5-9, 0-6 Ivy League) Head Coach: Cheryl Wolf Captains: .......... Lauren Feinstein Liz Robertson 3/11 at Bucknell .................. L 5-8 3/17 at Davidson ................ W 18-8 3/19 at Virginia Tech ........... W 11-10 3/22 PENNSYLVANIA (OT) ..... L 14-15 3/23 LAFAYETTE ................... L 7-11

Cornell Letter Winners Allen, Michelle - 2001

Amengual, Jen - 1998 Averson, Sarah - 2000-02

Bantley, Meg - 1985-88

Bass, Jennifer - 1992-95 Bennett, Beth (mgr.) - 1980 Burn, Joanne - 1986-87

Calder, Beth - 2001-02

Campbell, Heather - 1980 Carpenter, Amy - 1993-96 Caruso, Suzanne - 1993-94 Chao, Jade - 1989-90 Chak, Yelena - 1996-97 Chong, Amy - 1997-99 Chong, Jen - 1998, 99 Collins, Mary - 1990-93 Comey, Jenn - 1990-91 Cooperson, Dana - 1981 Clisby, Liz - 1989-92

3/29 4/5 4/6 4/9 4/12 4/13 4/19 4/20 4/26

at Brown* .................... L at Yale* ........................ L at Columbia ................ W at Colgate ................... L DARTMOUTH* .............. L VERMONT ................... W HARVARD* ................... L BOSTON COLLEGE ....... W at Princeton* ............... L

4-12 6-17 17-9 10-13 3-6 11-6 4-10 8-5 2-17

1998 (7-7, 3-4 Ivy League) Head Coach: Jenny Graap Captains: ............ Abby Friedland Susannah Johnson Meredith Scardino 3/15 vs. Virginia Tech .......... W 12-3 3/18 at Vanderbilt ............... L 8-13 3/24 at Lafayette ................. W 9-6 3/28 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 15-9 4/3 at Columbia* .............. W 17-9 4/5 at Princeton* ............... L 3-14 4/8 COLGATE .................... L 6-10 4/11 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 7-23 4/18 at Brown* .................... L 13-16 4/19 at Boston College ......... L 10-12 4/22 SYRACUSE ................... W 8-7 4/25 YALE* ......................... W 9-8 4/30 BUCKNELL .................. W 15-4 5/2 at Harvard* .................. L 9-10 1999 (9-6, 3-4 Ivy League) Head Coach: Jenny Graap Captains: ................. Amy Chong Marissa Perman 3/7 vs. Ohio State .............. W 10-8 3/16 LAFAYETTE .................. W 10-7 3/20 at Columbia* .............. W 14-6 3/24 vs. Stanford ................ W 20-6 3/26 at Pennsylvania* .......... W 14-6 3/31 VANDERBILT ............... W 7-6 4/3 PRINCETON* ................. L 4-12 4/7 at Colgate .................. W 11-10 4/10 at Dartmouth* ............. L 7-12 4/16 BROWN* (OT) ............... L 11-12 4/18 BOSTON COLLEGE ....... W 17-6 4/21 at Syracuse .................. L 6-12

Graap, Ellen - 1986-89 Graap, Jenny - 1983-86 Graham, Liz - 1995 Graham, Sarah - 1999-2002 Grandolfo, Christine - 1993-95 Grant, Ellen - 1984-86 Gredder, Susan - 1985 Griffin, Kara - 1987-88 Griffin, Karla - 1984-87 Gur, Sara - 1991, 1993-94

Hamburger, Gilly - 1993

DeGaetano, Cara - 1981, 83 DeLaney, Mary-Beth - 1985-88 Enhle, Alsyon - 1996 Everitt, Elaine - 1997 Ewing, Robyn - 1980-82

Johnson, Carol - 1980 Johnson, Susannah - 1995-98

Ehrenson, Sarah - 1982-83

Feinstein, Lauren - 1994-97

Fischer, Sarah - 2001-02 Foster, Kim - 1983-86 Friedland, Abigail - 1995-96, 98 Friedman, Rachel - 2000-02

Giancola, Carrie - 1999-2002

Gil, Lucia - 1982-83 Glucksburg, Nadia - 1986-89

4/28 HARVARD* .................. W 12-8 5/5 JOHNS HOPKINS .......... W 8-5 5/10 at Princeton# ............... L 4-14 # - NCAA first round (Princeton, N.J.)

2000 (13-4, 5-2 Ivy League) ECAC Champion Head Coach: Jenny Graap Captains: ............... Kathy Knapp Sarah McGoey 3/12 at Rutgers ................... W 11-7 3/15 MASSACHUSETTS ........ W 10-6 3/18 at Stanford ................. W 15-6 3/21 at California ................ W 14-3 3/25 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 15-5 3/31 vs. Vanderbilt ............... L 6-12 4/2 at Princeton* ............... L 7-12 4/5 COLGATE ................... W 12-6 4/8 DARTMOUTH* .............. L 8-11 4/15 at Brown* ................... W 11-6 4/16 at Boston College ........ W 15-7 4/19 SYRACUSE .................... L 9-17 4/22 YALE* ......................... W 10-4 4/28 COLUMBIA* ................ W 15-3 4/30 at Harvard* ................. W 18-8 5/13 SACRED HEART# .......... W 17-4 5/14 JOHNS HOPKINS# ........ W 16-4 # - ECAC Championships (Ithaca, N.Y.)

2002 (16-2, 6-1 Ivy League) NCAA Tournament Head Coach: Jenny Graap Captains: ............. Katie McCorry Lori Wohlschlegel 3/2 at Stanford ................. W 20-6 3/9 at Rutgers ................... W 9-5 3/15 COLUMBIA* ................ W 16-4 3/19 at Notre Dame ............ W 10-9 3/23 PENNSYLVANIA* .......... W 9-8 3/30 at Princeton* ............... L 12-16 4/6 DARTMOUTH* ............. W 14-6 4/12 at Brown* ................... W 13-9 4/14 at Boston University .... W 11-8 4/17 SYRACUSE ................... W 13-6 4/20 YALE* (OT) .................. W 10-9 4/23 at Colgate .................. W 13-4 4/27 at Harvard* ................. W 9-8 5/1 DELAWARE .................. W 14-6 5/4 at Johns Hopkins ......... W 15-8 5/9 SYRACUSE# ................. W 16-8 5/12 MARYLAND$ ............... W 14-4 5/17 vs. Georgetown% (OT) .. L 10-12 # - NCAA first round (Ithaca, N.Y.) $ - NCAA quarterfinal (Ithaca, N.Y. % - NCAA semifinal (Baltimore, Md.)

2001 (11-4, 5-2 Ivy League) NCAA Tournament Head Coach: Jenny Graap Captains: ............. Sarah McGoey Ginny Miles 3/3 at Penn State .............. W 11-9 3/10 RUTGERS .................... W 15-6 3/17 at Columbia* .............. W 12-5 3/20 vs. Vanderbilt .............. W 8-6 3/23 at Pennsylvania* .......... W 10-5 3/27 STANFORD .................. W 15-5 3/31 PRINCETON* ................. L 5-9 4/4 COLGATE ................... W 17-5 4/7 at Dartmouth* (3OT) .... L 5-6 4/14 BROWN* ..................... W 8-6 4/18 at Syracuse .................. L 7-9 4/21 at Yale* ....................... W 11-7

* - Ivy League game

(Since 1980)

Han, Julie - 1988-90 Hardy, Catherine - 1990-93 Hathaway, Jacqui - 1983 Hennessey, Tina - 1990-93 Herrmann, Jenny - 1982-84 Hills, Carolyn - 1995-98 Hirschfield, Kate - 2002 Hiscock, Lisa - 1995 Hjelm, Joy - 1980 Holveck, Erica - 2000-02 Howard-Johnson, Kate - 1983-86 Hughey, Julia - 2002

Daniels, Karen - 1980-82

4/24 at Yale* ........................ L 7-8 5/1 HARVARD* (OT) ........... W 10-9 5/8 at Yale# ....................... L 5-11 # - ECAC Championships (New Haven, Conn.)

Infurna, Julie - 1986-88 Jaron, Stefanie - 1997

Katzer, Dorree - 1991-92

Kennedy, Loretta - 1982-83 Kerzner, Janice - 1981 Kessman, Erin - 1998 Knapp, Kathy - 1997-00 Kohl, Sally - 1980, 82 Kolongowski, Lisa - 1984-87 Krobisch, Marina - 1991-93

2003 Cornell 36 Women’s Lacrosse

Kuo, Elizabeth - 1988-90

Lamb, Tara - 1993-95

Land, Renee - 1993 Lavin, Katie - 2001-02 Lawson, Diana - 1985 Levy, Sue - 1982, 84 Lubick, Caroline - 1982-84

Mallardi, Michele - 1991-94 Maman, Suzanne - 1989-90 McCarthy, Aubin - 1996 McCormick, Terri - 1982-83 McCorry, Katie - 1999-2002 McGoey, Sarah - 1998-2001 Meldrim, Amy - 1993-95 Miles, Ginny - 1999-2001 Miller, Jamie - 1994-95 Miller, Linda - 1981-84 Milmoe, Kathryn - 1982-84 Mixter, Sarah - 1988-89 Morell, Tania - 1989 Murray, Stephanie - 1993-96

Nazzaro, Silvana - 1989 Novik, Sonia - 1998-99 Noyes, Jen - 1997

Ogorek, Lauren - 1998 Paciello, Beth - 1986-88

Perman, Marissa - 1996-99 Polutan, Verna - 1987 Powell, Joanne - 1980

Quinn, Jaime - 2002 Quinton, Joy - 1980-82

Ramamurthy, Priya - 1994-95 Rappaport, Elizabeth - 1985

Regan, Kim - 1996-99 Reitenbach, Lyn - 1982-85 Reynolds,Jaimee-1999-2002 Rider, Terry - 1980-81 Riley, Allison - 1996 Robertson, Elizabeth - 1994-97 Rossiter, Laurie - 1982-84

Savarese, Gina - 1987-88

Scardino, Meredith - 1995-98 Scholl, Heather - 1998 Schrieber, Liz - 1987 Sharbaugh, Anne - 1982, 84 Sheldon, Sue - 1981 Sinicki, Leane - 1982-85 Smith, Cindy - 1981 Snow, Cate - 1980 Solano, Lesley - 1995 Steinacher, Kelly - 1997 Stern, Julia - 1988-89 Stiles, Mindy - 1996-97

Tascoe, Ria - 1989-92

Teitelman, Melissa - 1989-92 Tevebaugh, Anne - 1989-92 Thatcher, Kate - 1982 Tormey, Diane - 1990-92

Walsh, Lauren - 1996

Wick, Lori - 1980-81 Wile, Susan - 1985 Wohlschlegel,Lori-1999-2002 Wolf, Kristen - 1997-99 Wright, Amy - 1994 Wydner, Cathy - 1980-81

Yocum, Jocelyn - 1987-88 Zachos, Tiffy - 1991-92

Zarzecki, Kari - 1999-2002

www.CornellBigRed.com


CORNELL RECORDS Points Scored POINTS LEADERS Game: 10 (8-2) by Sara Gur vs. Rutgers, 5-1-94 Season: 74 (57-17)by Jaimee Reynolds, 2002 Career: 204 (144-60) by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999-02 Consecutive Games: 65 by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999-02 Points Scored — Season 1. Jaimee Reynolds ....... 74(57-17) ............ 2002 2. Lori Wohlschlegel ..... 63(39-24) ............ 2000 3. Cari Hills ................. 57(38-19) ............ 1996 4. Lyn Reitenbach ........ 56(32-24) ............ 1984 5. Cari Hills ................... 54(47-7) ............ 1998 Jaimee Reynolds ....... 54(40-14) ............ 2000 7. Ginny Miles ............. 52(41-11) ............ 2000 8. Sarah Averson ...... 50 (35-15) ........... 2000 9. Ginny Miles ............. 49(38-11) ............ 1999 Kathy Milmoe .......... 49(36-13) ............ 1984 Points Scored — Career 1. Jaimee Reynolds .. 204(144-60) ........ 1999-02 2. Cari Hills ............ 180(131-49) ........ 1995-98 3. LoriWohlschlegel .. 177(108-69) ......... 1999-02 4. Linda Miller ........ 155(100-55) ........ 1981-84 5. Tina Hennessey .. 134(101-33) ........ 1990-93 6. RobynEwing ....... 133(109-24) ........ 1979-82 7. Ginny Miles ........ 130(106-24) ........ 1999-01 8. Lyn Reitenbach ... 129(75-54) .......... 1982-85 9. Ria Tascoe ......... 123(105-18) ........ 1989-92 10. Sarah Averson .. 116 (91-25) . 2000-present

Assists — Career 1. Lori Wohlschlegel ................ 69 ....... 2. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 60 ....... 3. Linda Miller ........................ 55 ....... 4. Lyn Reitenbach ................... 54 ....... 5. Cari Hills ............................ 49 ....... 6. Tina Hennessey .................. 33 ....... 7. Anne Moss ......................... 32 ....... 8. Carol Johnson ..................... 31 ....... 9. Jenny Graap ....................... 30 ....... Mary-Beth DeLaney ............. 30 .......

Ground Balls GROUND BALL LEADERS Season: 78 by Jaimee Reynolds, 2002 Career: 275 by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999-02 Ground Balls — Season 1. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 78 ............ 2002 2. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 73 ............ 1998 3. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 65 ............ 2000 4. Cari Hills ............................ 60 ............ 1995 5. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 59 ............ 2001 Ground Balls — Career 1. Jaimee Reynolds ................ 2. Cari Hills .......................... 3. Katie McCorry ................... Lori Wohlschlegel .............. 5. Carrie Giancola .................

275 ....... 154 ....... 124 ....... 124 ....... 118 .......

Goals

Draw Controls

GOAL LEADERS Game: 8 by Emily Montgomery vs. Hartwick, 1975 8 by Sara Gur vs. Rutgers, 5-1-94 Season: 57 by Jaimee Reynolds, 2002 Career: 144 by Jaimee Reynolds, 2002 Consecutive Games: 31 by Cari Hills, 1995-97

DRAW CONTROL LEADERS Season: 43 by Jaimee Reynolds, 2000 Career: 141 by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999-02

Goals Scored — Season 1. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 57 ............ 2002 2. Cari Hills ............................ 47 ............ 1998 3. Jennifer Bass ...................... 46 ............ 1994 4. Ginny Miles ........................ 41 ............ 2000 5. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 40 ............ 2000 6. Lori Wohlschlegel ................ 39 ............ 2000 Meg Bantley ....................... 39 ............ 1986 8. Cari Hills ............................ 38 ............ 1996 Ginny Miles ........................ 38 ............ 1999 10. Kathy Milmoe ..................... 36 ............ 1984 Goals Scored — Career 1. Jaimee Reynolds ................ 144 ....... 1999-02 2. Cari Hills .......................... 131 ....... 1995-98 3. RobynEwing ..................... 109 ....... 1979-82 4. Lori Wohlschlegel .............. 108 ....... 1999-02 5. Ginny Miles ...................... 106 ....... 1999-01 6. Ria Tascoe ....................... 105 ....... 1989-92 7. Jennifer Bass .................... 104 ....... 1992-95 8. Tina Hennessey ................ 101 ....... 1990-93 9. Linda Miller ...................... 100 ....... 1981-84 10. Sarah Averson .................. 91 2000-present

Assists ASSIST LEADERS Game: 6 by Linda Miller vs. William Smith, 4-10-84 Season: 27 by Linda Miller, 1984 Career: 69 by Lori Wohlschlegel, 1999-02 Consecutive Games: 10 by Sue Hartwell, 1978 Assists — Season 1. Linda Miller ........................ 27 ............ 1984 2. Lori Wohlschlegel ................ 24 ............ 2000 Lyn Reitenbach ................... 24 ............ 1984 4. Cari Hills ............................ 19 ............ 1996 Jaimee Reynolds .................. 19 ............ 1999 Lori Wohlschlegel ................ 19 ............ 2001 7. Lori Wohlschlegel ................ 18 ............ 2002 8. Cari Hills ............................ 17 ............ 1997 Jaimee Reynolds .................. 17 ............ 2002 Melissa Teitelman ............... 17 ............ 1992

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1999-02 1999-02 1981-84 1982-85 1995-98 1990-93 1975-78 1977-80 1983-86 1985-88

1999-02 1995-98 1999-02 1999-02 1999-02

Draw Controls — Season 1. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 43 ............ 2000 2. Cari Hills ............................ 40 ............ 1995 3. Jaimee Reynolds .................. 38 ............ 2002 4. Marissa Perman .................. 37 ............ 1999 5. Cari Hills ............................ 35 ............ 1998 Jaimee Reynolds .................. 35 ............ 1999 Draw Controls — Career 1. Jaimee Reynolds ................ 141 ....... 1999-02 2. Cari Hills .......................... 110 ....... 1995-98 3. Marissa Perman .................. 65 ....... 1996-99 4. Katie McCorry ..................... 61 ....... 1999-02 5. Sarah Averson .................. 55 ....... 2000-02

Caused Turnovers CAUSED TURNOVER LEADERS Season: 31 by Amy Chong, 1999 31 by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999 Career: 113 by Jaimee Reynolds, 1999-02 Caused Turnovers — Season 1. Amy Chong ........................ 31 ............ 1999 Jaimee Reynolds .................. 31 ............ 1999 3. Cari Hills ............................ 30 ............ 1998 Erica Holveck .................... 30 ........... 2002 Jaimee Reynolds .................. 30 ............ 2000 Caused Turnovers — Career 1. Jaimee Reynolds ................ 113 ....... 1999-02 2. Katie McCorry ..................... 76 ....... 1999-02 3. Kari Zarzecki ...................... 74 ....... 1999-02 4. Sarah Graham .................... 69 ....... 1999-02 5. Erica Holveck .................... 63 ....... 2000-02

Goals Against Average GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE LEADERS Season: 4.70 by Tiffy Zachos, 1992 Career: 5.73 by Tiffy Zachos, 1990-92

Goals Against Average — Season 1. Tiffy Zachos .................... 4.70 ............ 1992 2. Lynn Vacca ...................... 4.82 ............ 1979 3. Beth Paciello ................... 5.99 ............ 1987 4. Tiffy Zachos .................... 6.00 ............ 1991 5. Lucy Gil .......................... 6.44 ............ 1983 6. Beth Paciello ................... 6.48 ............ 1988 7. Carrie Giancola ................ 6.56 ............ 2001 8. Ellen Grant ...................... 6.63 ............ 1984 9. Lynn Vacca ...................... 6.83 ............ 1978 10. Lori Wick ......................... 7.09 ............ 1980 Goals Against Average — Career 1. Tiffy Zachos .................... 5.73 ....... 2. Lynn Vacca ...................... 5.87 ....... 3. Lucy Gil .......................... 7.14 ....... 4. Beth Paciello ................... 7.29 ....... 5. Lori Wick ......................... 7.41 ....... 6. Carrie Giancola ................ 7.50 ....... 7. Suzanne Maman .............. 7.55 ....... 8. Sue Levy ......................... 8.11 ....... 9. Ellen Grant ...................... 9.02 ....... 10. Sonia Novik ..................... 9.43 .......

1990-92 1978-79 1982-83 1986-88 1980-81 1999-02 1989-90 1982-84 1984-86 1996-99

Goalkeeper Saves GOALKEEPER SAVE LEADERS Game: 32 by Lori Wick vs. Yale, 4-4-81 Season: 229 by Lori Wick, 1981 Career: 471 by Carrie Giancola, 1999-02 Saves — Season 1. Lori Wick .......................... 2. Lori Wick .......................... 3. Sonia Novik ...................... 4. Carrie Giancola ................. 5. Sue Levy .......................... 6. Carrie Giancola ................. 7. Yelena Chak ..................... 8. Lynn Vacca ....................... 9. Lucy Gil ........................... 10. Beth Paciello ....................

229 ............ 1981 175 ............ 1980 156 ............ 1998 144 ............ 2000 143 ............ 1982 140 ............ 2002 136 ............ 1997 132 ............ 1979 130 ............ 1983 129 ............ 1987

Saves — Career 1. Carrie Giancola ................. 2. Lori Wick .......................... 3. Sonia Novik ...................... 4. Beth Paciello .................... 5. Ellen Grant ....................... 6. Yelena Chak ..................... 7. Lynn Vacca ....................... 8. Sue Levy .......................... 9. Tiffy Zachos ..................... 10. Carol Bean .......................

471 ....... 404 ....... 307 ....... 276 ....... 262 ....... 259 ....... 223 ....... 210 ....... 197 ....... 189 .......

1999-02 1980-81 1996-99 1986-88 1984-86 1996-97 1978-79 1982-84 1990-92 1978-79

Save Percentage SAVE PERCENTAGE LEADERS Season: .688 by Carol Bean, 1975 Career: .667 by Lori Wick, 1980-81 Save 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Percentage — Season Carol Bean ...................... Lori Wick ......................... Lori Wick ......................... Lynn Vacca ...................... Lynn Vacca ...................... Beth Paciello ................... Lucy Gil .......................... Sue Levy ......................... Tiffy Zachos .................... Sonia Novik .....................

.688 ............ 1975 .676 ............ 1981 .651 ............ 1980 .650 ............ 1978 .644 ............ 1979 .629 ............ 1987 .628 ............ 1983 .619 ............ 1982 .600 ............ 1992 .596 ............ 1999

Save 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Percentage — Career Lori Wick ......................... Lynn Vacca ...................... Lucy Gil .......................... Sue Levy ......................... Carol Bean ...................... Sonia Novik ..................... Suzanne Maman .............. Tiffy Zachos .................... Carrie Giancola ................ Beth Paciello ...................

.667 ....... .646 ....... .596 ....... .588 ....... .583 ....... .569 ....... .558 ....... .550 ....... .542 ....... .541 .......

1980-81 1978-79 1982-83 1982-84 1978-79 1996-99 1989-90 1990-92 1999-02 1986-88

2003 Cornell 37 Women’s Lacrosse


CORNELL RECORDS All-Time Opponents

Team Records

Most Games Played .................. 18

2002 (16-2)

Most Wins ............................... 16

2002 (16-2)

Most Losses .............................. 12

1989 (1-12)

Most Ties ................................. 2

1978 (7-2-2)

Longest Winning Streak ............ 11

Apr. 22, 2000-Mar. 31, 2001

11

April 6-May 17, 2002

Longest Losing Streak ............... 9

March 25-April 22, 1989

Most Goals Scored (Game) ....... 22

vs. Rut., May 1, 1994 (22-11)

Most Goals Scored (Season) ...... 228

2002 (16-2)

Most Assists (Season) ................ 99

2000 (13-4)

Most Points (Season) ................ 311

2002 (16-2)

Most Goals Allowed (Game) ..... 23

vs. Dartmouth, 1998 (23-6)

Most Goals Allowed (Season) .... 172

1994 (4-10)

Largest Margin of Victory .......... 16

vs. Hartwick, 1977 (16-0)

Largest Margin of Defeat .......... 20

vs. Penn State, 1974 (1-21)

Cornell Lacrosse Year-By-Year Years

W

L

T

Ivy

Sue Tyler (1972-74, 5-10; 3 years) 1972 3 2 0 1973 1 3 0 1974 1 5 0 -

Coach

Sue Tyler Sue Tyler Sue Tyler

Judy Zoble Kosstrin (1975-76, 4-10; 2 years) 1975 3 4 0 Judy Zoble Kosstrin Happy Horgan (19765, 1-6; 1 year) 1976 1 6 0 Judy Zoble Kosstrin & Happy Horgan Cheryl Wolf (1977-97, 133-145-4; 22-86 Ivy; 21 years) 1977 3 6 0 Cheryl Wolf 1978 7 2 2 Cheryl Wolf 1979 7 4 1 Cheryl Wolf 1980 6 9 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf 1981 6 8 0 1-5, 6th Cheryl Wolf 1982 5 9 0 1-5, 6th Cheryl Wolf 1983 6 8 0 1-5, 6th Cheryl Wolf 1984 8 6 0 1-5, 6th Cheryl Wolf 1985 5 8 1 1-5, t-5th Cheryl Wolf 1986 6 8 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf 1987 11 3 0 3-3, t-3rd Cheryl Wolf 1988 7 6 0 2-4, t-4th Cheryl Wolf 1989 1 12 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf 1990 8 6 0 1-5, t-6th Cheryl Wolf 1991 8 5 0 3-3, t-3rd Cheryl Wolf 1992 11 5 0 3-3, 4th Cheryl Wolf 1993 7 6 0 3-3, 4th Cheryl Wolf 1994 4 10 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf 1995 7 6 0 2-4, t-4th Cheryl Wolf 1996 5 9 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf 1997 5 9 0 0-6, 7th Cheryl Wolf Jenny Graap (1998-present, 56-23; 22-13 Ivy, 5 years) 1998 7 7 0 3-4, t-4th Jenny Graap 1999 9 6 0 3-4, 5th Jenny Graap 2000 13 4 0 5-2, 3rd Jenny Graap 2001 11 4 0 5-2, t-3rd Jenny Graap 2002 16 2 0 6-1, 2nd Jenny Graap Totals 198

188

4

Opponent Boston College Boston University Brockport Brown Bucknell California Colgate Columbia* Cortland Dartmouth Davidson Delaware Drexel Fairfield Georgetown Hamilton Hartwick Harvard Ithaca Johns Hopkins Lafayette Lehigh Maryland Massachusetts New Hampshire Northeastern Notre Dame Ohio State Oneonta Penn State Pennsylvania Princeton Rochester Rutgers Sacred Heart St. Lawrence Stanford Syracuse Towson Union Vanderbilt Vermont Virginia Virginia Tech William Smith Yale

Series Last Started Meeting 1989 ........ 2000 2002 ........ 2002 1972 ........ 1980 1980 ....... 2002 1978 ........ 1997 2000 ........ 2000 1974 ........ 2002 *1997 ...... 2002 1973 ........ 1990 1980 ....... 2002 1997 ........ 1997 1992 ....... 2002 1992 ........ 1996 First meeting 2002 ........ 2002 1985 ........ 1985 1972 ........ 1980 1980 ........ 2002 1972 ........ 1992 2000 ........ 2002 1988 ........ 1999 1990 ........ 1990 2002 ........ 2002 2000 ........ 2000 1992 ........ 1996 1976 ........ 1976 2002 ....... 2002 1999 ....... 1999 1979 ........ 1986 1972 ........ 2001 1975 ....... 2002 1980 ....... 2002 1981 ........ 1981 1991 ....... 2002 2000 ........ 2000 1979 ........ 1987 1999 ....... 2002 1998 ....... 2002 1992 ........ 1992 1983 ........ 1987 1998 ....... 2001 1993 ........ 1997 1988 ........ 1988 1997 ........ 1998 1972 ........ 1991 1980 ....... 2002

W 8 1 3 9 11 1 17 *6 7 4 1 2 4

L 4 0 7 14 1 0 14 0 13 19 0 1 0

T 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 1 6 4 11 3 4 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 6 1 12 2 1 6 1 9 4 3 1 2 2 4 0 2 23 9

1 0 2 19 13 0 8 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 3 16 22 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 15

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTALS:

31 years (1972-02)

198

188

4

*Columbia started playing varsity lacrosse in 1997, but games vs. Columbia did not count in league standings until 1998. * 2003 Opponents in BOLD

44-99

2003 Cornell 38 Women’s Lacrosse

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CORNELL ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME Mary-Elizabeth DeLaney ’89

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1993

In lacrosse she was a Brine Northeast All-America first-team pick three straight years. She was named to the Brine USWLA Division I All-America second team in 1988 and was honorable mention in 1987. She also received All-Ivy first-team honors in 1987 and 1988, and was honorable mention in 1986. A cocaptain her senior year, she ranked among Cornell’s top 10 in career points and assists for over 10 years and is still listed ninth on the all-time assist list. In field hockey, she was an All-Ivy first-team selection in 1998 and was second team in 1987. She was co-captain and MVP as a senior.

Robyn Ewing ’82

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1996

In lacrosse, she was selected to play for the Central District II team in the USWLA tournament in 1979 and 1980 and played on the New York state college all-star team in 1980. She led Cornell to the NYSAIAW championship in 1981. Ewing was named to the All-Ivy second team in 1981 and was an honorable mention pick in 1982. A co-captain as a senior, her 109 goals and 133 points were both Cornell records and she set records for game assists, consecutive games with goals and points scored. She lettered in field hockey as a freshman, when she was third on the team in scoring and tied for the team lead in goals scored.

Ellen Graap ’89

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 2000

She was a four-year letter winner in both lacrosse and field hockey. In lacrosse, she led the team in scoring in 1988 (19-9—28) and in 1989 (14-1—15). Over her four-year career, she scored 76 points on 59 goals and 17 assists. She was a Brine Northeast Regional All-America first-team selection in 1988 and received honorable mention honors in 1989. She was a unanimous All-Ivy first-team selection in 1988 while earning second-team honors in 1989. An All-Ivy selection in field hockey, she set Cornell records for career assists (15), season assists (9 in 1988) and game assists (4 in 1988). She served as the team’s co-captain in 1988.

Karla Griffin ’87

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1992

She was a four-year letter winner in both lacrosse and field hockey as a defender. In lacrosse, she was named to the Brine Northeast Regional All-America first team in 1987, when the Big Red went 11-3 overall. A two-time All-Ivy second-team pick, she was co-captain in 1987. Griffin was the recipient of one of 10 New York State Women’s Collegiate Athletic Association Scholar-Athlete Recognition awards. In field hockey, she was named to the All-Ivy first team as a senior and the second unit as a junior.

www.CornellBigRed.com

The first Cornell Athletic Hall of Fame induction ceremonies were held in September 1978. There are currently 429 members in the Hall, eight of whom are former women’s lacrosse players. Women’s lacrosse is one of the most represented women’s programs in the Hall. Susan Hartwell ’78

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1984

A versatile athlete, she was the co-captain of the lacrosse and field hockey teams as a junior and senior. A three-year regular in lacrosse and a fouryear member of the field hockey team, she helped the 1978 lacrosse team to a second-place finish in the New York state tournament. She was runner-up in team scoring in 1976 and was third as a junior and senior.

Linda Miller ’84

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1990

In lacrosse, she set the career scoring record and the season and career marks for assists. Miller was an All-Ivy first-team selection as a senior after receiving second-team honors as a sophomore and a junior. In 1983, she was accorded All-America honorable mention and was selected to the All-Northeast Division I first team and the All-New York State second squad. She co-captained both the lacrosse and field hockey teams as a senior and was lacrosse co-captain as a junior. In field hockey, she led the squad in scoring for four years, setting season and career records for goals, assists and points.

Cynthia Schlaepfer ’78

Lacrosse/Ice Hockey/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1985

A three-sport athlete in college, she was a member of the lacrosse team as a senior. In ice hockey, she was a dominating player, leading the squad to three consecutive Ivy league titles. She practically rewrote the record books, setting a slew of standards that still stand. She also played field hockey as a junior.

Leane Sinicki ’85

Lacrosse/Field Hockey • Inducted: 1998

She was a four-time letter winner in both lacrosse and field hockey. In lacrosse, she received All-Ivy honorable mention honors in 1983 and 1984, and was an All-Ivy second-team selection as a senior, when she was named the team’s best defender. She was a three-time New York state second-team pick. She was selected to compete in the USWLA national tournament in 1982 and was a member of the USWLA Central District College All-Star third team. In field hockey, she was a tricaptain of the 1984 squad. She led the Big Red in scoring and was named to the All-Ivy first team in 1984.

2003 Cornell 39 Women’s Lacrosse


2002 IVY LEAGUE STANDINGS/STATS 2002 Ivy League Standings Princeton Cornell Yale Dartmouth Pennsylvania Harvard Brown Columbia

W 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

L 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Ivy League Pct. GF 1.000 97 .857 83 .714 89 .571 51 .429 68 .286 57 .143 65 .000 32

GA 38 60 59 54 68 70 81 112

W 19 16 11 10 7 8 5 6

L 1 2 5 6 8 7 9 9

Overall GF Pct. .950 291 .889 230 .688 184 .625 149 .467 140 .533 128 .357 143 .400 116

GA 130 134 143 135 141 127 147 174

2002 Ivy League Scoring Leaders • League Games Only Scoring Leaders Jaimee Reynolds, Cornell Miles Whitman, Yale Sarah Queener, Yale Sarah Averson, Cornell Jen Newitt, Dartmouth Charlotte Kenworthy, Princeton Crissy Book, Pennsylvania Katherine Sargent, Yale Theresa Sherry, Princeton Mimi Hammerberg, Princeton Goalkeeping Sarah Kolodner, Princeton Meghan McInnes, Princeton Sarah Hughes, Dartmouth Carrie Giancola, Cornell Laura Mancini, Harvard Niki Caggiano, Brown Jessica Valdez, Columbia

G 24 22 11 17 14 14 17 17 15 8

A 6 3 13 4 7 5 1 1 3 10

Min. 261 159 366 371 426 395 340

Pts. 30 25 24 21 21 19 18 18 18 18 Svs. 39 24 46 57 56 88 63

Pct. .639 .600 .541 .504 .444 .550 .391

GA 22 16 39 56 70 72 98

Avg. 5.06 6.04 6.39 9.06 9.90 10.94 17.57

Ivy League Player of the Year Jaimee Reynolds

2002 All-Ivy Women’s Lacrosse Team First Team A — Lauren Simone, Sr. , Princeton* A — Sarah Averson, Jr., Cornell A — Charlotte Kenworthy, Sr. , Princeton MF — Jaimee Reynolds, Sr., Cornell* MF — Jen Newitt, Sr., Dartmouth* MF — Theresa Sherry, So., Princeton* MF — Crissy Book, Jr., Pennsylvania MF — Miles Whitman, So., Yale D — Rachael Becker, Jr., Princeton* D — Katy Cuneo, Sr., Dartmouth D — Brooke Owens, Sr., Princeton D — Megan Strenski, Sr., Yale G — Carrie Giancola, Sr., Cornell

Second Team A — Christine Anneberg, So., Brown A — Katie Shaughnessy, Jr., Harvard A — Sarah Queener, Jr., Yale MF — Bekkah Rottenberg, So., Brown MF — Alison Moulin, Sr., Dartmouth MF — Mimi Hammerberg, Sr., Princeton MF — Katie Sargent, Fr., Yale D — Erica Holveck, Jr., Cornell D — Erin Kutner, Jr., Harvard D — Christy Bennett, Jr., Pennsylvania G — Nikki Caggiano, Sr., Brown

All-Ivy Honorable Mention Honorable Mention Kari Zarzecki Attack — Lori Wohlschlegel (Cornell), Sarah Fischer (Cornell), Kate Murray (Pennsylvania), Lindsay Biles (Princeton), Clarissa Clarke (Yale) 2002 Academic All-Ivy Midfield — Laurel Pierpont (Brown), Ellen Lowrey (Columbia), Lindsey Cassidy (Pennsylvania) Jaimee Reynolds — Senior ... Major: Defense — Kari Zarzecki (Cornell), Rowan Smith (Dartmouth), Heather Gotha (Harvard) Agricultural Biological Engineering, Goalkeeper — Jessica Valadez (Columbia), Sarah Kolodner (Princeton) First-Team All-Ivy, Ivy League Player of Player of the Year the Year, First-Team All-America, FirstJaimee Reynolds, Cornell Team Academic All-America. Rookie of the Year Erica Holveck — Junior ... Major: Katie Sargent, Yale Psychology, Second-Team All-Ivy, *Unanimous selections Second-Team All-America 2003 Cornell 40 Women’s Lacrosse

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2003 Cornell 41 Women’s Lacrosse


THE CORNELL EXPERIENCE Cornell University offers tremendous opportunities to compete at the highest levels on the field and in the classroom, but don’t just take our word for it ...

Tina Hennessey ‘93

“Through the experience of playing lacrosse at Cornell, one quality that has carried over into my postcollege life is the ability to juggle multiple challenges at a time. Being a student-athlete at Cornell, with its demanding academic workload and Division I athletics, is a great warm-up for what you will face after college. I recently decided to get my MBA while also working full time, and I had no doubt I could handle the addition of school to my already busy

life, mainly because I got great training as a student-athlete at Cornell. Watching the Cornell team excel today is great for us alumnae, since we can live somewhat vicariously through the current team in watching the players strive for goals we never reached — beating Harvard (for the first time ever in 1999 and then again the last three seasons!) winning the Ivy League (this year?) and getting a bid to the NCAA tournament. It is exciting because we experienced the same feelings and had many of the same goals, yet today’s team is reaching them, and we can truly relate to how amazing these records and accomplishments must be for them.”

Mary-Beth DeLaney Hahn ‘89 “My experience as a member of the Cornell women’s lacrosse team taught me to be disciplined and to prioritize activities. While I was a student-athlete, I had to juggle studies

and sports. I now juggle work, family and leisure activities. My success at Marsh is a result of my ability to be disciplined and organized, as I am constantly working on projects for Fortune 500 accounts and each project must be done well. I am grateful for my experience as a women’s lacrosse player, and I am proud of how well the team is currently doing.”

Jaimee Reynolds ‘02

If someone told me that during my senior year at Cornell I would be on a team that beat the University of Maryland Women’s Lacrosse Team to reach the Final Four in 2002, I would have smiled, nodded, and then maybe laughed. That’s usually what I do when I think something’s out of my reach. Now I’m starting to cry just thinking about it, but at least I can say they are happy tears. I came into Cornell not even knowing if I would/could play, and when I left I discovered that the only thing which might have kept the 2002 team from succeeding was doubt. We had the strength thanks to Coach Howley, we had the skills thanks to our coaches, Jenny, Lellie, JJ and Adrian, and we had the heart thanks to our parents and teammates. We were a team that continually im- Jaimee Reynolds, receivproved, and I can prom- ing her NCAA New York ise you that the 2002 Woman of the Year trophy alumnae and their parents will be on the side- with Cornell head coach linescheeringforateam Jenny Graap. that gets stronger every year. And when we can’t make it, we’ll have to be content with the game recaps written by our biggest fans, the Cornell communication staff and administration. Go Big Red!

Sarah McGoey ‘01

“Cornell lacrosse exemplifies unity. We work hard together and for each other. We push ourselves every day in practice because we love lacrosse, and we are passionate to play the game. The ingredient that makes all the sprinting, weight training and drills easier is that we are there together. I feel so fortunate to have been a part of the turn around in this program. We came so far in my four years, and I am so proud of my Cornell lacrosse experience.”

The 2002 Cornell women’s lacrosse alumni game

Kristen Wolf ‘99

“It is hard to find the words to express the tremendous pride I have experienced both as a player and as a coach of the Cornell women’s lacrosse program. During my first two years on the team, the Big Red went without a single Ivy League victory. In 2000 and 2001 the team finished 5-2 in the Ivies for a third-place finish. Last year they went 6-1 to finish second. Thanks to the commitment and dedication of the coaching staff and players, the program is now ranked as one of the top teams in the nation and considered to be a contender for both an Ivy League title and another NCAA tournament bid. The biggest difference between then and now can be seen by the fear in our opponent’s eyes as we take the field on game day. Cornell comes out ready to play. We are focused, we are confident, and nobody can break our team spirit. Although we definitely have some true stars on the squad, Cornell lacrosse presents itself as a unit. We are successful because opponents may be able to limit the scoring of a few of our top players, but every player on this team is a weapon ready to step up when needed. On any given day, we can threaten an upset of a higher ranked team because we believe in ourselves, and we play with the philosophy that we have nothing to lose, and everything to gain.” 2003 Cornell 42 Women’s Lacrosse

www.CornellBigRed.com


PLAYING FACILITIES Schoellkopf Field Schoellkopf Field has been an integral part of the Cornell campus since it was first constructed in 1915. During the summer of 1999, the entire playing surface was renovated with the new AstroTurf System 2000 surface, making Schoellkopf one of the finest playing fields in the country. The AstroTurf surface covers six layers of padding and drainage, designed to protect both the field and the student-athletes who play on it. The drainage system is state of the art, according to Steve Wright, director of planning, design and construction at Cornell. “This is the Cadillac of turf systems,” Wright said. “Water goes straight through; you couldn’t get any better AstroTurf.” Surrounding the playing field is a new Eurotan EPDM outdoor track. This replaced the Poly-Surf track that was installed in 1972 and the gift of Floyd R. Newman ’12. The original stadium was completed with funds given by Jacob F. Schoellkopf, Jr., ’05, Paul A. Schoellkopf ’06, Walter H. Schoellkopf ’08 and William G. Schoellkopf ’19. The seating capacity is 25,597. The crescent, constructed in 1924 to enlarge the stadium on the east side of the field, seats 20,950. The permanent steel stands were added in 1947 on the west side to accommodate 4,647. Schoellkopf Field refurbished in 1986 as part of a $3.6 million restoration. The crescent and west stands were painted and adorned with new aluminum seating. The press box was also built in 1986-87. In the summer of 1988, All-Pro Turf was installed. The installment of AstroTurf in 1999 is the fourth artificial covering on the field since the natural turf at Schoellkopf was removed in 1971 and replaced with Poly-Turf, which was installed as a gift of Joseph P. Routh ’17 of New York City. The installation of the artificial turf has enabled the field to be used for varsity and junior varsity football games, sprint football games and field hockey in the fall; and men’s and women’s lacrosse in the spring.

Berman Field On October 24, 1996, the Robert J. Kane Sports Complex was dedicated at Cornell University. The multisurfaced complex contains the William E. Simon Track and the Charles F. Berman Field. Berman Field is used by the women’s lacrosse team and both the men’s and women’s soccer squads, while the track is home to the Big Red men’s and women’s outdoor track teams. The complex is named in honor of the late Robert J. Kane ‘34, who was a Cornell athletic administrator for 37 years, starting in 1939, when he became an assistant to athletic director James Lynah. The natural turf is flat, with vertical drainage and automatic irrigation systems. The design includes a soil mix of eight parts sand, one part top soil and one part bio-solid compost. This system can divert 5-10 inches of rain per hour away from the playing surface. A mixture of 30 percent perennial rye and 70 percent Kentucky bluegrass has been used to create the turf. This mixture was selected for its sod-forming capabilities, as well as its adaptability to close mowing. The final phase of the complex was completed two years ago with the addition of permanent seating for 1,000 and a full lighting system, which allows for night time contests. The field was named in honor of the late Charles F. Berman ‘49. Described as a flashy and fiery center forward on the historic Cornell soccer team of 1948, Berman was probably the major reason that Cornell soccer reached national prominence that year.

The Richard M. Ramin Indoor Turf Room While the weather may be unpredictable, the Big Red lacrosse team knows there is a constant practice facility that isn’t affected by rain or snow. The Richard M. Ramin Room is a 27,000-square-foot indoor turf facility that allows teams the opportunity to train at any time of the year. The Lindseth Climbing Wall is also located in the Ramin Room, and is the largest natural rock, indoor climbing wall in North America. The room is named in honor of the late Richard M. Ramin ’51, who played on the varsity football team from 1948 to 1950, and who served as a Cornell administrator for 41 years. www.CornellBigRed.com

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THE FRIEDMAN CENTER Cornell’s 1,100 varsity athletes have exclusive access to one of the newest and best training facilities in the nation—the 8,000-square-foot Friedman Strength and Conditioning Center. Completed in June 1997, this impressive $2 million addition to Bartels Hall reflects the university’s strong commitment to athletic excellence. Coaches and team members alike credit the center, its world-class equipment, and first-rate staff with adding immensely to the success of the Big Red athletic program. The Friedman Center contains free-weight, selectorized, plyometric, and cardiovascular equipment and has been designed to meet the diverse training needs of Cornell’s athletes. The center can accommodate up to 100 users at a time without compromising safety or function. Its unique features include airconditioning, a 175-watt stereo system, and damage-resistant flooring. Cornell’s varsity strength and conditioning program—nicknamed “Big Red Power”—focuses on enhancing performance and preventing injury. The new facility and equipment enable the staff to prescribe year-round sport-specific programs with variety and precision. Before the training programs are designed, the muscular and metabolic needs for each sport—and for each position within the sport—are analyzed. Athletes are then assessed to identify their individual strengths and weaknesses, and follow-up assessments are conducted at regular intervals. Comprehensive workouts are prescribed to address deficiencies and promote the development of skills used during competition. Injury prevention also is emphasized. Through resistance training, the number and the severity of injuries are reduced. If an injury does occur, the strength and conditioning staff works closely with the sports medicine staff to ensure a safe and complete rehabilitation. The objective is to allow the athlete to resume full participation as soon as possible.

Strength and conditioning coach Tom Howley with five of the Big Red seniors: (l-r) Katie Lavin, Sarah Averson, Rachel Friedman, Erica Holveck and Abby Beyer.

2003 Cornell 44 Women’s Lacrosse

Tom Howley

Head Coach, Strength and Conditioning Tom Howley has been the Strength and Conditioning coach at Cornell University since July 1995. In that role, he oversees the design and implementation of athletic performance programs for Cornell’s 36 varsity sports. The comprehensive, year-round programs include strength and power development, mobility skill training and conditioning, and are implemented in a motivating, team-oriented environment. Prior to his arrival at Cornell, Howley was the assistant director of strength and conditioning at East Carolina University from 1991-1995. While there, the Pirates participated in two bowl games (1992 Peach Bowl and 1995 Liberty Bowl), qualified for the NCAA baseball regional tournament (1994) and played in the NCAA basketball tournament (1993). Howley was a graduate assistant strength and conditioning coach at Auburn University from 1989-91, where he earned his master’s degree in exercise physiology. The Tigers, the 1989 Southeastern Conference co-champions, were the 1990 Hall of Fame Bowl and the 1991 Peach Bowl champions, as Howley also served as an assistant coach with the special teams. A 1988 graduate of Tulane, Howley earned a bachelor of arts degree in history and was a threeyear letterman and two year starting offensive lineman on the football team. The Green Wave played in the 1987 Independence Bowl his senior year. He was the recipient of the New Orleans Quarterback Club Student-Athlete Award as a senior. Howley is an active participant in the Cornell University/Ithaca College chapter of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. He and his wife, Amanda, reside in Ithaca. www.CornellBigRed.com


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION Hunter R. Rawlings III President of the University

Hunter Rawlings, Cornell’s 10th president, is a classics scholar who was the starting center on the Haverford basketball team during his undergraduate days and later had a pitching tryout with the Baltimore Orioles. “There is nothing better than a vigorous combination of academic and athletic life,” says Rawlings. “My own college experience had a healthy measure of both and taught me the value of competition. My best friends continue to be my basketball and baseball teammates. “At Cornell, we strive for excellence in athletics as an important endeavor in its own right and as part of our commitment to the undergraduate education. The opportunity to earn an Ivy League degree and to be part of an intercollegiate team is a great reason to attend Cornell University.” Rawlings, who earned his doctorate at Princeton University, came to Cornell in 1995 from the University of Iowa, where he was president and professor of classics from 1988 until 1995. Before that, he served for four years as vice president for academic affairs and research and as dean of the graduate school at the University of Colorado. At the end of the 2002-03 academic year, he will return to full-time research and teaching as a professor of classics at Cornell. Rawlings was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995. He has served on the board of directors of the American Council on Education and is now serving a second term on the executive committee of the Association of American Universities. He is chair of the Council of Ivy Group Presidents and a member of the Council on the Financing of Higher Education (COFHE). He is also a member of the National Academy Foundation, the Partnership for Public Service Governors, the Board of Managers of Haverford College and the National Advisory Committee of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

Susan H. Murphy

Vice President, Student and Academic Services Susan H. Murphy has served Cornell University as vice president for student and academic services since July 1994. Under her direction are academic support, campus life, dean of students, Greek life, career services, public service, religious affairs, athletics and physical education and health services. A 1973 graduate of Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences, Murphy majored in history. She subsequently completed master’s degrees at Stanford University and Montclair State College. In 1994, she earned a Ph.D. in educational administration from Cornell. Murphy joined the Cornell staff in 1978 following work as a guidance counselor and head of the guidance department at Chatham (N.J.) Borough High School. For 16 years, she worked in admissions and financial aid, including nine years as dean of admissions and financial aid. In addition to her responsibilities at Cornell, Murphy chairs the policy committee of the Council of Ivy Group Presidents. Previously, she has held state-wide and national positions in the College Board and the National Association of College Admission Counselors.

J. Andrew Noel Jr.

Director of Athletics and Physical Education After serving three years as an associate director of athletics at Cornell University, Andy Noel was named the university’s director of athletics and physical education in 1999. Noel was the Big Red’s head wrestling coach from 1974 to 1988 and then served two years as an assistant director in the department’s public affairs office, implementing the athletics annual giving program. A native of Lancaster, Pa., he graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in 1972 with a bachelor of arts degree in history and received his master of arts degree in counseling and guidance from Colgate University in 1973. At Cornell, his wrestling teams won four Ivy League championships and placed second four times. Under Noel’s direction, the wrestling team established a strong network of support from alumni and friends. In 1990, he was recognized at the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association Championships for his distinguished coaching career at Cornell, and in 1992 he was inducted into the New York State Wrestling Coaches Association Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the Franklin and Marshall Sports Hall of Fame. In addition to his coaching and administrative career, Noel served on the wrestling committee of the National Collegiate Athletic Association from 1997-2001. He is a past chairman of the Ivy League athletic directors’ committee on administration.

www.CornellBigRed.com

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CORNELL UNIVERSITY In the mid 1800s, two New York state senators, Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, shared the bold dream of founding a “truly great university.” Cornell, a plain-spoken inventor, wanted “an institution where any person can find instruction in any study,” including the mechanical arts and agriculture. White, a scholarly graduate of Oxford and Yale, yearned to establish a university where “truth shall be taught for truth’s sake” in the arts and sciences. Together they created a nonsectarian university that was the first in the eastern United States to admit women and that pioneered the concept of elective courses. Their egalitarian vision and innovative ideas, which set Cornell apart at its opening in 1868, continue to guide the university today. Cornell includes 13 colleges and schools. On the Ithaca campus are the seven undergraduate units—the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning; the College of Arts and Sciences; the College of Engineering; the School of Hotel Administration; the College of Human Ecology; and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations—as well as four graduate and professional units: the Graduate School, the Law School, the Johnson Graduate School of Management, and the College of Veterinary Medicine. (The Weill Medical College and the Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences are in New York City.) An Ivy League university that is also the land-grant institution of New York State, Cornell is a unique combination of public and private divisions committed to teaching, research, and public service. Cornell’s 13,600 undergraduates and 6,000 graduate and professional students come from all 50 states and more than 100 countries. Interdisciplinary study and research are Cornell hallmarks, as is attention to undergraduate educa-

CORNELL’S MISSION AND VALUES

In keeping with the founding vision of Ezra Cornell, our community fosters personal discovery and growth, nurtures scholarship and creativity across a broad range of common knowledge, and engages men and women from every segment of society in this quest. We pursue understanding beyond the limitations of existing knowledge, ideology, and disciplinary structure. We affirm the value to individuals and society of the cultivation of the human mind and spirit. Our faculty, students, and staff strive to achieve these objectives in a context of “freedom with responsibility.” We promote initiative, integrity, and excellence in an academic community that prizes collegiality, civility, and responsible stewardship. As the land grant university of the State of New York, we apply the results of our endeavors in service to the community, the state, the nation and the world. “I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study.” -- Ezra Cornell, 1865

OPEN DOORS, OPEN HEARTS, AND OPEN MINDS Cornell’s Statement on Diversity and Inclusiveness

Open Doors ”I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study.” This statement, made by Ezra Cornell in 1865, proclaims Cornell University’s enduring commitment to inclusion and opportunity which is rooted in the shared democratic values envisioned by its founders. We honor this legacy of diversity and inclusion and welcome all individuals, including those from groups that have been historically marginalized and previously excluded from equal access to opportunity. Open Hearts Cornell’s mission is to foster personal discovery and growth, nurture scholarship and creativity across a broad range of common knowledge and affirm the value to individuals and society of the cultivation of the human mind and spirit. Our legacy is reflected in the diverse composition of our community, the breadth of our curriculum, the strength of our public service, and the depth of our commitment to freedom, equity, and reason. Each member of the Cornell community has a responsibility to honor this legacy and to support a more diverse and inclusive campus in which to work, study, teach, research, and serve. Open Minds Free expression is essential to this mission, and provocative ideas lawfully presented are an expected result. An enlightened academic community, however, connects freedom with responsibility. Cornell stands for civil discourse, reasoned thought, sustained discussion and constructive engagement without degrading, abusing, harassing, or silencing others. Cornell is committed to act responsibly and forthrightly to maintain an environment that opens doors, opens hearts and opens minds.

tion. The university’s 2,200 faculty members are active teachers as well as researchers—Nobel laureates often conduct introductory courses—and the lines of traditional disciplines are easily crossed. Engineering students dabble in photography; theatre arts students explore the world of computers; physics majors learn landscape architecture. National Science Foundation studies on programs in research and development at U.S. universities consistently rank Cornell among the top 10 or 11 in total research and development expenditures, and in

Cornell Facts • Founded In 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White. • Opened October 7, 1868. Morrill Hall was the first building constructed on the main Ithaca campus, which today includes 260 major buildings on 745 acres. • Affiliations Cornell is a private endowed university and the federal land-grant institution of New York state. It is a member of the Ivy League and a partner of the State University of New York. • Colleges and Schools Thirteen — seven undergraduate units and four graduate and professional units in Ithaca, and two medical graduate and professional units in New York City.

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• Undergraduate Colleges and Schools College of Agriculture and Life Sciences College of Architecture, Art, and Planning College of Arts and Sciences College of Engineering School of Hotel Administration College of Human Ecology School of Industrial and Labor Relations • Graduate/Professional Colleges and Schools Graduate School Law School Johnson Graduate School of Management Weill Medical College (New York City) Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York City) College of Veterinary Medicine

www.CornellBigRed.com


REALIZING A BOLD DREAM federally financed expenditures. Cornell ranks second among U.S. universities in funds allocated by the National Science Foundation for programs in academic science and engineering. Cornell has five national research centers: the Center for High Energy Synchrotron Studies, the Floyd R. Newman Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center (which operates the world’s largest radio-radar telescope, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico), the Cornell Nanofabrication Facility, and the National Science and

Technology Center for Computer Graphics and Scientific Visualization. The university also has four national resource centers: the Latin American Studies Program, the East Asia Program, the South Asia Program, and the Southeast Asia Program. Cornell University Library’s 17 Ithacacampus units provide an array of reference, information, and instructional services. At the southeast edge of the Arts Quad, Olin and Kroch Libraries house the largest concentration of resources in the humanities, social sciences, and area studies, including extensive Asia collections, and rare books, manuscripts, and archival materials. Mann Library, on the Ag Quad, has materials in agriculture, biology, biotechnology, and related fields. Other libraries specialize in African and African American studies, engineering, entomology, the fine arts, hotel management, industrial and labor relations, law, management, mathematics, music, the physical sciences, and veterinary medicine. Famed for its woodlands, gorges, and waterfalls, the 745-acre main campus is on a hilltop overlooking Ithaca, a lively city of about 30,000 situated at the southern end of 44-mile-long Cayuga Lake, in the Finger Lakes region of New York state. Campus attractions of special interest include the Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell Plantations, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Sapsucker Woods wildlife sanctuary. The heart of New York state’s wine-growing region is less than an hour away, as are the Corning Glass Center and Museum and the Watkins Glen auto circuit. New York City is about a four-hour drive from Ithaca.

Cornell Points of Interest

Jennie McGraw Tower and Cornell Chimes: Constructed in 1891 atop Uris Library, the tower is a campus landmark, 173 feet high and 161 steps from the ground. It houses the Cornell clock, chimes, and chimes museum. The reconfigured, retuned, and expanded set of 21 bells was reinstalled in the tower in fall 1999. The chimes are played daily by student and alumni chimesmasters, whose repertoire includes more than two thousand songs. Willard Straight Hall: “The Straight” opened in 1925 as one of the nation’s first student unions. A stately Gothic structure with cathedral ceilings, marble staircases, and oak paneling, it houses dining facilities, a browsing library, a music room, a ceramics studio, an art gallery, Cornell Cinema, meeting and activity rooms, the Office of the Dean of Students, and offices for more than forty student organizations. Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art: The museum is housed in a building designed by I. M. Pei. Built in 1973 on the site where Ezra Cornell is said to have announced his intention to found a university, it offers spectacular views of the campus, Ithaca, and Cayuga Lake. The museum’s Asian, American, and graphic arts collections are especially notable. Cornell Plantations: The Plantations’ holdings include 3,600 acres in and around Ithaca, all open to the public. On or near campus are the arboretum and botanical garden (200 acres) and 500 acres of natural areas encompassing woodlands, trails, streams, and gorges. Easily accessible on campus are rose, peony, rhododendron, wildflower, and herb gardens; shrub and nut-tree collections; the Pounder Heritage Crops Garden; and the Muenscher Poisonous Plants Garden. Laboratory of Ornithology: Situated not far from the main campus, the laboratory’s facilities include the Lyman K. Stuart Observatory, which overlooks a 10-acre pond and a bird-feeding garden, and the 200-acre Sapsucker Woods, a wildlife sanctuary with more than four miles of trails. The laboratory’s Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds has the world’s largest collection of bird-song recordings. The laboratory also is active in bioacoustics research and bird population studies. Athletics and Physical Education: Cornell’s physical education program, one of the largest in the nation, offers 120 different courses. The intramural athletics program, the largest in the Ivy League, involves 7,500 participants on 1,756 teams in 35 sports. There are 18 men’s and 18 women’s varsity teams. Varsity facilities include the Niemand•Robison Softball Field; Schoellkopf Field for football, lacrosse, and field hockey; Lynah Rink for ice hockey; Bartels Hall’s Newman Arena for basketball and volleyball; the Friedman Wrestling Center; and the Kane Sports Complex for track and field and soccer.

www.CornellBigRed.com

Tour Cornell

The Information and Referral Center offers guided walking tours of the campus throughout the year, except from late December through early January. The tours are an enjoyable and informative introduction to Cornell and its history, student life, and Cornell’s combined roles as an undergraduate teaching institution, an international research university, and New York State’s land-grant institution. Tours begin at the Information and Referral Center in the Day Hall lobby and appointments are not required. The tours are mostly outdoors; each lasts about one hour and fifteen minutes and includes information about Cornell’s undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools and colleges. The tour routes are accessible to wheelchairs. Please advise the tour guide of any special needs or call ahead. The Information and Referral Center can be reached at 607 254-INFO, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 10p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to 5p.m. (Eastern time).

April 1 through November 30:

Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m.

Saturday9:00a.m.,10:30a.m.,1:00p.m. Sunday 1:00 p.m.

The Freshman Experience Tour goes out every day at 11:00am.

December 1 through March 31:

Every day 1:00 p.m. (including Sundays)

The Freshman Experience Tour goes out every day at 11:00am. Holidays: Tours are conducted seven days a week, year round, except on the following 12 university holidays in November, December, and January: • Thanksgiving Day, as well as the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday immediately following Thanksgiving Day. • December 25 • December 26 • December 27 • December 28 • December 29 • December 30 • December 31 • January 1

Meet the Lacrosse staff: To make an appointment to meet with head coach Jenny Graap or a member of the Cornell women’s lacrosse coaching staff when you are visiting campus, please call in advance to the Big Red lacrosse office at (607) 255-1591 to make arrangements. 2003 Cornell 47 Women’s Lacrosse


STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Chris Wlosinski

The Andrew ‘78 and Margaret Paul Director of Student-Athlete Support Services

Personal needs counseling is available to all student-athletes. Individuals are encouraged to arrange an appointment with the student services resource specialist when they have concerns regarding academic, athletic, or personal issues. Assistance will be provided and referrals will be made to appropriate support services on campus.

Chris Wlosinski took over the role of The Andrew ‘78 and Margaret Paul Director of Student-Athlete Support Services in August 2001, assuming a dedicated role focused on student-athlete support. Cornell and its counterparts embrace a philosophy that includes the notion that student-athletes should experience a mainstream collegiate life, but the university also recognizes the extra demands placed on this special Career development assistance for studentpopulation. So in August of 1998, the position, the first of its kind in the Ivy League, athletes is coordinated through Cornell Career was created, a role that asks Wlosinski to work as an available and reliable advisor Services and each of the undergraduate who understands the lifestyle student-athletes lead and assists them in balancing colleges. General information sessions as well as seminars for a variety of interests and their academic, athletic and personal challenges. In this capacity she also serves as a planning issues will be offered. Services liaison with the colleges and directs student-athletes to appropriate campus-wide including assistance with resume writing and resources for academic and personal needs. conducting a job search will also be available When Wlosinski first joined the Big Red program, she worked collaboratively with in collaboration with Cornell Career Services the director of student-athlete support services, coaches and administrators to provide counseling and academic support services serving 36 varsity sports. She developed and maintained personal contacts with administrators and professors throughout Cornell’s seven colleges, and she assisted the director in monitoring the academic progress of student-athletes. Most of Wlosinski’s time is devoted to personal meetings with student-athletes, and while the bulk of her work focuses on freshmen, sophomores and transfer students, she does assist athletes from all classes and across all colleges at Cornell. Wlosinski came to Cornell in August 1999 and worked in compliance, student services and event management. In June 2000, she accepted the position of associate director of alumni affairs and development for athletics where she served until assuming her current position. Prior to joining the Cornell staff, Wlosinski spent a year each as an athletics administrative intern at both Bates College and Plymouth State College. She also served as a special education teacher for the learning disabled for seven years in Lancaster, Pa. Wlosinski graduated from Millersville University in 1989 with a bachelor’s degree in special education and from Plymouth State College in 1999 with a master’s degree in education.

Class of ‘44 Study Room

Student-athletes at Cornell have access to the Class of ’44 Study Room. The room is furnished with study tables and chairs to comfortably accommodate 15-20 people in addition to the computers that are all equipped with internet access. Members of Cornell’s Class of 1944 contributed to the project, covering the expense of new furniture, computers, a printer, a lectern and a coat rack. The space is conveniently located in Bartels Hall and is accessible to student-athletes between classes and before and after practice. The room is open Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Fridays 8 a.m.to 4 p.m.

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Academic Services

Academic counseling is provided in partnership with student-athletes’ assigned academic counselors and college advising office. Academic contracts are developed to outline specific academic goals for the semester and used to hold student-athletes accountable for working toward the goals. Referrals are made to the Learning Strategies Center in CCC420 for additional, individual academic and study skills support. Team faculty advisors are appointed for each of the 36 varsity sports programs and serve as advocates for the sport and student-athletes. Team faculty advisors establish a direct relationship between members of a particular sport team and the Cornell University faculty by acting as a liaison and assisting student-athletes in meeting immediate and long-term academic needs. Team faculty advisors foster a relationship with the team members in an effort to enhance their experience as student-athletes at Cornell. Study skills workshops in time management, exam preparation and strategies, note taking, rapid reading and other skills necessary to increase academic performance are offered every semester. These interactive workshops are typically an hour long and held in the evenings to accommodate the schedules of student-athletes. Tutorial support is available for all student-athletes. As a supplement to existing tutorial services on campus, tutors with varied backgrounds are hired to work one-on-one with student-athletes in specific courses. Student-athletes may request a tutor by completing a request form that can be obtained from a coach. The completed form is returned to the student services resource specialist and a tutor will be found to assist with a specific course. Current course grades and academic performance can be requested from instructors by coaches or student-athletes at any time throughout the semester via the academic monitoring form. The instructor will be asked to complete the form and return it to the student services resource specialist, who will follow-up with student-athletes during a scheduled academic meeting.

www.CornellBigRed.com


APPLYING TO CORNELL Applying to Cornell Admission to Cornell is highly selective. Typically, 20,000 students apply for the 3,000 places in the freshman class. Cornell selects women and men from all parts of the country and around the world, and from a wide range of social, economic, racial, and educational backgrounds. Our students are graduates of public, parochial, college preparatory, and alternative schools (including home schools). We strongly support equality of opportunity. No one is denied admission because of race, religion, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, or disability. Outstanding grades, a strong academic program, and a thoughtfully-written personal application are very important to us in the selection process. So are written recommendations, standardized-test scores, and your special talents, strength of character, and intellectual potential. Quite simply, we’re interested in the people who will get the most out of a Cornell education. ○

Application Procedures Cornell has a two-part application. Both part one and part two (school forms, essay questions and recommendation forms) of the freshman application are included in our viewbook, The Big Red Book. The entire transfer application (also two parts) can be found in our Transfer Guide. If you would like to request a viewbook or the Transfer Guide, please contact the admissions office via mail, phone or internet. You’ll also need to arrange to have official records of all your secondary school and/or college-level work and standardized-test scores sent directly to us. (Note that we don’t accept the Common Application.) Once your file is complete, the Undergraduate Admissions Office will pass it along to the undergraduate college you’ve applied to at Cornell, where the selection committee will review it. You may apply to only one of the seven undergraduate colleges at Cornell.

What’s Due When?

A Word About Early Decision If Cornell is your first choice and you’re applying for freshman admission, consider applying under the early-decision plan. Your application will be read in the fall, and you’ll be notified by mid-December of Cornell’s decision. Between 25-30 percent of recent freshman classes came to Cornell through EDP. Because enthusiasm for Cornell is considered a plus, early-decision applicants stand a better chance of gaining admission—a fact reflected in the statistics. Remember that an early-decision application is a commitment. You can apply under early decision to only one college or university. If you’re accepted at Cornell, you must withdraw any applications sent to other schools and send your acceptance deposit by January 10th. Most applicants who are notified in mid-December that they were not accepted under early decision will be reviewed again during the regular decision process. Some applicants will receive final notification in December that they are being denied admission to Cornell and will not be referred to the regular decision pool.

When Does The Fat Envelope Arrive? If you’re applying as a freshman for the fall semester, you’ll have Cornell’s decision by early April. Agriculture and Life Sciences, Hotel Administration and Industrial and Labor Relations roll out their decisions as they’re made, from February through early April. Architecture, Art, and Planning; Arts and Sciences; Engineering; and Human Ecology let you know in early April. No matter when you receive notification you’ll have until May 1, or 15 days after you’ve received the offer, whichever is later, to respond. If you’re applying as a transfer student for the fall semester, you’ll receive Cornell’s decision by mid-June. Spring transfers hear in December. You’ll have until June 1 (spring transfers, until January 1), or two weeks after you’ve received the offer, whichever is later to respond.

Questions? Contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office: web: admissions.cornell.edu phone:(607) 255-5241 mail: Undergraduate Admissions Office Cornell University 410ThurstonAvenue Ithaca, N.Y. 14850-2488 ○

Item

Fall Freshman Applicants (regular decision)

Early-Decision Applicants (Freshmen Only)

Spring Applicants

Part 1 of the application

well before January 1

well before November 10

well before November 10

Financial Aid Application (Form 2E)

January 1

October 11

November 1

Copy of parents’ 2001 federal income tax returns to Cornell’s financial-aid office

January 1

October 11

November 1

CSS PROFILE

January 17

October 11

November 1*

Part 2 of the application

January 1

November 10

November 10

CSS PROFILE application to the processor

February 10

November 10

November 10*

FAFSA to the processor

February 10-May 1+

April 15 (or when tax returns are completed)

November 10*

Admissions decisions to applicants

Agriculture and Life Sciences, Hotel, ILR: rolling from February 15 through early April; other four colleges: early April

Mid-December

Rolling in December

Financial-aid notifications to accepted applicants

Early April

Mid-December

Mid-December

Your response to Cornell

May 1 or two weeks after you receive Cornell’s offer, whichever is later

January 10

January 10 or two weeks after you receive Cornell’s offer, whichever is later

*The FAFSA may be filed as late as May 1 for Cornell. Other institutions, however, may require an earlier filing date. +Spring applicants file the 2002-03 PROFILE and FAFSA; all other applicants file the 2003-04 PROFILE and FAFSA.

www.CornellBigRed.com

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PROMINENT CORNELL ALUMNI Prominent Cornell Alumni AEROSPACE

Martin Fettman ‘76, ‘80, DVM ‘80 Veterinarian and astronaut; payload specialist for Spacelab Life Sciences 2 mission Ed Lu ‘84 Mission specialist for the Space Shuttle Atlantis, which docked with the Russian Space Station Mir

ARTS

Richard Meier ‘57 Internationally known architect specializing in museums Nathaniel A. Owings ‘27 Award-winning architect Robert A. Moog PhD ‘65 Musician and inventor of the Moog music synthesizer Stephen M. Reich ‘57 Award-winning composer of contemporary music Susan Rothenberg ‘67 Painter Jason Seley ‘40 Sculptor; Cornell faculty member Jennifer Tipton ‘58 Award-winning theatre and dance lighting designer Peter Yarrow ‘59 Musician; Peter, Paul & Mary

BUSINESS

Adolph ‘07 and Joseph Coors ‘39 Founder/executives of the nation‘s largest single brewery Peter Coors ‘69 President, Coors Brewing Company Steve Friedman ’59 Former CEO of Goldman Sachs Leroy R. Grumman ME ‘16 Founder of Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation Laurens Hammond ME ‘16 Inventor of the Hammond organ and other electronic devices Herbert F. ‘22 and Samuel C. Johnson ‘50 Founder/executives of Johnson Wax Company Myron Taylor LLB 1894 Chairman and chief executive officer of U.S. Steel Co.; envoy to the Vatican Sanford I. Weill ‘55 Janet Reno ‘60 Financier

EDUCATION AND HUMANITIES

Urie Bronfenbrenner ‘38 Pioneer in human development studies; Cornell faculty member Robert W. Fogel ‘48 Co-winner of the 1993 Nobel Prize in economic sciences Jerome H. Holland ‘39, MS ‘41 Former Ambassador to Sweden; former president of Hampton Institute and Delaware State University; businessman; two-time football All-American Hu Shih ‘14 Philosopher, poet, scholar, statesman; championed vernacular Chinese as a literary language Emil Q. Javier PhD ‘69 President of the University of the Philippines Flemmie Kittrell MS ‘30, PhD ‘36 Educator; early advocate of preschool education programs William Strunk PhD 1896 Educator and editor; co-author of Elements of Style

2003 Cornell 50 Women’s Lacrosse

ENTERTAINMENT

Allen Funt ‘34 Producer and host of Candid Camera television series Harold Gould ‘48, PhD ‘53 Actor; appeared in 300 television shows, 25 movies and 45 plays; starred in The Sting with Robert Redford and Paul Newman Arthur Laurents ‘37 Tony Award-winning playwright, screenwriter, director, and author; wrote West Side Story and directed La Cage Aux Folles Bill Maher ‘78 Comedian, author; host of Politically Incor- Ed Marinaro ‘72 rect panel show on ABC Edward Marinaro ‘72 Actor, Hill Street Blues, Sisters; played in NFL for Minnesota Vikings and New York Jets; appeared in Super Bowl IX vs. the Pittsburgh Steelers Christopher Reeve ‘74 Actor, Superman I, II and III movies; activist for medical research Thelma Schoonmaker ‘61 Oscar-winning film editor; worked on every Martin Scorsese film Jimmy Smits MFA ‘82 Actor, L.A. Law and NYPD Blue

GOVERNMENT

Samuel (Sandy) R. Berger ‘67 National Security Advisor, Clinton Administration Barber Conable ‘42, LLB ‘48 Former World Bank president and Congressional representative Ruth Bader Ginsburg ‘54 U.S. Supreme Court Justice Mark Green ‘67 Government consumer-affairs activist; public-interest attorney Sol M. Linowitz JD ‘38, LLB ‘38 Attorney, statesman; U.S. ambassador-at-large 1979-81; Panama Canal Treaty negotiator 1977; received Presidential Medal of Freedom 1998 Edmund Muskie LLB ‘39 Governor of Maine 1955-59, U.S. senator 1959-80, presidential candidate 1968, and U.S. secretary of state 1980-81 Samuel Pierce, Jr. ‘47, JD ‘49 Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Janet Reno ‘60 U.S. attorney general, Clinton Administration William P. Rogers LLB ‘37 U.S. attorney general 1958-61; U.S. secretary of state 1969-73 Elbert Tuttle ‘18, LLB ‘23 Chief judge, U.S. Court of Appeals; ruled on many fundamental 1954 civilrights cases

LITERATURE

Diane Ackerman MFA ‘73, PhD ‘79 Best-selling author, poet, and naturalist Kenneth Blanchard ‘61, PhD ‘67 Author, The One-Minute Manager; management consultant Susan Brownmiller ‘56 Feminist author and activist Pearl S. Buck M.A. ‘25 Novelist; winner of 1932 Pulitzer Prize & 1938 Nobel Prize for literature Junot Díaz M.F.A. ‘95 Critically acclaimed short-story writer Anne LaBastille ‘55, PhD ‘69 Author and award-winning conservationist Toni Morrison ‘55 Author and winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize Bill Nye ‘77 and 1993 Nobel Prize for literature Tom Peters ‘65, MEC ‘66 Best-selling author and management consultant Richard J. Price ‘71 Novelist and screenwriter

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PROMINENT CORNELL ALUMNI Thomas Pynchon ‘59 Award-winning novelist and short-story writer Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ‘42 Author (Cats Cradle, Slaughter House Five); prisoner of war in Germany during World War II E. B. White ‘21 Author (Charlotte‘s Web, Stuart Little) and editor; co-author of Elements of Style

MEDIA

Margaret Bourke-White ‘27 Award-winning photojournalist and war correspondent Jane Brody ‘62 Science reporter and author Charles Collingwood ‘39 Broadcast journalist and foreign correspondent Frank Gannett 1898 Newspaper publisher; founder of the Gannett chain Austin H. Kiplinger ‘39 Editor, publisher, and journalist Bill Nye MEng ‘77 Award-winning popular-science media host and author Bill Pidto ‘87 Television sports anchor, ESPN Keith Olbermann ‘79 Television sports anchor and commentator, Fox Sports Dick Schaap ‘55 Emmy Award-winning television sports commentator, ABC and ESPN; Former host of ESPN’s The Sports Reporters; author of 30 books including, Flashing Before My Eyes and Instant Replay Jeremy Schaap ‘91 Sports reporter/producer, ESPN; four-time Emmy Award winner Dick Schaap ‘55 Whit Watson ‘93 Television sports anchor, ESPN Sheryl WuDunn ‘81 Journalist; 1990 Pulitzer Prize winner for coverage of the Tiananmen Square protests in Beijing Robert Zelnick ‘61 Political correspondent for ABC News

SCIENCE, MEDICINE AND HEALTH

George W. Beadle PhD ‘30 Co-winner of the 1958 Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine Joyce Brothers ‘47 Psychologist, author, and media personality Dean Edell ‘63 Physician and media personality Sheldon L. Glashow ‘54 Co-winner of the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics Wilson Greatbatch ‘50 Inventor of the cardiac pacemaker; NASA biomedical equipment designer; member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame Henry Heimlich ‘41, MD ‘43 Developer of the Heimlich maneuver and of esophagoplasty Robert W. Holley PhD ‘47 Co-winner of the 1968 Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine Helen Lewis Irlen ‘67 Developer of a treatment for dyslexia Mae Jemison M.D. ‘81 Physician and former space-shuttle astronaut C. Everett Koop MD ‘41 U.S. surgeon general 1981-89 Philip Levine MD ‘23 Immunohematologist; discovered the Rh factor in blood in 1939 Barbara McClintock ‘23, ‘25, PhD ‘27 Winner of the 1983 Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine Lee Teng-hui PhD ‘68 President of Taiwan Douglas Osheroff MS ‘71, PhD ‘73 Co-winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in physics

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Isidor Isaac Rabi ‘19 Winner of the 1944 Nobel Prize in physics Steven Weinberg ‘54 1991 National Medal of Science winner, and co-winner of the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics

SPORTS

John Anderson ‘29 1932 Olympic gold medalist, discus Jon Anderson ‘71 1972 Olympian, track; winner of 1973 Boston Marathon Bruce Arena ‘73 Coach of U.S. World Cup soccer team; coached 1996 U.S. Olympic team; former coach of D.C. United and University of Virginia Gary Bettman ‘74 First National Hockey League commissioner Bryan Colangelo ‘87 President and General Manager, NBA Phoenix Suns Darren Eliot ‘83 Former NHL player, Los Angeles Kings, Detroit Red Wings, Buffalo Sabres; 1984 Olympian Ken Dryden ‘69 Former NHL player, Montreal Canadiens, Gary Bettman ‘74 1971-79; inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, 1983; current President and General Manager, Toronto Maple Leafs; attorney Pete Gogolak ‘64 Former NFL player, Buffalo Bills (1964-65) and New York Giants (1966-75) Al Hall ‘56 Four-time Olympian (1956, 1960, 1964, 1968), hammer throw Derrick Harmon ‘84 Former NFL player, San Francisco 49ers (1984-86); played in Super Bowl XIX Mike Huyghue ‘84 Former Vice President of Football Operations, Jacksonville Jaguars Robert Trent Jones ‘30 Golf course architect; constructed over 450 courses around the world; inducted into PGA World Golf Hall of Fame, 1987 Robert J. Kane ‘34 Former U.S. Olympic Committee president, 1976-80; inducted into U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame, 1986; served as director of athletics at Cornell for 36 years. Kent Manderville ‘93 Drafted in second round by NHL Calgary Flames, 1989; played for Toronto Maple Leafs, Edmonton Oilers, Hartford Whalers, Carolina Hurricane and currently plays for Pittsburgh Penguins; 1992 Olympian Pedro Pablo Morales JD ‘94 Two-time 1992 Olympic gold medalist, swimming Charles H. Moore ‘51 1952 Olympic gold medalist (hurdles) and silver medalist (1600-meter relay); honored as Golden Olympian, 1996 Joe Nieuwendyk ‘88 Drafted in second round by NHL Calgary Flames, 1985, currently plays for the New Jersey Devils; 1998 Olympian; 1999 Conn Smythe Trophy winner with the Dallas Stars; 2002 Gold Medalist for Team Canada. Seth Payne ‘97 Drafted in fourth round by Jacksonville Jaguars, 1997; currently a defensive lineman with the Houston Texans Dan Ratushny ‘92 Former NHL player, Vancouver Canucks; 1992 Olympian Glenn (Pop) Warner 1894 Football coach at Cornell, Georgia, Carlisle (where he coached Jim Thorpe), Pittsburgh, Stanford and Temple. Overall 44-year coaching record was 319-106-29.

2003 Cornell 51 Women’s Lacrosse


COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE Those who seek an undergraduate education at an Ivy League school do so because of the promise of academic challenge, of quality teaching and of diverse and plentiful resources. It was a shared perspective on the proper balance of athletics and academics that led to the creation of the Ivy League in 1954. When the member schools formally united, it was agreed that athletes are admitted as students and should be awarded financial aid only on the basis of economic need. As a result, students today are not bound to their sports because of athletic scholarships, rather they choose to participate in athletics because they relish competition and physical challenges. Cornell is especially attractive to those who seek a school committed to both academic and athletic excellence. With 36 varsity sports, the university’s athletic department is one of the most comprehensive in the country. Along with a schedule that pits Cornell against its Ancient Eight rivals, Big Red teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and the ECAC. An impressive staff of coaches leads the Big Red teams and recruits some of the finest student-athletes from a national and international pool of accomplished young men and women. The coaches demonstrate a commitment to teaching and a willingness to share their own competitive experiences with their teams. Their individual achievements and accomplishments include playing and coaching time in the professional and international ranks as well as numerous all-star performances during their own collegiate careers. Set against a backdrop of the natural beauty of Cayuga Lake and the surrounding hills, an extensive array of facilities provides a tremendous environment for practice and competition for Cornell’s varsity teams. Schoellkopf Field and its distinctive crescent-shaped stadium may be Cornell’s most familiar sports venue, but since the mid-’90s, a number of new facilities have become landmarks as well. The Friedman Strength and Conditioning Center, a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to the support and improvement of athletes’ performances, is a place where all teams gather to train. The Kane Sports Complex, with its Berman Field for soccer and the Simon Track, and the Niemand•Robison Softball Field are also impressive facilities. The Reis Tennis Center and the Oxley Equestrian Center, home of the equestrian and polo teams, are part of an expanding complex that will include new homes for other teams as Cornell continues to realize its plan for renovation and building of athletic facilities. Spacious and historic Barton Hall is home to the indoor track and field teams. The volleyball and basketball teams compete in Bartels Hall’s 4,473-seat Newman Arena and the fencing team’s home, the Stifel Fencing Salle, is located on the lower level of the facility. Adjacent to the Bartels Hall is famed Lynah Rink, where the Big Red hockey teams perform before sellout crowds for most home games. The Friedman Wrestling Center, new to campus in 2002, is located to the north of Bartels. The gymnastics and swimming teams are

Varsity Teams Women Basketball Cross Country Equestrian Fencing Field Hockey Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Polo Rowing Soccer Softball Squash Swimming and Diving Tennis Track and Field, Indoor Track and Field, Outdoor Volleyball

2003 Cornell 52 Women’s Lacrosse

Men Baseball Basketball Cross Country Football Golf Ice Hockey Lacrosse Polo Rowing, Heavyweight Rowing, Lightweight Soccer Sprint Football Squash Swimming and Diving Tennis Track and Field, Indoor Track and Field, Outdoor Wrestling

Department of Athletics and Physical Education Mission Statement

The Department of Athletics and Physical Education strives to provide students with powerful and meaningful participatory experiences that forge enduring bonds with Cornell, and to provide for the well-being of members of the faculty, staff, and community. We offer a diverse program of physical and outdoor education, recreational services, and intercollegiate athletic competition, equitably administered with special attention to the needs of women and members of under-represented minority groups. We foster the values of physical fitness, total well-being, and enduring participation in athletics; teach leadership skills, teamwork, responsibility, and accountability; and administer programs that can be critical to the educational and personal development of students in keeping with the high standards of Cornell, the Ivy League, the Eastern College Athletic Conference, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The department promotes pride and unity within the university community and provides opportunities to develop, strengthen, and maintain ties to external audiences such as alumni, friends, the educational community, and the general public by attracting interest, recognition, and support.

housed in Teagle Hall where Cornell crews also train during the winter months. Just down the hill from campus are the Collyer Boat House and the Doris Robison Shell House, which are scheduled for renovation and expansion. Cornellians have been national champions in ice hockey, lacrosse, polo, rowing, track and field and wrestling. They have also earned spots in halls of fame, on All-America teams, on the Olympic medal podium and have written their names in record books as Wimbledon tennis champions and major league players in baseball, basketball, football and hockey. Four years ago, Seth Payne ’97 joined the Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL after being selected in the fourth round of the draft and is now with the Houston Texans. Ken Dryden ’69, former star goalie of the Montreal Canadiens and current president of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and Joe Nieuwendyk ’88, a 2002 Olympic gold medalist and current player for the New Jersey Devils, are Cornell hockey alumni. Last year a number of teams and individuals competed in NCAA tournament action, including women’s cross country, men’s ice hockey and men’s and women’s lacrosse. The men’s hockey team was ranked among the top 10 in the nation for most of the year, while the women’s lacrosse team advanced to its first-ever final four. Two gymnasts earned All-America honors at the USA Gymnastics National Championships, while in polo, Melissa Riggs ’02 was honored as the nation’s top collegiate player for the second straight year. Doug Murray ’03 was a finalist for the Hobey Baker Award, the highest honor in men’s collegiate hockey, and Ryan McClay ’03 helped the United States capture top honors at the 2002 International Lacrosse Federation World Championships in Perth, Australia. Cornell is proud that, as a group, varsity athletes regularly match or exceed the student body’s overall GPA for academic performance. The University is especially proud that every semester a number of undergraduates — more than 30 on average — achieve a 4.0 GPA while participating in varsity sports. These scholar-athletes are inducted into the athletic department’s 400 Club at a semiannual breakfast given by President Hunter Rawlings, Vice President for Student and Academic Services Susan Murphy and Director of Athletics Andy Noel. These dedicated student-athletes demonstrate that the ideal is achievable, that it is possible to excel both in the classroom and in the sporting arena. In 2001-02, a number of student-athletes were named to Verizon Academic All-America teams, including a repeat first-team selection by Jaimee Reynolds ’02. The collegiate experience at Cornell is a rich one for varsity athletes because the University supports their passion to excel. www.CornellBigRed.com

2003 Cornell Women's Lacrosse Media Guide  

The 2003 Cornell women's lacrosse media guide

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