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AND INCLUSION


History

Picture Yourself at Cornell Law “We hope to be a law school in which each of us learns to listen with respect and an open mind to the commitments of our colleagues and classmates. An inclusive and diverse law school like Cornell is the ideal place to train your mind for the task of becoming a large-minded, morally based lawyer.”

Cornell Law School is among the nation’s most inclusive top law schools, and has been since its founding. Our multidisciplinary approach to legal education plus our dynamic campus community make for an environment where all students have the tools to excel.

— Eduardo M . Peñalver

a l l a n r . tessler d ea n a nd p ro f e sso r o f law

As you make your final decisions about law school, you may be wondering whether you will meet other students at Cornell who share your particular background

This will not only enrich your educational experience—it will make you a better lawyer as you learn to consider perspectives different from your own.

Chances are, you will. Cornell Law students come from all over the United States and the world. Many are the first in their families to attend law school or even to earn advanced degrees.

At Cornell Law School, you will be challenged personally, academically, and professionally. Yet you’ll also find a close-knit and supportive environment that encourages you to pursue your goals and seize new opportunities.

In short, you won’t have to look far to find others who share your experiences. But you can also expect to meet others with vastly different viewpoints, interests, and approaches to the law.

W hatever your story,

when you come to Cornell, consider yourself home.  

A Legacy of Inclusion Diversity at Cornell Law School is not a new addition, nor did it happen by chance. It’s part of what makes us who we are.

Our inclusive approach dates back to our founder, A. D. White. His egalitarian outlook on education lives on in Cornell Law’s mission to train “lawyers in the best sense.” In a letter to the abolitionist Gerrit Smith in 1862, when slavery was still legal, White described his ambition to found a university that would provide instruction “afforded to all—regardless of sex or color.” It wasn’t long before White’s vision became reality. Cornell Law’s first graduating class included George Washington Fields, who was the only former slave to graduate from the university. In 1919, Mary Donlon became the first woman editor-in-chief of a law review anywhere in the United States, decades before any other woman held such a title.

law schools in the nation. We ranked highest on U.S. News and World Report’s “diversity index,” which measures the likelihood that students will encounter classmates from racial or ethnic groups different than their own.

GW Fields was the only former slave to graduate from the university.

Cornell Law’s diversity story is still being written. One of our ongoing priorities is to provide opportunities for women and minorities, both in our student body and in faculty positions. We believe the richest learning environment is one in which people from all backgrounds are encouraged to share their perspectives.

Cornell Law to Schoolmeet is a place to think “You are not just going critically about the world around you. It is a place You to learn about the context in which 200 fellow students. are going We’re proud to continue White’s legacy to laws are made and applied—and a place to this day. We are one of the most diverse top envision— a better futureJoseph, for all. to meet 200 friends.” JoAnne 3L

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History

Picture Yourself at Cornell Law “We hope to be a law school in which each of us learns to listen with respect and an open mind to the commitments of our colleagues and classmates. An inclusive and diverse law school like Cornell is the ideal place to train your mind for the task of becoming a large-minded, morally based lawyer.”

Cornell Law School is among the nation’s most inclusive top law schools, and has been since its founding. Our multidisciplinary approach to legal education plus our dynamic campus community make for an environment where all students have the tools to excel.

— Eduardo M . Peñalver

a l l a n r . tessler d ea n a nd p ro f e sso r o f law

As you make your final decisions about law school, you may be wondering whether you will meet other students at Cornell who share your particular background

This will not only enrich your educational experience—it will make you a better lawyer as you learn to consider perspectives different from your own.

Chances are, you will. Cornell Law students come from all over the United States and the world. Many are the first in their families to attend law school or even to earn advanced degrees.

At Cornell Law School, you will be challenged personally, academically, and professionally. Yet you’ll also find a close-knit and supportive environment that encourages you to pursue your goals and seize new opportunities.

“Professor Torres is very engaging. I’m impressed by his brilliance every single In short, you won’t have to look far time I talk with him. He makes you think to find others who share your exW hatever your story, periences. But you can also expect about things would have never to meet others with vastly when youthat comeyou to Cornell, different viewpoints, interests, yourself home. about on consider your own.” — Oscar Lopez, 3L and approaches to thethought law.  

A Legacy of Inclusion Diversity at Cornell Law School is not a new addition, nor did it happen by chance. It’s part of what makes us who we are.

Our inclusive approach dates back to our founder, A. D. White. His egalitarian outlook on education lives on in Cornell Law’s mission to train “lawyers in the best sense.” In a letter to the abolitionist Gerrit Smith in 1862, when slavery was still legal, White described his ambition to found a university that would provide instruction “afforded to all—regardless of sex or color.” It wasn’t long before White’s vision became reality. Cornell Law’s first graduating class included George Washington Fields, who was the only former slave to graduate from the university. In 1919, Mary Donlon became the first woman editor-in-chief of a law review anywhere in the United States, decades before any other woman held such a title.

We’re proud to continue White’s legacy to this day. We are one of the most diverse top

law schools in the nation. We ranked highest on U.S. News and World Report’s “diversity index,” which measures the likelihood that students will encounter classmates from racial or ethnic groups different than their own.

GW Fields was the only former slave to graduate from the university.

Cornell Law’s diversity story is still being written. One of our ongoing priorities is to provide opportunities for women and minorities, both in our student body and in faculty positions. We believe the richest learning environment is one in which people from all backgrounds are encouraged to share their perspectives. Cornell Law School is a place to think critically about the world around you. It is a place to learn about the context in which laws are made and applied—and a place to envision a better future for all.

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Fa c u lt y

Ac a d e m i c s

Learn from a Wealth of Perspectives Cornell Law faculty will expose you to new ways of understanding the law. Their goals are not to teach you to think like they do—but rather to teach you how to think.

The faculty at Cornell Law School hail from all walks of life and all areas of legal practice. As you progress through your law education, you will be exposed to a variety of viewpoints. This richness is especially evident in our professors’ areas of scholarship: from feminist theory to African law, refugee law to LGBT rights.

same-sex marriage legislation

Our faculty, who are prominent experts in their areas of study, regularly weigh in on matters of current legal and ethical debate. Recently, faculty members were quoted in national publications on issues including:

use of international humanitarian law in Gaza

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implications of police brutality debt management in Argentina presidential use of executive orders on immigration the Religious Freedom Restoration Act

application of the death penalty Despite wide-ranging areas of focus, the Law School faculty are united by a commitment to instruction. Cornell Law faculty live and breathe the teaching of the law.

You will learn from faculty both inside the classroom and out. Small class sizes mean you’ll get to know your professors on a first-name basis. You’ll be encouraged to share your perspectives in class. And you’ll be able to seek out professors after hours for help with assignments or advice on reaching your academic and career goals.

Cornell Law has a 10 to 1 faculty ratio, one of the lowest among U.S. law schools.

Expand Your Horizons Your education at Cornell Law is what you make it. Whatever issues matter to you, you’re sure to find learning opportunities to match.

Every Cornell Law student charts a unique course for his or her education. After the first year, other than courses in legal ethics and advanced writing, no specific courses are required. While other law schools specialize in certain areas of legal practice, Cornell offers an all-embracing curriculum. This allows students to explore the interests and pursue the passions that matter to them.

You’ll have access to: Classes on a wide range of topics,

including Federal Indian law, cross-cultural negotiations, human rights, and women and justice. You can even take courses in other schools at Cornell University. Seminars of 16 students or less

in which you will confront topics ranging from African-American social history to East Asian law, health care law to the “War on Drugs.” Clinics and externships where

you’ll put your education to work assisting attorneys and clients, such as the LGBT Clinic, Death Penalty Clinic, International Human Rights Clinic, and more.

International programs on and off campus help you understand the law in a global context. You also have the option of studying abroad.

You’ll also find that Cornell Law offers a distinctive in-class experience. The first-year Lawyering course is taught in sections of 34 students, and many classes are even smaller. This allows for an exchange of ideas that’s uncommon among top law schools.

Create an environment where students will learn from one another, not just from their professors.

OUR GOAL

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Community

Asian Pacific American Law Students Association

Find Your Home at Cornell

Black Law Students Association Lambda Law Students Association (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Allies Students Association)

Collegial. That’s how Law School students describe the community at Cornell. With around 200 students per class, you’re likely to know many of your class.

Latino American Law Students Association Muslim Law Society Native American Law Students Association South Asian Law Students Association

At Cornell, you’ll find a rigorous and vibrant intellectual community in which students view one another as colleagues instead of competitors. What make us unique among top law schools is that the entire range of options will be available to you in a supportive, collegial environment. Cornell Law School’s student diversity organizations are important links to a network of information and support. With the backing of the Law School, they work separately and together to present workshops, seminars, panel discussions, conferences, and moot-court competitions. In recent years, student organizations have held professional

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Student Resources

Student Organizations

Join A Supportive Network When you enroll at Cornell Law, you’ll join more than a student body. You’ll become part of a vibrant alumni network that stretches across the globe and into every field of legal practice. You’ll gain a support system of peers, mentors, and possibly even future employers.

Sampling of University-Wide Organizations* Black Graduate and Professional Students Association Black Women’s Support Network Chinese Students Association Hindu Student Council Islamic Alliance for Justice

development “boot camps” in which minority students learn about career options, network with seasoned lawyers, and participate in mock interviews.

can take advantage of invited speakers, entertainers, and events of all kinds, not to mention the

The sense of community here extends well beyond the walls of the Law School. Our affiliation with a large, Ivy League college— Cornell University—also benefits Law School students. Students

Some say the city of Ithaca is what knits the Cornell community together. The city manages to be cozy and cosmopolitan at the same time, offering an eclectic

university’s top-notch athletic, dining, and library facilities.

variety of restaurants, shops, and outdoor activities for students to enjoy outside of class. In recent years, Ithaca has received many accolades from national publications for its quality of life. Most Cornell Law students live off campus, and learn to call Ithaca’s many neighborhoods home.

Korean Students Association Latino Graduate Student Coalition Out in the World

For a complete listing, please visit the Cornell University and Cornell Law School websites: www.cornell.edu www.lawschool.cornell.edu

That support starts before your first semester at the Law School even begins. Each year, we award over $6 million in scholarships to new and returning students. Nearly half of Law School students receive scholarship assistance. Average awards are more than $20,000 per year. While a majority of Cornell Law School graduates join private law firms, some choose lower-paying public-interest or public-sector positions. These graduates become eligible for one of the most generous loan-forgiveness programs in the nation. The Financial Aid

Office can help you understand your options and choose the best way to finance your education.

technology assistance, physical and mental health care, and spiritual outreach. No matter what your need, you’ll always have somewhere to turn.

The Career Services Office will work with you during your years at the Law School through graduation and beyond. By the time you leave Cornell, you’ll have the tools you need to make an impression on prospective employers. You’ll have access to the following:

“I don’t know how I would have survived law a student,support you’ll have a full- system of APALSA school withoutAstimethe academic support coordinator, as well as options for counseling (Asian Pacific American Law Students Association) by upper-level students. You’ll also have access to resources for and my friends.” —Seulbee Lee, 3 L

workshops on resume and cover letter writing, interview techniques, and networking job postings available only to Cornell Law students a career information library including directories, books, and other print and electronic publications one-on-one job search counseling programs and panels on particular types of law practice job fairs held on campus and across the country alumni “shadow” and mock interview programs

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Community

Asian Pacific American Law Students Association

Find Your Home at Cornell

Black Law Students Association Lambda Law Students Association (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Allies Students Association)

Collegial. That’s how Law School students describe the community at Cornell. With around 200 students per class, you’re likely to know many of your class.

Latino American Law Students Association Muslim Law Society Native American Law Students Association South Asian Law Students Association

At Cornell, you’ll find a rigorous and vibrant intellectual community in which students view one another as colleagues instead of competitors. What make us unique among top law schools is that the entire range of options will be available to you in a supportive, collegial environment. Cornell Law School’s student diversity organizations are important links to a network of information and support. With the backing of the Law School, they work separately and together to present workshops, seminars, panel discussions, conferences, and moot-court competitions. In recent years, student organizations have held professional

4

Student Resources

Student Organizations

Join A Supportive Network When you enroll at Cornell Law, you’ll join more than a student body. You’ll become part of a vibrant alumni network that stretches across the globe and into every field of legal practice. You’ll gain a support system of peers, mentors, and possibly even future employers.

Sampling of University-Wide Organizations* Black Graduate and Professional Students Association Black Women’s Support Network Chinese Students Association Hindu Student Council Islamic Alliance for Justice

variety of restaurants, shops, and outdoor activities for students to enjoy outside of class. In recent years, Ithaca has received many accolades from national publications for its quality of life. Most Cornell Law students live off campus, and learn to call Ithaca’s many neighborhoods home.

development “boot camps” in which minority students learn about career options, network with seasoned lawyers, and participate in mock interviews.

can take advantage of invited speakers, entertainers, and events of all kinds, not to mention the

The sense of community here extends well beyond the walls of the Law School. Our affiliation with a large, Ivy League college— Cornell University—also benefits Law School students. Students

Some say the city of Ithaca is what knits the Cornell community together. The city manages to be cozy and cosmopolitan at the same time, offering an eclectic— Zachary D ugan, 3L

university’s top-notch athletic, dining, and library facilities.

Korean Students Association Latino Graduate Student Coalition Out in the World

For a complete listing, please visit the Cornell University and Cornell Law School websites: www.cornell.edu www.lawschool.cornell.edu

“Diversity at Cornell is a very real thing. It is not contrived.”

That support starts before your first semester at the Law School even begins. Each year, we award over $6 million in scholarships to new and returning students. Nearly half of Law School students receive scholarship assistance. Average awards are more than $20,000 per year. While a majority of Cornell Law School graduates join private law firms, some choose lower-paying public-interest or public-sector positions. These graduates become eligible for one of the most generous loan-forgiveness programs in the nation. The Financial Aid

Office can help you understand your options and choose the best way to finance your education. As a student, you’ll have a fulltime academic support coordinator, as well as options for counseling by upper-level students. You’ll also have access to resources for

technology assistance, physical and mental health care, and spiritual outreach. No matter what your need, you’ll always have somewhere to turn.

The Career Services Office will work with you during your years at the Law School through graduation and beyond. By the time you leave Cornell, you’ll have the tools you need to make an impression on prospective employers. You’ll have access to the following:

workshops on resume and cover letter writing, interview techniques, and networking job postings available only to Cornell Law students a career information library including directories, books, and other print and electronic publications one-on-one job search counseling programs and panels on particular types of law practice job fairs held on campus and across the country alumni “shadow” and mock interview programs

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OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS Myron Taylor Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-4901

www.lawschool.cornell.edu

Cornell Law School Diversity and Inclusion  

Cornell Law School Diversity and Inclusion