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S O I N T O A I L T E A R L E C I R C A I I L D B E U P M A W I E D N E C S I L N B O U I T P A R L O RE L Y M A S B I A L I A ED N R U J O

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JOURNALISM

PUBLIC RELATIONS

NEW

MEDIA


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JPR&NM by the numbers GOING viral

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THE MUSIC man

BRIGHT LIGHTS IN the big city LEADING the pack

NO SMALL feat

STUDENT leaders

DREAMS REALLY do come true


crunching THE NUMBERS

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WHAT IS THE

JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT?

Students here are immersed in the world of journalism, public relations & new media. They learn to write and edit stories for print and the Web, shoot photos and video, design print and Webpages, in order to become convergent journalists. Assignments will take you out of the classroom and into the world, keeping you current and relevant in a constantly evolving media landscape.

PR & NEWS ED STATISTICS: PR AVG SALARY

# SOCIAL NET USERS

1.43

21%

RATIOS STUDENT

79 students 24 students

News Editorial

JOURNALISM MALE/FEMALE BREAKDOWN

55/270

THIS PAST SPRING

PROFESSOR

215 students

New Media

MALES

15 -TO- 1

FEMALES

PR JOB OUTLOOK

$36,359

$57,550

BILLION

NEWS ED 1ST YEAR

Public Relations

MAJORS BREAK DOWN

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#

GOINGVIRAL

BAYLOR PROFESSOR’S STUDY GOES VIRAL ON TWITTER

In today’s world, business practices are held accountable to ethics boards and consumers worldwide. The introduction of the Internet and the recent growing trend of companies utilizing social media has spurred a new opportunity for businesses to connect with their publics. However, this innovative media acts as a two-way lens that also positions the employee’s actions under the microscope. In December 2012, Marlene Neill, a public relations professor at Baylor University, published a study about PR practitioners and their ethical dilemmas in the “Journal of Mass Media Ethics.” This study, co-authored with Dr. Minette Drumwright, exemplified the impact social media can have on the popularity of a story, seeing as the study went viral shortly after a blogger named Sara Evans picked it up. “Before I knew it, there were ‘tweets’ from Spain, the UK, Canada, Saudi Arabia and Australia,” Neill said. “Every time someone

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new picked it up there were multiple tweets about it.” The study could be found on Pinterest, Google+, LinkedIn as well as Twitter. This study delved into “the how and why of public relations practitioners’ ethical decisions. The techniques practitioners use to raise ethical concerns and their motivation behind it,” Neill said. “There’s a range of different approaches you can use other than just going to your boss and saying ‘you’re wrong.’” Neill shared a story about an informant who had been asked to write a speech for a school district that would have been misleading to the public. His superiors asked him to write a speech a specific way, and he did what they wanted. However, he also wrote a second version – one that he felt would be more ethically sound. In the end, his superior ended up choosing the second speech he wrote. By choosing a less confrontational approach, practitioners may have more of an opportunity to be listened to. Recent college graduates may question exactly how to stand up to their superiors without potentially losing their job, but they likely may never find themselves in an ethically compromising situation when first starting out at a business. Neill reveals that the practitioners she “talked to that were senior executives said that they didn’t believe this idea of serving as an ethical conscious would be something associated with a new practitioner because of the fact they’re not in the board room when key decisions are being made.” However, the she did report instances where businesses put students in an ethical crisis during an internship. “It’s not too early to teach ethics in the classroom and prepare students for that,” Neill said. “In the classes I teach, I go over ethical scenarios and have students think through what they might do.” CONTRIBUTOR sahara price


twitter

A Trend Towards Ethics

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STUDENT

The Department of Journalism, Public Relations and New Media boasts several prestigious organizations including the National Association of Black Journalists, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Public Relations Student Society of America. Perhaps even more impressive than the organizations themselves are the students who lead them. As they look toward their future careers, these student leaders reflect on the growth and skills they have acquired throughout their time as both members and leaders. CONTRIBUTOR maxcey kite

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JESSICA FOUMENA National Associations of Black Journalists

Originally from the nation of Cameroon, Jessica Foumena is in her second year of graduate school working toward a Masters in international journalism. She speaks both French and English and is “addicted” to social media. When Foumena first joined the graduate program at Baylor, Dr. Mia Moody-Ramirez urged her to become involved with the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Foumena assented and became the president of NABJ. She now serves as the Vice President. The NABJ frequently hosts guest speakers who come and speak to membership about their careers and the issues that they face in the workplace. This has been an incredibly beneficial experience for Foumena. “Being around professionals is valuable…seeing that they do these things and that’s how they do it. You have a better expectation of what is out there.” Foumena hopes to obtain a career in either the media industry or within a nonprofit and NABJ is helping her reach that goal. As a member, she has made connections that have given her a realistic glimpse into her future. As president, she has learned the value of self-motivation. “It just allows you to put yourself out there…I met those professionals, they saw me at work and that can only be a gain in the long run. It may look like a lot of work, but it does help you to be a better student.”


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ALEKZA LATTE Public Relations Student Society of America Alekza Latte is a senior from Katy, Texas who spends her time as a member of Student Foundation, the organizations editor for The Roundup yearbook in addition to being the president of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA). In her presidency, Latte organizes workshops, contacts speakers, updates the organization’s social media and acts as a liaison with the Public Relations Society of America Central Texas chapter. As president, one of Latte’s main responsibilities is to inform the PRSSA membership of the tools and resources the organization provides, especially those that could begin a public relations career. These benefits have also rebounded on Latte herself. Her involvement in PRSSA reflects her commitment and enthusiasm for the public relations industry. “You’re striving toward that professionalism,” Latte explains. Latte recalls a panel of recently graduated alumni who returned to offer advice about entering the public relations career field to be the most beneficial PRSSA event. Through the event, Latte was able to discover the benefits of a “networking relationship with recent Baylor grads and [of] having a leg up on people that don’t necessarily have that connection with big firms like that.” Forming connections both outside of and within PRSSA has been crucial for Latte as a graduating senior. “I’ve really loved the relationships that I’ve developed through PRSSA,” says Latte.

LINLEY PISANO Society of Professional Journalists Linley Pisano is one of the Society of Professional Journalists’ (SPJ) two co-presidents. Now a senior, Pisano joined SPJ her freshman year alongside her co-president Caitlin Giddens after the students sat in on an SPJ meeting. She has held various leadership roles within the organization, including Public Relations Chair, Vice President, and now President. SPJ holds monthly meetings that host different journalism professionals who offer their guidance and advice for entry-level journalists. The speakers are generally more focused on the newseditorial side of journalism, but Pisano, who is focusing on public relations, still reaps the benefits. “[The speakers] have always been really interesting!” Pisano affirms. Pisano is currently helping SPJ to include more public relations speakers. Last October, she arranged for her internship supervisor from ESPN Central Texas to speak to SPJ. “Everyone really loved it, and it grabbed more Baylor boys,” Pisano laughs. Pisano would like to begin her public relations career in the agency setting. She hopes to someday incorporate her passion for sports and country music into her career, and believes that her time in SPJ may very well help her to achieve that goal. “I think [SPJ] definitely added to my resume, and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it. So whether it counted on my resume or not, that’s okay with me,” says Pisano.

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BRIGHT LIGHTS IN THE BIG CITY

Journalism, Public Relations & New Media majors pack their bags for the semester of a lifetime


Each semester, brighteyed public relations and new media majors venture out in the big apple in hopes of making industry connections. These students intern with some of the nation’s most recognized organizations, flinging their green and gold afar. Houston, Tx. Senior Morgan Taylor takes a subway ride from her Long Island City aparment to the Seventh House PR headquarters in Manhattan. Hoping to gain experience in the fashion public relations industry, a typical day for Taylor includes checking in clothing samples, writing pitches and attending stylist appointments. The buzz of the city has left an impression on Taylor, “You have to make yourself stand out, especially in New York City. I’ve learned to put myself out there and make it known that I’m capable of responsibility. If you don’t prove it, they’ll never know,” she says. CONTRIBUTOR alekza latte

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WATCH OUT MICKEY THERE’S A BEAR IN TOWN

Waco, Texas native Kaitlyn Rollins spends her spring semester in Orlando, Florida.

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Waco native Kaitlyn Rollins is spending than one area- a highly sought after role. this semester with everyone’s favorite childhood Deciding to go was not an easy decision. friend, Mickey Mouse. Rollins, a junior studying “On one hand, I’ve always wanted to work for Journalism: PR, has been obsessed with Disney Disney and knew that this could potentially be ever since she was in diapers, and after coming the start of a career down the line,” said Rollins. to Baylor, immediately looked for ways to work “On the other hand, I didn’t really want to be towards her dream job. away from Baylor for two semesters in a row.” Rollins found the Disney College Program A native Wacoan, she’d never been far during her freshman year, and decided that it from home for such an extended amount of wasn’t for her at the moment. Deciding to study time. This made her decision even harder. But abroad instead, she planned her next four years knowing that this program could potentially help with the intention of studying in London in the her secure a job in the future, she jumped at this fall of 2013. once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. However, in the fall of 2012, after seeing Unfortunately, Rollins isn’t doing an ad on Facebook about a Disney internship, anything toward Public Relations while she is in Rollins entertained the thought she had long Disney, but instead is working in merchandise forgotten. Not wanting to give up on her and custodial/guest services. Working 45 Disney dreams, she applied and was hours a week and taking classes, immediately rejected. most would be daunted by the Rollins was told that task, but Rollins embraces the internships were the opportunity. only available to those “I’m proud to be who had completed able to say that I have the Disney College worked for such a Program. prestigious and well “[The Disney respected company… College Program] I have loved getting gives college students to meet and help so the opportunity to many people,” said work at Disney World Rollins. for a semester while According to Rollins, taking classes they the greatest thing she offer, attending career is taking away from the seminars, networking and program is knowing that -Kaitlyn Rollins getting to enjoy all Orlando she’s making a difference in has to offer,” Rollins explained. the lives of children and their On a whim, Rollins applied, families. She recognized that the and after completing a personality assessment same Disney memories she shared with her and a phone interview, was accepted. family as a child are the ones that she can help “I had Googled questions that most people recreate for others. got on this interview and had written out and “Being able to make a child’s day is rehearsed my answers. I felt very confident that I seriously one of the greatest feelings I’ve ever had some good ‘Disney’ answers,” said Rollins. “I experienced,” said Rollins. “In this moment for was not expecting the interviewer to mostly ask the child, they are in the most magical place on questions about my previous work experience. earth and everything should be like they are That didn’t give me the opportunity to be really in a fairy tale.” creative and exciting…. I left the phone interview It is hard to say whether or not she will thinking it had gone badly, that Disney thought I return to Disney post-Baylor, but for now, Rollins was a boring workaholic.” is in the most magical place on earth, making That was not the case. Shocked to be her dreams and the dreams of others come true accepted, she had ten days to reject or accept the with a little faith, trust and a little pixie dust. offer to join Disney for the Spring of 2013 as a CONTRIBUTOR amber owens hopper, a person who is trained to work in more

“Being able to make a child’s day is seriously one of the greatest feelings I’ve ever experienced”

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THE MUSICMAN Music Restoration Project. What started out as a passion has now developed into the world’s largest collection of digitized gospel vinyl. The project started in 2006 after Professor Darden wrote the book, People Get Ready. While writing the book, he discovered that 75 percent of the music he was writing about was lost. “I knew this was an important song that changed rock and roll, the rhythm of blues and the blues, but I couldn’t get a copy. I couldn’t get it online, on eBay, it just didn’t exist,” Darden said. After calling a number of collectors, Darden found that about 75 percent of gospel music from music’s golden age from about 1945 to 1970 was lost. It completely disappeared. This was due to a variety of reasons, from racism to bad business, and even the fact that some people simply did not value the music. “So I sat down at my little computer and batted out an editorial. And in my ego, I sent it straight to the New York Times, which gets 850 editorial suggestions a week. They called back and said, ‘We want to run it,’” Darden said. “So we tweaked it a bit, and held it a couple of weeks so it would come out the same time as the Grammys. This was the year several gospel type songs were really big like Kanye West’s ‘Jesus Walks’ so it was kind of a nice hook.” The story ran in February 2005. The morning it came out, a businessman from New York, named Charles Royce, called and said, “I don’t know anything about you, and I don’t know anything about black gospel music and I’m a white Episcopalian, but I believe what you say. You find out how much it will take to save that music and I will pay for it.” Darden immediately met with the staff from Moody Memorial Library, and they said they would help in any way they could. He talked with the information technology (IT) professionals at the library and Tim Logan, vice president for IT, and came back with a plan that would utilize the best quality equipment in the world: a recording studio When Professor Darden is not traveling, writing, with the best turn tables, the fastest computers, teaching or making his commute from San Antonio the highest-quality microphones, a plan to have an to Baylor, he is working on the Black Gospel audio engineer to do the recordings and a cataloguer

Baylor University JPR&NM professor builds world’s largest gospel collection

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to take the data and make it more accessible to those trying to review it for academic purposes. The final price came to $350,000. A letter was sent to Mr. Royce with an outline, and a few weeks later he wrote back. He approved of the plan, and the checks arrived over the next few weeks. With the library IT department leading the way, they were able to hire an audio engineer and to put everything together. “We finished it in less than a year, so there is an actual recording studio on the garden level of the Moody Library. It is floating, so it is not actually connected to the building. This way it doesn’t get influenced by vibrations or air conditioning,” Darden explained. When the money ran out for the audio engineer within the first year, the library administration came back and said, “We think this is important enough that we will pay for the audio engineer and the cataloguer,” assuring the future of the project. It is now a part of Baylor. Baylor is paying for the engineer, the air conditioning, the cataloger and the computers. There are seven copies of everything to protect against a potential disaster. In the last couple of months Moody Memorial Library has opened the first listening room on the fourth floor. People can now go to the digitization room, sit at a computer and put on headphones to listen, but you are in a working office where people are talking and coming and going. To remedy the distractions, Ella Pritchard, who was the editor of the Baylor Lariat in the 1960s, gave money to set up

a listening lab. So there is now a small room with nice seats, including a church pew, big headphones and a big screen that is accessible to both scholars and the general population of avid listeners of music. “What I would like to do is get a portable version of that recording studio and take it to places that have said we can make copies of their music, but it is too fragile to travel. So our next step is to raise enough money to get an audio engineer and the portable studio out there to get everything scanned because we also scan the jacket and the label,” Darden said. The team is now working with Truett Seminary to start digitizing the collected sermons of the best-known African American preachers in the United States over the last 50 years. Most people have the sermons recorded on a cassette tape, which is the worst format possible, and they have never been catalogued. In addition, they have never been identified, and these are the sermons that not only helped the civil rights movement but also shaped African American life over the last 60 years. “They are dying, and the cassettes are deteriorating. Air oxidizes them, and it’s hard to take them from a cassette to a CD. Only a few machines in existence will do that, and they keep breaking down. We bought one and it has broken down twice already,” Darden said. But once these tapes arrive, the Black Gospel Music Restoration Project will also include the largest collection of African American preaching tapes in the country. CONTRIBUTOR jenny philen

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NO SMALL FEAT


Sophomore breaks age barriers as yearbook editor-in-chief Kansas City, Missouri sophomore Derek Byrne shows us that age shouldn’t keep one from aiming high. At an early age, Byrne recognized his two passions in life, music and journalism. Taking a photography class his freshman year of high school, he learned basic writing skills. “I just fell in the love with the idea to be able to tell people’s stories,” said Byrne, “I think anything having to do with telling stories-whether it’s visual with photography, or even design, or the written word-it’s just really powerful.” Despite this, Byrne didn’t consider majoring in journalism, and auditioned for the music school before entering as a music education major his freshman year. However, his love for journalism wouldn’t vanish so quickly. In the summer of 2011 he learned that the sports editor position for the Round Up yearbook was open. His combined love for writing, sports and the Baylor bears convinced him to apply for the job. With three years of previous experience on his high school yearbook staff, Byrne was offered the position, and began working for the Round Up that semester. After spending his first semester as a music major and a member of the Golden Wave Band, he realized that his heart was truly in communications. After only one semester in the music department, Derek changed his major to public relations. “I’ve been doing this for two years, working in the department for the Round Up and a year and a half as it being my major, and I’ve never had second thoughts about it,” said Byrne. “That’s how I know I’m in the right spot; I made the best choice of the two.” With one year on staff under his belt,

Byrne decided to apply for the editor-in-chief position. Despite encouragement from then editor, Rachel (Moorman) Lott, Byrne heavily contemplated if this was the right move at such a young age. “The issue was always whether I could do it, not whether I wanted to it,” said Byrne. And do it, he could. With responsibilities ranging from designing conceptual spreads, editing, fact-checking, proofing and marketing, there is no doubt that the pressure is on. Byrne gives credit to his team of ten, praising their skill sets and their collective ability to know when to hold back and know when they’ve hit their creative limits. In addition to working at the Round Up, Byrne also makes time for Baylor Urban Missions through Spiritual Life working with the special needs team. “I love working with people with special needs, they’re one of my favorite groups and I just love being able to give back to Waco.” Working with Urban Missions and with the Round Up keeps Byrne busy, but doing the things he loves makes it well worth his time. “It’s important to societies to share these stories, that’s how culture develops, that’s how culture is sustained, that’s how history’s written,” says Byrne. “That’s always fascinating to me and I’ve been doing this since the beginning of high school, so that’s quite a while now and it’s never gotten less interesting to me. I think that’s cause there’s something new to discover every day.” Though it may be too early to tell where Byrne may end up, one thing is for sure, he loves what he does and the opportunities are endless. CONTRIBUTOR amber owens 16 & 14 &


LEVI NORWOOD

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As a junior public relations major, Levi Norwood balances the rigors of the student athlete lifestyle every day. He is currently in his second year as a receiver and returner on the Baylor football team. The balancing act of being a full-time student and athlete is a difficult one. “It takes a lot of time and determination to get it all done,” said Norwood. A regular day consists of waking up at 5 a.m. for morning workouts, followed by class and an internship, a night class, and then studying until it is time for bed, just to wake up and do it all again. Norwood enjoys being busy but sometimes it is, “just straight hectic.” While having a busy schedule can give you the momentum to stay productive, being too busy can lead to being overwhelmed. Although Norwood is always on-the-go, it has taught him patience, hard work, and how to overcome tough situations. Being an athlete has helped Levi become the person he is today. He likes to keeps things simple and never lose his goal-oriented mentality.

LEADING

THE PACK Baylor JPR NM student &

athletes conquer both classroom and field CONTRIBUTOR katelyn martinez

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TORI COX volleyball

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Oklahoma City native Tori Cox was recruited by Baylor after a four-year highschool volleyball career. As a sophomore, Cox has learned many valuable life lessons through successfully balancing volleyball and her college education. During the season, a normal day is, “planned out by the minute,” said Cox. She is busy with games, traveling, practice, weight lifting, classes, meetings, and studying on a daily basis. Although it can get pretty overwhelming, Tori “wouldn’t trade it foranything.” Tori has learned a lot about her character through her time as a student-athlete. She has learned values such as sacrifice, dedication, prioritizing and discipline. Cox has always had a love for people, writing and traveling, so she knew that public relations was where she wanted to be. With two years to go, Tori looks forward to discovering more about herself and getting to fulfill a personal passion by traveling with multiple Baylor study abroad programs.

TORI JACKSONacrobatics & tumbling

As a junior student athlete on the Baylor Acrobatics and Tumbling team, Tori Jackson has had a passion for cheerleading her entire life. At the age of five, Tori tried gymnastics for a day, and just knew it wasn’t for her. The next day she went straight into cheerleading. She has been cheering ever since. A normal day for Tori begins with morning workouts, followed by class, another workout and a team practice, followed by a night of studying. Most of Tori’s free time is dedicated to homework and studying, but she prefers to be busy. When asked whether she liked being busy with acrobatics and tumbling or not, Tori said that without it life, “would be pretty boring.” One skill she has developed through cheering is time management. “One thing my coach always says is that academics come before athletics,” said Jackson. Jackson’s passion for sports will not end in college. She hopes to integrate her love for sports into a journalism, public relations & new media career.

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WHERE ARE BAYLOR’S JPR The Department of Journalism, Public Relations and New Media has many alumnae to be proud of. Read about how a few of our alumnae land the job of their dreams!

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ERICA JOHASKY Erica works as the Social Media Coordinator for Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City. She is responsible for a variety of tasks including creating content, community management, competitive benchmarking, strategy and promotions. Overall, her Baylor classes well prepared her for work. “I liked that the majority of classes were heavily focused on projects because you work on projects in your career – you don’t study for tests,” said Johasky. Erica also had the chance to participate in the Baylor Communications in New York program, and she feels that it made the biggest impact in her postgraduate life. “The program enabled me to feel confident in my decision to move away from all my friends and family in Texas,” said Johasky. When asked what advice she would give to graduating Baylor students, Erica says to find an industry you love and chase after it.


THEY NOW? &NM ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS kate martinez & marissa minter

LAUREN GUY

ERICA BENKEN

After graduating from Baylor in 2012, Lauren relocated to Dallas, where she runs both a small dance studio and a freelance photography business from her home. Lauren is one of the few who can claim that both of her passions, dance and photography, are integral parts of her daily life. Before graduating, Lauren was already beginning to combine her love of photography with her love for dance. She commuted from Baylor’s campus to Dallas teaching choreography for various high schools. She also photographed the dancers, whether that be taking recital or senior portraits. Upon graduation, it was only logical that she continue pursuing both passions. “My jobs are really rewarding because I get to spend time with people. The people I work with make my job worthwhile,” Lauren says. To see Lauren’s photography or to contact her about a photography session, visit laurenguyphotography.com.

Erica currently works as an Account Coordinator at Kirvin Doak Communications, a Public Relations and Marketing firm based in Las Vegas. She has worked on over six shows on the Las Vegas Strip including Broadway shows such as “WICKED,” and “Billy Elliot.” She stresses the importance of enjoying your work environment as well as loving the clients you work with. Erica graduated from Baylor in December 2011 as a journalism major with a concentration in public relations and a minor in marketing. During her time at Baylor, Benken completed a total of seven internships before landing her first “big girl” job. When applying for a job, Erica’s advice is, “to never let your fears hold you back.” Benken’s hometown is San Antonio, Texas, but when she saw the job posting in Las Vegas she knew it was meant for her and went for it. “It has been one of the most wonderful, life-changing adventures I could have ever embarked on,” said Benken. 20 &


PR A

2013


“PR Agency has provided me with the skills I need to show future employers that I’m the one they’re looking for! #osopragency #bestclassever” -@jennyphilen, Jenny Philen, ‘13 “What an amazing experience working with such a talented group of young professionals! #pragency” -@maxceylee, Maxcey Kite, ‘13 “Taking pictures and interviewing people was so much fun! Loved working with such amazing people. #PRLOVE” -@2courtneyy2, Courtney Ouellette, ‘15 “The amazing Professor Perry had so much advice and wisdom about working in the PR field. #loverher” -@marissakminter, Marissa Minter, ‘14 “Bad clients come and go, but friends are forever #prbabes #pragency” -@ambercowens, Amber Owens, ‘13 “PR Agency was great for building my design skills and portfolio...and having lots of fun! #pragency #prbabes“ -@k8_martinez, Kate Martinez, ‘14

“I’d like to thank the gals in agency, Adobe, AP Style, Starbucks and dry shampoo for making my year a memorable one. #emptybowl #perry4ever” -@alekzalatte, Alekza Latte, ‘13 “Creating a magazine for international students was such a humbling learning experience #CIE #bearsacrosstheglobe” -@marissamarak, Marissa Marak, ‘15 “I am so proud of the women of #pragency! There are some bright futures in this classroom! #watchoutworld #prbabes” -@corinnehope, Corinne Roberts, ‘13 I love #pragency! I got to collaborate with awesome clients and ladies who taught me so much about working in PR! #emptybowl #PRpeeps -@saharaprice, ‘15

AGENCY


I T O A I L T E A R L E C I R L B C I L PU B U W P E N A I S D N E O I M T A W A L L E E R R C I C I L L B B U PU P A O I I T D E A L M E R W E C I N L D B E U P M A W I E D N E S M N O W I O I T T A A L L E E R R C I L LIC B U M P W A E I N D E S M N O W I A T L A E L R E R C I L C I B L U B P U A I W E D E N M W E W E N N A I A L D E E R M C I W L E B N U P A W I E D N E S M N W O E I T N A L EL


Baylor University Journalism, Public Relations & New Media Department Magazine