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EDUCATION THROUGH INVOLVEMENT Ordinarily, the candidate has a year of residence at Concordia College before becoming eligible for an assistantship.

Superior Studies Consortium Concordia College is a member of the Superior Studies Consortium and offers a variety of courses at the Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center in Finland, Minn. Wolf Ridge is an accredited residential environmental school that offers outdoor learning experiences focusing on ecology, science, human culture, teambuilding and personal growth. For detailed information about the programs, contact the co-chairs of the environmental studies program.

Tri-College University Fargo-Moorhead is fortunate to have three institutions of higher education within its boundaries. Each of these schools has outstanding departments, and students from all three schools are able to take advantage of each school’s respective strengths under the Tri-College University (TCU) program. TCU is a consortium of Concordia College, Minnesota State University Moorhead (MSUM) and North Dakota State University (NDSU). TCU also provides several services and programs of interest to Concordia students. Students regularly make use of the student exchange for courses in such fields as ROTC, special education and East Asian languages (see below). Student Exchange: Full-time Concordia students may take courses at NDSU and MSUM during fall and spring semester at no additional charge, but are subject to the following limitations: 1) a student may take only one course each term, 2) a student may not take a course also offered at Concordia College, and 3) an overload charge is assessed if total semester credits in a student’s load are greater than 17. Grades and credits received for such courses are applied to a student’s Concordia grade point average and graduation requirements. The appropriate department or program chair must approve substitution of TCU courses in a Concordia major. Students should see the Office of the Registrar for information on available courses and further details about TCU registration. Tri-College Minors: The Tri-College institutions recognize minors earned through the TCU course exchange. This means students can receive recognition on their transcripts for minors completed on one of the other TCU campuses, if in compliance with graduation requirements at Concordia. This policy applies only to minors earned in programs not available on a student’s home campus. This option makes it possible to combine majors at Concordia with complementary minors on another campus. Library Services: Library patrons have direct access to the local collections at Minnesota State University Moorhead and North Dakota State University through the Tri-College Library Consortium, providing a library resource of more than 1.25 million books and 5,000 journals with titles representing all academic disciplines. Materials are delivered between libraries daily. Bus Service: Community bus service is provided between campuses on a regular weekday schedule during the academic year. Parking: Concordia students enrolled in TCU who desire to park at Minnesota State University Moorhead or North Dakota State University must obtain a TCU parking permit, available without charge from the Office of Public Safety at Concordia.

East Asian Languages Instruction in Chinese is available at Concordia College. (See Chinese in the department pages of the catalog.) Instruction in Japanese is offered through the Tri-College University Program in East Asian Languages. For more information contact the Office of the Registrar. Courses taken through the East Asian language program can satisfy the liberal arts Core requirement for proficiency in a world language and can lead to or contribute to degrees granted by Concordia College.

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Education Through Involvement APPLIED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Cooperative Education Internship Program Concordia’s Cooperative Education program bridges the academic and working worlds, integrating classroom instruction with supervised work-based learning related to a student’s career interests. Cooperative Education, also known as a co-op, allows students to explore career interests, network with professionals, and build their résumé. For majors and minors without a required practicum or internship, a co-op enhances employability after graduation. Students are registered for academic credit and work with a faculty coordinator in their department. Experiences must be professional or paraprofessional in nature and can be paid or unpaid. Each Cooperative Education experience is unique, based on a partnership between the college, the student and the business community, including government and nonprofit organizations. Career Center staff assists in coordinating each experience, and the student is mentored by a site supervisor, with individualized learning goals and outcomes determined in consultation with a faculty coordinator. The Cooperative Education office is located in Academy 110. Separate and distinct from programs of study with required clinical experiences or internships, the Cooperative Education program is centrally coordinated and available to students in all majors. The universal course number 390 identifies Cooperative Education in all departments. Each department determines the amount of credit allowed for the fulfillment of majors and minors. Students may enroll for a minimum of 1 semester credit per term, reaching a maximum of 8 semester credits permitted toward degree and graduation requirements.

Internship and Practicum Experiences Similar to Cooperative Education Internships, practicums provide on-thejob training for a specific profession. Some programs require practicums as a demonstration of mastery and/or the licensing requirements of outside agencies. Required practicums and internships are arranged by departments and supervised by qualified faculty as well as trained and/or licensed or certified professionals at the placement site. A required practicum or internship is typically assigned a 490-499 course number.

Service-Learning In many courses, your professors will use service-learning as a strategy to help you integrate your classroom learning and a community service experience. The projects might involve working with the staff or clients of community organizations such as after-school programs, shelters for people who are homeless or in crisis, environmental programs or local schools. The emphasis in service-learning is on both the service experience and the learning: while Concordia students contribute to these organizations through service, that work provides the opportunity to learn about the social, economic and political context in which the service is necessary, as well as a way to enhance learning of the course’s academic content. Staff and clients of the organization become community experts from whom students can learn. Through this experience, students are able to see the context in which the theoretical principles of their learning are applied, acted out, and sometimes challenged. The service helps the organization attain its important

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III