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RELIGION 145 whether Christians should love nature and, if so, how. It aims to equip students to think critically and responsibly about the Christian and American environmental traditions, about current and expected challenges to sustainable planetary life, and about norms and practical strategies. This course can also count toward the global studies program and the environmental studies program. REL 349 J – Christian Ethics in the Material World, 4 credits. D. This course is a study in constructive moral reflection on roles and relations in the Christian life. This course will examine questions about how Christians should relate to planet Earth, to created things or artifacts, to the body. It aims to equip students to think critically and responsibly about living in a biophysical world, of which humans are parts, products and participants. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity REL 392 G – Religion and World Affairs, 4 credits. D. This course looks at religion in the context of global issues that are relevant to the present day, especially on an international, but also local, level. Topics for the course will vary depending on the issues of the present day and scholarly expertise of the instructor. REL 393 J – Religion and Ecology, 4 credits. E1 or E2. This course explores various perspectives on nature and the human-earth relations within worldreligions against the background of the ecological crisis. Because world-religions importantly shape people’s worldviews, they greatly determine the way people interact with each other and the rest of nature. The course will engage teachings from all world-religions. Depending on the instructor, the course will have a special focus on Christianity, Islam, or Asian traditions. The course includes an overnight field experience at Concordia’s Long Lake Field Station. This course can also count toward the environmental studies program. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity

Language REL 211 and 212 are also counted in the “interpretive studies” category. REL 211 – Biblical Hebrew I, 4 credits. A1 (2014-2015). This course is a study of the language of the Hebrew Bible, including basic grammar, and leading to the reading of prose passages. REL 212 W – Biblical Hebrew II, 4 credits. A2 (2014-2015). This course is a study of the language of the Hebrew Bible, including basic grammar, and leading to the reading of prose passages. Prerequisite: REL 211 or equivalent

Other Courses REL 250 – Pre-May Seminar, 4 credits. D. REL 300 – May Seminar, 4 credits. D. REL 380 – Special Topics, 4 credits. D. Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information.

through a variety of research opportunities. The subject of the course will rotate among the four areas for the study of religion (interpretive, historical, comparative and constructive) and credit will be assigned to one of these areas. REL 410 – Research Seminar, 4 credits. E1. Limited to religion majors and minors, this course uses the seminar format to engage students in systematic reflection about the ways in which the modes of inquiry in the field of religion can contribute to the consideration of a common topic. Each student will complete a research project under the supervision of the instructor and present the results in a paper to the seminar for criticism and discussion. REL 480 – Independent Study, 1 to 4 credits. D. This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information. REL 487 – Directed Research, 1 to 4 credits. D. This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor REL 490 – Practicum, 4 credits. D.

Faith and Leadership FL 201 – Faith and Leadership, 4 credits. E1 or E2. This course is a study of the theory, ethics, and practice of leadership in faith-based service organizations and congregations. It considers vocational discernment, examines different religious leadership and service positions, analyzes contexts and professional standards, explores religious/denominational organizations, and considers gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation as factors in leadership practice. FL 201 – Faith and Leadership may count toward the religion minor. Prerequisite or concurrent: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity FL 490 – Practicum in Faith and Leadership, 1 to 4 credits. E. Supervised leadership practice in a faith-based context demonstrating the integration of theological study and leadership responsibility and practice. Additional requirements will include reading assignments, journal activities, and attendance at group seminar meetings. Prerequisite: FL 201 – Faith and Leadership. Recommended prerequisites: REL 317 – Making Meaning: Reading, Interpreting and Teaching the Bible and REL 333 – Faith in Dialogue: Interfaith Leadership FL 491 – Integrating Vocation, Faith and Leadership, 1 credit. E1 or E2. Reflection, analysis, dialogue and personal discernment on vocation and preparation for faith and leadership. This course functions as the final and integrating piece in the religion major with a faith and leadership concentration. It should be taken the semester following the 4-credit completion of FL 490. Exception: Students taking FL 491 in their final semester may take it concurrently with FL 490.

REL 390 – Cooperative Education, 1 to 8 credits. D. REL 394 G, HIST 394 G, H – Cultural Despair and Radical Hope, 4 credits. E. Throughout history, civilizations have collapsed and societies have been conquered with the result that traditional ways of life were rendered obsolete. Readings from multiple time periods and diverse cultures will illustrate adaptive strategies that have been used to cope with radical cultural upheaval and transition from despair to hope. REL 402 – Advanced Religion Seminar, 4 credits. D. This course is designed primarily for religion majors and minors (students must have completed at least five courses in religion before enrolling in the course). It offers students an opportunity to study a particular topic, theme or figure in significant depth. The course aims to expose students to advanced level work in the field of religion, in preparation for further work in the field after graduation. Students will be encouraged to pursue original research on the seminar topic/theme/figure

Scandinavian Studies – see Norwegian and Scandinavian Studies Milda O. Halvorson, program director

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III