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142 RELIGION • 12 additional credits in religion, which may include REL 211 – Biblical Hebrew I and REL 212 – Biblical Hebrew II • REL 410 – Research Seminar, 4 credits. This course is offered during the fall semester and should be taken during the senior year. Students who expect to be studying off campus that semester should take the Research Seminar during the junior year. Students may count 4 credits in REL 390 – Cooperative Education or 4 credits from REL 490 – Practicum toward the major. Students may apply to transfer up to the equivalent of 4 courses and no more than 16 credits from outside the college

Major in Religion with a Faith and Leadership Concentration The requirements for a major in religion with a faith and leadership concentration are 36 credits for the major, plus 21 additional credits. • REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity, 4 credits • 16 credits (4 credits from each mode of inquiry). The Religion 300 J Core requirement counts as a course in one of the areas of study. • 12 additional credits in religion, which may include REL 211 – Biblical Hebrew I and REL 212 – Biblical Hebrew II. Students may count 4 credits in REL 390 – Cooperative Education or 4 credits from REL 490 – Practicum toward the major. • REL 317 – Making Meaning: Reading, Interpreting and Teaching the Bible, 4 credits • REL 333 – Faith in Dialogue: Interfaith Leadership, 4 credits • REL 410 – Research Seminar, 4 credits. This course is offered during the fall semester and should be taken during the senior year. Students who expect to be studying off campus that semester should take the Research Seminar during the junior year. • FL 201 – Faith and Leadership, 4 credits • FL 490 – Practicum in Faith and Leadership, 4 credits • FL 491 – Integrating Vocation, Faith and Leadership, 1 credit • 4 additional credits from an elective to inform the concentration. This elective must be approved by a religion faculty member.

Minor in Religion The minor in religion can be used for different educational goals. Students may wish to concentrate on courses in a specific mode of inquiry. They may wish to select courses to complement a major course of study or for personal enrichment. The requirements for a minor in religion are 20 credits. Religion 100 and Religion 300 J courses are counted in the five-course requirements for a minor. REL 211 – Biblical Hebrew I and REL 212 – Biblical Hebrew II may also be counted for a minor. Students are encouraged to develop a plan for their course of study with a religion department advisor. FL 201– Faith and Leadership may count toward the religion minor. Students may select any religion courses beyond those meeting the Core religion requirement, except for REL 390 – Cooperative Education and REL 490 – Practicum. Students should normally declare a minor by the end of the junior year. Students may apply to transfer the equivalent of two courses and no more than 8 credits from outside the college.

world. The course offers an important initial opportunity for integrative study that is characteristic of a liberal arts education. It invites students to engage in thoughtful and informed reflection upon religious questions.

Interpretive Studies REL 313 J – Jesus the Jew – Jesus the Christ, 4 credits. E1 or E2. This course is an examination of the Jewish context and character of Jesus of Nazareth. This course will investigate Jesus’ life, ministry, and death in the social and religious context of first-century Palestine. In addition, it will focus on the character of the Gospels as literary narratives that tell the stories of Jesus. Jesus also came to be the object of worship and devotion, and this course will investigate how it is that Jesus became the focal point of the church’s thought and ritual practice. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity REL 314 J – Paul: Apostle or Apostate, 4 credits. E1 or E2. This course is a study of the historical circumstances of Paul, the religious and theological significance of his epistles, and his legacy for the Christian church. Paul is one of the most important people in the formation of early Christianity, and has left us some of the most significant documents in the New Testament, the Pauline Epistles. Paul, however, was not appreciated by many of his contemporaries or by many people in the church since his time. He has been a figure of much controversy historically, and this course will explore why that is the case. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity REL 316 J – The Good Life: Old Testament Perspectives, 4 credits. E1 or E2. What is “the good life”? This course explores various perspectives on “the good life” contained in the writings of the Old Testament. Comparisons will be made to contemporary views. The course will also look at what the biblical writings picture as obstacles to “the good life” and what are viewed as challenges today. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity REL 317 – Making Meaning: Reading, Interpreting and Teaching the Bible, 4 credits. E1. This course provides hands-on experience reading and interpreting the Bible with attention to the Bible’s ancient and modern audiences, its public uses, its genres, cultures and themes, the social locations of its readers, methods and the ethics of drawing meaning from its content, and views of the Bible’s relationship to the sacred texts of other faith communities. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity REL 318 – Women, Religion and Literature, 4 credits. D. This course is an investigation of the images and status of women in the Judeo-Christian tradition and in Western literature from an interdisciplinary perspective. The interplay of these scripts in the psychosocial and spiritual formation of contemporary men and women will be assessed. This course can also count toward the women’s studies program. REL 362 J – Approaching the Qur’an, 4 credits. E1 or E2. This is an introductory course in the academic study of the Islamic scripture, the Qur’an. The course will provide some of the basic analytic tools needed for approaching and appreciating the text and teachings of the Qur’an, including an introduction to its historical context, literary qualities, esthetic reception and interpretive traditions – both classical and modern. The course is aimed at helping students understand the nature and function of the Islamic scripture both in its native context of Muslim history and cultural life, as well as in its relation to the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament. Prerequisite: REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity

Courses

Historical Studies

First Core Religion Course

REL 225 – Religion in Film, 4 credits. A1 or A2 (2014-2015). This course is a study of the religious content and focus of the place and importance of film in culture. As a 200-level course it is an introduction to the examination of film from a religious and critical perspective, in particular the four modes of inquiry (interpretive, historical, comparative and constructive). The types of films that will be examined range from historical classics, international films, documentaries, popular film, films from great directors, and much more. This course can also count toward the film studies program.

REL 100 – Christianity and Religious Diversity, 4 credits. E. This course seeks to meet the needs of all students for a better understanding of religion as a basic feature of human life and of Christianity’s classic and contemporary expressions and the rich diversity of religion. The four modes of religious inquiry (interpretive, historical, comparative and constructive) that are appropriate to the study of religion will be used to examine the complexity of religion in the modern

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III