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Group Project Book Corcoran College of Art + Design Spring Semester 2012 Design Team Keziah Chong Ricardo Cortes Sandra Gichuhi Ashley Hopkins Lita Ledesma Allison Nambo Travis Poffenberger Maggie Winters


Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2. Design

Brief

3. Strategies

& Tactics

4. Communications

Brief

6. Research 12. Branding 22. Imagery

& Messaging

& Print

32. Microsite 39. PSA 42. Motion 50. Social

Graphics

Media

58. Mobile

App

69. Event 76. Group

Process Photos

78. Thank

You Note


Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Introduction

About Creer Es Just before the elections hit full swing, a group of Corcoran students have launched a game-changing ‘get out the vote’ campaign, Creer Es. A completely non-partisan and student run campaign, Creer Es is Spanish for “to believe is.” We aim to encourage and empower citizens by talking about beliefs, community, family and how they relate to voting.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Design Brief

Our Goal The Hispanic population of Northern Virginia is significantly underrepresented amongst the voting populace. We will instill a meaningful and emotional experience within this population to alter their perception of voting, and change their voting habits through education and empowerment.

Problem The Hispanic-American population is the fastest growing minority group in the United States, but they have a significantly low voter turnout relative to other members of the American population. This is a disparity that must be addressed to ensure that our government is a more accurate representation of all its people.

Audience Hispanic-Americans in the Northern Virginia region eligible to vote by the November 2012 Presidential elections.

Approach This will be a regionally-based bilingual campaign with a focus on the Northern Virginia Hispanic population. While aimed toward a specific region presently, it is our aim to make this project scalable on a nationwide level.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Strategy & Tactics

Strategy 1

Strategy 4

The Ritual Leveraging emotionally meaningful, ritualistic activities. Helping people associate the voting ritual with ones the find more personal.

The Vernacular Making the vocabulary more personal.

Tactics • A potluck, BBQ or picnic • A musical performance • A simple get-together

Strategy 2 The Day-to-Day Connecting intuitive day-to-day choices or micro-voting, with macrovoting, aka making a choice at the polls. Tactics • PSA comparing daily decisions to voting decisions • Freebies which people can use to express what they vote on in everyday life

Tactics • Refer to voting as speaking up or expressing • Minimalizing terms like voting • Embrace terms like choosing

Strategy 5 The Apple Educating our audience about the plethora of rights and privlieges they have in the United States of America. Tactics • Educational material about rights • Helping Hispanics feel more aware of their unique freedoms

Strategy 6 Strategy 3 The Connector Getting the community involved. Using a group of people to reinforce ideas. Tactics • A street mural or a chalk project • Local artists and musicians • Conversation; stimulating dialogue about voting online or in person

The Entertainer Simply being honest and transparent; educational and funny. Tactics • Youtube videos about voting • Interviewing people for honest feedback • Encouraging participation • Having people share their stories and thoughts

Strategy 7 The Accommodator Making the voting process easier, more accessible and most importantly, more human. Tactics • Personally helping people register at events • Creating materials that simplify the process

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Communications Brief

Branding

Motion Graphics

We chose a handcrafted aesthetic for the Creer Es logomark, reminiscent of the visual language of Hispanic signage. This friendly and approachable type treatment evokes a sense of nostalgia and engenders an emotional connection between our intended audience and the Creer Es brand. “Creer Es”, or “to believe is” , is positioned within a speech bubble, with space underneath to encourage our audience to share what they believe. Then, the community can see a physical mark, their handwriting which ultimately can be shared and make a difference and open the conversation. Our tagline, “join our conversation,” appears above the wordmark, encouraging our audience to participate in the campaign. We use a bilingual approach for our campaign, because of this, our logomark appears in Spanish and our logotype appears in English, reflecting both languages within the brand and expressing the multicultural aspect of our concept. The colors were chosen based on the vibrant hues one finds in the Hispanic culture which also contributes well to eye-catching collateral.

The animated PSAs are digital adverts created to promote and enhance the Creer Es campaign via placement on social media sites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Facebook and Twitter, as well as the Creer Es website. Both PSAs are brief vignettes encouraging viewers to participate in the campaign and to “join our conversation.” Both PSAs reinforce the visual language and overall messaging strategy used throughout the campaign. They underscore the relationship between community, personal values, and voting. They emphasize the “one plus one” facet of Creer Es with emotionally resonant language and the use of multiple actors to tell the story of collective action toward positive change, inviting the viewer to share in this effort through the voting process.

Print & Imagery The imagery created for the Creer Es campaign evokes an emotional connection between the intended audience and Hispanic culture through its brightly colored, hand-crafted aesthetic. Predominately hand-drawn patterns, the imagery was inspired by traditional Hispanic clothing. Repeating floral elements and hand-drawn patterns convey a sense of community and coming together to be a part of something greater. The approachable hand-crafted personal feel can also be found in our customized social media icons which are presented in one of the four vivid colors in our color palette. The print collateral was created to help acheive Creer Es’s goal of engaging the community and raising awareness on the importance of voting by relating to the beliefs of individuals. Both in Spanish and English, our informational brochure is approachable and inviting towards our intended audience as well as informative and engaging. The interactive cards encourage participation as they ask the viewer to fill in the blank with a doodle, word or story that describes their beliefs. The buttons and magnet were created to help provoke intrigue and promote our campaign through the approachable sizes and bright colors.

Event Creer Es is a campaign that encourages casual conversations and open dialogue. The Creer Es experiences start that dialogue in the physical world and encourage continuing the conversation on our social media pages. We attend community events and display our fun, colorful banner and print materials, which help us to attract people’s attention. We begin the conversation by talking about ourselves and our campaign, and then ask our audience about themselves, asking what they believe in and if they would like to share with us by signing our banner or writing on a takeaway card. We don’t talk directly about voting at first. We post photos of people with their takeaway cards to social media and encourage them to tag themselves, which creates a 1+1=1000 situation with Facebook’s viral reach. We have found that this system of an honest and open dialogue with our audience creates a strong community bond and an interest about voting that our audience wouldn’t experience in everyday life. Creer es video PSAs, are messages in the public interest disseminated by social media sites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Facebook and Twitter. The objective is to raise awareness, change public attitudes and behavior towards our campaign. Created to enhance the personal touch that a campaign is trying to achieve and show the power of 1+1 during the voting process. The video PSA not only seek being aired, it attempts to develop a relationship with the viewer that will benefit both parties.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Communications Brief

Social Media

PSA

The goal of our social media channels is to encourage people to speak up and share their opinions on the voting process. We all believe in something. People should share what they believe and what makes them want to vote. Our campaign is to raise awareness in the community, to start a conversation, and get people to join. The audience for our social media pages is mostly Hispanic-Americans but not limited to them. These pages are open to everyone to join our conversation. The messaging language for our posts is not all related to the Hispanic-American community. We post news about Hispanic-Americans to attract the Hispanic-American community. We also post news about U.S. politics, people’s success stories, motivational and inspirational quotes that encourage people to act, and some interesting topics that encourage discussion.

Creer es video PSAs, are messages in the public interest disseminated by social media sites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Facebook and Twitter. The objective is to raise awareness, change public attitudes and behavior towards our campaign. Created to enhance the personal touch that a campaign is trying to achieve and show the power of 1+1 during the voting process. The video PSA not only seek being aired, it attempts to develop a relationship with the viewer that will benefit both parties.

Mobile App The Creer Es mobile application is a fun and fast way to share what you believe which is a part of what the Creer Es campaign is about. It encourages people to start conversations and to help them realize that what they believe in is a reason they should vote. It involves taking pictures, creating doodles and sharing them with the rest of the community. The hand written beliefs on the images enhance the emotional connection and adds a personal feel to the campaign. The app not only builds a platform for people to be creative but also increases the participation within the community which enhances the one plus one aspect of the campaign.

Microsite The Creer Es website is meant to infuse all the benefits of a healthy community with that of good voting habits. Voting offers no immediate positive re-enforcement in itself, unless it comes from within one, or from someone in the community. The website is full of featured content specific to the Northern Virginia area, where our campaign focuses. It contains a “featured” section reserved for people nominated by their peers for being good at something, a “stand up guy” or involved in the neighborhood. If people can see the smaller areas they live in as being part of the larger community of the United States, it would make voting seem more important. Linking everyday choices with voting (via the images on the main page) help give immediate, and positive feedback to “speaking up” or “participating” in something. If you vote to grow a garden, the plants thank you with their fruits. If one votes to help a friend, they offer kind words and gestures. If you speak up in government, the community should have something good to say about it.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Demographic Research

Demographic Research Our research concentrates on understanding the preferences, attitudes, and behaviors of Hispanics. The information we gathered is used to identify and understand our audience’s behaviors and problems in order to evaluate their voting habits. It also helps us improve our understanding of our campaign as a process. It specifies the information required to address the voting issues and methods for collecting information. It assists us in the decision making related to the identification and solution of problems. We conducted our research in a systematic, analytical and objective manner which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty and increase the probability and magnitude of creating a successful campaign. We divided ourselves into groups to carry out the research. We analyzed and summarized the results to communicate the findings and their implications. Country of Origin for U.S. Hispanic Population Mexican 65% Puerto Rican 9% Cuban 3.4% Dominican 2.8% Central American 7.6% Southern American 5.5% Other 7.7% Hispanics in Virginia Hispanics are the second largest and fastest growing minority group in Virginia. The latest census conducted in 2010 counted more than 630,000 Hispanic residents in Virginia. With a total state population of just over 8 million, this means that 8 out of every 100 Virginians are Hispanic. The Hispanic population in Virginia has grown 92 percent since 2000, due to high birth rates (resulting in large increases in the U.S.-born Hispanic population) and an influx of Hispanic immigrants coming to the U.S. from Central and South America (resulting in large increases in the foreign-born Hispanic population). Both factors contribute to the significant growth in the number of Hispanic Virginians.

Hispanics are native-born and foreign-born. On a number of dimensions, the immigrant Hispanic population differs from the Virginia population as a whole and from native-born Hispanics. The median age of Hispanics in Virginia is 26 years old. The median age of native-born Hispanics is much younger (14) while the median age of foreign-born Hispanics is much older (35). Overall, Virginia’s Hispanic population is 53 percent male and 47 percent female. Native-born Hispanics represent the genders equally at fifty percent each. In contrast, males comprise 56 percent of the foreign-born Hispanic population because they immigrate to the U.S. for employment opportunities at higher rates than females. Voting There has been a general increase in the percentage of eligible Hispanics who vote. Hispanics were also a larger share of the electorate in 2010 than in any previous midterm election, representing 6.9 percent of all voters, up from 5.8 percent in 2006. Rapid population growth has helped fuel an increase in Hispanic electoral participation. Women had higher rates of participation than men in 2010. Sixty-five percent of women voted, while 61.5 percent of men did in the 2008 presidential election. Family and Personal Life Hispanics are more likely than non-Hispanics to live in family based households – those where individuals are related by marriage, birth, or adoption. Three-quarters of Hispanic households contain families, while only two-thirds of non-Hispanic households are family-based. Additionally, Hispanic households are bigger on average than nonHispanic households.The average non-Hispanic household contains 2.3 people, while the average Hispanic household contains 3.0 people. At the same time, single parent households are more common among Hispanic families. Twenty-two percent of Hispanics live in multi-generational households compared the 13 percent of Caucasians in the United States.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Demographic Research

Demographic Research Hispanic households often include more than one family. Fourteen percent of U.S. born Hispanic households and 24 percent of foreign born Hispanic households contain two or more families, in contrast to 9 percent of non-Hispanic households. Family income is a significant predictor of the number of families living in a single household, but additional reasons for multi-family household arrangements may include culture, age, language, and privacy preferences. Among families where the head of the household is 20 – 55 years old, thirty-four percent of Hispanic families and twenty-three percent of non-Hispanic families have children under the age of 5. Likewise, the birth rate among Hispanics exceeds that of non-Hispanics. The total fertility rate, which is the average number of children born to a woman in her lifetime, is 1.8 for non-Hispanic white women and 2.7 for Hispanic women. Education Among adults ages 25 and above, Hispanics have lower educational achievements. Educational achievement is attributable in large part to Hispanic immigrants, who typically come to the U.S. with low educational attainment. In contrast, the educational achievements of U.S.-born Hispanic adults is similar to the educational achievements of non-Hispanic adults. Hispanic youth are less likely to be enrolled in school than non-Hispanic youth. In 2009, 34% of Hispanic three- and four-year-olds were enrolled in pre-school, compared to 52% of non-Hispanics. Data also shows that 30% of Hispanics ages 19 to 24 were enrolled in school, compared to 47% of non-Hispanics. Among youth for whom school attendance is compulsory, the high school dropout rate is high for Hispanics. In Virginia, eighteen percent of Hispanics in the class of 2010 dropped out of high school between 9th and 12th grade, compared to 5 percent of whites, 12 perent of blacks, and 4 percent of Asians. Conclusion Based on our findings through academic research we have concluded that the Hispanic population is growing rapidly and has a significantly low voter turnout relative to other members

of the American population. The latest national population projections from the U.S. Census Bureau predict that the Hispanic population will grow from 50 million (16 percent of the U.S. population) in 2010 to 133 million (30 percent of the population) in 2050. We found that Hispanics are more likely than non-Hispanics to live in large family-based households. There is a greater frequency of multi-generational households as compared to the general population in the United States. Children are, and will continue to be, a significant portion of Virginia’s Hispanic population due to high fertility rates among Hispanics. Optimizing the potential of these children to become productive and successful holds the greatest promise for their futures and for strengthening Virginia through the talents of its citizens. It was found that education plays an important role in voter turnout. College educated Hispanics are more likely to go to the polls than Hispanics who are not seeking higher education. Cited Sources Pew Hispanic Center “The Latino Electorate in 2010” April 26, 2011. http://pewhispanic.org/files/reports/141.pdf Accessed February 25th, 2012 Diverse Education “Virginia Hispanic Population Triples in 16 Years” March 5, 2008. http://diverseeducation.com/article/10776c2/virginia-hispanicpopulation-triples-in-16-years.html Accessed February 23rd, 2012 Cooper Center “Demographics and Workforce” http://www.coopercenter. org/demographics/ Accessed February 23rd, 2012 Pew Hispanic Center “Latinos in the 2010 Elections: Virginia” October 15, 2010. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2010/10/15/latinos-in-the-2010elections-virginia/ Accessed February 23rd, 2012 U.S. Census Bureau “Maryland QuickFacts from Census Bureau” Last Modified January 17, 2012. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/24000. html Accessed February 23rd, 2012 U.S. Census Bureau “Virginia QuickFacts from Census Bureau” Last Modified January 17, 2012. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/51000. html Accessed February 23rd, 2012 DCI Group Digital “Digital America” As of July 2010 http://www. dcigroupdigital.com/digital-america/ Accessed February 22nd, 2012 Infoplease “Hispanic Americans: Census Facts” 2007 http://www.infoplease. com/spot/hhmcensus1.html#ixzz1la2ZQ4oN Accessed February 22nd, 2012

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Competitive Research

Abstract Competitions On “Busy” “I’m just too busy”, The leading misinformation of a vague phrase. How many times have you made that excuse about something you really did not want to do? Example A: “Hey man can you help me move my really heavy couch saturday?” “Sorry dude, I’m really busy Saturday” “Whatever, man.” People make time for things that are important to them. How many times honestly have you skipped some classes or called in sick to an appointment in order to make time for something you deemed more important? People get the stuff done that they believe is the MOST IMPORTANT. Putting this question on the questionnaire which was widely circulated by the census seems to have leading results. “Too Busy” may be one of the most highly subjective phrases to exist in the english language. Even if people are not “too busy” by one’s standards, the unpleasant nature of voting may further deter people who have little else to do that day, but see voting as such a low priority that even walking a dog will exceed the importance of such. Example B: “Hey why didn’t you vote? You do know that voting is the root system on which democracy is based and It’s really important. There must have been a good reason.” “Uhh, I was really busy, Official Looking Government Survey.” “Business is a good excuse, you must be a very productive person, I am not judging you at all”

Have you ever been summoned to an event, say your favorite band is in town, but you are “really busy”? Did you make time for your friends birthday party? Even if you had several other commitments? If not, what was MOST important to you? People don’t vote because they see the political process not as a glimmering fractal of eagles and stars. They see it as a grey rainy day, standing in line in a stinking community center- only to cast their worthless opinion into the swallowing abyss which is the political spectrum. But maybe, that’s just it. Maybe it’s not that people are “too busy” but the unpleasant nature of the voting process itself. Perhaps the actual voting process works against itself in getting people to vote, maybe it in itself is competition for our campaign. It is not an “organization” per se, but it is in itself an institution.

On “Micro-Voting” People Vote all of the time, everyday. People vote when they choose how to get to work, what they eat at lunch. Casting a singular opinion into the greater scale of things is a human theme, we have been doing it for millions of years. I am sure you can think of several thingsyou do every day which is “voting” in nature. It can go down to the route you take home, to the brand of bottled water you consume. Imagine if no one bought any gas today, in the USA. What actions would that promote? What would it look like on sales graph’s for the oil companies? What would people spend their money on instead? People who don’t vote because they see the political system as crooked. Most people drive cars, or use some kind of transportation which is based on fossil fuels, which we all know are not sustainable.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Competitive Research

It is common knowledge that these technologies are bad for the environment, are the cause of several fatal crashes, and not to mention stink up the environment and deplete the ozone, but we do it anywaybecause we have to, or we like to, or we feel comfortable with it. Even though macro-voting has far less negative affects, or far greater reaching positive ones than the micro-votes do, we see it as alien, and are hesitant to participate in this circus. Even though we vote in our “rulers” we do not see this as essential, which is insane. We need to figure out how to people to view voting as a normal behaviour, such as eating lunch meat or riding the bus. People need to see it as a learning experience, even if it means making an uneducated vote for the “wrong” candidate. Perhaps they will learn from their experience and put more emphasis in educating themselves in the future.

On Contemporary Culture The memes. Those little funny things on the internet. They have plenty about Mitt Romney, and Ron Paul, of course Obama as well. Bush when he was relevant... etc. People are interested in these. People who don’t vote but find this manifestation (although highly simplified)of the political spectrum interesting and funny. People like funny things, people don’t like voting.

Politics and the sentiment of “idealism” are too closely related. We seem to think of these people as creating something closer to being “ideal” than other aspects in our lives, linking back to the fossil fuels idea. We all buy stuff we know isn’t IDEAL for the environment, yet we want our candidates to be? I think we can emphasize political participation as the first step to becoming more educated about the political process, even becoming so involved to designate one’s self as the “ideal” candidate. We are competing with everyday choices, but we need to partner with them. We need people to see that the things they do everyday are votes, and that way the “real deal” will be less weird, and more welcoming.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Competitive Research

Other Successful Campaigns The LIVESTRONG Campaign Raise awareness and increase outreach to improve cancer experience Website showing pictures of people who wear yellow on LIVESTRONG Day Sharing their story and showing people that you are making a change The Obama Campaign Promoting “hope” and “change” People have great faith in concepts Appeal to emotion Voto Latino Represent certain issues in a partisan sense Appeal exclusively to Latino voters More than 120,000 young Latino voters had been registered 12,511 Likes on Facebook, 9,735 Twitter followers Urge people to help repeal “this shameful law” Rock the Vote Focused on young voters 70,112 people LIKE this on Facebook, 25,099 followers on Twitter People can register to vote online via their site Their Youtube Channel has 514,008 total views and 252 subscribers

What Makes a Successful Campaign Emotion Faith in Concept Community Interaction Transparency “Goodness” Being Human

Cited Sources http://www.quickmeme.com/Scumbag-mitt-romney/?upcoming http://www.quickmeme.com/Ron-Paul/ http://www.buzzfeed.com/donnad/20-best-obama-memes-from-the-osama-drama http://www.livestrong.org/ http://www.barackobama.com/ http://www.votolatino.org/stophb56/ http://tequilapartytour.com/ http://www.rockthevote.com/about/about-young-voters/how-to-mobilizeyoung-voters/

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Ethnographic Research

Ethnographic Research We created a simple survey with which to poll the Hispanic community to learn about their voting habits. We posted our survey online and also went into the Hispanic community to interview people face-to-face. The countries represented were Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, San Salvador, and Uruguay. The median age of participants was 29, with the youngest being 18 and the oldest being 83. We obtained completed surveys from a total of 54 men and 67 women. We posted the online survey on social media sites such as FaceBook and Twitter, encouraging our Hispanic contacts to participate in the survey. We also made use of our personal contacts via email and phone. Additionally, we shared links to the survey on social media sites managed by Hispanic organizations like Latina Magazine and Cuentame.

Many of the people we interviewed in-person did not have access to internet, or did not use it frequently. Some people interviewed appeared to have trouble understanding the Spanish-language forms, possibly because of an issue of adequate literacy or else of legibility. Many of the people interviewed had blue-collar forms of employment, such as construction, restaurant work, or other service professions. The most common reasons we heard for why eligible voters are not voting are 1) apathy 2) cynicism 3) a lack of time. We all observed that the attitudes similar to what many Americans in general seem to feel about voting; there is a sense of being powerless, of voting being meaningless because it doesn’t change anything, and also a feeling that it has nothing to do with them, it’s something that they cannot even relate to.

We conducted our personal interviews at various locations where Hispanics gather, including a Catholic church, a Central-American restaurant, a grocery store, a shopping center, bus stations, and sidewalks. We were able to speak many people, and obtained a total of approximately fifty completed face-to-face surveys by this method. The language barrier was a major factor in collecting ample in-person surveys, as was a general apparent reluctance on the part of our audience to be approached by strangers with clipboards. Many of the people we interviewed were not eligible to vote; many had resident status but not citizenship, thus disqualifying them from completing the survey. The first church we contacted for permission to survey its parishioners did not give us permission to do so. The person we spoke to felt protective, and was concerned we’d scare the parishioners because a many are not citizens and may not have legal status. She herself was Hispanic.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Branding and Messaging Responsible Team Member: Ashley Hopkins

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Branding

Tagline

We chose a handcrafted aesthetic for the Creer Es logomark, reminiscent of the visual language of Hispanic signage. This friendly and approachable type treatment evokes a sense of nostalgia and engenders an emotional connection between our intended audience and the Creer Es brand. “Creer Es”, or “to believe is” , is positioned within a speech bubble, with space underneath for our audience to share what they believe. Our tagline, “join our conversation,” appears above the wordmark as a call to action, encouraging our audience to participate in the campaign. We use a bilingual approach for our campaign, because of this, our logomark appears in Spanish and our logotype appears in English, reflecting both languages within the brand and expressing the multicultural aspect of our concept.

Logomark

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Spanish Logomark Tagline

The tagline must appear in Spanish when presented in Spanish-language collateral. The audience may still write in whatever language they choose.

Logomark

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Tagline

Clear Space

x

Logomark

y

y

y

x

Blue indicates Clear Space. The blue area must be kept free of other elements. Outside the blue box is safe. Magenta indicates type and element alignment and boundaries. The minimum required Clear Space is defined by the measurement ‘X’ (square whos sides are the same length as the height of the “join the conversation” letters.) The minimal size of the Creer es logo is 54mm with a 9pt tagline.

x

x

x

54mm

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Tagline Usage The tagline is omitted in certain applications. The tagline should always be included in professional or web applications. When used in interactive collateral such as postcards, dry-erase boards, and community banners, the audience may write in their beliefs however they choose, making the logo mark personal.

Tagline

Without Tagline

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Unacceptable Usage The Creer es logo is a custom-designed artwork. With this in mind the proportions and positioning of each element in our logo configurations are important to uphold. Never alter the logo in any way. To the left are some examples of common mistakes to make it easy to avoid misrepresentation.

DO NOT Change Elements Positioning.

DO NOT distort or stretch elements.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

DO NOT change typography or colors.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Color Palette The color palette was chosen based on our research of the Hispanic culture, where one finds many vibrant reds, golds, and aquablues. The colors come toghether as one strong standing community that an Hispanic-American can connect with. Appropriate use of the wordmark is the most important part of maintaining the Creer es Brand. The consistency of its appearance is critical to communicating the principles and overall strength of the brand. Only these colors will be used no tint will appear below 65%.

Hex RGB CMYK

#F2B705 242 183 5 5 29 100 0 PANTONE 124 M

#330040 51 0 64 80 91 34 53 PANTONE 525 M

#E21509 226 21 9 5 100 100 .6 PANTONE 1795 M

#0EAC8D 14 172 121 78 6 58 0 PANTONE 334 M

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Logomark & Copy The logomark is dynamic and gives many options for strong verticals with body copy. Body copy should either align with the “c” in Conversation, the end of the bubble, or the “n” in conversation. Copy placement will be determined based on the rules for the logomark’s clear space. Exception: To adjust to title safe space in animations, body copy may align with the “e” in “Creer Es”,

The Hispanic-American population is the fastest growing minority group in the United States, but there is a significantly lower voter turnout relative to other members of the American population. This is a disparity that must be addressed to ensure that our government is a more accurate representation of all its people. Our goal is to make that happen.

The Hispanic-American population is the fastest growing minority group in the United States, but there is a significantly lower voter turnout relative to other members of the American population. This is a disparity that must be addressed to ensure that our government is a more accurate representation of all its people. Our goal is to make that happen.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Typography Appropriate typography is important in the presentation of the Brand. The guidelines below explain which typefaces can be used in specific contexts; do not vary from these specificawtions or introduce other typefaces. St. Ryde reflects the organic element of the speech bubble.

St. Ryde Regular

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890!@#$%^&*()_+|\.?;’, St. Ryde Bold

The St. Ryde typeface is an important element of the Creer Es brand appearance. This type family complements the logo with its confident yet approachable tone. St. Ryde provides flexibility by offering a broad range of type weights and styles for both headlines and text. Use Helvetica or a sans-serif for web and screen applications. For headers and bodycopy.

Helvetica | Web Use Only

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890!@#$%^&*()_+|\.?;’,

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

Brand Metrics Overall response to the Creer Es branding was successful and positive. The vibrant colors attracted the crowd over to the table at our events, and our demographic has admitted to bond with our campaign almost right away just due to the color choices. The colors overall complimented each other well and worked exceptionally well across all print collateral. The St. Ryde body copy is readable, playful, but still professional. The positioning of “Creer Es” allowed for our audience to share what they believe, and everyone understood where to fill in the blank. People responded with excitement, and proudly held our vibrant speech bubbles over their heads. This brought in the 1+1 aspect, if people share what they believe in within their community, they can influence others to join in and come together as one. The tagline overall helped our audience to get excited, and contribute to sharing their beliefs. However, there were some negative experiences as well. People had trouble reading “Creer Es” correctly from an older demographic or if they were not bilingual, they misunderstood.

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Imagery and Print Responsible Team Member: Allison Nambo

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Inspiration The imagery for Creer Es is predominantly hand-drawn patterns. Inspired by traditional Hispanic clothing, these elements are reminiscent of the visual language and environment within the Hispanic culture.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Process After researching various visual and environmental elements of the Hispanic culture, sketching explorations took place. Focusing on the traditional patterns and floral elements we encountered in our research, many different patterns and approachable images were created. The Creer Es elements were drawn by hand with ink on paper, then scanned into the computer for coloring. This technique allowed for the imperfect, organic quality found in hand-crafted works, evoking the humanness which is the hallmark of the Creer Es camapign. After exploring many different sketches, color combinations and pattern elements, the Creer Es team decided upon the most appealing imagery for our intended audience. Although many of these early sketches were not chosen they did help with the overall brand of the campaign. Specifically the speech bubble in the Creer Es wordmark.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Imagery This friendly and boldly-colored imagery treatment evokes an emotional connection between our intended audience and the Creer Es brand. The patterned elements, evocative of floral and geometric patterns found in Hispanic textiles, symbolize the idea of community and the act of coming together to join something greater. These patterns are strictly used within our chosen color palette to emphasize the vibrancy of color within the Hispanic culture and the Creer Es campaign.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Print Collateral The print collateral created for the Creer Es campaign consists of an informational brochure in both Spanish and English, interactive cards, buttons and a magnet with the Creer Es wordmark.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Brochure The brochure provides information on Creer Es and voting in Virginia. This 6� by 4� brochure is tri-folded and printed of 60 lb laser cover paper. In order to reach our audience more broadly, we created editions in English and Spanish. The language and imagery used in the brochure is engaging, inviting our intended audience to learn more about the Creer Es campaign. The first 2 panels of the brochure show a sense of unified diversity. Through the many highlighted Creer Es speech bubbles with hand-written beliefs comprising a community of individuals. On the reverse side of the brochure, frequently asked questions about voting are featured, as well as information on how to get involved with the Creer Es campaign. The vivid colors and supporting visual elements help unify all of the information presented within this appealing brochure.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Interactive Cards These interactive cards were created to help acheive our goal of engagling the community and to raise awareness on the importange of voting. Each card is 4“ by 6 “, double-sided and printed on 100 lb laser paper cover. Highlighting the aspect that our wordmark can be personalized, this card invites the viewer to participate by adding their beliefs in the empty space of our wordmark. A set of instructions are located on the back of the card, inviting the participant to photograph themselves with the card and share it with us via social media. This card was heavily used at the Creer Es events for documentation of community participation and to highlight each individual. This interactive postcard was created to highlight the creativity and individuality of our audience, allowing them to take an active role in the designing of the card. The framed blank space calls for participation by asking the viewer to make their own mark by doodling or writing what they believe in. Having multiple colors, these cards envokes the approachable and personal aspects of our campaign.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Buttons & Magnet The Creer Es buttons and magnet were created to help promote the Creer Es campaign. Highlighting our wordmark with our vibrant color palette, the buttons and magnet easily catch the eyes of our audience which helps evoke interest in our campaign. The Creer Es buttons simply highlight the wordmark. Featuring both the teal and red color on a white background, the wordmark can easily be read and understood on these 1” round buttons. The brightly-colored backing of the buttons displayed the url to the Creer Es website and a QR code allowing those with QR readers to visit the site immediately via mobile devices. The Creer Es magnet highlights our wordmark in a 1.75” by 2.75” gold rectangle. The vivid colors of the magnet were intended to help provoke intrigue from our audience.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Social Media Icons The social media icons for the Creer Es campaign are custom-designed to emphasize the hand-crafted aesthetic of our visual language. All social media icons are presented in one of the four colors used in the Creer Es color palette.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

Imagery and Print Collateral The overall response to the imagery and print collateral of the Creer Es campaign was positive. The vivid colors, hand-crafted patterns and approachable text caught the eye and provoked intrigue in our audience. At both of the Creer Es events many brochures, both in English and Spanish were taken and read by the public. Through the vivid colors and emphasis on our wordmark, the brochure highlighted the beliefs of individuals and how they relate to voting. The language used in the brochure was both approachable and informative. Both in Spanish and English, the content provided consisted of more information about Creer Es, why voting matters and how to vote. The brochure wasn’t as popular for children as it was very text heavy and geared more towards an older literate audience.

The buttons and magnet provoked intrigue about our campaign. The fun-sized brightly colored buttons drew many children who then brought their parents to our table at the Creer Es events. The magnets were also very popular with the children. Providing the website of our campaign on the magnet helped encourage participation on our website which then would lead to participating on our various social media pages.

The interactive cards were successful in getting the community engaged. Both cards called for participation in a way that didn’t exclude any age group. Children were encouraged to color, draw and write in the framed blank space of the doodle postcard. Asking the audience to fill in what they believe in our wordmark, the audience then created a personal bond with our campaign. The directions on the backs of these cards calls for the participant to share their images with friends and us via social media and through traditional mail. This addressed the 1 + 1 aspect of our campaign and generated conversation between Creer Es and its audience.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Microsite Responsible Team Member: Travis Poffenberger

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Concept

“In the Mood” Not all websites are the same. Obviously, But what is different about the websites that people look at? For www.CreerEs,org I chose to model the site after those which sharing and visual culture play a main role. I wanted the website to be friendly, fun, and put viewers in the right “mood” ; it needed to be inspirational. As designers we know all about mood boarding, Just because there is a specific word for the concept does not meant that it is an ineffective tactic for those unfamiliar with the idea. Looking at a grid display or scroll feed of images is currently recognized as “truthful”. Look at Facebook, they use a scroll feed, Tumblr, uses the same concept. Google images is a premier source now a days for information. Let us say that one has never seen a Dragon fruit, plug it into Google images and there it is! A whole bunch of Dragon fruit. We trust this image display format because it is associated with a giant search engine we trust as well. The semiotics of Google Images were utilized to create the home page of the website, to provide a legitimate appearance. Coming back to the mood boards, what if instead of someone typing “Dragon fruit” into Google images, a grid of pictures comes up with someone’s motive behind the content and arrangement? My goal was to inspire people, to make them feel good, to feel like participating. Using hand selected content and a trusty structure the home page of the website is a mood board for inspiration, for involvement. The other pages contain pictures from the community. The local feel was pivotal in this site concept as well. I want folks to be able to visit the site and immediately recognize a face, or location, as well as to be inspired by something. Mixing this with the approachable vibe of the branding one creates an accessible, yet professional platform for community engagement. A hub for our social media outlets, and a place one knows they will always find something good. People like good sites, they will tell their friends. 1+1 =2 .

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Sitemap The home page contains most of the content on the website. It is meant to be the “trigger”. The other pages are also inspirational, and link one back and fourth in the site, many pages have re-purposed ad space that links back to the “speaking up” page. The “speaking up” page is the call to action. This is where people can go to learn about voting, to learn why it’s good to do. It is filled with imagery from local events hosted by Creer Es, showing that getting involved can really make a difference. The grid format on the main page makes featuring content easy. There is also a “featured” page , giving folks the choice to nominate someone who deserves a pat on the back. Seeing someone one knows online, in a “featured” context is a big pull to get them involved in the community. The positive feedback lacking in voting in elections is created by Creer Es, and seen on the website. It can be beautiful to speak up, and be involved in one’s community.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Up and Running The screen shot higher on the page shows the home page of the website. Notice the visible branding and mild color palette to provide a rest for the eyes in the media heavy page. A Twitter stream is present on the left side of the page, so one can see that we are in fact an active organization. This encourages quick sharing of the site as well. Above the Twitter stream there is a filter option. Such filter options include: NOVA, VIDEO, INSPIRATIONAL, EVENT, SUBMISSION. This makes the task of browsing a snap. The social media presence is reiterated on the top right of the screen. Three custom social media icons, designed by Allison Nambo are present. This shows the visitor that we are on Facebook, Twitter, and we have an RSS feed that one could subscribe to. The bottom screen shows the “about” page. Participants at an event can be seen on the right sidebar, while other even photos populate the main page. The page closes with a “Creer Es” to vote image. Reinforcing our message to the visitor.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Adaptable The site was based on the “Shaken Grid Premium� theme. All of the colors were changed, customized to the brand. The main appeal of this theme is the built in adaptable wireframe. www.CreerEs.org is viewable on any internet enabled device. Shown on the right is the view from a smartphone sized device. Notice the menu is now a drop down, and instead of a grid, the images are displayed as a scroll. Social media icons are present, the site is fully adaptable to whatever device the user wishes to view the site on.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics I believe the site to be quite successful in reference to the structure of the site. The sites that I studied garner millions of visits a day, so I know I am pulling from good stock. The site was live for twelve days before I felt it was ready to be promoted through social media. Lita Ledesema had created a PSA video. I put the video on the site, and advertised through social media. The site got over 20 hits in that day, as opposed to the daily 2 or 3 it was getting without being promoted. If this were to be a fully funded campaign rich with videos, and more events and the like, I am certain the site would garner several hits a day. It was such a drastic increase in visitors that it proves the symbiotic relationship between our social media channels, and the main website.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

More Metrics With the site only being live and populated for a bit over a week, it already jumped to the first page in Google. This is due to the strategic tagging on the website and the rampant success of our social media; the majority of other links being just that.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

PSA Video Responsible Team Member: Ricardo Cortez

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Video PSAs

Spread the Word The Creer Es campaign features two video PSAs reinforcing the message of 1 + 1. The PSA titled “speech bubble” was inspired by our collateral speech bubble, on which participants wrote what they believe. This PSA relates the way the campaign works when spreading the word is the main concept. Multicultural actors,mainly Hispanics, start passing along an empty speech bubble which once is received is filled by the words that represent their believes then the words are shown to the camera before is passed along to the next person. The main idea was to only represent one person per screen with different backgrounds, then the video will imply movement and visual interaction among different actors that were never filmed together. This shows that if you share information with someone the way this information is spread, the message gets stronger and it will get around any community.

Our campaign main goal is to show that once a message is transmitted from person to person, it will continue the cycle of spreading everywhere and encourage people to participate, be part of the campaign and finally increase the Hispanic vote.

The second video “your voice” represents the community and the way the community is responsible for spreading the word. The video starts with a cyclist that meets up with a girl on the street, they have something in common, they both have a Creer Es pins on their clothes, then the girl meets up with a group of friends and has a brief talk with them. The group of friends then spread to different parts to continue the sharing of information from the campaign, The message is distributed to several different persons until one of the actors approaches to the camera man and hands him over a flyer from Creer Es showing that eventually everybody will get the message.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Inspiration & Process The Video PSAs were inspired by the speech bubble and the way people reacted to the collateral created for the campaign, magnets, pins, stickers and all the different ways of getting the information around. Either using the speech bubble or using the collateral people we used as actors were willing to participate because the strong and friendly display of the message. Use of proper lighting was essential to show different scenarios and create different moods for different scenes during the filming of the campaign.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Video PSAs Speech Bubble. Your Voice.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

Video PSAs Video marketing has a far greater reach than the traditional print media. This is because people respond better to live pictures than to bland text, however effectively written. Video is a content source and when integrated with the rest of the on-site content, creates an effective medium for marketing products and services. Videos reach a much larger group through word of mouth and video-sharing. An ideal video is crisp, informative, and engaging, to create a positive impact. The content is of vital importance, a creative presentation with interesting elements interwoven draws more attention than a long straightforward narrative. The quality of the video (pictures, sound, etc.,) is equally important. It is also essential that the videos carry the brand identity either in the form of the logo or other creative entities representative of the brand. The response to the PSAs videos will be measure with general public and social media feedback.The general public feedback for the short amount of time that the video have been display is been great lots of great comments on the simplicity and integration of the whole campaign with the PSA videos.The social media feedback is expected to be similar to the general public response, although data collection still in process

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Motion Graphics Animation Responsible Team Member: Lita Ledesma

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Animated PSAs

We Believe Your Vote Matters The Creer Es campaign features two animated PSAs aimed at reinforcing the message in our call to action, which invites the audience to participate in our conversation about beliefs and how they relate to voting. The PSA titled “I Believe” was inspired by our event banner, on which participants wrote what they believe on a large version of the wordmark, reflecting the unified diversity of the Hispanic community. This PSA features an animation of these hand-written beliefs as a continuation of this dialogue, maintaining the approachable quality that defines our overall visual language. Using After Effects, the words are animated to appear as if written across a digital version of the event banner while voiceovers from several different actors state these beliefs, affirming the goal of our campaign at the end by expressing the belief “my vote matters.”

Our campaign is centered on engaging our audience in a meaningful way. To do so, it was important to reflect the diverse Hispanic community convincingly. Both PSAs include Hispanic volunteers performing the voiceovers. As well, both PSAs include original musical accompaniments written and performed by Hispanic artists. By working with members of the Hispanic community, we were able to add a more approachable and authentic feeling to both animation concepts while uniting them thematically. This collaborative effort was very much in the spirit of the Creer Es campaign; both PSAs were created with participation from the intended audience.

in “One Becomes Many” the flower pattern from our event brochure is transformed into an animation that expresses exponential growth, reflecting the “one plus one” facet of the Creer Es campaign. This message is enhanced with music and a voiceover performance by multiple actors encouraging people to get involved and to invite members of their community to do the same, thus empowering their community toward positive change through voting.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Inspiration & Process The animated PSAs were inspired by the hand-written beliefs expressed by event participants who interacted with the Creer Es banner. To recreate the feeling of a diverse community, we hand-wrote key words in a variety of styles to imply different voices. We needed to have our voiceovers convey a sense of authenticity to the listener. Rather than employ professional voiceover actors, we enlisted the help of Hispanic volunteers from the local community. While the performances are not as “polished� as one would get from a professional actor, our particpants do come across as sincere, which was essential to the project. It was a challenge to find suitable recording space and equipment for voiceovers with the limited resources available, but it was nevertheless a rewarding and fruitful experience for everyone involved.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Animated PSAs I Believe One Becomes Many

creeres.org @CreerEs on Twitter • facebook.com/creeres

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics Viewership of the Animated PSAs was fairly successful given the brief time period used for this assessment. The animations were shared via YouTube through social media sites (primarily Facebook and Twitter) and through the Creer Es website. A significant portion of viewers in the week after going live belong to female viewers (over 85%) which may be attributed to the persons and locations through which videos were shared; in addition to the Creer Es sites, the animations where shared on personal Facebook and Twitter sites. Additionally, the PSAs were posted to Hispanic sites such as Latina Magazine, which has a large female demographic.

Demographics

Views By Gender Male 14.1 % Female 85.9%

Views By Age & Gender 100% 50% 0% 50% 100% 13-17 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 56-64 55-64 65+

Views By Country United States (133) Indonesia (2) Spain (1) Colombia (1) Japan (1)

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

Referrals From All Traffic Sources

Methods of viewer traffic were fairly wide-ranging, with the dominant means being the embedded link from the Creer Es Facebook site. A significant portion (14.1%) of views were via mobile devices, which underscores the importance of this medium as a delivery method for motion graphics.

80 60 40 20 0 4/2/12

Traffic Source

5/1/12

Views

Embedded player (Facebook) YouTube - other features YouTube suggested video Mobile apps & direct traffic Creer Es website YouTube search YouTube channel page

% of Total Views

40 28.2% 32 22.5% 23 16.2% 20 14.1% 13 09.2% 07 04.9% 07 04.9%

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Social Media Responsible Team Member: Keziah Chong

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Social Media

Goal

Language

Creer Es believes voting matters, and that we should all share our beliefs in voting. We vote every day on ordinary choices; we vote for taking the bus, we vote for bringing an umbrella. Why don’t we vote for our representatives? The goal of our social media channels is to encourage people to speak up and share their opinions on the voting process. We all believe in something. People should share what they believe and what makes them want to vote. Our campaign is to raise awareness in the community, to start a conversation, and get people to join.

The primary language we use on Facebook is English, and the secondary language is Spanish. Most of our audience is English-speaking or bilingual, so we use English as a primary language in most of our posts. The messaging language for our posts is not all related to the HispanicAmerican community, even though our audience is mostly HispanicAmerican. We post news about Hispanic-Americans to attract the Hispanic-American community. We also post news about U.S. politics, people’s success stories, motivational and inspirational quotes that encourage people to act, and some interesting topics that encourage discussion. In addition, we retweet and use hashtags on our Twitter page to get more followers. For instance, our hashtags includes #nova, #dmv, #believe, #community, #latism, etc. We raise questions and conduct polls for our audience to foster activity.

Audience The audience for our campaign is Hispanic-Americans in Northern Virginia. However, the purpose of our social media page is to raise awareness and encourage the community to speak up. Therefore, the audience for our social media pages is mostly Hispanic-Americans but not limited to them. These pages are open to everyone to join our conversation.

Research Of the social media tools available, Hispanic Americans use Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube most. They use social media more than other minority groups. From the research we have done, other successful voting campaigns such as VotoLatino, Rock the Vote, and Votizen post frequently on their social media pages to get the attention of their audience, raise questions for discussions, and share interesting news to engage their audience. We also found that people are interested in news that are not related to voting or politics, but that this can be used as a way to draw people into a discussion about our organization.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Facebook We were able to built 64 “Likes”, get 42 people to talk about this, engage 164 users, and acquire 1411 weekly total reach, in less than two months. We reached 199 people in one of the polls that we conducted. We also created a “Quote of the Day” album to share inspirational and motivational quotes that encourage people to act or speak up. We had people “like” and “share” the quotes.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Facebook This is one of the quotes that I shared “Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.� We got messages from people who were interested about our organization, and who wanted to learn more about us. We reached the peak when we had our event, and after the event.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Facebook We posted our two events on Facebook, and uploaded photos from both events. We engaged 164 users to actually click on our event albums.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Twitter We were able to get 68 followers in less than two months; our followers included some Latino organizations. We have posted 259 tweets so far; most of our tweets are to encourage participations and to inspire the audience. We used hashtags to gather more followers, Some of the hashtags we used are: #nova, #dmv, #vote, #believe, and #latism, which helps a lot on gathering Hispanic-American followers. We also promoted our events on Twitter and linked our events album from Flickr.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Flickr Our Flickr was a platform for people to search us more easily; we used both English and Spanish tags on our photos. Some of the tags that we used are believe, creer, community, comunidad, cultura, education, motivational, encourage, familia, fun.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics and Success We were able to build 64 “Likes” on our Facebook page and 68 followers on Twitter in less than two months. We had Facebook members from all over the world, including Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay, Australia, and more. We engaged 164 users to click on our albums for our events. We also “reached” 199 people in one of our polls. We had a weekly total reach of 1411 users, and 42 people talked about our page. People liked the links we share and they made thoughtful comments on our posts. We received messages from people who said that they were interested at our organization and liked the posts that we share. In addition, we attracted 127 views and one like for one of our campaign videos on YouTube in three days.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Mobile App Responsible Team Member: Sandra Gichuhi

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Mobile App

Creer Es Mobile Application Creer Es is a fun and fast mobile app that allows people to share what they believe simply by using pictures from their mobile phone and doodling on them. At any point anyone can upload a picture as a beginning of a conversation and start getting responses from their family, friends and the rest of the community. It is about converstaion and how we can use the one plus one aspect to make people realise that what they believe in is a reason they should vote.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Home screen The visual identifier appears as the app loads. As the loading percentage increases, the blue circle spins. After the app loads, The user needs to sign up. Once they sign up the next screen will appear. The user can either click to view their profile, their friends profile, create what they believe or see their notifications.

Sign Up

Creer Es

email

88%

Creer Es

Doodle

password

My profile

submit

My friends

loading....

1

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Notifications On clicking the bubble on the first screen, the bubble becomes larger revealing the users notifications. User decides to view his or her event notifications. User has been invited to a creer es mural event. After reading about the event, user can clicks the home button in order to go back to the home screen.

Event

Creer Es

Creer Es

Doodle

Doodle

My profile

My profile

My friends

My friends

1

Date: Sat 28th April Venue: Farmers Market You and your friends are invited to attend the Creer Es SHARE WHAT YOU BELIEVE MURAL EVENT this weekend. We will all play a part in creating this mural. Food and drinks will be provided.

1 event

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Profiles The User can view his or her images or friends images by clicking on my profile or my friends profile.

Creer Es

My Profile

My Friends

Doodle

My profile

My friends

0

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Upload User decides to create what he or she believes in. User clicks on the doodle option, He or she uploads a photo from his or her gallery. User clicks the button my gallery which takes him or her to the next screen. Images in gallery appear cronologicaly from when they were created. User clicks on the first image.

Creer Es

my gallery

Select Photo

Cancel

Doodle

My profile

My friends

0

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Doodle and share After user selects the pen tool size and the color, user presses down on the image in a soft clicking motion to create a doodle. When user is done, he or she clicks on the bar on the third icon in order to save the image. To share what he or she belives, user clicks the fourth icon and a small screen appears which reveals the option to share the image.

Back

Creer Es

Back

Share

email message tweet facebook cancel

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Gesture screens Click create on home screen Upload a photo

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Gesture screens Select the photo to upload Select pen tool size and color

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Gesture screens Begin to doodle Share

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

I printed out all the screens I made for the mobile application and told a real mobile application. The navigation was easy to use and most people figured it out very easily throughout the doodling process. They liked the concept of doodling on pictures mostly because of the personal feel it gave to the app. They liked that it was relatable and usable by pretty much anyone who would like to share what they believe. They liked the choice of colors and the consistency in the look and feel that flowed throughout the application. Some said that they would like to see more fun patterns throughout the mobile application and not only on the loading screen. A couple of people suggested that I should have a way to learn about the campaign or a way to get to our sites through the app although some said that it would make the mobile app overwhelming, or that it would take the fun out of it and it might be overwhelming. Lastly, someone said that there was no way to know what the app did until one got to the home screen or doodle screen.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Event Responsible Team Member: Maggie Winters

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

In the Real World

It’s all about the community. Creer Es is focused on sharing beliefs and getting involved in our communities. For our events, we thought it would be appropriate to have an informal conversation with members of the community by being part of community events and talking with event attendees and participants. We were well received at both events we participated in, and our audience members were very excited to share their thoughts and feelings with us. Everyone seemed to have a strong opinion about our campaign and the subjects we presented--community, voting, and beliefs. Our table was quite colorful and fun; many participants commented on our brightly colored, well-designed print collateral and banner. The bright colors helped attract people to the table, and we were able to start conversations with them as they started to approach us, or come our direction.

We invited participants to write what they believe in on our oversized logo banner to represent the community. Responses from participants ranged from very well thought out, conversation-provoking responses like, “peace”, to somewhat silly ones, such as “my cat”, and simply touching: “power of smile”. Some people took a few minutes to think about what they wanted to write, talked with us about it, talked with their families about it, while others knew what they wanted to write immediately. We engaged in some really great dialogue with our participants. People were very excited and interested in what we’re doing, and talked with us a lot about how beliefs relate to voting and how they felt they were and could make the community stronger. We also spoke with Arlington’s transportation office, who had a table across the park, about our campaign as well as a couple Obama 2012 workers who were at the event as well. Both groups thought our campaign was strong and were glad to be involved in a non-partisan community project.

There was a definite positive response to Creer Es from Arlington residents. Our participants were excited, inspired to make a difference, and impressed with the campaign.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

The Home Show The first event that Creer Es was a part of was the Arlington Home Show on April 14th. The Home Show was a great place to test out our print collateral, interactive pieces, and see how our audience reacted to our campaign. The event was highly successful; we talked to about 50 people, half of whom were in our target audience. We engaged our audience via social media before, during, and after the event and have seen a jump in both Facebook and Twitter followers, and participation.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

The Farmer’s Market Our next event was Sunday, April 15th at the Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization’s Farmer’s Market. It was a beautiful day and we got a spectacular spot at the market, which helped us to engage many shoppers and market vendors. This event was also very successful. We had great conversations and people ended up lingering around our table area to talk with other participants, which was exactly what we were hoping for.

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

The Farmer’s Market

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Our Banner

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Metrics

How many people participated? At Saturday’s event, we talked to about 50 people, half of whom were in our target audience. At Sunday’s event, we talked to about 30 people, a third of whom were in our target audience.

How many people expressed interest in the events via social media? We have had significantly more social media interaction since the events. Below is a graph showing our Facebook “likes” in April (our events were halfway through the month).

Were the responses well thought out? Responses ranged from very well thought out, conversation-provoking responses to somewhat silly ones, like “my cat”, and simply touching, like “power of smile”. Some people took a few minutes to think about what they wanted to write, talked with us about it, talked with their families about it, while others knew what to write on the spot.

Did we engage in meaningful discussion with participants? We did engage in some really great dialogue with our participants. People were very excited and interested in what we’re doing, and talked with us a lot about how beliefs relate to voting and how they felt they were and could make the community stronger. We also spoke with Arlington’s transportation office, who had a table across the park, about our campaign as well as a couple Obama 2012 workers who were also at the event.

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Process Photos

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Process Photos

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Thank You Note

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Corcoran College of Art & Design | Junior Studio 2012

Thank You Note

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