Page 1

AN N UAL BU D G E T Fiscal Year 2015


City of Coral Springs, Florida

Annual Budget Fiscal Year 2015 To be the premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family.

City Attorney John Hearn, Commissioner Dan Daley, Vice Mayor Larry Vignola, Mayor Vincent Boccard, Commissioner Claudette Bruck, Commissioner Tom Powers, City Manager Erdal Dรถnmez Erdal Dรถnmez, City Manager Susan Grant, Deputy City Manager Jennifer K. Bramley, Deputy City Manager Robert Goehrig, Director of Budget, Strategy, and Communication Liliana Alvarez, Senior Financial Analyst Laurie Bishara, Senior Financial Analyst Chelsea Stahl, Senior Financial Analyst Sherri Toops, Senior Financial Analyst Kristin Holowicki, Grant Coordinator Vannelys Rivera, Budget Analyst Yanell Sanchez, Principal Office Assistant

Cover design by Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer

Adopted September 17, 2014


Distinguished Budget Presentation Award

The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to City of Coral Springs, Florida for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2013. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as a financial plan, as an operations guide, and as a communications device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award.

2

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


How To Use This Book We’ve made every effort to make this book as easy as possible to read, but we understand just how difficult it can be to find what you’re looking for in such a complex document. To make your search easier, we’ve provided a number of tools to help you get what you need.

Organization of This Book The City of Coral Springs’ Annual Budget is made up of three separate books: The Annual Budget (this book), the Capital Improvement Program, and the Business Plan. This Annual Budget volume is divided into five sections: Introduction—This section contains the City Manager’s Letter, Mission, Strategic Priorities, Core Values, Citywide Organization Chart, and a few brief statistics about the City and its history. Pages 1-18. Budget Overview—This section contains the Budget Process Overview, Budget Highlights, Fund Structure Overview, Fund Summaries and Descriptions, Debt Management, Capital Improvement Program, and long-range planning tools. Pages 19-82. Business Plan—This section contains the current Market Environment, Service and Operations Strategy including ongoing and new initiatives, Financial Strategy, and results showing how well the City has performed in achieving strategic and departmental goals. Pages 83-158. Performance Budget—This section contains a description of each department’s mission, core processes and outputs, new initiatives, organization chart, revenue and expenditure summary, performance measures, and capital improvement projects. Pages 159-218. Appendix—This section includes the City’s Budget Resolution, Budget Ordinance, Financial Policies, Fund Balance, Debt Service Maturity Schedules, and staffing information. Pages 219-276.

Abbreviations and Acronyms A useful list of abbreviations and acronyms used in the book.

Glossary A concise description of the terminology used in this document that is either technical in nature or unique to the City of Coral Springs. Each term is given a short entry that clearly defines it within the context that we use the term.

Index In the back of the book (starting on page 269) we are providing a useful index with pointers to important terms. Headings and subheadings with corresponding page locators are listed to help the reader quickly search and easily access information throughout this book. This tool can be used to search by specific topic, by alphabet, and by cross reference.

Key Tools Strategic Priorities and Values................... 11-12 Coral Springs Organization Chart...................13 Budget Highlights......................................... 25-28 Combined Budget Summary...........................29 Fund Structure Overview........................... 30-31 Summary Net Budget.................................. 32-33 Fund Summaries & Descriptions..............35-63 Major Capital Projects...................................77-78 General Fund Five-Year Forecast............. 81-82 Summary of FY 2015 Initiatives.............115-116

Tables of Contents

FY 2014 KIO Summary .................................... 126

A comprehensive Table of Contents is provided (pages 4-5) to help the reader locate information in this document. In addition, each subsequent section contains a table of contents directly behind the tab page to identify specific information about that section. Following the main Table of Contents is a list of Tables and Illustrations to highlight charts and graphs that contain essential information.

Performance Measurements ................ 127-130 Composite Indicators ...............................131-133 Fiscal Year 2014 Initiative Summary....134-139 Budget Process Map.................................160-161 Department Budgets...............................164-216 Staffing.................................................................. 245

City of Coral Springs, Florida

3


Table of Contents Introduction...................................................................................................................................................................................3 How To Use This Book........................................................................................................................................................3 Table of Contents................................................................................................................................................................4 City Manager’s Letter.........................................................................................................................................................8 Strategic Priorities............................................................................................................................................................ 11 Core Values......................................................................................................................................................................... 12 City of Coral Springs Organization Chart................................................................................................................ 13 Coral Springs at a Glance............................................................................................................................................... 14 Service Statistics............................................................................................................................................................... 15 History of Coral Springs................................................................................................................................................. 16 Management and Budget Office................................................................................................................................ 18 Budget Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Budget Process Overview............................................................................................................................................. 20 Budget Highlights............................................................................................................................................................ 25 Combined Budget Summary....................................................................................................................................... 29 Fund Structure Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 30 Fund Budget Overviews................................................................................................................................................ 35 General Fund Budget Summary........................................................................................................................ 35 General Fund Description................................................................................................................................... 38 Fire Fund Budget Summary................................................................................................................................ 43 Fire Fund Description............................................................................................................................................ 44 Water and Sewer Fund Budget Summary...................................................................................................... 47 Water and Sewer Fund Description.................................................................................................................. 48 Health Fund Budget Summary.......................................................................................................................... 50 Health Fund Description...................................................................................................................................... 51 General Insurance Fund Budget Summary.................................................................................................. 52 General Insurance Fund Description.............................................................................................................. 53 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Budget Summary............................................................................. 54 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Description......................................................................................... 54 Public Art Fund Budget Summary.................................................................................................................... 55 Public Art Fund Description................................................................................................................................ 55 Equipment Services Fund Budget Summary................................................................................................ 56 Equipment Services Fund Description............................................................................................................ 57 Pension Allocation Summary............................................................................................................................. 59 Solid Waste Fund Budget Summary................................................................................................................. 60 Solid Waste Fund Description............................................................................................................................. 60 Debt Service Fund Budget Summary.............................................................................................................. 61 Debt Service Fund Description.......................................................................................................................... 62 Debt Service Schedule.......................................................................................................................................... 64 Debt Management................................................................................................................................................. 65 Debt Service Schedule - Water and Sewer Loans........................................................................................ 67 Capital Improvement Program................................................................................................................................... 68 Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget.............................................................................................. 71 Capital Improvement Summary by Fund....................................................................................................... 74 CIP Budget by Funding Source—All Funds................................................................................................... 75 General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source.......................................................................................... 76 Major Capital Projects by Location................................................................................................................... 77 Major Capital Projects by Department............................................................................................................ 78 Revenue Trends................................................................................................................................................................. 79 General Fund Five-Year Forecast................................................................................................................................. 81

4

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Table of Contents (continued) Business Plan............................................................................................................................................................................... 84 Introduction....................................................................................................................................................................... 84 Market Environment....................................................................................................................................................... 85 Service and Operations Strategy................................................................................................................................ 95 A Family-Friendly Community..................................................................................................................................... 96 A Thriving Business Community...............................................................................................................................100 An Active, Healthy Community.................................................................................................................................105 An Attractive Community...........................................................................................................................................108 An Innovative, High-Performing Organization...................................................................................................112 Financial Strategy...........................................................................................................................................................117 Measuring Results..........................................................................................................................................................125 Customer Requirements Analysis............................................................................................................................140 Benchmarking.................................................................................................................................................................153 Process Improvement Teams.....................................................................................................................................154 Awards and Special Recognitions............................................................................................................................156 Performance Budget .............................................................................................................................................................159 Performance Budget Overview.................................................................................................................................162 Department Budgets....................................................................................................................................................164 City Attorney...........................................................................................................................................................164 City Commission...................................................................................................................................................166 City Manager’s Office...........................................................................................................................................167 Development Services........................................................................................................................................172 Financial Services..................................................................................................................................................179 Fire/EMS....................................................................................................................................................................182 Human Resources.................................................................................................................................................188 Information Technology.....................................................................................................................................192 Parks and Recreation...........................................................................................................................................195 Police.........................................................................................................................................................................204 Public Works............................................................................................................................................................209 Appendix....................................................................................................................................................................................219 Millage Rate Resolution...............................................................................................................................................220 Budget Ordinance..........................................................................................................................................................222 Financial Policies.............................................................................................................................................................227 Fund Balance Overview...............................................................................................................................................235 Staffing...............................................................................................................................................................................245 Abbreviations and Acronyms....................................................................................................................................262 Glossary of Terms...........................................................................................................................................................263 Index...................................................................................................................................................................................269

City of Coral Springs, Florida

5


Tables and Illustrations Introduction...................................................................................................................................................................................3 Key Tools.................................................................................................................................................................................3 City of Coral Springs Organization Chart................................................................................................................ 13 Coral Springs at a Glance............................................................................................................................................... 14 Service Statistics............................................................................................................................................................... 15 MBO Staff............................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Budget Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................... 19 FY 2015 Budget Calendar.............................................................................................................................................. 24 No change in the Coral Springs Operating millage rate.................................................................................... 25 Operating millage rate comparison Fiscal Year 2015.......................................................................................... 25 Voter-approved debt service millage rate.............................................................................................................. 25 Tax rate Fiscal Year 2015................................................................................................................................................. 25 Full-time additions for Fiscal Year 2015.................................................................................................................... 26 Net full-time position changes per fiscal year....................................................................................................... 26 Annual net operating budget and capital.............................................................................................................. 27 Appropriated Funds Budget窶認iscal Year 2015.................................................................................................... 29 Fund structure overview............................................................................................................................................... 30 Major Funds........................................................................................................................................................................ 30 Summary of net budgeted revenues窶認iscal Year 2015.................................................................................... 32 Summary of net budgeted expenditures窶認iscal Year 2015............................................................................ 33 Where the money comes from by source (all funds) ......................................................................................... 34 Where the money goes by category (General Fund only)................................................................................ 34 Where the money goes by type of program (all funds)..................................................................................... 34 Millage rates....................................................................................................................................................................... 38 General Fund total revenues........................................................................................................................................ 38 Utility service taxes.......................................................................................................................................................... 39 Franchise fees.................................................................................................................................................................... 39 General Fund revenue and expenditure summary ............................................................................................. 40 General Fund total expenditures................................................................................................................................ 41 General Fund non-departmental operating expenses...................................................................................... 42 Fire Assessment rate schedule ................................................................................................................................... 44 Fire Fund total revenues................................................................................................................................................ 44 Fire Fund total expenditures........................................................................................................................................ 45 Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2015.............................................................................................. 45 Fire Fund revenue and expenditure summary ..................................................................................................... 46 Water bill for average single-family residence...................................................................................................... 48 Water and Sewer Fund total revenues .................................................................................................................... 48 Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary................................................................................... 49 Water and Sewer Fund total expenses..................................................................................................................... 49 Health Fund revenue and expense summary........................................................................................................ 51 General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary................................................................................. 53 Ten-year fleet replacement cost................................................................................................................................. 57 Equipment Services Fund revenue and expense summary............................................................................. 58 Debt Service Fund revenues........................................................................................................................................ 62 Allocation of Debt Service for Revenue Bonds and Other Debt* for Fiscal Year 2015............................ 63 Debt Service Fund expenditures................................................................................................................................ 63 Debt Service Schedule................................................................................................................................................... 64 Debt Management.......................................................................................................................................................... 65 Debt Service Schedule - Water and Sewer Loans................................................................................................. 67 Capital expenditure FY2015 ........................................................................................................................................ 68 Capital expenditure FY2015-2020 ............................................................................................................................ 68 Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses ............................................................................... 69 Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses .................................................................... 69

6

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Tables and Illustrations (continued) CIP funding sources— Fiscal Year 2015................................................................................................................... 70 CIP impact on the operating budget Fiscal Year 2015........................................................................................ 71 FY 2015 Capital projects financed via grants......................................................................................................... 73 Major Capital Projects by Location............................................................................................................................ 77 Major Capital Projects by Department..................................................................................................................... 78 Primary General Fund Revenues................................................................................................................................ 79 General Fund Five Year Forecast ................................................................................................................................ 81 General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary Schedule........................................................................................ 82 Business Plan............................................................................................................................................................................... 83 Yield Curve May Indicate Future Economic Growth............................................................................................ 85 Business Environment is Healthy - Unemployment Rates Recovering......................................................... 86 Future is Uncertain - CPI Bears Watching................................................................................................................ 86 Recovery is not Robust - Percent Change in GDP Urges Caution................................................................... 86 Median Single-Family Home Sales Prices in Broward County......................................................................... 87 Coral Springs Properties in Some Stage of Foreclosure..................................................................................... 88 Demographic charts....................................................................................................................................................... 91 City of Coral Springs’ Business Model....................................................................................................................... 95 2015-2016 Short-Range Transportation Improvement Plan..........................................................................102 Long-Range Transportation Improvement Plan.................................................................................................103 NW 40th Street Bike Path Map..................................................................................................................................105 Summary of Fiscal Year 2015 Initiatives.................................................................................................................115 Total Millage Less than Fiscal Year 2013.................................................................................................................117 Total Taxable Assessed Value ....................................................................................................................................118 Property tax revenue trend........................................................................................................................................119 Communications services tax revenue..................................................................................................................119 Electric Franchise Fee revenue..................................................................................................................................119 Five-Year Forecast: General Fund ............................................................................................................................120 Residential Solid Waste Assessment.......................................................................................................................121 Water and Sewer Fund forecasted debt service ................................................................................................122 Fiscal Year 2014 KIO Summary...................................................................................................................................126 Department Performance Measurements............................................................................................................127 Survey respondents by general location...............................................................................................................140 Overall Composite Customer Satisfaction Index 2009 vs. 2011 vs. 2013...................................................141 Residential Survey Trends...........................................................................................................................................142 Importance-Satisfaction Assessment Matrix.......................................................................................................143 Overall Quality of Services Provided by the City................................................................................................145 Business Survey: Bottom line up front...................................................................................................................145 Overall Ratings of Customer Service.......................................................................................................................145 Reasons Businesses Decide to Locate Here..........................................................................................................146 Likelihood of recommending City as a business location to friends, family and co-workers ...........147 Overall Business Atmosphere Rating......................................................................................................................147 Best Ways for the City to Communicate with Businesses ...............................................................................147 Are Businesses Interested in Conducting Business with the City On-Line?..............................................148 Ratings of City Property Taxes Compared to Other Communities ..............................................................148 Ratings of City Property Taxes...................................................................................................................................148 ICMA comparison cities...............................................................................................................................................153 Performance Budget .............................................................................................................................................................159 Budget Process Map......................................................................................................................................................160 Appendix....................................................................................................................................................................................219 Fund Balance Summaries............................................................................................................................................236 Summary table of Position Counts..........................................................................................................................245 Number of budgeted positions By Department—Fiscal Year 2015............................................................245 Position Counts for all Departments and Divisions...........................................................................................246

City of Coral Springs, Florida

7


City Manager’s Letter

I am pleased to present to you the Fiscal Year 2015 Adopted Budget which maintains the current millage rate, already one of the lowest in the County, while improving service levels. The adopted operating net budget for Fiscal Year 2015 for all funds totals $161,821,110 which represents an increase of $5,285,073 or 3.3% more than the Fiscal Year 2014 net budget. This is the second budget year supporting the 2014-2015 Strategic Plan. Although Fiscal Year 2014 was a busy and productive year, it was also a year punctuated with respites from the serious business of running the City with the City’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Staff, in conjunction with a group of dedicated volunteers, organized and promoted numerous fun-filled community events. Who can forget Campapalooza! This was our attempt to break the Guinness Book of World Records for the most kids taking part in a ZumbAtomic class at the same time. Although we didn’t quite make the record, 900 of Coral Springs finest gave it their best. Our celebrations started off with a half marathon and 5k run. Other events included the Broward Pioneer Days, an outdoor concert at Sportsplex, and a community block party on the actual date of the anniversary. We had a wonderful time at these events but, more importantly, these celebrations contributed to a feeling of pride among our residents. We did conduct a lot of business during the year too. The completion of the Royal Palm entryway and branding initiative as well as the delivery of the Economic Development Strategic Plan has announced the City is indeed open for business. The creation of a white fly remediation grant program to help restore white fly ravaged vegetation along our arterial roadways, increased number of litter removal crews, and an enhanced recycling program has shown our continued dedication to enhance the curb appeal of our City. Our residents are excited by the visual evidence of the downtown redevelopment, a reduction in the crime rate, and noticeable park improvements including the renovation of Sartory and Cypress Halls. These results, and more, top the list of the Fiscal Year 2014 accomplishments that will be featured in the forthcoming State of the City Report. The Fiscal Year 2015 Business Plan promises to deliver more of the same – world class service at reasonable rates. Although the lackluster, on-again-off-again, nature of the economic recovery has made it difficult to project revenues and expenditures, we are pleased to provide a number of new initiatives for your consideration and a balanced budget with no increase in the property tax rate. No Change in the Millage Rate We are recommending a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2015 using a millage rate of $4.5697. While this millage rate is the same millage rate as the Fiscal Year 2014 millage rate, by Florida law it must be advertised as a 5.2% tax increase because it is higher than the Rolled-Back Rate (RBR) of $4.3439. As you are aware, the Rolled-Back Rate is the millage rate which will provide the same amount of property tax revenue in the new fiscal year as it received in the previous fiscal year. Reducing the current millage rate to the RBR would have resulted in $1.6 million less revenue than the current rate. Maintaining the existing rate enables us to continue to meet our residents’ most important needs and to add 26 new initiatives, included in the Business Plan. In addition to no change in the millage rate, other points from the Fiscal Year 2015 budget that are worth highlighting include: • Fiscal Year 2015 marks the third year in a row that Total Taxable Assessed Values have increased following five years of decline. • There will be no increase in the single-family Fire Assessment Fee. • Per contract, the residential Solid Waste Assessment will increase by the rate of inflation, 2.2%, from $220.92 in Fiscal Year 2014 to $225.84, or $4.92 per household. • The Debt Service Millage rate will increase by just $0.0005 or 0.2%. This represents an increase of $1.78 for the typical singlefamily homeowner. • There will be no increase in user fees such as building permits, fire inspections, or park fees.

8

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


City Manager’s Letter (continued) Overall we expect the typical single-family homesteaded homeowner to pay $22.10 more to the City in Fiscal Year 2015 than in Fiscal Year 2014. Furthermore, the typical non-homesteaded condominium owner will pay $44.49 more in Fiscal Year 2015. We will end Fiscal Year 2014 within budget across all funds. We are on track to meet or exceed 25 of our 26 Key Intended Outcomes which measure the overall success in meeting our customers’ needs and expectations. In fact, customer satisfaction is a cornerstone of our Business Model. It is worth mentioning the City of Coral Springs continues to set the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services and customer satisfaction. Our most recent residential survey conducted in the spring of 2013, for example, found that 95% of the residents surveyed were satisfied with the service provided by City employees. Moreover, 94% of the businesses surveyed in the 2014 business survey rated the City’s customer service as “very good” or “good.” These, and other, survey results will be explored in-depth in the upcoming Environmental Scan. Strategically Poised for Success The strength of our Strategic Planning Process is its long-term approach to planning and financial management, with special emphasis on anticipating emerging issues, using forecasting tools to quantify their impacts, and then implementing sound practices to mitigate or take advantage of these opportunities. Just as we leaned on these methods to exit the great recession on sound financial footing, we will rely on our Core Values and solid principles of financial management to guide our journey toward continued long-term financial sustainability. Leaning on our Business Model informed by our Environmental Scan, the City developed a long-term financial strategy that articulated two primary goals. First, the City eliminated the use of reserves to support operating expenditures while maintaining the quality of service our residents have come to expect and minimizing the financial impact on our residents. While the use of reserves was an appropriate strategy during the depths of the recession, returning to structural balance is an important financial principal. In fact, the City ended the practice of using reserves to close the gap between revenues and expenditures in FY 2013. Our goal now is to slowly build those reserves to pre-recession levels. The second goal of the financial strategy is to proactively prime the engine of economic growth by implementing the Economic Development Strategic Plan. This plan is comprehensive in scope. It includes activities to support the redevelopment of the City’s commercial areas such as the Corporate Park, University Drive and Sample Road corridors, and Downtown Coral Springs. Growing and further diversifying the economic base will provide a more solid foundation that will foster development that enables the City to withstand future economic downturns. Key Initiatives for the Coming Year While the Business Plan includes economic data as well as the City’s budget process and methodology, most importantly it includes staff’s proposals for initiatives geared toward addressing our residents’ needs and enhancing our community’s look, feel, and overall appeal. These initiatives will serve as the guiding force behind the City’s Fiscal Year 2015 activities. The Business Plan and Annual Budget are our “community contracts” for the coming fiscal year and we consider these documents a means to an ongoing dialogue with our residents. Highlights of the 26 new initiatives, as well as 22 ongoing initiatives, contained within the Business Plan section of the adopted budget include: • Encouraging business development and redevelopment by implementing recommendations from the Economic Development Strategic Plan is a prominent feature of this Business Plan. We will continue to work closely with the Community Redevelopment Agency, Chamber of Commerce, and the business community to diversify the tax base and absorb vacant commercial space. In addition, the City will work to attract businesses and increase property values by investing in the curb appeal, safety, and educational resources of our community. • Construction of the “Art Walk” along NW 31st Court began in August 2014 and will continue throughout Fiscal Year 2015. The Art Walk is an urban linear plaza that will provide public space for events and will create a sense of place for our residents, business owners, and visitors. • In Fiscal Year 2013, we began the process of developing a municipal complex in the downtown area to act as a catalyst for economic development. Significant steps were taken in Fiscal Year 2014 and in Fiscal Year 2015 we will continue moving this project forward.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

9


City Manager’s Letter (continued) • Maintaining a safe community will remain a top priority. Not only will the highly successful “Make a Call, Make a Difference” and the Burglary Enforcement and Reduction (BEAR) programs continue, the City will add three new Law Enforcement Officers to bring the Patrol Unit to full strength. • Continue efforts by the Police and Fire Departments to replace the existing analog-based public safety emergency dispatch equipment with state of the art technology known as P25. • The Fire Department will pilot an innovative public health treatment and prevention campaign known as mobile integrated health care, an expansion of the existing Community Paramedicine program. • Continuing to support educational excellence by fostering our alliance with Broward College and ensuring the Charter School remains highly rated. The Coral Springs Charter School has received an ‘A’ rating for ten consecutive years. • Make needed repairs and upgrades to our Parks and Recreation facilities including the Mullins Gymnasium, the Tennis Center, and the Aquatic Complex. • Continue the very successful 5K/half marathon. • Celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the City’s Martin Luther King Jr. observance. • Work toward achieving the goal of recycling 75% of the waste stream by 2020 by offering recycling incentives and exploring methods of encouraging recycling within the multi-family and commercial sectors. • Continue to invest in our vital information technology infrastructure. • Improve the communication with our customers by gathering in-depth knowledge on the methods they most prefer to receive information from the City. • Implementing and upgrading Wi-Fi infrastructure at City facilities and parks. Our Employees Are the Reason for Our Success We have the best employee productivity ratios in the area and extremely high customer satisfaction rates. Once again, we are asking our employees to make the initiatives included in this year’s Business Plan a reality, often under difficult conditions/ circumstances. In fact, the initiatives funded in this proposed budget are over and above the work our employees do on a daily basis. We are deeply grateful for their commitment to public service, this community, and first rate customer service. We remain committed to excellence: providing excellent police and fire services; keeping our parks in first-rate condition; providing sound financial management; providing well-maintained streets and transportation; providing outstanding business opportunities and support; and providing superior service to our customers. We also remain committed to maintaining the training and equipment necessary to provide that level of service as well as to respond to emergencies within our boundaries. We know our residents have the right to take these things for granted. Please be assured that we never do! Our employees proudly serve the citizens of our wonderful City and remain committed to creating the premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family.

10

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Strategic Priorities A Family-Friendly Community Augment the quality of life that defines the hometown feel of our community by assuring public safety and good schools, promoting arts and culture, capitalizing on the strength in our diversity, and embracing our inclusive, welcoming nature. A Thriving Business Community Continue to provide fiscal benefit and economic stability to the City by encouraging and supporting economic development and redevelopment as well as expansion and retention of existing businesses.

An Attractive Community Take proactive measures to preserve and enhance the community’s appearance and maintain of its vital infrastructure. Lead by example in the stewardship and conservation of natural resources.

An Active, Healthy Community Influence and support an environment that promotes active, healthy, and enriched lifestyles for residents of all ages. Focus on leisure, cultural, recreational, and sporting activities and events that infuse event dollars into the local economy.

An Innovative, High Performing Organization The City is committed to ethical governance, adherence to its Core Values, transparency, innovation, collaboration, and exceeding customer expectations by delivering highquality programs and services that meet the needs of an increasingly diverse community. City of Coral Springs, Florida

11


Core Values •  Solicit and listen intently to employees’ requirements and expectations.

Customer Focus •  Demonstrate a passion for customer service. •  Care about employees, so they will be more likely to care about customers.

•  Recognize and reward quality and customer service initiatives. •  Recognize change as a given, not government as usual.

•  Measure organizational and employee successes based on customer satisfaction.

Continuous Improvement

•  Solicit and listen intently to customer requirements and expectations.

•  Commit “every day, in every way, to getting better and better.”

•  Maximize the positive impact of customers’ first impression and “moments of truth.”

•  Plan for quality.

•  Collect customer feedback continuously and use it to improve quality. •  Achieve customer satisfaction by assessing the specific needs and expectations of each individual customer.

Empowered Employees •  Empower the people closest to the customer, working individually or in teams, to continuously improve the organization’s quality and services. •  Commit the entire organization to achieving total customer satisfaction. •  Empower employees to make decisions based on their experience, skill, training and capability, rather than their position. •  Share decision-making and allow employees to take authority and responsibility for the organization’s mission. •  Encourage use of individual judgment; do what needs to be done.

•  Make quality a never-ending effort. •  Have customers define quality. •  Let customer feedback drive quality improvements. •  Focus on process improvements to increase quality. •  Create a culture in which the right things are done the first time and every time.

Sustainability • Work toward efficient and cost-effective solutions to protect and conserve natural resources, maintain economic viability, and ensure a healthy and safe quality of life for current and future generations. • Commit to increasing green awareness in the community and reducing our own carbon footprint. • Balance environmental, economic, and social factors in decision making.

•  Empower employees to contribute to customer satisfaction regardless of organizational level.

• Promote and role-model practices that improve our environment by reducing energy usage, water consumption, and waste stream.

Leadership

• Promote practices that improve our environment while creating greater economic opportunity.

•  Establish an inspiring vision that creates a government that works better and costs less. •  Create an atmosphere of innovation, risk-taking and tolerance for mistakes. •  Recognize failure as the price paid for improvement. •  Lead by example, by involvement and demonstrate commitment to quality, service and customers—“walk the talk.”

• Promote the concepts of “green” development, sustainable business practices, and renewable energy in our community. • Contribute to economic development through the support and promotion of a market for environmentally friendly and energy-efficient products. • Consider the impact of your actions on the environment and aesthetics of the City.

•  Create a system of guidelines, not rules. •  Remove “red tape” to achieve the organization’s mission. •  Practice a “can do” attitude.

12

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


City of Coral Springs Organization Chart Citizens/ Customers

Citizens Advisory Committees and Boards

City Commission City Attorney

Internal Auditor

John J. Hearn jhearn@coralsprings.org

City Manager

Erdal Dönmez edonmez@coralsprings.org

Deputy City Manager Susan Grant sgrant@coralsprings.org

Financial Services

Director of Financial Services Melissa Heller mheller@coralsprings.org

*City Clerk’s Office

City Clerk Josephine Chavez jchavez@coralsprings.org

Information Technology

Director of Information Technology Curlie Matthews cmatthews@coralsprings.org

*Budget, Strategy, and Communications

Dir. Budget/Strategy/Communications Robert Goehrig rgoehrig@coralsprings.org

*Management and

*Communications

Budget Office

and Marketing

Fire/EMS

Deputy City Manager

Jennifer K. Bramley jbramley@coralsprings.org

Development Services

Director of Development Services Susan Hess Krisman skrisman@coralsprings.org

Public Works

Fire Chief Frank Babinec fbabinec@coralsprings.org

Director of Public Works Rich Michaud rmichaud@coralsprings.org

Police

*Economic Development

Chief of Police Anthony Pustizzi apustizzi@coralsprings.org

*Community Redevelopment Agency

Economic Dev Manager position vacant

Parks and Recreation

Human Resources

Director of Parks and Recreation Rick Engle rengle@coralsprings.org

Director of Human Resources Dale Pazdra dpazdra@coralsprings.org

Charter Offices Charter Offices

*Divisions of the City Manager’s Office City of Coral Springs, Florida

13


Coral Springs at a Glance  Incorporated July 10, 1963  Commission - City Manager Form of Government  Five-member City Commission, nonpartisan, elected at large  City Manager appointed by the City Commission

Demographics Population per U.S. Census Bureau 1980 37,349 1990 78,864 2000 117,549 2010 121,096 2011* 121,651 2012* 122,681 2013* 122,994 2014* 123,618

23.93 sq. miles

Land use: % of Total Residential 49.1% Traffic circulation 18.5% Waterways 10.2% Commercial 7.9% Recreation/open space 7.3% Community facilities/schools/hospitals 4.1% Industrial 2.9% 100% 1.0%

Developed 98.4% Undeveloped 1.6% 100.0% Source: 2013 Community Development Land Data Record System and GIS.

36.5

Number of households   Median household income (2010 ACS est.)

41,814 $65,348 69.17% 17.94% 5.10% 4.19% 0.24% <0.1% 3.31%

Hispanic or Latino (of any race)

23.49%

Source: 2010 U.S. Bureau of the Census.

Education For School Year 2013-2014

Number of public/charter schools   Elementary   Middle   High school (including Douglas) Charter (all grades)

29 12 4 4 9

Number of students

30,100

(Includes public schools, charter schools, and out-of-city limits Stoneman Douglas High School.)

For more details, refer to Demographic Trends in the Business Plan section of this book.

Economics Office space Retail space Industrial space Assessed Taxable Property Valuation (2014 Tax Year)

3.1 million sq. feet 6.6 million sq. feet 2.8 million sq. feet $8,131,195,392 % of Total

Racial composition (may be more than one race)   White   Black or African American   Asian   Some other race American Indian, Alaskan Native   Pacific Islander   Two or more races

14

Land area

Downtown LAC

*As of April 1 Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR)

Median age

Land Use

Principal taxpayers: Assessed Value

Coral-CS/LTD Associates Florida Power & Light Mid-America Apartments LP Spa the Grove LLC Knickerbocker Properties Inc City National Bank of Florida Wal-Mart Stores East LP ERP Operating LP Sherwood Forest at Coral Springs Target Corporation

Source: City of Coral Springs Fiscal Year 2013 CAFR.

Property tax millage rate (Fiscal Year 2015):   General operating   Voter-approved debt   Total Bond ratings:   Moody’s Investors Service   Standard and Poor’s   Fitch Ratings Per capita debt (Fiscal Year 2015):   General Obligation debt per capita

1.34% 0.72% 0.67% 0.65% 0.54% 0.43% 0.43% 0.41% 0.38% 0.37%

$4.5697 $0.2038 $4.7735 Aa1 AAA AAA $130.23

Fiscal Year 2015 Net Adopted Budget: Fiscal Year 2015 Adopted Capital Budget:

$161,821,110 $41,836,054

Fire Assessment (single-family residence) Solid Waste Assessment

$141.36 $225.84

Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Budget


Service Statistics Police (for 2014) Police officers Number of service calls Number of 911 calls Average emergency response time

Center For The Arts/Theater/Museum 205 172,000 69,649 4:43 min.

Fire/EMS Uniform strength (career and certified firefighters): Coral Springs 132  Parkland 33 Number of fire stations:   Coral Springs 5   Parkland 3 Number of service calls (for Coral Springs):  Fire 143  EMS 9,063   Other 2,920 Average response times (for Coral Springs):   Fire 4:49 min.   EMS 4:40 min.

Parks and Recreation Number of parks Number of acres Number of park patrons Number of sports teams Number of tennis patrons Number of Aquatic Complex visitors Number of swim classes Number of swim class participants

49 765 4,250,000 750 115,000 600,000 32,000 4,000

Theater size Capacity Meetings hosted Theater attendance Museum size Museum attendance Museum events Museum classes

67,000 sq. ft. 1,471 seats 78 127,000 13,500 sq. ft. 170,200 112 182

Public Works Tons of waste recycled Streets / miles maintained City vehicles and equipment maintained Bike path / sidewalks

7,311 tons 224 miles 1,387 95 miles

Utility District Size Population served Customer accounts Miles of water lines Fire hydrants Number of wells Average daily water demand Daily water treatment capacity Permitted maximum day withdrawal Sewer lines / force mains Average daily sewer treatment Sewer reserve capacity

11.5 sq. miles 66,158 12,988 163 1,150 18 5.95 mgd 16 mgd 11.37 mgd 125.1/31.4 miles 7.17 mgd 9.79 mgd

Total City Staff Coral Springs Charter School Number of students (2014 School Year) Number of classrooms Number of teachers Grades

1,635 84 99 6 - 12

Full-time (excludes city of Parkland fire staff) 794 Part-time 1 Subtotal 795 Temporary (excludes Summer Recreation) 215 Total 1,010

City of Coral Springs, Florida

15


History of Coral Springs Known as “the City in the Country,” Coral Springs has become a premier South Florida community, known for its abundant parks, quality schools, numerous athletic programs, and attractive neighborhoods. Prior to its incorporation as a city in July 1963, the area that was to become Coral Springs was part of a huge tract of land acquired by Henry “Bud” Lyons between 1911 and 1939 that totaled over 20,000 acres of marshy wilderness in western Broward County. He cleared and drained the land to grow beans. Lyons died in 1952, leaving his vast land holdings to his family, who converted the land to be used for ranching, bringing in 5,000 head of cattle. After a series of hurricanes flooded much of the southern portions of the state in 1947, Florida created the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District (now the South Florida Water Management District) that built a network of canals and levees throughout South Florida. The canals helped to further drain the land that would become Coral Springs. After World War II there was a real estate boom in South Florida. Coral Ridge Properties, a land development firm, was started by James Hunt, Joseph Taravella, and Stephen Calder to develop communities in Broward County. By the late 1950s, they were running out of land to develop in the Fort Lauderdale area and were seeking opportunities further west. Land in the northwest corner of Broward County, now owned by Lena Lyons, perfectly suited Hunt’s vision for a masterplanned community. On December 14, 1961, Coral Ridge Properties purchased 3,860 acres for $1 million. They moved three wooden shacks onto the land, along with five Coral Ridge Properties employees, which made the land eligible to incorporate as a city under Florida law. The City of Coral Springs was chartered on July 10, 1963. Additional land purchases from the Lyons family brought the total land in the City up to 5,000 acres. By 1964, a master plan was developed that projected a population of more than 50,000 residents living in small neighborhoods throughout the community. On July 22, 1964, the first land sale was held, selling 536 building lots for $1.6 million. Looking to give the new town a country flair, Hunt ordered the construction of the Covered Bridge that same year. It is now a Florida Heritage site. Employees from Coral Ridge Properties staffed the City administration, with Werner Buntemeyer holding the position of city manager from 1964 to 1974. In 1965, Coral Ridge Properties acquired an additional 5,000 acres from Lena Lyons, increasing the City to 16 square miles.

16

From the very beginning, Coral Ridge Properties enacted strict landscaping and sign laws to create a beautiful and natural looking town. In May 1965, a second land sale was held, with television celebrity Johnny Carson on hand to help draw buyers. Johnny himself bought almost 55 acres of land. This time 1,100 lots were sold. Then the first residents began moving in, including Wilfred Neale II and Robert Fuller in The Hills in early 1965. Both became early city commissioners. Also in 1965, the City’s first employee was hired, Police Chief Richard Vedilago, who was assisted by a German Shepherd named “Sergeant Satan.” According to Stuart McIver, in 1966 Westinghouse Electric Corporation acquired Coral Ridge Properties so it could use the new City as an “urban laboratory to evaluate new products, such as a home utility center, home sewage disposal systems, an infrared heating system, full electric kitchens, and central air-conditioning and heating systems.” In 1967, the City had several hundred residents and held its first election. Lewie Mullins was elected mayor and Robert Fuller vice-mayor. The remaining commissioners were Wilfred Neale, Peter Giordano, and Richard Hunt. The census of 1970 set Coral Springs’ population at 1,489, although the City Manager believed the actual number was closer to 3,750. In January 1970, the Broward County School Board voted to build the City’s first elementary school. Westinghouse opened its “Electra Center” designed to showcase state-of-the-art home systems. Some of these modern conveniences were built into model homes in the Electra Lab to allow visitors to experience motion-detecting lights, electric kitchens, and home security systems first hand. The volunteer Fire Department was also started in 1970. Early in 1971, the last large increase in property came with the purchase of the Remsberg Ranch on the north side of the City. The City was now 13,400 acres. In 1974, O. Benjamin Geiger was elected Mayor and began the task of making Coral Springs independent. This included establishing the City’s first ad valorem property tax, which at $4.0000 mils, was a huge increase to residents’ tax bills. Phillip Kelley was hired as the new City Manager, completing the break from Coral Ridge Properties. It was during this transition that the City’s codes and ordinances were created and the charter was modified to reflect the new vision for the City. The Commission wanted a professionally run City, so they chose a strong city manager form of government. The City grew at an incredible pace. Ten new public schools, a regional mall, shopping centers, and parks sprang up around the City during the 1970s. By 1980, the population had swelled to more than 37,000 people.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


City Hall was originally the Administration Building for the corporate headquarters of Coral Ridge Properties.

During the 1980s, growth continued to be the City’s greatest concern. By 1985, the population had passed 50,000 and schools were overcrowded as young families poured into the neighborhoods. The realities of development - increasing traffic and crowding - provided a series of challenges for the City’s planning office. The total property value passed the $1 billion mark in 1983 and the City, drawing on a strengthening financial position and debt service ratings, began planning bond referendums for community parks, a public safety facility, fire stations, and a community center. The nation took notice as the Honda Classic golf tournament moved to Eagle Trace Country Club in 1984. After 1986 when the Sawgrass Expressway was constructed, linking the City to the major transportation centers in Broward County, more and more corporate relocations and retailers were attracted to Coral Springs. The 1990s turned out to be a critical decade for the City. Only thirty years old, the City was nonetheless facing a staggering growth rate—which created a huge demand for City services. Between 1990 and 2000, the City’s population grew from 78,864 to 117,549 and the taxable value from $2.8 billion to $4.7 billion. By 1994, it became apparent that there was a need for better recreational and cultural programming for City residents, so several existing facilities were improved and new ones opened to serve the growing population. The Coral Springs City Centre was renovated to add an art museum and renamed the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. The Aquatic Complex was expanded and improved. The Sportsplex and Tennis Center were created to provide additional recreation opportunities. At the same time, City residents passed a $7.5 million bond referendum to purchase environmentally sensitive lands (now Red Lichen and Sandy Ridge Parks) to preserve the few wetlands left within city limits. The biggest change to City operations began in 1993 when a total quality management program was implemented, to completely overhaul operations and service delivery by becoming customer-focused and quality-oriented. The central

feature of the program was a new business model that would take us from “government as usual” to a high-performance municipal corporation. The strategic and business planning system we use today—allocating resources strategically through data-driven decision making—was instituted in 1995. Numerous awards and recognition followed (see Measuring Results – Awards and Special Recognitions), but that wasn’t the only positive outcome of the City’s business model. When 95% of our residential property was developed in the late 1990s, we reached “build-out,” a time when growth-related revenues dropped precipitously. We were able to make the transition smoothly, without a significant change to our current operating millage rates. Sustaining our reputation for excellence becomes more challenging as the City ages. With no space left for new development, the City must leverage its strengths to encourage vibrant redevelopment. A recommitment to improving the aesthetics of the City was launched as the build-up to the City’s 50th Anniversary in July 2013. Future focus is on sparking interest in the Downtown area.

Sources: City of Coral Springs; 1994-95 Guide to Program and Facility Sponsorships; 1994. City of Coral Springs; Economic Development Brochure; 1988. City of Coral Springs; Statistical Guide for Economic Development; Coral Ridge Properties, Coral Springs, FL; 1989. Greater Coral Springs Chamber of Commerce; Guide to Greater Coral Springs Florida; 1994. McIver, Stuart; Coral Springs: the First Twenty-Five Years; The Donning Company, Norfolk, VA; 1988. Wangberg, Wendy and Kevin Knutson; Images of America: Coral Springs; Arcadia Publishing; 2003. Various City documents and memoranda.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

17


Management and Budget Office We are pleased to present this nationally recognized planning and budgeting document as one of the many services we provide to the City of Coral Springs. The Management and Budget Office (MBO) is a division of the City Manager’s Office and is responsible for managing and implementing several cross-functional processes within the City, including: Strategic Plan Business Plan Performance Measurement System Annual Budget Capital Improvement Program Performance Improvement Projects Grants Business SWAT Team Projects Program Analysis Financial Analysis Performance Benchmarking Operational Auditing Technical Assistance for Departments

We have had the good fortune to receive the Government Finance Officers Association Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for twenty-three consecutive years. In past years, our Annual Budget has received “Special Performance Measures Recognition” from GFOA as well as “Outstanding as a Policy Document and Operations Guide.”

18

Our Performance Measurement system was selected as a “Best Practice” by the American Quality and Productivity Center. We also received the International City/County Managers Association Center for Performance Measurement Certificate of Excellence. Our strategic planning, performance measurement, and budgeting efforts also contributed to the receipt of the 2007 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. We are the first state or local government to receive the Baldrige Award. In addition, we also received the Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for Organizational Performance Excellence in 1997 and again in 2003. We are the first organization to win the Governor’s Sterling Award for the second time.

Our budgeting system meets all of the best practice recommendations of the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting, as well as previous recommendations by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA).

In addition, our performance measurement and budgeting system has been cited as a “Best Practice” by the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Fitch Rating Agency uses our planning

system as a model for cities interested in achieving the distinction of an ‘AAA’ bond rating.

For more information, please visit our web site, www.coralsprings.org, to download copies of our Strategic Plan, Business Plan, Annual Budget, Capital Improvement Plan, and other related documents and presentations.

Thank You! Thanks to the City Manager’s Office, the department heads and their staff for helping us make this budget successful! We’d also like to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer in developing the cover design of this budget document.

MBO Staff Robert Goehrig

Director of Budget, Strategy, and Communications (954) 344-5920

rgoehrig@coralsprings.org

Liliana Alvarez

Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-1133

lalvarez@coralsprings.org

Laurie Bishara

Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-5938

lbishara@coralsprings.org

Chelsea Stahl

Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-5914 cstahl@coralsprings.org

Sherri Toops

Senior Financial Analyst (954) 346-1723 stoops@coralsprings.org

Kristin Holowicki Grant Coordinator (954) 344-5902

kholowicki@coralsprings.org

Vannelys Rivera Budget Analyst (954) 344-5928

vrivera@coralsprings.org

Yanell Sanchez

Principal Office Assistant (954) 344-1191

ysanchez@coralsprings.org

Pictured from left: Yanell Sanchez, Liliana Alvarez, Sherri Toops, Bob Goehrig, Chelsea Stahl, Kristin Holowicki, Vannelys Rivera, and Laurie Bishara

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

City of Coral Springs 9551 West Sample Road Coral Springs, FL 33065 www.coralsprings.org Fax: (954) 344-1198


Budget Overview Contents Budget Process Overview...................................................................................................................................................... 20 Budget Highlights..................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Combined Budget Summary................................................................................................................................................ 29 Fund Structure Overview....................................................................................................................................................... 30 Fund Budget Overviews......................................................................................................................................................... 35 General Fund Budget Summary................................................................................................................................. 35 General Fund Description............................................................................................................................................ 38 Fire Fund Budget Summary.......................................................................................................................................... 43 Fire Fund Description..................................................................................................................................................... 44 Water and Sewer Fund Budget Summary............................................................................................................... 47 Water and Sewer Fund Description........................................................................................................................... 48 Health Fund Budget Summary.................................................................................................................................... 50 Health Fund Description............................................................................................................................................... 51 General Insurance Fund Budget Summary............................................................................................................ 52 General Insurance Fund Description........................................................................................................................ 53 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Budget Summary...................................................................................... 54 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Description.................................................................................................. 54 Public Art Fund Budget Summary............................................................................................................................. 55 Public Art Fund Description......................................................................................................................................... 55 Equipment Services Fund Budget Summary......................................................................................................... 56 Equipment Services Fund Description..................................................................................................................... 57 Pension Allocation Summary....................................................................................................................................... 59 Solid Waste Fund Budget Summary.......................................................................................................................... 60 Solid Waste Fund Description...................................................................................................................................... 60 Debt Service Fund Budget Summary....................................................................................................................... 61 Debt Service Fund Description................................................................................................................................... 62 Debt Service Schedule................................................................................................................................................... 64 Debt Management.......................................................................................................................................................... 65 Debt Service Schedule - Water and Sewer Loans................................................................................................. 67 Capital Improvement Program............................................................................................................................................. 68 Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget....................................................................................................... 71 Capital Improvement Summary by Fund................................................................................................................ 74 CIP Budget by Funding Source—All Funds............................................................................................................ 75 General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source................................................................................................... 76 Major Capital Projects by Location............................................................................................................................ 77 Major Capital Projects by Department..................................................................................................................... 78 Revenue Trends.......................................................................................................................................................................... 79 General Fund Five-Year Forecast.......................................................................................................................................... 81

City of Coral Springs, Florida

19


Budget Process Overview The Budget Environment

How the Budget Was Created

After the economy slowed perceptively in 2012, the economy has started off strong in 2013. For example, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the total dollar value of all goods and services produced in the United States during any given time period, is one of the primary indicators used to measure the health of the nation’s economy. Calendar year 2011 started off slow (0.4% GDP growth in the first quarter) but finished strong (4.1% growth in fourth quarter) raising hopes that this strong growth would continue. Calendar year 2012, however, opened with a modest 2% growth in GDP the first quarter of the year finishing with a disappointing 0.4% in the fourth quarter causing one economist to refer to 2012 as the year of lost momentum. With a GDP of 1.8%, the first quarter of 2013 started off strong. While the remainder of the year is not expected to continue at this pace, GDP is still expected to grow by around 2% for the remainder of the year.

The 2014-2015 Strategic Plan began with the City’s mission, strategic priorities, and Key Intended Outcomes developed in year one. Reviewed and updated biennially, the plan creates a shared vision for the future of the community.

In fact, Florida’s GDP growth is expected to eclipse the national average in the next two years. While one pundit describes Florida’s economic growth as “more eye-watering than eye-popping” since the official beginning of the economic recovery, there appears to be a growing consensus among economists that Florida’s economy is in recovery mode.

• An Active, Healthy Community

The City Commission has set the stage for economic growth by incorporating a “Thriving Business Community” Strategic Priority in the 2014-2015 Strategic Plan directing the City to take a leadership role in creating its future by investing in our community. In partnership with the Economic Development Foundation, Community Redevelopment Agency, the Chamber of Commerce, and other stakeholders, the City will build on the financial strategy adopted last fiscal year by continuing to invest in economic development. In addition, the City will work to attract businesses and increase property values by investing in the curb appeal, safety, and educational resources of our community.

Strategic Priorities Beginning in 1997, the City Commission began a process of strategic planning designed to identify the issues that must be addressed to achieve our mission and that will persist over the lifetime of the Strategic Plan. These long-range policy issues developed by the City Commission in Fiscal Year 2015, emphasize the values of our customers: • A Family-Friendly Community • A Thriving Business Community

• An Attractive Community • An Innovative, High Performing Organization For each priority, an action plan is developed for implementing policy and operating measures. Through this process, the Business Plan was developed: • Commission Priority: Identify the vital issues. • Key Intended Outcomes (KIO): Identify desired results. • Initiatives: Allocate activities, resources, personnel, investment and time planned for the year to achieve each KIO. • Performance Measures: Specific and measurable data indicating the effectiveness in meeting the KIOs. • By setting quality targets (Key Intended Outcomes) we are able to determine the resources necessary to meet them. The Business Plan section includes a matrix listing the KIOs and the departments that impact each. Business Plan Just as in previous years, once the priorities and indicators are established, the operations of the City are reviewed and resources aligned to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific actions, programs, capital purchases, staffing requirements and funding levels are developed in response to the needs identified in the strategic plan. The Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic priorities, capturing the City’s vision in a quantifiable form, improving decision-making and resource allocation. Despite the reduction in revenues, initiatives in this year’s plan focus on economic development, as well as improving the look of the City.

20

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


A guiding principle we’ve used to focus our analysis is to continue to offer our customers the highest quality services possible. A benefit of using a business plan is the direct link between costs, activities, and key drivers. We use this model to monitor our performance by:

City Mission Strategic Priorities

• Performing variance analysis using cost drivers.

Key Intended Outcomes

• Mapping the process that links budget items to activities. • Identifying value-added and non-value-added activities. In developing the Fiscal Year 2015 operating budget, departments analyze both existing and potential services in light of the strategic priorities. The Business Plan identifies added and removed services, which are then quantified in the line item budget. They reflect not only the strategic priorities as set by the City Commission, but also incorporate feedback from customer surveys and policy initiatives that contribute to the long-term financial health of the City. Departments set goals to meet the needs identified by the strategic priorities. To meet these goals, programs within the departments have specific objectives that are measured through process indicators. Staff’s individual objectives and performance measures are then linked to the program objectives. Each employee knows what the end result should be and how it contributes to the strategic plan. In this way, the budget becomes a tool for monitoring, rather than controlling, operating performance. The performance measures table included with each department’s summary is designed to show how the program objectives support the strategic priorities. Each performance measure is explicitly related to the Key Intended Outcome it supports and the strategic priorities it addresses. Our policy deployment model follows the illustrated path. It’s significant we view the process in this fashion, so we combine top-down and bottom-up input, tightly linking targets to the strategic plan.

Budget Methodology The budget for the City of Coral Springs is a performancebased budgeting system. This type of budgeting system identifies a particular level of service performance for each type of service (program) and the resources needed to operate it, as well as describes the structure of the departments and the programs into which they are divided. The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement—the statement identifies the specific purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes and Outputs—a listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department. New Initiatives—new services or the removal of existing services as they relate to the strategic plan.

Department Performance Measures Objectives and Performance Measures—the objectives focus on particular program accomplishments that will be attained within the current year. All objectives are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each performance measure includes explicit links showing how program objectives and their indicators are directly related to KIOs and the strategic priorities they support. Organization Charts—outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—the budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, overtime and other pay including vacation payment incentive, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, retirement contributions, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, utilities, services and other costs. • Operating Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000.

Approach To The Budget Review Process Start-Up We begin by reviewing all current services in light of the Strategic Plan. Are current services sufficient or necessary? What are our customers’ needs and desires? Through citizen and business surveys, SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis, Slice of the Springs meetings, our customers’ input is a critical piece of the budget process. What new initiatives should be undertaken to meet constituent requirements or a changing market environment? We then develop a list of recommended changes arising out of this analysis, forming the basis for the Business Plan.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

21


Beginning with each department’s mission statement, which is a driving force behind the department’s budget and should set the direction of the department, we develop a projected budget based on the previous year’s budget with any new initiatives appended, and any discontinued services removed.

The actual users of the supplies and services review their practices and habits involving daily expenditures for possible efficiencies. Departments review the line item account codes for accuracy of description and determine if they reflect the actual types of expenditures.

From there, goals and objectives are developed that relate to each other and to the department’s mission and the City’s Key Intended Outcomes as outlined in the Strategic Plan. Goals and objectives should be realistic, quantifiable, and include improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. Current goals and objectives may be used to establish a starting point for the future.

Lastly, they provide justification for any changes from the target budget with the use of information from current year expenditures or information obtained from other sources, such as trends in next year’s contracts or service costs provided by the Purchasing Division.

In the spring, the Management and Budget Office (MBO) distributes to departments a target budget for the coming year, which is based on projections of current year expenditures, as well as the two prior years’ actual expenditures. Included in this target budget are budgeted line items for salaries and benefits (for example, pension and health plan allocations). Also included are the current year’s goals and objectives for the department. At the same time, Capital Replacement Program, Capital Improvement Program and physical inventory worksheets are distributed for department input.

Departments also evaluate all existing equipment, facilities, and other capital items, to determine if useful life has been exceeded, or will be exceeded, in the coming budget year.

Verification of all numbers and assumptions made in these categories is carried out by departmental staff. Personnel changes such as retirements, projected salary increases or changes in hours worked are submitted to the Management and Budget Office.

Each department maintains a six-year Capital Improvement Program plan for its equipment needs and submits same to MBO for review, summarization and presentation to the City Commission for approval.

Methodology Given the slow economic recovery, the budget process proceeded in two steps. First, MBO asked departments to develop a budget with the expectation of no new money. Second, CMO asked departments to identify cost savings and/ or revenue enhancements resulting from service refinements. The service refinement exercise was not necessarily about cutting service, but about finding a different way of providing that service. Investments were considered if they would lead to enhanced productivity or reduced expenditures. While indiscriminate, across-the-board cuts are easy to implement and have the pretense of equity and fairness, these cuts do not consider customer (that is, residents and businesses) needs and expectations. The City of Coral Springs’ business model, by contrast, has customer-driven excellence as its foundation. Our customer-driven excellence philosophy enables the City to address potential challenges strategically. It involves awareness of current and emerging customer needs, expectations and trends, which, in turn, leads to increasing levels of customer trust, value, and satisfaction.

Capital Expenses

They then identify all recommended capital expenditures from this evaluation of equipment. Vehicle life expectancy information is provided by the Public Works DepartmentEquipment Services Division. Other capital expenses, such as office equipment, are estimated with help from the Purchasing Division.

Business Plan Taking into account the market environment, customer expectations and emerging issues, the changes to service structure (discontinued services, new initiatives, etc.) are outlined and cross-referenced to the Strategic Plan. Citywide financial strategies are identified to address the longterm needs of the City in relation to emerging issues that have been identified through the strategic planning process. Anticipated results are identified and linked to Key Intended Outcomes for inclusion in the City’s performance measurement system. Based on the recommended projects and services, a preliminary budget is presented at the Business Plan workshop.

Budget Format A municipal budget document should provide sufficient, meaningful and useful information to elected officials, City staff, and to the public. To that end, we have developed a budget document that serves four primary functions: • Policy document

Operating Expenses The target budget will also contain operating expenses based on projections of the current year’s expenditures.

• Financial plan • Operations guide • Communication device.

22

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Together, these budget elements define what the City of Coral Springs has done, what it plans to do, and how it will accomplish its objectives. The budget is a program- and performance-based plan that links prescribed organizational goals and objectives with the financial resources necessary to achieve them. Each of the budget’s programs represent a “product” of the City. Contained within each program are objectives and achievements. The program/performance budget is integrated with line item financial information to ensure optimal budget control. This program/performance budget enables the City Commission and the public to analyze the budget by priorities based on program goals and performance objectives rather than line item costs. In addition, this format provides information so that the City Commission and the public will have a better understanding of the allocation of resources among programs and the measurable work that each department will accomplish.

Amending The Budget If, during the course of the fiscal year, it becomes evident that a particular fund is unable to provide the required level of services to the community due to unexpected higher costs of providing the service, the budget may be amended. The Director of Budget and Strategic Planning submits a request to amend the budget to the City Commission. The request contains a written explanation from the director(s) of the department(s) needing additional funds. The request also includes a proposal for financing the additional expenditures, such as by appropriating from the fund balance/retained earnings or by submitting evidence of expected surplus from current year revenues. City Commission approval is required for budget amendments which alter the total adopted budget amount of any fund.

The Fiscal Year 2015 budget includes the following sections: Introduction, Budget Overview, Business Plan, Performance Budget, and Appendix.

Approving The Budget During the summer months, recommended operating and capital improvement program budget documents are prepared and presented to the City Manager and forwarded to the City Commission for review during budget workshops which are open to the public. The City Commission either approves or makes changes to the recommended budget(s) and returns to staff for further study. Public hearings and final adoption of the budget occur in midSeptember.

Monitoring The Budget The Budget staff is authorized to transfer funds within individual departments. Revisions that alter the total expenditures of any department within a fund must be approved by the City Manager. Actual expenditures and operating transfers out may not exceed budget appropriations at the individual fund level. Appropriations which are neither expended, encumbered, nor specifically designated to be carried over lapse at the end of the fiscal year.

This Public Art installation, entitled “HD”, is a popular photo spot. Designed by Kimber Fiebiger, this bronze sculpture was financed by fees charged to developers who have projects greater than 12,500 feet.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

23


FY 2015 Budget Calendar FY 2015 Budget Calendar Date

Meeting Description

4/4/14 and 4/7/14

Budget Training Sessions—2:00 p.m.

5/5/14

Departmental Budget requests due to the Budget office

5/7/14

Commission Strategic Planning Workshop—11:00 a.m.

5/12/14 - 5/30/14

Departmental Budget meetings with City Manager’s Office

5/28/14

Commission Business Plan Preview Workshop—5:00 p.m.

6/12/14

Department Directors’ Business Plan Retreat

7/2/14

Commission Business Plan Workshop I—10:00 a.m.

7/23/14

Commission Business Plan Workshop II—5:15 p.m. (TRIM Notification prepared and submitted to City Commission) (Adopt Preliminary Assessment Resolutions)

9/12/14

First Public Budget Hearing—5:15 p.m.

9/17/14

Second Public Budget Hearing —6:30 p.m. (Adopt Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program)

10/1/14

FY 2015 begins

Note: all Commission meetings and workshops are open to the public.

The Little Free Library program is a free book exchange that was established to promote literacy. These boxes are available at Coral Springs City Hall and at Mullins Park. For information on the program, visit the program’s web site at LittleFreeLibrary.org.

24

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Budget Highlights

Tax rate Fiscal Year 2015

Introduction The Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget, which was adopted on September 17, 2014, is a numerical reflection of the Fiscal Year 2015 Business Plan. By allocating our resources in alignment with the City Commission’s five strategic priorities and departmental performance indicators, we believe this budget will successfully meet the challenges we have before us and set the stage for continued success in the future.

Budget in Brief The adopted operating net budget for Fiscal Year 2015 for all funds totals $161,821,110. This represents an increase of $5,285,073 or 3.3% more than the Fiscal Year 2014 net budget. The Fiscal Year 2015 budget is balanced, prudent and responsive to community needs as identified in the Fiscal Years 2014 - 2015 Strategic Plan. Some features of the Fiscal Year 2015 budget that deserve special attention are: • No change to the adopted operating millage rate of $4.5697. By retaining the current millage rate, the City will collect approximately $1.6 million additional property tax revenue than Fiscal Year 2014 budget. The average single-family homesteaded homeowner will pay an additional $15.40 in property taxes due to an increase in home values. • The voter-approved debt service millage rate will increase from $0.2033 to $0.2038, an increase of $0.0005 or 0.2%. • The combined general operating and debt service millage rate is $4.7735 per $1,000 of assessed value, an increase of $0.0005 or 0.01%. • The Fire Assessment fee for SingleFamily homes will remain at $141.36. • Water and Sewer rates will increase by 3.5%. An increase of $2 per month for the majority of residential customers. • The Solid Waste Special Assessment will be $225.84 for Single-Family homes. An increase of $4.92 or 2.2% from the previous year.

General Operating Millage

$4.5697

Debt Service Millage

$0.2038

Combined City Millage Rate

$4.7735

Operating Millage Rate-5.2% Increase No change in the Coral Springs Operating millage rate $6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000

$4.3559 $4.3939

$4.5697 $4.5697 $4.5697

$3.8866

$3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.3651 $3.3651

$3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015

The operating millage rate will remain the same as in Fiscal Year 2014. Keeping the millage rate exactly the same, $4.5697, will be considered a 5.2% tax increase.

Operating Millage Rate Comparison – 5.2% Increase - $4.5697 Operating millage rate comparison Fiscal Year 2015 FY 2015 Proposed $8.0000 $7.0000 $6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000 $3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000

$7.4479

$6.7654 $5.9142 $6.0543 $5.6368 $6.2317

$5.2476 $5.0829 $4.5697 $4.1193

When comparing Broward County cities with populations greater than 70,000, Coral Springs’ operating millage rate is one of the lowest of the 10 municipalities.

Voter-Approved Debtmillage Service Millage Voter-approved debt service rate Rate $1.0000 $0.8000 $0.6000 $0.4000

$0.3924 $0.2510

$0.2000

$0.2915 $0.2134

$0.1774

$0.1763

$0.1763

$0.1763

$0.2906 $0.2033

$0.2038

$0.0000 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015

The debt millage rate will increase from $0.2033 to $0.2038 or 0.2% in Fiscal Year 2015.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

25


Net Full-Time Position Changes per Fiscal Year 50

44 40

17

14

12

10

8

Creative Services Coordinator Project Manager Database Analyst

13

14

4

-13

-11

-8

Dept—Division

FY 2012

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

FY 2001

FY 2000

FY 1999

FY 1998

-20

Fire Fund (Training Officer and Fire Inspector ), and two positions are split between the Fire Fund and the General Fund —Public Education Officer (62% Fire/38% General Fund; Data Analyst (50% Fire/50% General Fund). These staff are necessary to continue providing high quality services to our customers. They are linked to the implementation of new Business Plan initiatives that will augment public safety and wellness, while enhancing the City’s ability to attract economic development. Details of these new initiatives are described in the Business Plan section of this document. # of positions

CMO—Economic Development CMO—Communications & Marketing Information Technology

1 1 1 1 1

Principal Office Assistant

Dev Services—Code Compliance

1

Law Enforcement Officer

Police—Patrol

3

Public Education Officer*

Fire—Inspection/EMS

1

Data Analyst*

Fire—Administration/EMS

1

Chief Training Officer

Fire—Training

1

Fire Inspector II

Fire—Inspection

1

Principal Office Assistant

EMS

1

Total

14

• In Fiscal Year 2014, 13 additional full-time positions were authorized; ten were funded in the General Fund and three in the Water & Sewer Fund. In Fiscal Year 2013, there was a net change of thirteen additional full-time positions—nine added to the General Fund and four to the Fire Fund. From Fiscal Years 2008 through 2011, 34 full-time positions were deleted primarily due to the elimination of vacant positions or through attrition, in response to the economic recession. In Fiscal Year 2007, 11 public safety positions were added. In Fiscal Year 2003, public safety employees were added as a result of September 11th national tragedy. Paid firefighters were added in Fiscal Year 2001, and EMS startup began in Fiscal Year 1996. Capital Improvements • The City will invest $41,836,054 in Fiscal Year 2015 to address its capital needs. For more on capital, refer to the Capital Improvement Program section included in this document.

*funding for these positions is split between Fire Fund and General Fund

26

7

13

-2

Full-time additions for Fiscal Year 2015

Principal Office Assistant

5

-10

• For Fiscal Year 2015, the number of full-time positions is 794 (excludes Fire/EMS services contract staff). This represents an addition of 14 full-time employees, offset by the conversion of three part-time positions to fulltime status. The table below lists each authorized new position for the upcoming budget year. Funding for this new staff is budgeted as follows: 10 are fully funded in the General Fund, two positions are funded 100% in the

Economic Development Manager

15

0

Changes in Staffing Levels

Position title

16

13

FY 2015

20

FY 2014

29

30

FY 2013

40

FY 1996

• With a General Obligation bond indebtedness of 0.21% of total taxable assessed value, the City is well below its debt policy limit of 5%.

Net full-time position changes per fiscal year

FY 1997

• General Fund debt service for franchise and capital revenue bonds, as a percentage of total budget, will equal 4.5% in Fiscal Year 2015 as compared to 3.7% in the current year, well within the General Fund debt service policy limitation of 12.5% of total General Fund expenditures.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Condition

Intergovernmental Revenue

Despite four years of downward pressure on revenues due to residential build-out, tax relief legislation, and the economic recession, Coral Springs continues to lead the nation in fiscal management and stability.

Most economists are expecting the economy to grow at a modest rate during the coming year. However, rather than growth returning to normal levels quickly, the economy will move slowly but steadily upward. We have, therefore, adopted a moderate growth philosophy for Fiscal Year 2014 revenue estimates. To hedge against being too optimistic, we have adopted a contingency that is higher than we otherwise would simply to counterbalance this risk.

Bond Ratings The City is proud to have earned the highest bond rating available from Standard and Poor’s (AAA) and Fitch Ratings (AAA). The City also received the Aa1 rating from Moody’s Investors Service. The City’s goal is to maintain the AAA from S&P and Fitch while making the changes needed to earn the Aaa bond rating from Moody’s. Increasing fund balance from 26% to 30% is an important change the City can make to achieve this goal. Achieving AAA bond rating is important for our residents because it indicates to investors that the City is a low investment risk which translates into lower interest rates and corresponding lower interest payments on general obligation bonds.

For many years, fund balances improved as a result of growthrelated revenues, improved productivity, and prudent financial management policies. Those fund balances have been leveraged to avoid future debt service by equity financing capital purchases. For further information on our fund balances, refer to the Appendix section of this document.

Annual net operating budget and capital

Net Operating Budget Capital Improvements (CIP) Total Financial Program

FY 2014 FY 2015 $ % Budget Budget Change Change $156,536,037 $161,821,110 $5,285,073 3.4% 13,960,688 41,836,054 27,875,366 199.7% $170,496,725 $203,657,164 $33,160,439 19.4%

FY 2014 FY 2015 Net Operating Budget Budget Budget General Fund $67,814,579 $69,632,817 Special Revenue Funds Fire Fund 11,873,782 12,198,755 C.S. Charter School Fund 10,488,350 10,008,913 Public Art Fund 96,500 222,000 Enterprise Funds Water and Sewer Fund 17,811,641 18,362,701 Solid Waste Fund 3,106,900 4,157,009 Internal Service Funds Health and General Insurance Funds 16,118,093 16,799,742 Equipment Services Fund 9,152,277 10,755,940 Pension Fund 13,638,747 12,898,198 Debt Service Fund 6,435,168 6,785,035 Total Net Operating Budget $156,536,037 $161,821,110

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ % Change Change $1,818,238 2.7% 324,973 2.7% (479,437) -4.6% 125,500 130.1% 551,060 1,050,109

3.1% 33.8%

681,649 1,603,663 (740,549) 349,867 $5,285,073

4.2% 17.5% -5.4% 5.4% 3.4%

27


Major Policy Considerations Although we expect the economic recovery to hold center stage, the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategy to invest in its community, as well as a number of other issues will also be part of the conversation. Investing in the Community During the depths of the recession, the City adopted a threepronged financial strategy. While this was an appropriate strategy for the time, a new financial strategy is necessary to place the City in the most advantageous position to embrace the economic recovery. Although the recession has officially ended, the return to prerecession economic growth rates is not on the horizon. Since the fuel that powered the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic engine (population growth and new construction) will not return to previous levels quickly, if at all, we must expect and plan for a new normal. For example, having reached build-out the City can no longer count on development of vacant parcels to spur economic growth. The City Commission has set the stage for this vision by incorporating language in the 2014-2015 Strategic Plan directing the City to take a leadership role in creating its future by investing in our community. In partnership with the Economic Development Foundation, Community Redevelopment Agency, the Chamber of Commerce, and other stakeholders, the City will proactively prime the engine of economic growth by assisting our existing business community, devoting resources to encourage the redevelopment of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial areas such as the Corporate Park, and investing in education. In addition, the City will work to attract businesses and increase property values by investing in the appearance and the safety of our community. Economic Development Strategy The City has adopted a targeted-industries approach which will replace the old model of economic development that was essentially driven by land developers. We will proactively target the industries that are projected to have the highest growth in our area: health care, medical devices, medical information technology, global information technology, and distribution. Our biggest challenge, however, is to fill existing vacant industrial and office space. Once absorption occurs we can set our sights on new development and expansion. Upgrade Technology Infrastructure The City will continue to invest in tools that allow its employees to achieve high levels of productivity as well as provide customer service that is second to none. A state of the art technology infrastructure is a crucial element in allowing the City to meet its service delivery goals now and in the future. This objective must be balanced against the need to protect citizen confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information and at the same time control costs. It is also important that all City departments participate in the efforts to utilize technology in an efficient and effective manner.

28

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Combined Budget Summary Appropriated Funds Budget—Fiscal Year 2015 GENERAL FUND CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FORWARD: ESTIMATED REVENUES Taxes: Millage Per $1,000 Ad Valorem Taxes $4.5697 Ad Valorem Taxes $0.2038 (Voted Debt) Solid Waste Assessment Fire Fund Special Assessment Sales and Use Taxes Franchise Fees Utility Service Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Revenues Other Financing Sources

$400,000

DEBT SERVICE FUND $0

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND $1,165,327

PUBLIC ART FUND $195,500

SOLID WASTE FUND $185,004

$1,928,000

CHARTER SCHOOL FUND

FIRE FUND $0

$252,500

35,299,267 1,574,394 2,124,467

3,972,005 10,566,521

7,673,453 10,134,499 11,070,986 3,735,836 11,810,050 14,400,669 2,219,854 4,131,757 225,355

3,150 5,207,491

311,798 20,058,501

26,500

TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER FUNDING SOURCES

$102,826,193

$6,785,035

$20,370,299

$26,500

$3,972,005

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES

$103,226,193

$6,785,035

$21,535,626

$222,000

$4,157,009

EXPENDITURES / EXPENSES General Governmental Services Education Public Safety Physical Environment Economic Environment Culture and Recreation Debt Service Capital Improvement Program (excluding Operating CIP) Other Financing Sources (Uses) TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES Reserves TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES

WATER & SEWER FUND

TOTAL BUDGET $4,126,331

$35,299,267 $1,574,394 $6,096,472 $10,566,521 $7,673,453 $10,134,499 $11,070,986 $3,735,836 $28,522,036 $37,351,870 $2,274,874 $4,544,955 $25,523,735

5,535,573 2,273,716 55,020 55,000 5,888

11,176,413

$20,720,735

$18,491,718

$11,176,413

$184,368,898

$22,648,735

$18,491,718

$11,428,913

$188,495,229

20,677,485 43,250

4,675,414 $103,226,193 $0

1,400 $6,785,035 $0

$21,535,626 $0

$222,000 $0

36,000 $4,157,009 $0

1,804,017 $22,648,735 $0

2,395,708 $18,491,718 $0

$11,428,913 $0

$14,364,474 $12,007,194 $71,972,558 $30,162,357 $704,514 $15,071,766 $13,764,201 $21,535,626 $8,912,539 $188,495,229 $0

$103,226,193

$6,785,035

$21,535,626

$222,000

$4,157,009

$22,648,735

$18,491,718

$11,428,913

$188,495,229

14,364,474 578,281 56,349,408 7,269,705 454,514 14,849,766 4,684,631

11,428,913 15,623,150 4,121,009

18,771,643 250,000

222,000 6,783,635

1,823,075

472,860

21,535,626

Note: Revenues (sources) and Expenses (uses) for Equipment Services, Health, and General Insurance funds are incorporated within all other appropriated funds included in this summary and thus, not listed separately.

Note: In accordance with standard budgeting practice, the main difference between the “Summary of Net Budgeted Revenues/Expenditures” on pages 32 and 33 and the “Fiscal Year 2015 Combined Budget Summary” on this page is that the latter does not include internal service funds to avoid double-counting interfund transfers (movement of money from one fund to another).

City of Coral Springs, Florida

29


Fund Structure Overview 325

FY 2015 Total Operating Budget and Capital $203,657,164

FY 2015 Net Operating Budget $161,821,110

General Fund $69,632,817

Enterprise Funds $22,519,710

Water and Sewer $18,362,701 Solid Waste Fund $4,157,009

Special Revenue Funds $22,429,668

Internal Services Funds $27,555,682

Fire $12,198,755 Charter School $10,008,913 Public Art $222,000

Insurance Funds $16,799,742 Equipment Services $10,755,940

Trust and Agency Funds $12,898,198 Pension $12,898,198

Capital Projects Funds $6,785,035 Debt Service $6,785,035

Major Funds Fund Name

Fund Type

Fund Description Accounts for police, code compliance, parks and recreation, public works, building, emergency medical services, and administration services Covers the fire department and subsequent divisions, including administration, suppression, inspection, training, and communications Provides water and wastewater services to approximately 51% of Coral Springs residents Includes the non-franchise portion of the City’s residential solid waste special assessment to cover cost of hauler and disposal fees Contribute to the City’s insured general liability, property, workers’ compensation, life, and employee medical benefits Includes the revenues and expenses incurred in the operation of the Coral Springs Charter School Accounts for the costs of maintaining the City’s fleet Includes the Public Art fee receipts collected during the permitting process for new construction and renovations of existing structures

General Fund*

City Operating Fund

Fire Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Water and Sewer Fund*

Enterprise Fund

Solid Waste Fund*

Enterprise Fund

Health and General Insurance Funds*

Internal Service Funds

Coral Springs Charter School Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Equipment Services Fund*

Internal Service Fund

Public Art Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Pension Fund

Trust and Agency Fund

Accounts for the accumulation of resources to be used for retirement benefit payments to the City’s employees

Debt Service Fund*

Debt Service Fund

Covers the revenues and payment of voter approved long-term general obligation debt and revenue bond debt

*Indicates appropriated funds in accordance with the Budget Ordinance.

30

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fund Structure Overview (continued)

FY 2015 Capital Budget $41,836,054

General Fund $21,735,626

Enterprise Funds $9,493,000

Water and Sewer $9,457,000 Solid Waste Fund $36,000

Special Revenue Funds $5,598,528

Internal Services Funds $5,008,900

Fire $5,478,528 Charter School $30,000 Public Art $90,000

Equipment Services $5,008,900

A pedestrian footbridge was replaced on 87th Avenue, South of Sample Road. This bridge provides an alternative access to and from Forest Hills Elementary School. The bridge has also been used by the school as an emergency exit egress.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

31


Summary of net budgeted revenues窶認iscal Year 2015 FY 2014 Amended Net Budget General Fund

Percent of Total

FY 2015 Adopted Net Budget

$94,689,974

60.5%

$97,769,413

Fire Fund

17,119,047

10.9%

Water and Sewer Fund

21,624,783

Percent of Total

Dollar Change

Percent Change

60.4% $3,079,439

3.3%

17,310,587

10.7%

191,540

1.1%

13.8%

22,648,735

14.0%

1,023,952

4.7%

1,338,000

0.9%

1,535,000

0.8%

197,000

14.7%

11,908,350

7.6%

11,428,913

7.1%

(479,437)

-4.0%

96,500

0.1%

222,000

0.1%

125,500

130.1%

Equipment Services Fund

3,725,585

2.4%

5,171,909

3.2%

1,446,324

38.8%

Solid Waste Fund

3,827,185

2.4%

4,157,009

2.6%

329,824

8.6%

Debt Service Fund

2,306,613

1.5%

1,577,544

1.0%

(729,069)

-31.6%

Health and General Insurance Funds C. S. Charter School Fund Public Art Fund

Total

$156,636,037

100.0% $161,821,110

100.0% $5,185,073

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different due to inter-fund transfers.

Fiscal Year 2015 Net Budget - All Funds - Revenues $161,821,110 Fire Fund 10.7%

Debt Service Fund 1.0%

Other 1.0% Charter School Fund 7.1%

Water and Sewer Fund 14.0% General Fund 60.4% Equipment Services Fund 3.2% Solid Waste Fund 2.6%

32

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

3.3%


Summary of net budgeted expenditures窶認iscal Year 2015 Summary of Net Budgeted Expenditures窶認Y 2015 FY 2014 Amended Net Budget General Fund

Percent of Total

FY 2015 Adopted Net Budget

Percent of Total

Dollar Change

$67,914,579

43.4%

$69,632,817

Fire Fund

11,873,782

7.6%

12,198,755

7.5%

324,973

2.7%

Water and Sewer Fund

17,811,641

11.4%

18,362,701

11.3%

551,060

3.1%

Health and General Insurance Funds

16,118,093

10.3%

16,799,742

10.4%

681,649

4.2%

C.S. Charter School Fund

10,488,350

6.7%

10,008,913

6.2%

(479,437)

-4.6%

96,500

0.1%

222,000

0.1%

125,500

130.1%

9,152,277

5.8%

10,755,940

6.6%

1,603,663

17.5%

13,638,747

8.7%

12,898,198

8.0%

(740,549)

-5.4%

Solid Waste Fund

3,106,900

2.0%

4,157,009

2.6%

1,050,109

33.8%

Debt Service Fund

6,435,168

4.1%

6,785,035

4.2%

349,867

5.4%

100.0% $5,185,073

3.3%

Public Art Fund Equipment Services Fund Pension Fund

Total

$156,636,037

100.0%

$161,821,110

43.0% $1,718,238

Percent Change 2.5%

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of interfund transfers.

Fiscal Year 2015 Net Budget - All Funds - Expenditures $161,821,110 Solid Waste Fund Equipment Services Fund 2.6% 6.6%

Water and Sewer Fund 11.3%

General Fund 43.0% Fire Fund 7.5%

Charter School Fund 6.2% Debt Service Fund & Public Art Fund 4.3% Pension Fund 8.0%

Insurance and Health Fund 10.4%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

33


Where the money comes from by source (all funds) 13.5%

19.6% Ad Valorem Taxes Sales and Use Taxes Utility Service Taxes Intergovernmental Fines and Forfeitures Misc. Revenues

2.4% 2.2% 1.2%

Special Assessments Franchise Fees License and Permits Charges for Services Capital Other Financing Sources

8.8% 19.8% 4.1%

Where the money goes by type of program

5.4% 5.9% 15.1% 2.0%

Where the money goes by type of program (all funds) 7.6%

4.7% 11.4%

6.4% General Government Services Education Public Safety Physical Environment Economic Environment Culture and Recreation Debt Service Capital Improvements Other Financing Uses

7.3%

8.0%

Where the money goes by category (General Fund only) 0.4%

38.2% 16.0%

Where the money goes by category (General Fund only) 1.4% 4.2% 0.3%

18.4%

4.5% 46.3%

Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Capital Improvements Non Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service

24.9%

34

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fund Budget Overviews General Fund Budget Summary FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$31,133,669 1,432,712

$32,726,175 1,827,073

$33,651,176 2,103,433

$35,299,267 2,124,467

$1,648,091 21,034

4.90% 1.00%

Franchise Fees: Electricity Solid Waste Towing/Other Subtotal - Franchise Fees

6,738,441 1,726,826 90,026 8,555,293

6,609,005 1,703,027 90,070 8,402,102

7,434,499 2,790,739 107,696 10,332,934

7,434,499 2,600,000 100,000 10,134,499

0 (190,739) (7,696) (198,435)

0.00% -6.83% -7.15% -1.92%

Utility Service Taxes: Electricity Water Propane/Natural Gas Subtotal - Utility Taxes

7,731,838 1,819,102 175,792 9,726,732

8,138,589 1,882,074 150,077 10,170,740

8,711,000 1,916,028 179,697 10,806,725

8,800,000 2,060,000 185,986 11,045,986

89,000 143,972 6,289 239,261

1.02% 7.51% 3.50% 2.21%

State Intergovernmental Revenues: Communications Services Tax PEG Revenues Shared Revenues Alcoholic Beverages/Casino Sales Tax Other Revenue/Municipal Rebate Subtotal State Intergovernmental

5,439,445 78,203 3,249,073 107,219 6,684,505 52,092 15,610,537

5,288,750 44,095 3,406,040 123,420 7,142,316 64,350 16,068,971

5,400,000 25,000 3,541,027 129,107 7,374,706 45,652 16,515,492

5,000,000 25,000 3,746,848 161,092 7,673,453 47,022 16,653,415

(400,000) 0 205,821 31,985 298,747 1,370 137,923

-7.41% 0.00% 5.81% 24.77% 4.05% 3.00% 0.84%

Other Intergovernmental Revenues: Miscellaneous Community Bus Program Revenues First Local Option Fuel Tax Second Local Option Fuel Tax Public Safety E911 Recycling Material Revenue Subtotal Other Intergovernmental Subtotal Intergovernmental

40,000 125,270 1,207,219 873,300 332,446 333,843 2,912,078 18,522,615

40,000 124,706 1,208,213 874,019 258,295 418,305 2,923,538 18,992,509

40,000 127,453 1,245,000 900,000 197,491 260,000 2,769,944 19,285,436

40,000 125,002 1,260,000 900,000 238,086 292,000 2,855,088 19,508,503

0 (2,451) 15,000 0 40,595 32,000 85,144 223,067

0.00% -1.92% 1.20% 0.00% 20.56% 12.31% 3.07% 1.16%

Permits and Business Tax: Building Permits Not Related State Surcharge Rebillable Overtime Other Permits (Waste Hauling) Subtotal Permits

2,017,050 113,358 0 0 2,130,408

1,834,570 103,449 123,088 108,733 2,169,840

2,200,000 150,153 67,667 7,000 2,424,820

2,213,000 225,153 67,667 8,116 2,513,936

13,000 75,000 0 1,116 89,116

0.59% 49.95% 0.00% 15.94% 3.68%

Business Tax Subtotal Permits and Business Tax

1,160,987 3,291,395

1,088,179 3,258,019

1,218,600 3,643,420

1,221,900 3,735,836

3,300 92,416

0.27% 2.54%

Charges For Services: Parks and Recreation Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Activity Center Recreation Services Summer Recreation Transportation Gymnasium Aquaticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Cypress Pool Aquaticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mullins Pool Aquatic Complex Sportsplex Tennis Center Cypress Tennis Subtotal Parks and Recreation

104,891 291,842 39,211 96,487 45,736 21,489 612,155 52,087 414,761 153,307 66,662 1,506,124 294,650 329,433 120,917 4,149,752

111,837 269,138 28,078 98,412 44,162 20,273 543,076 46,846 421,985 140,846 73,067 1,653,434 277,730 307,363 128,385 4,164,632

111,000 286,235 41,211 101,019 59,507 21,410 622,448 50,099 407,000 153,513 75,950 1,558,592 308,947 387,850 148,180 4,332,961

119,325 307,703 44,302 108,596 63,970 23,016 600,000 53,856 437,525 165,027 81,646 1,700,486 335,181 416,940 159,293 4,616,866

8,325 21,468 3,091 7,577 4,463 1,606 (22,448) 3,757 30,525 11,514 5,696 141,894 26,234 29,090 11,113 283,905

7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% -3.61% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 9.10% 8.49% 7.50% 7.50% 6.55%

Revenues General Operating Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Assessment-FF

City of Coral Springs, Florida

35


General Fund Budget Summary (continued) FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

FY 2013 Actual

Charges for Services to other funds: W&S Fund—Admin Services W&S Fund—Economic Development Fire Fund—Admin Services Subtotal - Chg/Svc - Other Funds

1,802,824 0 1,432,545 3,235,369

1,921,487 0 1,504,172 3,425,659

2,007,954 0 1,579,380 3,587,334

2,128,431 250,000 1,658,349 4,036,780

120,477 250,000 78,969 449,446

6.00% n/a 5.00% 12.53%

Charges for Services—Other: General Government City Hall in the Mall Public Safety EMS Transport Fees EMS Interfacility Transportation EMS Community Paramedicine EMS Contract Subtotal - Chg/Svc - Other

758,840 586,750 1,136,280 2,578,547 102,646 0 1,751 5,164,814

900,765 647,248 1,178,881 2,433,785 97,342 0 2,907 5,260,928

915,047 638,647 1,206,735 2,604,000 94,414 0 1,751 5,460,594

896,648 648,075 1,189,383 2,682,120 97,246 231,801 1,751 5,747,023

(18,399) 9,428 (17,352) 78,120 2,832 231,801 0 286,429

-2.01% 1.48% -1.44% 3.00% 3.00% n/a 0.00% 5.25%

Subtotal - Charges For Services

12,549,935

12,851,219

13,380,889

14,400,669

1,019,780

7.62%

Fines and Forfeitures Court Fines Other Police Fines Red Light Cameras Misdemeanor Diversion Prog-Admin fee Code Compliance Citations & Liens Other Miscellaneous Subtotal Fines and Forfeitures

514,754 71,392 3,175 0 654,696 294,775 1,538,792

606,910 114,151 42,295 0 767,385 40,940 1,571,681

575,000 220,610 197,400 0 943,000 114,681 2,050,691

725,000 207,066 197,400 150,000 758,000 182,388 2,219,854

150,000 (13,544) 0 150,000 (185,000) 67,707 169,163

26.09% -6.14% 0.00% n/a -19.62% 59.04% 8.25%

Other Income: Interest Rents & Royalties/Cell Tower Lease Sale 50th Anniversary Sept 11 5K Event CRA Contribution Charter School Lease Auction Resource Recovery SW Disposal Rebate Solid Waste Disposal Agreement Volunteer Firefighter Pension Facility Rental Other Miscellaneous Subtotal

265,553 1,204,766 0 0 0 1,420,000 5,086 0 0 0 0 124,645 139,125 3,159,175

95,527 1,214,591 104,350 0 50,000 1,420,000 9,695 1,388,360 0 185,000 1,155,820 126,970 280,275 6,030,588

375,000 1,028,775 0 0 127,734 1,420,000 18,285 0 12,518 272,000 0 150,000 239,074 3,643,386

307,500 1,277,412 0 15,000 155,143 1,420,000 18,651 0 18,000 525,000 0 150,000 245,051 4,131,757

(67,500) 248,637 0 15,000 27,409 0 366 0 5,482 253,000 0 0 5,977 488,371

-18.00% 24.17% n/a n/a 21.46% 0.00% 2.00% n/a 43.79% 93.01% n/a 0.00% 2.50% 13.40%

89,910,319

95,830,106

98,898,090 102,600,838.2

3,702,748

3.74%

0 0 0 500,000 0 2,822,013 3,322,013

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 125,355 0 0 100,000 400,000 625,355

(100,000) (63,863) (720,285) 0 (150,000) 140,000 (894,148)

-100.00% -33.75% -100.00% n/a -60.00% 53.85% -58.84%

$100,417,593 $103,226,193

$2,808,600

2.80%

Total General Operating Other Capital Reserve Transfer from CDBG Fund Transfer from Solid Waste Fund Transfer from Library Fund Forfeiture for SRO's Appropriation of fund balance for CIP Total Other Grand Total - Revenues

36

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2012 Actual

$93,232,332 $95,830,106

100,000 189,218 720,285 0 250,000 260,000 1,519,503

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


General Fund Budget Summary (continued) FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$271,867 2,731,916 1,338,163 2,370,586 2,714,483 849,553 5,716,533 42,512,397 8,623,568 4,051,812 13,264,952 84,445,830

$352,109 3,333,225 1,452,647 2,545,778 2,886,654 863,842 6,499,433 45,124,246 8,844,999 4,414,581 14,135,475 90,452,989

$356,301 3,814,675 1,675,532 2,478,075 3,258,968 997,264 6,710,575 45,386,271 8,952,199 4,608,241 14,314,766 92,552,867

$4,192 481,450 222,885 (67,703) 372,314 133,422 211,142 262,025 107,200 193,660 179,291 2,099,878

1.19% 14.44% 15.34% -2.66% 12.90% 15.45% 3.25% 0.58% 1.21% 4.39% 1.27% 2.32%

25,878 50,000 727,531 0 0 0 135,710 830,000 10,717 159,115 46,419 472,111 440,016 0 100,029 0 0 0 8,342 0 0 0 3,005,868

524,567 50,000 420,443 0 0 0 2,186 0 0 131,702 34,829 471,142 448,933 0 11,496 0 0 6,802 107,121 0 606,461 381,071 3,196,755

592,308 0 651,981 450,764 129,076 250,000 180,924 0 0 139,214 94,564 578,281 500,000 (300,000) 100,000 25,000 0 10,000 75,000 337,050 0 0 3,814,162

200,000 0 654,982 450,000 0 200,000 67,404 0 0 146,175 75,000 578,281 525,000 0 100,000 25,000 264,456 10,000 0 0 0 0 3,296,298

(392,308) 0 3,001 (764) (129,076) (50,000) (113,520) 0 0 6,961 (19,564) 0 25,000 300,000 0 0 264,456 0 (75,000) (337,050) 0 0 (517,864)

-66.23% n/a 0.46% -0.17% -100.00% -20.00% -62.74% n/a n/a 5.00% -20.69% 0.00% 5.00% -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% -100.00% -100.00% n/a n/a -13.58%

Interfund Transfers: Property/Casualty Fire Fund (Nonprofit Subsidy Churches/Schools) Fire Fund Govt. Assessment To Capital Fund Subtotal - Interfund Transfers

887,823 897,755 156,717 0 1,942,295

939,990 959,675 159,915 114,451 2,174,031

1,043,886 1,043,031 182,830 185,000 2,454,747

1,105,266 995,808 185,323 406,000 2,692,397

61,380 (47,223) 2,493 221,000 237,650

5.88% -4.53% 1.36% 119.46% 9.68%

Debt Service: Revenue Bond Rev Bonds - '04 (Refunding) Rev Bonds - '08 2010 Recovery Zone Bond 2013 Capital Revenue Note 2013 Lease Purchase Financing (Phone) 2014 Municipal Complex Loan Total Debt Service

375,696 1,565,863 405,516 0 0 0 2,347,075

1,625,384 1,565,963 405,517 0 0 0 3,596,864

827,159 1,569,663 405,517 519,600 373,756 0 3,695,695

1,533,970 1,576,788 405,517 519,600 373,756 275,000 4,684,631

706,811 7,125 0 0 0 275,000 988,936

85.45% 0.45% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 26.76%

Total Non-Departmental

7,295,238

8,967,650

9,964,604

10,673,326

708,722

7.11%

$93,232,332

$93,413,481

$100,417,593

$103,226,193

$2,808,600

2.80%

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$277,535 2,686,196 1,326,880 2,547,851 2,687,018 826,566 5,741,622 43,833,365 8,939,341 4,012,555 13,058,163 85,937,092

Non-Departmental Operating Capital Conference Center Equipment Non-Departmental Operating Contingency Solid Waste Contingency Economic Development Incentive Market Adjustments Other Post Employment Benefits Inventory/Over/shortage CRA Special Assessment Tuition Reimbursement Charter School (Lease Expense) Center for the Arts EMS Pension Adjustment Internal Auditor City Hall Licensing/Maintenance City Hall South Rental Library/Grounds Parking lot Maint 50th Anniversary Microsoft Office License/ESRI Maintenan SQL Database License Computer Replacement Plan Subtotal - Non-Departmental

Expenditures: Departmental City Commission City Manager Human Resources Financial Services Information Technology City Attorney Development Services Police Emergency Medical Services Public Works Parks & Recreation Total Departmental

Grand Total - Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures Positions

$0 $2,416,625 631.91 640.41

$0 649.66

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0 659.77

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 10.11

n/a 1.56%

37


General Fund Description The General Fund is the general operating fund of the City of Coral Springs. It provides for a broad spectrum of premier services such as beautiful parks and recreational facilities, public safety, code compliance, athletic programs, an attractive Aquatic Complex, public works, building plan review and inspections, emergency medical services, and more. Resources are, in the majority, provided by taxes. The General Fund budget is $103,226,193 for Fiscal Year 2015. This represents an increase of $2,808,600 or 2.8% from the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. This budget is adequate to finance the General Fund expenses and a portion of the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, Insurance, Debt Service, Equipment Services, and Pension fund expenses relative to the General Fund.

General Fund Total Revenues - $103,226,193

Revenues

General Fund total revenues—$103,226,193 Sales Tax 7.4%

A summary of the Fiscal Year 2015 General Fund revenue by source is provided in the chart to the right. Major revenue sources for the General Fund Fiscal Year 2015 budget include:

Fines and Forfeitures 2.2%

Misc. Revenues 4.0% Intergovernmental 11.5%

Charges for Services 14.0%

Ad valorem taxes: $35,299,267

Utility Taxes 10.7%

(34.2% of total revenues) Ad valorem taxes represent a levy on the assessed value of real and personal property. In Fiscal Year 2015, ad valorem taxes will account for 34.2% of total General Fund revenues.

Permits and Business Tax 3.6% Other 0.6% Ad Valorem Taxes 34.2%

The general operating tax millage rate is $4.5697, no increase from Fiscal Year 2014. This is well below the state-imposed ten mill cap. The ad valorem revenue generated by the Fiscal Year 2015 tax millage rate is based on the July 1, 2014 assessed value provided by the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office. Tax year 2014 gross taxable property value increased from $7,751,557,101 to $8,131,195,392 or 5.35%. New additions, annexations, and construction added $11,516,140 or 0.14% to the tax roll.

Franchise Fees/Solid Waste Assessment 11.8%

The combined general operating and debt service millage rates of $4.5697 and $0.2038, respectively, total $4.7735 per $1,000 of assessed property value. The Fiscal Year 2015 combined millage rate represents a 0.01% increase from the Fiscal Year 2014 combined millage rate of $4.7730.

Solid Waste Assessment: (2.1% of total revenues)

$2,124,467

The voter-approved debt service millage rate for Fiscal Year 2015 is $0.2038 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value levied on real and personal property. This represents an increase of $0.0005 or 0.2% over Fiscal Year 2014 budget.

The City assesses residences for solid waste services. Anticipated revenue is $21,034 or 1.0% more than Fiscal Year 2014.

There is no legal debt millage limit established by the State of Florida for its municipalities, counties, or independent taxing districts. City policy does, however, limit annual General Fund debt service expense to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget. At 4.5%, the City is well within its General Fund debt service limitation policy.

(9.8% of total revenues)

Millage rates

Franchise fees:

Franchise fees are charges to service providers for the right to operate within the municipal boundaries of the City. The “Franchise Fee” table presented on the following page, includes current franchise fee rates, projected Fiscal Year 2015 revenues, and percent change from the adopted Fiscal Year 2014 budget. For more details, see “Revenue Trends” in this section of the document.

Adopted Adopted Adopted Adopted Percent FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Change General Operating Voter-Approved

$4.3939 $0.2915

$4.5697 $0.2906

$4.5697 $0.2033

$4.5697 $0.2038

0.00% 0.24%

Total Millage

$4.6854

$4.8603

$4.7730

$4.7735

0.01%

38

$10,134,499

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Utility service taxes: $11,045,986

Utility service taxes

(10.7% of total revenues)

Type (% of Gross)

The City charges a 10% utility service tax on all utility payments made in the City. As shown in the “Utilities service taxes” chart to the right, Fiscal Year 2015 utility service tax revenues are projected to increase by 2.2% or $239,261 from Fiscal Year 2014 budgeted revenue.

Total

Intergovernmental revenue sharing: $11,645,048

Franchise fees

Electricity (10%)

Communications service tax

$5,000,000

State shared revenue

$3,746,848

First local option fuel tax

$1,260,000

Second local option fuel tax

$900,000

Recycling material revenue

$292,000

Public safety E911

$238,086

Alcoholic beverage license

$161,092

Municipal rebate

$8,800,000

1.02%

1,916,028

2,060,000

7.51%

173,620

179,697

185,986

3.50%

$10,102,079,

$10,806,725

$11,045,986

2.21%

Type (% of Gross)

FY 2013 Budgeted Receipts

FY 2014 Budgeted Receipts

FY 2015 Budgeted Receipts

Electricity (6%)

$7,080,475

$7,434,499

$7,434,499

1,929,730

2,790,739

2,600,000

-6.83%

104,054

107,696

100,000

-7.15%

$9,114,259

$10,332,934

$10,134,499

-1.92%

Solid Waste Towing/Other Total

$47,022

$7,673,453

Also considered an intergovernmental revenue, half-cent sales tax may be used for municipal-wide programs, municipalwide property tax or utility tax relief, or principal and interest payments on capital projects only. Sales tax revenue is expected to increase $298,747 or 4% over Fiscal Year 2014 budget.

Permits and business tax: (3.6% of total revenues)

Percent Change

$8,711,000

The Communications service tax revenue is projected to decrease by $400,000 or 7.4%. The State shared revenue is estimated with a 5.8% increase or $205,821, the First local option fuel tax is projected to increase by 1.2% or $15,000, while the Second local option fuel tax will remain the same. Revenue for recycling materials is expected to increase by 12.3%. Public safety E911 revenues are expected to increase by 4%. (7.4% of total revenues)

FY 2015 Budgeted Receipts

1,878,459

Propane (10%)

Intergovernmental revenue sharing is provided to local municipalities by the state using a predetermined allocation methodology based, in part, on population. Anticipated revenues to be received in Fiscal Year 2015 are as follows:

FY 2014 Budgeted Receipts

$8,050,000

Water (10%)

(11.3 % of total revenues)

Sales tax:

FY 2013 Budgeted Receipts

$3,735,836

Building permit revenues are budgeted at $2,213,000, an increase of $13,000 or 0.6% from Fiscal Year 2014. This include charges for permit and inspection services related to any construction, alteration, repair, or other activity required by the City Code and South Florida Building Code. We have seen

Percent Change 0.00%

a steep decline in the number of building permit applications during Fiscal Years 2008 through 2013 with the majority of permits issued for homeowner renovations. (Refer to Revenue Trends in this section for more information on building permits). Building permits are 2.1% of total General Fund revenues. Business tax revenues are expected at $1,221,900, an increase of $3,300 or 0.3% over Fiscal Year 2014 budget. Formerly known as an “occupational license,” local governments are authorized to charge an annual “business tax” to businesses, professionals, and other for-profit enterprises for the privilege of operating a business within the City boundaries. Business tax revenues represent 1.2% of total revenues. Revenues received from rebillable overtime for building services and waste hauling permits are also included in this revenue category and account for another 0.1% of total revenues.

Charges for services—Parks & Recreation: (4.5% of total revenues)

$4,616,866

Parks and Recreation revenues are generated from user fees at the City’s parks, pools, and athletic facilities. Fiscal Year 2015 revenues are projected to increase 6.6% or $283,905.

Charges for services—other funds: (3.9% of total revenues)

$4,036,780

The transfer from the Water and Sewer Fund to the General Fund for administrative services is increasing by $120,477 or 6%. The transfer from the Fire Fund to the General Fund for indirect cost is increasing by $78,969, or 5%, in Fiscal Year 2015. These inter-fund transfers will fully reimburse the General Fund for the cost of administrative services related to Fire and the Utilities fund. In addition, a transfer in the amount of $250,000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

39


is budgeted from the Water and Sewer Fund to the General Fund to support the newly created Economic Development Division. This function was budgeted previously in the non departmental budget in the Water and Sewer Fund at $287,476. Bringing business development in house will save the City $37,476

Charges for services—other: (5.6% of total revenues)

$5,747,023

Charges for services rendered represent a fair method of recovering the cost of providing a service to an individual or group, not the community at large. These user fees are primarily related to planning, EMS, and general governmental services. Fiscal Year 2015 revenues are projected to increase 5.3% or $286,429 from the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. EMS transport fee revenue is expected to increase by 3% or $78,120 over Fiscal Year 2014. General Government revenues decreased by $18,399 (from $915,047 to $896,648). This is primarily due to an expected reduction in registration fees for abandoned properties.

Fines and forfeitures:

(2.2% of total revenues)

$2,219,854

Fines and forfeitures are revenues generated by enforcement and prosecution of municipal ordinances and state statutes. Fiscal Year 2015 revenues are projected to increase $169,163 or 8.2% from Fiscal Year 2014. This additional revenue is mainly due to the implementation of the Misdemeanor Diversion program. For details of this new initiative, please refer to the Business Plan section of this document.

Miscellaneous revenues: (4.0% of total revenues)

$4,131,757

The majority of the miscellaneous revenues include the Coral Springs Charter School lease, rents and royalties, interest earnings from fund balance, and the Solid Waste Disposal agreement. The Coral Springs Charter School lease revenue will remain the same ($1,420,000). This represents 1.4% of total General Fund revenues. Rents and royalties include telecommunication tower leases and facility rentals. Fiscal Year 2015 revenues are expected to be $1,277,412, an increase of $248,637 or 24.2% over Fiscal Year 2014. The increase is due to prorating $3.7M of revenue received in Fiscal Year 2013 for the sale of cellular tower lease, over a 14-year period. Interest earnings are expected to be $307,500, a decrease of $67,500 or 18%. They are generated by investment earnings on that portion of cash reserve investments attributable to the General Fund. Interest earnings represent 0.3% of total General Fund revenues.

40

Other financing sources:

$625,355

(0.6% of total revenues) These revenues include $125,355 from Community Development Block Grant, using $100,000 of forfeiture funding to offset the cost of school resource officers, and $400,000 as an appropriation from fund balance per the Financial Strategy.

Expenditures The Fiscal Year 2015 General Fund budgeted expenditures total $103,226,193. This adopted budget represents an increase of $2,808,600 or 2.8% from the Fiscal Year 2014 budget of $100,417,593. A recap of departmental expenditures in the General Fund Budget includes:

City Commission:

$356,301

(0.3% of total expenditures)

The City Commission’s budget increased $4,192 or 1.2% from Fiscal Year 2014. The increase is primarily due to health allocation.

City Manager:

$3,814,675

(3.7% of total expenditures) The City Manager’s Office includes Administration, Economic Development, the Management and Budget Office, Communications and Marketing, City Clerk, and the CRA (Community Redevelopment Agency). The overall department increased by $481,450 or 14.4% in Fiscal Year 2015. The majority of the increase is attributed to the newly created Economic Development Division, which includes two additional positions (an Economic Development Manager and a Principal Office Assistant) with its corresponding operating expenses. A Creative Services Coordinator full time position was added in the Communications and Marketing Division to promote

General Fund revenue and expenditure summary FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

Sources Revenues: Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Assessment Sales and Use Taxes Franchise Fees Utility Service Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Revenues Other Financing Sources Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues

$31,512,835 $31,133,669 $32,726,176 $33,651,176 $35,299,267 994,502 1,432,712 1,827,073 2,103,433 2,124,467 6,713,258 6,684,505 7,142,316 7,374,706 7,673,453 8,633,882 8,555,293 8,887,102 10,332,934 10,134,499 9,551,411 9,726,732 10,170,739 10,806,725 11,045,986 3,513,777 3,291,395 3,031,511 3,643,420 3,735,836 11,995,589 11,838,112 11,900,193 11,942,168 11,835,050 11,352,145 12,672,832 13,361,037 13,380,888 14,400,669 1,491,010 1,538,793 1,529,386 2,019,253 2,219,854 3,334,109 3,036,278 9,743,303 3,643,387 4,131,757 1,097,798 500,000 0 1,159,503 225,355 2,550,000 2,822,013 0 360,000 400,000 $92,740,316 $93,232,332 $100,318,836 $100,417,593 $103,226,193

$1,222,337 238,533 144,602 718,675 704,646 (18,111) (476,456) 722,803 39,313 (445,241) 142,210 (1,390,000) $1,603,311

3.8% 12.8% 2.0% 7.5% 7.0% -0.5% -3.8% 5.7% 2.0% -10.9% 14.0% -79.4% 1.6%

Uses Expenditures: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service Total Expenditures

$42,870,054 $43,099,482 27,239,927 26,910,324 15,486,683 15,876,171 39,784 126,967 2,610,215 3,974,556 1,254,337 897,755 3,203,059 2,347,076 $92,704,059 $93,232,331

$1,084,461 165,334 416,492 (204,520) (225,643) 268,356 98,831 $1,603,311

2.4% 0.6% 2.3% -24.3% -4.8% 28.0% 2.7% 1.6%

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

$36,257 627.91

$0 631.91

$43,841,892 $46,560,297 $47,758,444 23,292,832 25,666,048 25,769,479 17,107,964 18,181,704 18,994,681 727,708 637,248 270,807 3,886,549 4,448,570 4,346,343 959,675 1,228,031 1,401,808 3,596,864 3,695,695 4,684,631 $93,413,481 $100,417,593 $103,226,193 $6,905,355 640.41

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$0 649.66

$0 659.77

$0 9.25

n/a 1.4%


and support new initiatives. An increase to the health plan costs also contributed to the overall increase.

Human Resources:

(1.6% of total expenditures)

General Fund Total Expenditures - $103,226,193 General Fund total expenditures—$103,226,193 Development Services 6.5%

$1,675,532

HR/CAO 2.6%

Human Resources’ budget increased $222,885 or 15.3% mainly due to transferring the entire Volunteer Services Division from the Police Department to Human Resources, funding for an evaluation of the salary compensation structure, increased contractual services, and employee training.

Information Technology 3.1% CMO/Commission 4.0% Police 44.0%

(2.4% of total expenditures)

Parks and Recreation 13.9%

Financial Services’ budget decreased by $67,703 or 2.7% from Fiscal Year 2014 budget. The savings are a result of funding a portion of two positions (Finance Director and Controller) in the Water and Sewer Fund. (3.1% of total expenditures)

Public Works 4.5%

$3,258,968

IT’s budget increased by $372,314 or 12.9%. The increase is mainly due to the addition of two full-time employees—Project Manager and Database Analyst, to meet network support needs and work on technology enhancement projects.

City Attorney:

(1% of total expenditures)

$997,264

The City Attorney’s budget increased by $133,422 or 15.4%. The increase is related to funding a vacant position and typical salary and health plan allocation increases.

Development Services—Administration, Code, Building, Community Development, and Engineering: $6,710,575 (6.5% of total expenditures) Development Services includes the Administration Division, Code Compliance, Building Divisions, Community Development, and Engineering. The budget for this department increased by $211,142 or 3.3%. A principal office assistant was added to the Code Compliance Division to help administer the Business Tax and Code Lien amnesty programs. Typical salary and health plan allocation increases account for part of the increase.

Police:

(44% of total expenditures)

Financial Services 2.4%

Non-Departmental 10.3%

Financial Services: $2,478,075

Information Technology (IT):

Emergency Medical Svc. 8.7%

$45,386,271

The Police Department’s budget increased by $262,025 or 0.6%.The addition of three full time Police Officers account for part of the increase, off set by transferring the expenses for the Volunteer Services Division to the Human Resources Department. The budget for overtime increased $33,613 or 3.3%.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS):

$8,952,199

(8.7% of total expenditures) The EMS budget increased $107,200 or 1.2%. This is mainly due to the addition of one full-time Principal Office Assistant, and partially funding two new positions (Public Education Officer and Data Analyst). In addition, typical salary and health plan cost contributed to the budget increase.

Public Works:

(4.5% of total expenditures)

$4,608,241

The Public Works budget increased by $193,660 or 4.4%, mainly due to budgeting additional funding for street lights and moving funding for Citywide air conditioning maintenance and repairs from multiple department’s budgets, into Public Works Facilities Division for better tracking and management.

Parks and Recreation—includes Aquatics, Tennis, and Sportsplex: $14,314,766 (13.9% of total expenditures) Parks and Recreation’s budget increased by $179,291 or 1.3%. Part of the increase is due to higher health cost and workers comp allocations. The operational cost for the Tennis Center increased by $34,914; the Aquatic Complex (including Cypress and Mullins Pools) increased by $95,734. This increase is mainly due to contractual agreements for swim and dive team, and coaches for the swim club, as well as expenses associated with sport clinic programs and instructor fees.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

41


Non-departmental: $3,296,298

This inter-fund transfer will also finance the replacement of irrigation pumps and playground replacement at various parks.

(3.2% of total expenditures) The non-departmental budget decreased by $517,864 or 13.6%. The majority of the reduced expenses were in the following areas: capital funding, funding for market adjustments, contingency for Solid Waste, and software licensing.

Internal fund transfers: $2,692,397 (2.6% of total expenditures)

The interfund transfer budget increased by $237,650 or 9.7%. The additional funding is mainly due to a $406,000 transfer to the Capital Fund to cover the cost of technology enhancements; such as, replacement of computer equipment and an additional server to increase data storage.

Debt service:

$4,684,631

(4.5% of total expenditures) Debt service consists of capital and franchise revenue bonds, including an Economic Recovery Zone Bond issued in December 2010. General Fund Debt Service will increase $988,936 or 26.8% over the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. This is due to beginning repayment of principal on the 2004 refunding revenue bond, and budgeting for interest only payments for a new capital loan.

General Fund non-departmental operating expenses Item Financial Quality Program

Cross Departmental

Special Projects Boards & Advisory Committees Grants

Events

Total

42

Internal Auditor Tuition Reimbursement Credit Card Charges Resident/Business Survey Benchmarking Election Expense Unemployment Security Licensing/Maintenance Festival of the Arts Lobbyist Center for the Arts Rentals Other Contractual Services Hurricane Preparedness (Safety) Special Event Banner Printing Business Development/EDF CRA Assessment Boards and Commission Expense Accessibility Issues (Disability) Historical Advisory Committee Sports Commission Multi-Cultural Events Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebrat Sports Event Grants Coral Springs Community Chest Holiday Parade Teen Political Forum September 11th 5K event Half-Marathon Kreul Classic Tournament July 4th

FY 2014 Budget

Proposed FY 2015 Budget

100,000 94,564 50,000 25,000 13,550 0 34,000 25,000 15,000 36,000 14,500 80,251 6,500 50,000 20,000 139,214 17,500 2,500 15,000 5,000 35,231 14,769 50,000 50,000 20,000 0 15,000 15,000 0 40,000

$983,579

100,000 75,000 50,000 25,000 15,000 42,000 34,000 25,000 15,000 36,000 8,500 80,251 6,500 50,000 0 146,175 17,500 2,500 10,000 5,000 35,231 20,000 35,000 50,000 20,000 7,500 15,000 15,000 20,000 40,000

$ Change

% Change

0 (19,564) 0 0 1,450 42,000 0 0 0 0 (6,000) 0 0 0 (20,000) 6,961 0 0 (5,000) 0 0 5,231 (15,000) 0 0 7,500 0 0 20,000 0

0.00% -20.69% 0.00% 0.00% 10.70% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -41.38% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 5.00% 0.00% 0.00% -33.33% 0.00% 0.00% 35.42% -30.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 100.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

$1,001,157 $17,578

1.79%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Statement of Revenues and Expenditures Fire Fund Budget Summary Fire Fund

Revenues: Non Ad Valorem Special Assessment Fees Non-Ad Valorem Special Assessment Fee Government Assessment Nonprofit Subsidy (Churches & Schools) Sub-Total Non Ad Valorem Special Assesment Fees Partial Year Assessment Intergovernmental Base Contract (Parkland) Base Contract (Broward County) Sub-Total Intergovernmental Charges for Services: Fire Inspection Services Fire Re-Inspection Fees Training Tuition Fees Training Miscellaneous Fees State Education Incentive Fund Off Duty Fire Rescue Service Plan Review Fees Sub-Total Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures: Fire Inspection Fines False Alarm Recovery Sub-Total Fines and Forfeitures Other: Interest Income Miscellaneous Revenue Doubtful Accounts Safer Grant Appropriated Fund Balance Sub-Total Other Grand Total - Revenues Expenditures: Departmental Administration Communication Service Suppression Training Inspection Total Departmental Non-Departmental C.I.P. Rate Consultant Contingency Assessment Collection Costs Indirect Costs Economic Conditions Computer Replacement Program Sub-Total - Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers: Capital Property Casualty Transfer Sub-Total - Interfund Transfers Bond Debt Service: Revenue Bond-'04 (Refunding) Revenue Bond-'08 2013 Lease Purchase Financing (Phone) Future Debt for Aerial Truck Sub-Total - Debt Service Total Non-Departmental Grand Total - Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures Positions

Prepared 11/21/2014 9:48 AM

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$ Change From FY14 Budget

% Change From FY14 Budget

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$8,265,442 156,715 897,755 9,319,912 13,034

$8,784,413 159,915 959,675 9,904,003 7,938

$9,131,007 182,830 1,043,031 10,356,868 26,457

$9,385,390 185,323 995,808 10,566,521 5,887

$254,383 2,493 (47,223) 209,653 (20,570)

2.79% 1.36% -4.53% 2.02% -77.75%

5,123,352 12,124 5,135,476

5,311,217 12,124 5,323,341

5,400,522 13,252 5,413,774

5,523,449 12,124 5,535,573

122,927 (1,128) 121,799

2.28% -8.51% 2.25%

814,070 40,859 748,414 92,187 50,510 26,444 126,389 1,898,873

750,463 20,182 886,244 132,417 53,170 34,905 102,894 1,980,275

834,462 31,212 820,024 129,005 48,899 41,007 112,200 2,016,809

834,462 31,836 987,625 220,349 50,000 35,000 114,444 2,273,716

0 624 167,601 91,344 1,101 (6,007) 2,244 256,907

0.00% 2.00% 20.44% 70.81% 2.25% -14.65% 2.00% 12.74%

68,395 2,150 70,545

4,626 1,900 6,526

51,000 3,000 54,000

52,020 3,000 55,020

1,020 0 1,020

2.00% 0.00% 1.89%

61,686 975 (15,041) 0 0 47,620 $16,485,460

45,094 4,749 (34,771) 0 0 15,072 $17,237,156

65,000 12,000 0 0 400,000 477,000 $18,344,908

50,000 5,000 0 0 0 55,000 $18,491,718

(15,000) (7,000) 0 0 (400,000) (422,000) $146,810

-23.08% -58.33% n/a n/a -100.00% -88.47% 0.80%

$538,977 120,233 11,216,600 1,018,693 1,153,375 14,047,878

$540,643 121,503 11,675,873 1,249,734 1,167,796 14,755,548

$579,558 125,124 11,961,947 1,102,133 1,198,142 14,966,904

$534,268 169,504 12,135,531 1,409,498 1,374,349 15,623,150

($45,290) 44,380 173,584 307,365 176,207 656,246

-7.81% 35.47% 1.45% 27.89% 14.71% 4.38%

229,407 0 16,857 19,607 1,432,545 84,769 10,315 1,793,500

291,513 0 0 19,610 1,504,172 29,177 5,192 1,849,664

578,072 30,000 105,000 24,079 1,579,380 77,474 19,800 2,413,805

286,730 0 100,000 24,560 1,658,349 102,367 31,700 2,203,706

(291,342) (30,000) (5,000) 481 78,969 24,893 11,900 (210,099)

-50.40% -100.00% -4.76% 2.00% 5.00% 32.13% 60.10% -8.70%

0 154,228 154,228

0 163,291 163,291

400,000 181,339 581,339

0 192,002 192,002

(400,000) 10,663 (389,337)

-100.00% 5.88% -66.97%

132,860 100,000 0 0 232,860 2,180,588

132,860 100,000 50,000 0 282,860 2,295,815

132,860 100,000 50,000 100,000 382,860 3,378,004

132,860 100,000 50,000 190,000 472,860 2,868,568

0 0 0 90,000 90,000 (509,436)

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 90.00% 23.51% -15.08%

$16,228,466

$17,051,363

$18,344,908

$18,491,718

$146,810

0.80%

$256,995 103.84

$185,793 107.84

$0 107.84

$0 109.98

$0 2.1

n/a 1.98%

Fire Fund Preliminary with DI, pension, health changes ADOPTED

City of Coral Springs, Florida

43


Fire Fund Description The Fire Fund is a special revenue fund to provide fire protective services to the citizens of Coral Springs. The City of Coral Springs also has a contractual agreement with the city of Parkland, Florida, to provide fire/rescue services. The Fire Department is funded by a special assessment. The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) portion of the Fire Department is funded in the General Fund (refer to the General Fund revenues and expenditures for information on the EMS budget). The Fire Fund budget is $18,491,718 in Fiscal Year 2015. This represents an increase of $146,810 or 0.80% over the Fiscal Year 2014 adopted budget.

Fire Fund Total Revenues - $18,491,718

Fire Fund total revenuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$18,491,718

Revenues Major revenue sources for the Fire Fund for Fiscal Year 2015 budget include: Special Assessment: (57.2% of total revenues)

Other 0.6% Charges for Services 12.3%

$10,566,521

The primary revenue source for the Fire Fund is a non-ad valorem special assessment which makes up 57.2% of total revenues. The assessment increased $209,653 or 2.02% from Fiscal Year 2014. A portion of this fire assessment fee is subsidized by the General Fund for churches and schools that are exempt from this assessment. The General Fund also covers the fire assessment fee for government properties. The table below shows fire assessment fees are based on the type of property, not the value of that property.

Intergovernmental 29.9% Special Assessment 57.2%

Intergovernmental: $5,535,573 (29.9% of total revenues) Intergovernmental revenues increased by $121,799 or 2.25% primarily due to an increase in our contract with the city of Parkland, Florida for fire/rescue services. This partnership began in March 2004. In April 2007, both cities partnered together to cover areas in northwest Coral Springs and west Parkland by adding a suppression unit and a rescue unit. These units are based in Parkland, but service both cities. In February of Fiscal Year 2010, the city of Parkland, Florida renegotiated and adopted a new five-year contract with the City of Coral Springs which began October 1, 2010.

Charges for services: (12.3% of total revenues)

$2,273,716

Charges for services, also known as user fees, are fees charged for a city service that are provided to an individual or group, not the community at large, such as training, inspections, and plan reviews. Charges for services revenue increased by $256,907 or 12.74%. Training tuition, including miscellaneous fees, increased by $167,607 or 20.4% due to an anticipated increase in student enrollment. This revenue is generated through firefighter training and certification programs offered at the Fire Training Academy to other cities and agencies in our area.

Fire Assessment rate schedule Adopted FY 2012

Adopted FY 2013

Adopted FY 2014

Single-Family

$128.77

$138.10

$141.36

$141.36

$0

Multi-Family

$143.94

$160.59

$174.89

$186.40

$11.51

6.6%

Commercial (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.)

$17.65

$17.61

$19.34

$19.98

$0.64

3.3%

Warehouse/Industrial (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.) Institutional/Governmental (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.)

$2.45 $22.33

$2.58 $22.95

$3.01 $23.05

$3.01 $21.47

$0 -$1.58

0% -6.7%

Property Use: Residential (per unit)

44

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

Adopted $ FY 2015 Change

% Change 0%


Revenue from fire inspection services and plan review fees both increased slightly. Fire inspections are mandated by the municipal code and the county for all commercial and multifamily properties in the City. A fee is levied on each dwelling based on classification of the structure. Other: $115,907 (0.6% of total revenues) Other revenue includes interest income and fines and forfeiture.

Fire AssessmentFire rateAssessment comparisonRate FiscalComparison Year 2015 Fiscal Year 2015 $350 $300

$304.90 $260.08

$250

$225.00 $209.00

$200

$169.50

$175.00

$166.00 $141.36

$150

$134.00

$100 $50 $0

Expenditures The Fire Fund expenditures increased by $146,810 or 0.8%, over the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. The increase is primarily attributable to operating expenditures, which were offset by decreases to operating capital. The graph below is a summary of the Fiscal Year 2015 Fire Fund expenditures by function. Major expenditures for the Fire Fund budget include: Suppression: (65.6% of total expenditures)

$12,135,531

The Fire Suppression Division responds to all fire calls and other emergency situations. The Suppression Division is comprised of Assistant Fire Chiefs, Battalion Chiefs, Captains, Rescue Lieutenants and Firefighter/Paramedics. These units not only provide fire service for the City of Coral Springs, but

also for the neighboring city of Parkland. This partnership has improved emergency response times and has benefitted both cities. The overall suppression budget has increased $173,584 or 1.45% from Fiscal Year 2014 primarily due to the redistribution of salary for employees and additional expenses related to uniforms and cleaning bunker gear. Rise in vehicle fuel, maintenance, and depreciation also contributed to this increase. Training: (7.6% of total expenditures)

$1,409,498

The Fire Training Division is responsible for the certification of fire and emergency rescue personnel. The Training Division budget increased $307,365 or 27.89% in Fiscal Year 2015. Two new positions were added to the training division. The new Fire Fund Total Expenditures - $18,491,718 Public Education Officer will deliver 20 ongoing educational programs to the community, Fire Fund total expendituresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$18,491,718 implement new programs for senior citizens, as well as raise public awareness through social Debt Service 2.6% media outlets. The new Training Officer will Training 7.6% organize training for all fire personnel. The Fire Academy started the accreditation process Inspection 7.4% which will enhance our ability to accept prepaid college funds, Federal financial aid and Interfund Transfer scholarships, along with having our courses 1.0% accredited for college credit transfers. Inspection: $1,374,349 (7.4% of total expenditures)

Non-Departmental 11.9%

Administration 2.9% Communication Services 1.0%

Suppression 65.6%

Fire Department personnel conduct annual inspections of every business and multi-unit dwelling in the City as a preventive measure to identify fire hazards. Fire Inspectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget increased $176,207 or 14.7% from Fiscal Year 2014. This is due primarily to the addition of a new fire inspector.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

45


Administration: (2.9% of total expenditures)

$534,268

Non-departmental: $2,203,706 (11.9% of total expenditures)

Fire’s Administration budget decreased $45,290 or 7.8%. This is due mainly to turnover. Communication Services: (1.0% of total expenditures)

$703,772

The Communication Services Division consists of telecommunicators and emergency call takers. The cost of communication and dispatch is split between the Fire Fund (23%) and EMS (77%) in the General Fund. Expenses in this area decreased $910 or 0.13% from Fiscal Year 2014.

Non-departmental expenses decreased by $610,099 or 21.68%. This decrease is due primarily to the completion of operating capital projects. The major Fiscal Year 2015 Fire non-departmental expenditures include the following: • $1,658,349 to cover indirect costs associated with various City departments • $100,000 dedicated to financial policy contingency and $102,367 to economic conditions • $24,560 for assessment collection costs • $31,700 for computer replacement • $68,000 to continue the fitness program • $218,730 for capital outlay Interfund transfer: (1.0% of total expenditures)

$192,002

The cost of property/casualty insurance premiums increased $10,663 or 5.88% from Fiscal Year 2014. Debt service: (2.6% of total expenditures)

$472,860

Debt service increased $90,000 or 23.5% due to future debt for the aerial truck.

Fire Fund revenue and expenditure summary Fire Fund FY 2011 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$9,319,912 5,135,476 1,898,874 62,661 70,545 13,034 0 $16,485,460

$9,904,003 5,323,341 1,980,275 49,843 6,526 7,938 0 $17,237,155

$10,356,868 5,413,774 2,016,809 77,000 54,000 26,457 400,000 $18,344,908

$10,566,521 5,535,573 2,273,716 55,000 55,020 5,888 0 $18,491,718

$209,653 $121,799 $256,907 ($22,000) $1,020 ($20,569) ($400,000) $146,810

2.0% 2.2% 12.7% -28.6% 1.9% -77.7% -100.0% 0.8%

$7,910,495 2,980,383 984,096 294,378 1,051,909 1,477,068 168,931 232,860 $15,230,201

$8,188,277 3,816,302 1,024,605 229,407 1,018,693 1,564,093 154,228 232,860 $16,228,465

$8,192,083 4,087,738 1,207,642 309,865 1,249,734 1,558,150 163,291 282,860 $17,051,362

$8,448,187 4,090,570 1,326,014 597,872 1,102,133 1,815,933 581,339 382,860 $18,344,908

$9,054,168 3,721,483 1,438,001 286,730 1,409,498 1,916,976 192,002 472,860 $18,491,718

$605,981 ($369,087) $111,987 ($311,142) $307,365 $101,043 ($389,337) $90,000 $146,810

7.2% -9.0% 8.4% -52.0% 27.9% 5.6% -67.0% 23.5% 0.8%

$488,358 103.84

$256,995 103.84

$185,793 107.84

$0 107.84

$0 109.98

Sources Revenues: Fire Fund Special Assessment Intergovernmental Revenue Charges for Services Misc. Revenue/Interest Income Fines and Forfeitures Partial Year Assessment Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues

$8,807,061 4,927,600 1,899,195 44,469 34,138 5,746 0 $15,718,559

Uses Expenditures: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Training Division Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service Total Expenditures Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

46

FY 2012 Actual

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 2.1

n/a 2.0%


Water and Sewer Fund Budget Summary

Revenues Operating Revenues Water Wastewater Private Fire Line Fee Meter Sales Backflow Recertification Adm. Fee Miscellaneous Income Charges for Service Total Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenues Interest Income - Operating Interest Earnings-Revenue Bond Series 2012 Doubtful Accounts Capitalization from Prior Year CIP Appropriated Fund Balance Total Non-Operating Revenue Grand - Total Revenues Expenses Departmental Administration Water Distribution Wastewater Collection Water Treatment Total Departmental Non-Operating Wastewater Treatment Capital Administrative Services Revenue and Collection Non-Departmental Transfer To Renewal and Replacement Business Development Property/Casualty Computer Replacement Debt Service Lease Purchase Financing 2013 (Phone System) Revenue Bond-Series 2010 Revenue Bond-Series 2012 ($8.7M/2.29%/20 years) Revenue Bond-Series 2014 ($4.7M/2.75%/20 years) SRF Loans Water Plant Imp DW0603010 ($5.4M/2.57%/20 years) Wells & wellheads DW0603020 ($1.8M/2.79%/20 years) Transm. Dist, Interconnect DW0603030 ($3M/2.79%/20 years) Source & Treatment DW061620 ($1.1M/3.06%/20 years) Lift Stations Rehab WW822020 Sewer Rehab WW06160 Forest Hills Wellfield DW061630 Subtotal Debt Service Total Non-Operating

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

$ Change From FY14 Budget

% Change From FY14 Budget

$8,173,072 12,251,457 24,141 12,360 18,180 11,330 186,945 20,677,485

$276,384 414,300 703 360 180 330 5,445 697,702

3.50% 3.50% 3.00% 3.00% 1.00% 3.00% 3.00% 3.49%

25,000 20,000 0 0 1,600,000 1,645,000

25,250 18,000 0 0 1,928,000 1,971,250

250 (2,000) 0 0 328,000 326,250

1.00% n/a n/a n/a 20.50% 19.83%

$19,588,774

$21,624,783

$22,648,735

$1,023,952

4.74%

537,639 870,944 1,103,487 2,337,571 4,849,641

529,226 810,121 1,033,771 2,445,240 4,818,357

680,029 1,019,999 1,235,259 2,813,892 5,749,179

881,622 1,068,823 1,231,394 2,917,928 6,099,767

201,593 48,824 (3,865) 104,036 350,588

29.64% 4.79% -0.31% 3.70% 6.10%

5,492,398 727,548 1,291,508 511,316 198,922 2,778,488 258,680 453,859 0

5,128,042 696,064 1,402,183 519,304 171,626 2,554,500 281,840 480,527 5,783

6,615,366 1,269,000 1,487,170 520,784 371,161 3,113,250 287,476 533,639 17,400

5,513,827 1,239,000 1,576,400 552,031 427,218 4,583,000 250,000 565,017 19,400

(1,101,539) (30,000) 89,230 31,247 56,057 1,469,750 (37,476) 31,378 2,000

-16.65% -2.36% 6.00% 6.00% 15.10% 47.21% -13.04% 5.88% 11.49%

0 2,717,842 0 0

50,000 0 579,192 0

50,000 0 580,376 175,028

0 0 1,184 175,028

n/a n/a 0.20% 100.00%

0 143,937 0 0 14,406 0 0

0 2,710,962 458,397 0 0 147,716 47,400 82,143 30,810 12,636 33,220 7,265

361,943 121,224 203,318 75,902 34,926 82,022 151,830

361,943 121,224 203,318 75,903 34,926 68,527 151,830

0 0 0 1 0 (13,495) 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

$2,876,185

$3,530,548

$1,660,357

$1,823,075

$162,718

9.80%

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$8,158,708 10,350,718 20,282 14,736 19,550 16,389 128,048 18,708,432

$8,410,260 10,666,161 20,942 13,120 17,325 4,918 215,780 19,348,507

$7,896,688 11,837,157 23,438 12,000 18,000 11,000 181,500 19,979,783

52,239 0 0 0 1,940,000 1,992,239

14,368 53,778 91,541 0 80,580 240,267

$20,700,671

14,588,904

14,770,417

15,875,604

16,548,968

673,364

4.24%

Grand Total - Expenses

$19,438,545

$19,588,774

$21,624,783

$22,648,735

$1,023,952

4.74%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

$1,262,126

($0)

($0)

$0

n/a

35.50

35.00

38.75

1.50

4.23%

Positions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0 40.25

47


Water and Sewer Fund Description The Water and Sewer Fund, as an enterprise fund, must be selfsupporting through user fees charged for services. The purpose of the Water and Sewer Fund is to provide clean water and to safely dispose of wastewater for customers living in the Coral Springs water district; which is the area between Wiles Road and Royal Palm Boulevard.

Water bill for average single-family residence 2014 2015 $ Increase % Increase Average Average (Decrease) (Decrease) Bill Bill Water Wastewater Total Monthly Bill

$21.13 $36.59 $57.72

$21.87 $37.88 $59.75

$0.74 $1.29 $2.03

3.5% 3.5% 3.5%

The Fiscal Year 2015 Water and Sewer Fund budget totals $22,648,735. This amount represents an increase of $1,023,952 or 4.7% from Fiscal Year 2014. This increase is primarily due to Note: Rates are calculated using an average consumption of 5,000 gallons interfund transfers to the Renewal and Replacement Fund to for a single family residence (including 10% utility tax on water). Rate continue funding capital improvements in order to maintain increase will be in effect October 1, 2014. the City’s water and sewer infrastructure. Water and Sewer Fund Total Revenues - $22,648,735

Revenues

Water and Sewer Fund total revenues —$22,648,735

A Water and Wastewater Rate Study completed in 2013 overhauled the rate structure and created a financial plan designated to accommodate increased operating expenses, charges from Broward County, debt service and funding of capital projects through Fiscal Year 2023. The study’s results recommended a 3.5% annual rate adjustment for Fiscal Year 2014-2018. The City Commission has approved the recommended 3.5% rate adjustment for Fiscal Year 2015. As illustrated in the table above, a typical single family residence in Coral Springs (consumption of 5,000 gallons per month) will notice an increase of $2.03 on the total water bill.

Other 1.3%

Water 36.1%

Reserves 8.5%

Wastewater 54.1%

Major revenues for the Water and Sewer Fund include: Water: (36.1% of total revenues)

$8,173,072

Revenue from the sale of water is estimated to increase by $276,384, or 3.5% compared to Fiscal Year 2014 budget. This increase is due to recommended 3.5% annual rate adjustment. Wastewater: (54.1% of total revenues) $12,251,457 The wastewater revenue consists of a base charge to the customer for sewage disposal and a volume-based charge based on the monthly water consumption. For Fiscal Year 2015, the rate to calculate the volumetric charge will be $3.69 per 1,000 gallons of water use. This represents a 3.5% annual rate adjustment. Appropriated fund balance (8.5% of total revenues) $1,928,000 This revenue is an allocation of surplus or fund balance designated to finance specific capital projects. Other (1.3% of total revenues)

$296,206

Other miscellaneous revenues include meter sales, private fire line fee, administrative fee for backflow certification, and interest income from fund balance.

48

Expenses The City has an aggressive plan to mitigate wastewater system inflow and infiltration problems, has acquired additional wastewater treatment reserve capacity, and has implemented measures to reduce operational costs. In Fiscal Year 2015 we will continue our efforts to control expenses and improve service to our customers. Major expenses in the Water and Sewer Fund include: Administration: $ 881,622 or 3.9% of total expenses Administration costs increased by $201,593 or 29.6% from the previous year’s budget. This increase is mainly due to the partial funding of three positions previously financed by the General Fund; Director of Financial Services, City Controller ,and Assistant City Attorney.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Water and Sewer Total Expenditures - $22,648,735 Water distribution: $1,068,823 or 4.7% of total expenses

Water and Sewer Fund total expenses â&#x20AC;&#x201D;$22,648,735 Wastewater Treatment 24.3%

The overall Water Distribution division is projected to increase by $48,824 or 4.79%. This increase is primarily due to increase in contractual services and materials needed for emergency repairs.

Non-Operating 43.3%

Wastewater treatment: $5,513,827 or 24% of total expenses Wastewater Collection 5.4%

Broward County Wastewater Treatment facility charges the City to process its wastewater. This expense is expected to decrease by ($1,101,539), or -16.65%, over Fiscal Year 2015 based on current run rates.

Administration 3.9% Water Distribution 4.7%

Wastewater Collection: $ 1,231,394 or 5.4% of total expenses

Water Treatment 12.9%

Capital 5.5%

The budget in this division decreased ($3,865) or -.31% Water Treatment: $ 2,917,928 or 12.9% of total expenses Water Treatment expenses increased $104,036 or 3.7%. The main drivers of this increase are higher operational costs such as electricity, supplies and compliance reporting. Capital outlay: $ 1,239,000 or 5.5% of total expenses Operating capital funds will be used to continue inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves, ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, replacement of portable generators, evaluations of sites, development of a transmission/ distribution system hydraulic model and relocation of City facilities in the Broward County right of way along the Wiles Road widening project corridor.

Non-operating: $ 9,796,141 or 43.3% of total expenses Non-operating expenses increase by $1,804,904 or 22.6% due to an increase in the transfer to the Renewal and Replacement Fund in order to continue the following capital projects: rehabilitation of booster stations, repairs to sanitary sewer lines in order to prevent ground water from entering into the sewer system, on-going repairs and replacement of spare pumps and the rehabilitation of lift stations. In addition, debt service of $175,028 has been budgeted for the anticipated Fiscal Year 2015 bank loan enabling the funding of CIP projects including rehabilitation, replacement and improvement to the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water and sewer infrastructure.

Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary Water & Sewer Sources Revenues: Water Wastewater Charges for Services Meter Sales Interest Income Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues Uses Expenses: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Debt Service Renewal and Replacement Insurance Other Non-Operating Total Expenses Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$8,167,917 $8,158,708 10,226,080 10,350,718 134,920 184,270 8,699 14,736 46,052 52,239 0 1,940,000 $18,989,685 $20,700,671

$8,410,260 10,666,161 254,047 13,120 44,248 200,937 $19,588,774

$7,896,688 11,837,157 233,938 12,000 45,000 1,600,000 $21,624,783

$8,173,072 12,251,457 240,596 12,360 43,250 1,928,000 $22,648,735

$276,384 $414,300 $6,658 $360 ($1,750) $328,000 $1,023,952

3.5% 3.5% 2.8% 3.0% -3.9% 20.5% 4.7%

$1,667,838 $1,783,057 741,669 828,300 7,668,231 7,717,410 344,251 740,823 2,946,610 2,876,185 578,717 2,778,488 497,125 453,859 2,042,831 2,260,423 $16,487,272 $19,438,545

$1,767,428 835,923 7,341,890 697,948 3,530,548 2,554,500 480,527 2,380,010 $19,588,774

$1,995,528 925,869 9,425,185 1,286,963 1,660,358 3,113,250 533,639 2,683,991 $21,624,783

$2,144,838 994,637 8,455,708 1,239,000 1,823,075 4,583,000 565,017 2,843,460 $22,648,735

$149,310 $68,768 ($969,477) ($47,963) $162,717 $1,469,750 $31,378 $159,469 $1,023,952

7.5% 7.4% -10.3% -3.7% 9.8% 47.2% 5.9% 5.9% 4.7%

$0 35

$0 38.75

$0 40.25

$2,502,413 35.5

FY 2012 Actual

$1,262,126 35.5

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 1.50

n/a 3.9%

49


Health Fund Budget Summary FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$9,109,253 510,225 1,492,446 21,696 216,961 11,350,581

$7,723,579 519,646 1,615,953 23,364 219,597 10,102,139

$9,308,330 555,212 1,545,141 21,493 214,921 11,645,097

$9,560,948 586,270 1,601,938 23,626 218,486 11,991,268

$252,618 31,058 56,797 2,133 3,565 346,171

2.71% 5.59% 3.68% 9.92% 1.66% 2.97%

30,032

12,249

45,000

35,000

(10,000)

-22.22%

565,281 38,159 497,021 144,288 1,244,749

632,420 23,172 518,810 243,528 $1,417,931

600,000 20,000 538,000 0 1,158,000

660,000 20,000 590,000 120,000 1,390,000

60,000 0 52,000 120,000 232,000

10.00% 0.00% 9.67% n/a 20.03%

$12,625,362 $11,532,319 $12,848,097

$13,416,268

$568,171

4.42%

12,577,537 144,500 126,060

13,124,718 160,350 131,200

547,181 15,850 5,140

4.35% 10.97% 4.08%

Total Expenses

$11,257,465 $11,474,688 $12,848,097

$13,416,268

$568,171

4.42%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

$1,367,897

$57,631

$0

$0

$0

n/a

1.25

1.25

1.25

1.50

0.25

20.00%

Revenues Transfers: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund General Insurance Fund Equipment Services Subtotal Transfers Interest Income Recoveries: Premium/Retirees Terminated/Cobra Employees W/Dependent Other/Pharmacy Rebate Subtotal Recoveries

Total Revenues Expenses Health-Dental Long Term Disability Life Insurance

Positions

10,991,335 144,500 121,630

11,192,892 154,951 126,845

10/2/2014 2:41 PM

50

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget


Health Fund Description The City provides insurance to employees in the areas of long-term disability, life insurance, and medical/dental insurance. The General, Water and Sewer, Fire, General Insurance, and Equipment Services funds are billed to cover premiums and claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance. Given the diversity of the Health Fund, the fund is categorized as health/dental, long-term disability, and life insurance to enhance accountability and budget control. The Fiscal Year 2015 Health Fund budget is $13,416,268. This represents an increase of $568,171 or 4.42% from the Fiscal Year 2014 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenses

Interfund transfers: (89.4% of total revenues)

$11,991,268

Group health/dental program: (97.8% of total expenses)

$13,124,718

Interfund transfers from the General Fund, Water and Sewer, Fire, General Insurance, and Equipment Services funds increased by $346,171 or 3%. This revenue consists of recovering administrative cost for services regarding health, dental, life, and long-term disability insurance. This fee is calculated annually based on the number of full-time employees assigned to each Department and Fund.

This represents health and dental insurance costs for the City, which is self-insured. This expense increased $547,181 or 4.4% from Fiscal Year 2014. This is due to expected higher cost for medical claims.

Recoveries: (10.4% of total revenues)

This represents the cost to cover long-term disability for full-time employees. This expense is projected to increase $15,850 or 11% over Fiscal Year 2014. This program has enabled the City to cap sick leave accruals at 480 hours per employee, while providing employees long-term disability coverage.

$1,390,000

Recoveries are premiums and other charges to employees, terminated employees, and retirees for the service of health insurance. Recoveries revenue increased by $232,000 or 20%. This increase is mainly due to budgeting $120,000 for pharmacy rebates, projecting a 10% increase in retireeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiums, and 9.7% increase in employeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution. Interest income: (0.3% of total revenues)

Long-term disability: (1.2% of total expenses)

$160,350

Life insurance: (1.0% of total expenses)

$131,200

The cost for life insurance for City employees is estimated to increase by $5,140 over Fiscal Year 2014.

$35,000

This type of income is an estimate of the interest earnings fund balance will generate during the fiscal year. Interest income for Fiscal Year 2015 is projected to decrease by 22%.

Health Health Fund Fund revenue and expense summary Sources Revenues: Interfund Transfers Recoveries Interest Income Total Revenues Uses Expenses: Health-Dental Long-Term Disability Life Insurance Total Expenses Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2013 Est. Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$9,735,428 $11,350,581 1,036,440 1,244,749 22,189 30,032 $10,794,057 $12,625,362

$10,102,139 1,417,931 12,249 $11,532,319

$11,645,097 1,158,000 45,000 $12,848,097

$11,991,268 1,390,000 35,000 $13,416,268

$346,171 $232,000 ($10,000) $568,171

3.0% 20.0% -22.2% 4.4%

$11,053,209 $10,991,335 155,379 144,500 120,517 121,630 $11,329,105 $11,257,465

$11,192,892 154,951 126,845 $11,474,688

$12,577,537 144,500 126,060 $12,848,097

$13,124,718 160,350 131,200 $13,416,268

$547,181 $15,850 $5,140 $568,171

4.4% 11.0% 4.1% 4.4%

$57,631 1.25

$0 1.25

$0 1.5

$0 0.25

n/a 20.0%

($535,048) 1.25

FY 2012 Actual

$1,367,897 1.25

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

51


General Insurance Fund Budget Summary FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$1,746,255 501,790 294,430 1,698 20,381 2,564,554

$1,847,892 529,995 317,122 1,806 21,282 2,718,097

37,980

14,810

81,672 29,953 39,445 151,070

65,427 22,601 50,029 138,057

$2,753,604

$2,870,964

1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004

1,460,707 1,506,702 52,588

Total Expenses

$2,983,077

$3,019,997

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

($229,473) ($149,033)

Revenues Transfers: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Health Fund Equipment Services Subtotal Transfers Interest Income Recoveries: Motor Vehicle Property Damage Workers' Comp Subtotal Recoveries Total Revenues Expenses Workers' Compensation Property/Motor Vehicle Liability Casualty/General Claims

Positions

1.50

1.50

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$2,177,938 $2,270,468 601,162 636,326 369,253 386,848 1,888 2,680 26,138 26,575 3,176,379 3,322,897

$92,530 35,164 17,595 792 437 146,518

4.25% 5.85% 4.76% 41.95% 1.67% 4.61%

50,000

25,000

(25,000)

-50.00%

50,000 25,000 10,000 85,000

50,000 25,000 10,000 85,000

0 0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$3,311,379 $3,432,897

$121,518

3.67%

1,481,400 1,820,097 131,400

32,000 89,118 400

2.21% 5.15% 0.31%

$3,311,379 $3,432,897

$121,518

3.67%

1,449,400 1,730,979 131,000

$0

$0

$0

n/a

1.50

1.50

0.00

0.00%

Prepared 10/2/2014 2:41 PM

52

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


General Insurance Fund Description The City is insured in the areas of general liability, property and auto liability, and workers’ compensation. The General, Water and Sewer, Health, Fire, and Equipment Services funds are billed to cover premiums, claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance in the General Insurance Fund. Given the diversity of the General Insurance Fund, the fund is categorized as workers’ compensation, property/motor vehicle liability, and casualty/general claims to enhance accountability and budget control. The Fiscal Year 2015 General Insurance Fund budget totals $3,432,897. This represents an increase of $121,518 or 3.67% from the Fiscal Year 2014 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenses

Interfund Transfers: (99.8% of total revenues)

$3,322,897

Workers’ compensation: (43.2% of total expenses)

Interfund transfer revenue consists of administrative fees charged to other funds for services related to workers’ compensation and property/casualty insurance. The fee for workers’ compensation is calculated proportionally using the number of full-time employees per fund. The annual cost of property/casualty is allocated among the General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund. The increase is primarily attributable to higher insurance premium costs in Fiscal Year 2015. Recoveries: (2.5% of total revenues)

$85,000

There is no change to projected recoveries revenue consisting of motor vehicle, property, and workers’ compensation recoveries. Interest Income: (0.7% of total revenues)

$1,481,400

Workers’ compensation claims are estimated to increase by $32,000 or 2.2%. Property/motor vehicle liability: (53.0% of total expenses)

$1,820,097

This represents a $89,118 or 5.2% increase for property/motor vehicle liability due mainly to rise in property insurance premium costs. Casualty/general claims: (3.8% of total expenses)

$131,400

Casualty/general claims will increase by 0.3% from Fiscal Year 2014 budget.

$25,000

Interest earnings from fund balance are projected to decreased from $50,000 to $25,000.

General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary General Insurance Fund Sources Revenues: Interfund Transfers Recoveries Interest Income Total Revenues

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Est. Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$2,700,573 300,794 32,794 $3,034,161

$2,564,554 151,070 37,980 $2,753,604

$2,718,097 138,057 14,810 $2,870,964

$3,176,379 85,000 50,000 $3,311,379

$3,322,897 85,000 25,000 $3,432,897

$146,518 $0 ($25,000) $121,518

4.6% 0.0% -50.0% 3.7%

Uses Expenses: Workers' Compensation Property/Motor Veh. Liability Casualty/General Claims Total Expenses

$859,672 1,585,318 74,845 $2,519,835

$1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004 $2,983,076

$1,460,707 1,506,702 52,588 $3,019,997

$1,449,400 1,730,979 131,000 $3,311,379

$1,481,400 1,820,097 131,400 $3,432,897

$32,000 $89,118 $400 $121,518

2.2% 5.1% 0.3% 3.7%

$514,326 1.5

($229,473) 1.5

($149,033) 1.5

$0 1.5

$0 1.5

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

53


Statement of Revenues and Expenditures Coral Springs Charter School FundFund Budget Summary Charter School FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

$ Change From FY14 Budget

% Change From FY14 Budget

Revenues Intergovernmental Other Revenue/ Miscellaneous Appropriation of Fund Balance

$10,274,572 101,787 0

$10,762,282 66,078 0

$10,777,632 103,934 1,026,784

$11,137,221 39,192 252,500

$359,590 (64,742) (774,284)

3.34% -62.29% -75.41%

Total Revenues

$10,376,359

$10,828,360

$11,908,350

$11,428,913

($479,437)

-4.03%

Expenditures Operating Expenses (CS USA) Transfer to General Fund-Lease Capital

$7,904,079 1,420,000 505,524

$9,772,729 1,420,000 49,850

$9,739,197 1,420,000 749,153

$9,876,413 1,420,000 132,500

$137,216 0 (616,653)

1.41% 0.00% -82.31%

Total Expenditures

$9,829,603

$11,242,579

$11,908,350

$11,428,913

($479,437)

-4.03%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

$546,756

($414,219)

$0

$0

($0)

n/a

Coral Springs Charter School Fund Description Charter Schools USA (CSUSA), a professional education management company, operates the school on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behalf. The Fiscal Year 2015 Charter School Fund budget is $11,428,913. This represents a decrease of $479,437, or 4.18% from the Fiscal Year 2014 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenditures

Intergovernmental: $11,137,221 (97.45% of total revenues)

Operating expenditures CSUSA: (86.4% of total expenditures)

This revenue represents funds received from Broward County for students attending the Coral Springs Charter School. Based on the updated calculation by the state for the new school year, revenues increased $359,590 or 3.3% from Fiscal Year 2014.

This represents the funds needed to operate the Coral Springs Charter School. Total operating expenses increased by $137,216 or 1.4%.

Other revenue: (0.34% of total revenues)

$39,192

A majority of this revenue represents funds received for interest income. Appropriation of fund balance: (2.21% of total revenues)

$252,500

A portion of the fund balance will be used to pay for capital items.

Transfer to General Fund: (12.4% of total expenditures)

$9,876,413

$1,420,000

This represents a lease expense to repay the General Fund for all school-related expenses necessary to operate the Charter School including telephone, electricity, cable/satellite, water and sewer, waste disposal, pest control, building, and equipment repairs and maintenance. There is no change from the current year. Capital: $132,500 (6.3% of total expenditures) The majority of capital expenditures will be used for furniture replacement, computer equipment, and air conditioning repairs.

54

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Statement of Revenues and Expenses Art Fund Public Art Fund BudgetPublic Summary 7/21/2014

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

Revenues Public Art Fees Realized/Unrealized Gain/Loss Interest Rents & Royalties Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues

$16,651 (2,578) 10,073 0 0 $24,146

$27,387 (4,912) 6,904 2,670 0 $32,049

$15,000 0 8,500 0 73,000 $96,500

$15,000 0 8,500 3,000 195,500 $222,000

$0 0 0 3,000 122,500 $125,500

0.00% n/a 0.00% n/a 167.81% 130.05%

Expenditures Operating Expenses Capital Total Expenditures

$11,222 65,140 $76,362

$121,591 0 $121,591

$76,500 20,000 $96,500

$132,000 90,000 $222,000

$55,500 70,000 $125,500

72.55% 350.00% 130.05%

($52,216)

($89,542)

$0

n/a

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

$0

$0

Public Art Fund Description The Public Art Fund is a special revenue fund utilized to account for the collection of Public Art fees, as well as operating expenditures to maintain all sculptures. No public tax money is used by this fund. Instead, Public Art Fees are fees charged to developers which are then used to purchase and maintain public art. The Fiscal Year 2015 budget for the Public Art Fund is $222,000, an increase of $125,500 or 130.05% from Fiscal Year 2014.

Revenues The only source of revenue for this fund is the Public Art fee receipts collected during the permitting process for new construction and renovations of existing structures. The fee only applies to structures in excess of 12,500 square feet, except residences on less than one acre. Revenues are collected only from those developers who choose not to purchase and maintain public art on their own property.

Expenditures The cost of selecting, purchasing, and maintaining public art are the main expenditures of the fund, along with consultants, materials, and supplies needed to support the Public Art Committee.

10/23/2014

12:49 PM

City of Coral Springs, Florida

55


Statement of Revenues and Expenses Services Fund Equipment ServicesEquipment Fund Budget Summary FY 2015 Adopted Budget

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

$2,464,836 204,211 328,349

$2,418,058 223,253 364,046

$2,538,942 234,414 382,246

$2,569,514 $237,237 $386,849

$30,572 2,823 4,603

1.20% 1.20% 1.20%

1,716,564 228,037 372,671

1,795,572 204,524 446,387

1,885,333 214,748 468,704

$1,979,600 $225,485 $492,139

94,267 10,737 23,435

5.00% 5.00% 5.00%

109,075 138,054

52,463 135,964

80,000 103,000

50,000 103,000

(30,000) 0

-37.50% 0.00%

84,088 3,495 2,839 5,652,219

179,168 3,431 0 5,822,866

90,000 5,000 0 6,002,387

45,000 3,500 0 6,092,324

(45,000) (1,500) 0 89,937

-50.00% -30.00% n/a 1.50%

3,213,989 1,900,449 5,114,438

0 2,024,740 2,024,740

173,475 3,274,110 3,447,585

258,509 4,711,900 4,970,409

85,034 1,437,790 1,522,824

49.02% 43.91% 44.17%

$10,766,657

$7,847,606

$9,449,972

$1,612,761

17.07%

Expenses Operating Expenses Personal Benefits Other Expenses Charge Back Expense Total Operating Expenses

$731,638 347,366 2,097,296 2,317,272 5,493,572

$767,561 354,659 2,157,239 2,446,483 5,725,942

$809,750 359,874 2,263,978 2,568,785 6,002,387

$829,384 370,394 2,156,831 2,697,224 6,053,833

$19,634 10,520 (107,147) 128,439 51,446

2.42% 2.92% -4.73% 5.00% 0.86%

Non-Operating Expenses Transfer to Capital Fund Equipment Purchases Total Non-Operating Expenses

3,213,989 1,900,449 5,114,438

0 2,024,740 2,024,740

173,475 3,274,110 3,447,585

297,000 4,711,900 5,008,900

123,525 1,437,790 1,561,315

71.21% 43.91% 45.29%

$10,608,010

$7,750,682

$9,449,972

$1,612,761

17.07%

$158,647

$96,924

$0

$0

$0

n/a

15.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

0

0.0%

Revenues Operating Revenues Fuel and Maintenance Transfers General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Vehicle Charge Back Transfers General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Miscellaneous Revenues Interest Income Auction Charges for Fleet Services City of Parkland City of Margate City of Coconut Creek Total Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenues Appropriations from Fund Balance Financial Strategy Equipment Purchases Total Non-Operating Revenue Grand Total Revenues

Grand Total Expenses Revenues in Excess of Expenses Positions

56

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$11,062,733

$11,062,733


Equipment Services Fund Description The Equipment Services Fund is an internal service fund used to account for the purchase, operation, and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and other major equipment; such as mowers and emergency generators. The City’s fleet inventory includes emergency vehicles (patrol units, rescues, fire trucks), buses for recreation, trucks for Building, Code Compliance, and fire inspections, as well as vehicles for maintenance of streets and parks, and generators. In addition, other small equipment such as workmans, mowers, ballpros, tillers, paint machines, pressure cleaners, trailers, etc. are essential to maintain tennis and basketball courts, city buildings and sport fields in optimal condition. The Fiscal Year 2015 Equipment Services Fund adopted budget totals $11,062,733. This represents an increase of $1,612,761 or 17.1% from Fiscal Year 2014. As a self-sustaining fund, the Equipment Services Fund provides maintenance services to all applicable departments in the City on a cost reimbursement basis. Cost recovery is performed for depreciation, also known as chargeback, fuel, maintenance, and operating expenses. These expenses are budgeted and paid for by the Equipment Services Fund; therefore, monthly interfund transfers are processed to reimburse this fund. For example, depreciation or chargeback, is an operating expense to gradually pay for the use of all equipment assigned to each department. The amount of annual chargeback is calculated for each piece of equipment using a simple formula that takes the cost of the item divided by the expected life (i.e., straight-line depreciation). The result is the amount to allocate to the user department annually for the number of years the item will be in service (refer to interfund transfers for allocation by fund). Budgeting depreciation for capital assets allows the City to “pay-as-you-go” finance its vehicles, therefore avoiding debt. As illustrated on the “Ten-year fleet replacement cost” table, the average annual vehicle replacement cost for Fiscal Year 2015 through Fiscal Year 2025 is estimated to be $4.4 million.

Revenues

For Fiscal Year 2015, Interfund transfers into the Equipment Services Fund are allocated as follow:

Major revenues in the Equipment Services Fund include: Interfund transfers: (53.2% of total revenues)

• Chargeback: General Fund: $1,979,600; Fire Fund: $492,139; Water and Sewer Fund: $225,485.

$ 5,890,824

Departments are charged an annual administrative fee plus a proportional fuel, maintenance, and replacement cost of their assigned vehicles and their share to operate the Fleet division. Overall revenues increased by 17.07% from Fiscal Year 2014. This is mainly due to an increase in vehicle’s cost. This additional expense is passed through to all departments proportionally, according with each department’s inventory and fleet replacement cost.

• Fuel and maintenance transfers: General Fund: $2,569,514; Fire Fund $386,849; Water and Sewer Fund $237,237. Approp Fund Balance: (44.9% of total revenues) $4,970,409 This revenue appropriation consists of $258,509 allocated for capital enhancements and $4,711,900 for replacement of vehicles and equipment.

Ten-year fleet replacement cost $7.0 $6.0

$6.2

$5.0

$5.5 $4.0

Millions

$4.7 $3.0

$4.1

$4.2 $3.7

$3.8

$4.1

$4.3

$4.4 $3.7

$2.0 $1.0 $0.0

City of Coral Springs, Florida

57


Miscellaneous income: (1.8% of total revenues)

Other operating expenses: (7.6% of total expenses)

$ 201,500

This source of revenue includes: • Return of investment or interest earnings on fund balance during the fiscal year. The projected interest for Fiscal Year 2015 is budgeted at $50,000. A decrease of $30,000 or 37.5% from the previous year’s budget. • Auction of vehicles is estimated at $103,000. This amount remains the same as the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. • Charges for fleet services to neighboring cities are projected at $48,500. This amount represents a 48.9% decrease from the Fiscal Year 2014 budget and includes maintenance of Fire vehicles for the City of Parkland and motorcycles for the City of Margate.

Other expenses include automotive parts, replacement tires for vehicles, chemicals, supplies, hand tools, vehicle warranties, costs to refurbish small equipment, etc. This budget represents a decrease of $11,082 or 6.35% from Fiscal Year 2014 budget. Equipment purchases: (42.6% of total expenses) $4,711,900 This represents an increase of $1,437,790 or 43.91% from the previous year. The increase is due to planning for the replacement of 102 fleet items in Fiscal Year 2015 (compared to 92 in Fiscal Year 2012) including high replacement value items such as a Fire truck ($950,000) and two EMS transport vehicles ($420,000) as well as the purchase of an additional Cab and Chassis truck for the Streets division($49,500).

Expenses Major expenses include: Personal and benefits: (10.8% of total expenses)

$1,199,778

This represents a increase of $30,154 or 2.58% from Fiscal Year 2014. Chargeback expense: (24.4% of total expenses) $2,697,224 The chargeback expense will increase by 5% or $128,439 from the previous year’s budget. Gasoline: (11.3% of total expenses)

$1,250,000

Fuel expenses are expected to decrease by $119,782 or 8.74% compared to the previous year’s budget.

Equipment Services Fund revenue and expense summary FY 2011 FY 2012 Sources Actual Actual Revenues: Interfund Transfers $5,105,042 $5,314,668 Parkland Maintenance Fee 125,267 84,088 Margate Maintenance Fee 2,574 3,495 Interest 116,107 109,075 Other 65,300 138,054 Approp Fund Balance (Fin. Strategy) 2,000,000 3,213,989 Approp Fund Balance (Eqt Purchases 1,822,033 1,900,449 Total Revenues $9,238,775 $10,766,657

FY 2013 Est. Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$5,451,840 179,168 3,431 52,463 135,964 0 2,024,740 $7,847,606

$5,724,387 90,000 5,000 80,000 103,000 173,475 3,274,110 $9,449,972

$5,890,824 45,000 3,500 50,000 103,000 258,509 4,711,900 $11,062,733

$166,437 ($45,000) ($1,500) ($30,000) $0 $85,034 $1,437,790 $1,612,761

2.9% -50.0% -30.0% -37.5% 0.0% 49.0% 43.9% 17.1%

Uses Expenses: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Vehicle Chargeback Interfund Transfers Equipment Purchases Total Expenses

$767,561 354,659 2,157,239 2,446,483 0 2,024,740 $7,750,682

$809,750 359,874 2,263,978 2,568,785 173,475 3,274,110 $9,449,972

$829,384 370,394 2,156,831 2,697,224 297,000 4,711,900 $11,062,733

$19,634 $10,520 ($107,147) $128,439 $123,525 $1,437,790 $1,612,761

2.4% 2.9% -4.7% 5.0% 71.2% 43.9% 17.1%

$96,924 15

$0 15

$0 15

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

58

$701,322 $731,637 312,084 347,366 1,982,794 2,097,297 2,249,779 2,317,272 2,000,000 3,213,989 1,822,033 1,900,449 $9,068,012 $10,608,010 $170,763 15

$158,647 15

$836,353

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%


Pension Allocation Summary FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Adjusted Budget

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

Revenues Transfers: General Fund Fire Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Health Fund General Insurance Fund

$13,621,210 1,604,199 136,711 54,462 9,906 8,051

$11,860,518 1,748,523 134,625 56,256 9,851 7,873

$11,670,915 1,743,542 149,652 56,636 10,233 7,769

$11,347,084 1,293,980 172,285 61,732 14,765 8,352

($323,831) (449,562) 22,633 5,096 4,532 583

-2.77% -25.78% 15.12% 9.00% 44.29% 7.50%

Total Revenues

$15,434,539

$13,817,646

$13,638,747

$12,898,198

($740,549)

-5.43%

Expenses Police Pension Sworn EMS/Fire Pension Certified Fire-Volunteers ICMA(401)a - General Employees ICMA(401)a - Management General Employees Pension City Commission Pension

$10,503,449 2,513,786 0 1,399,255 499,817 500,003 18,229

$8,700,000 2,700,000 0 1,402,310 510,536 500,000 4,800

$8,500,000 2,600,000 0 1,499,254 505,693 529,000 4,800

$8,275,000 2,000,000 0 1,545,620 543,778 529,000 4,800

($225,000) (600,000) 0 46,366 38,085 0 0

-2.65% -23.08% #DIV/0! 3.09% 7.53% 0.00% 0.00%

Total Expenses

$15,434,539

$13,817,646

$13,638,747

$12,898,198

($740,549)

-5.43%

$0

$0

$0

$0

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0

n/a

The Pension allocation consists of the accumulation of resources to be used for benefit payments to retired City employees. The Fiscal Year 2015 budgeted allocation for pension is $12,898,198. This represents a decrease of $740,549 or 5.43% reduction from the Fiscal Year 2014 budget.

Revenues The $12,898,198 Pension budget has been allocated as follows: • $11,347,084 transfer from General Fund

Employee (ICMA) expense: (12% of total expenses)

• $1,293,980 transfer from Fire Fund • $172,285 transfer from Water and Sewer Fund • $61,732 transfer from Equipment Services Fund • $14,765 transfer from Health Fund

Expenses $8,275,000

This represents a $225,000, or 2.7%, decrease from Fiscal Year 2014 budget. Pension reform and change in methodology is major cause for decrease. Since this is a defined benefit plan, it is necessary to maintain the appropriate funding levels for the pension’s obligation as determined by an actuary. EMS/Fire pension expense: (15.5% of total expenses)

$2,000,000

This defined benefit plan was established in 2005 for firefighters and paramedics. This represents a decrease of

$1,545,620

This represents a $46,366 or 3.1% increase from Fiscal Year 2014. This is a defined contribution plan available to full-time general employees. Management (ICMA) expense: (4.2% of total expenses)

• $8,352 transfer from General Insurance Fund

Police pension expense: (64.2% of total expenses)

$600,000 or 23.1%. As a defined benefit plan, it is required to maintain the appropriate funding level for the pension’s obligation as determined by an actuary.

$543,778

This represents a $38,085 or 7.5% increase from Fiscal Year 2014. This is a defined contribution plan, based on salary, available to managers and supervisors. General employee pension expense: (4.1% of total expenses)

$529,000

This is a single-employer defined benefit plan that was established in 1973 and was closed to new participants in 1988. This expense will remain the same in Fiscal Year 2015. City Commission pension expense: (0.03% of total expenses)

$4,800

No change to the City Commission pension plan from Fiscal Year 2015. This is a former Commission closed pension plan with only one remaining participant.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

59


Solid Waste Fund Budget Summary FY 2012 Actual

FY 2015 Adopted Budget

FY 2014 Adopted Budget

FY 2013 Actual

$ % Change From Change From FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

Revenues Solid Waste Non Franchise

$0

$0

$3,827,185

$3,972,005

144,820

3.78%

Appropriated Fund Balance

$0

$0

$0

185,004

185,004

n/a

Total Revenues

$0

$0

$3,827,185

$4,157,009

$329,824

8.62%

$0

$0

$3,106,900

$4,121,009

$1,014,109

32.64%

0

0

720,285

36,000

(684,285)

-95.00%

Total Expenses

$0

$0

$3,827,185

$4,157,009

$329,824

8.62%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

n/a

Expenses Operating Expenses Interfund Transfer (to Capital)

Solid Waste Fund Description The Solid Waste Fund was established as an enterprise fund in Fiscal Year 2014. This fund includes the non-franchise portion of the City’s residential solid waste special assessment which covers the cost of collecting and disposing of solid waste and recycling. In the first year of this fund, Fiscal Year 2014, only nine months’ of expenditures were included, to coincide with the start of the Waste Pro contract on January 1, 2014. At this time, the City began paying for solid waste collection and disposal separately. Fiscal Year 2015 will be the first year to record a complete 12 months’ of revenues and expenditures in this fund. The Fiscal Year 2015 Solid Waste Fund budget totals $4,157,009 which is an increase of $329,824 or 8.62% from Fiscal Year 2014.

Revenues Solid Waste Non-Franchise: (96% of total revenues)

Expenses $3,972,005

The solid waste non-franchise revenue is collected as part of the City’s residential non-ad valorem special assessment on residents’ tax bill and a portion is distributed to the Solid Waste Fund to cover the cost of collection and disposal fees. Appropriated Fund Balance: (4% of total revenues)

$185,004

A contingency has been set aside to cover additional costs, as more expenience is needed to accurately budget for disposal costs.

60

Operating Expenses: (99% of total expenses)

$4,121,009

This represents the cost for the waste hauler contract with Waste Pro and the waste disposal contracts with Sun Bergeron and Wheelabrator. Interfund Transfer: (1% of total expenses)

$36,000

These funds will initiate the design of a capital project for improvements at the Waste Transfer Station.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Statement of Revenue and Expenditures Debt Service Fund Budget Summary Debt Service Fund

$0.2038 FY 2015

$

%

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014

Adopted

Change from Change from

Actual

Actual

Budget

Budget

FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

Revenues Ad Valorem Taxes

$2,065,981

$2,081,501

$1,497,097

$1,574,394

$77,297

5.16%

2,347,076

3,596,864

3,695,694

4,684,631

988,937

26.76%

Transfer from General Fund

232,860

282,860

382,860

472,860

90,000

23.51%

Transfer from Water & Sewer Fund

0

50,000

50,000

50,000

0

0.00%

Transfer from Capital Projects

0

100,000

0

0

0

1,250,000

1,700,000

800,000

0

Proceeds of Refund Bond

0

14,302,475

0

0

0

n/a

Lease Principal Contribution

0

78,170

0

0

0

n/a

Interest Rebate-Revenue Bond Series 2010

135,437

129,940

0

0

0

n/a

Other

(13,243)

(10,833)

0

0

0

n/a

49,886 $6,067,997

16,981 $22,327,958

9,517 $6,435,168

3,150 $6,785,035

(6,367) 349,867

-66.90% 5.44%

Transfer from Fire Fund

Appropriated Fund Balance

Interest Income*

Total Revenues

(800,000)

n/a -100.00%

*Interest income fluctuates yearly based on how much cash is reserved, including the 10% debt commitment.

Expenditures General Obligation Bond-2003A(Refunding)

$355,400

$355,350

$0

$0

$0

n/a

General Obligation Bond-2005A (Refunding)

601,138

607,150

$617,438

606,156

(11,282)

-1.83%

General Obligation Bond-2005B (Refunding)

525,704

531,354

534,004

530,516

(3,488)

-0.65%

General Obligation Bond-2013 - (Refunding) Public Safety*

551,438

551,438

345,582

437,721

92,139

26.66%

1,250

1,250

1,249

1,750

501

40.11%

2,034,929

2,046,542

1,498,273

1,576,144

77,871

5.20%

Franchise Revenue Bond-2004 (Refunding in 2014)

1,758,556

1,758,244

1,760,019

1,666,830

(93,189)

-5.29%

Capital Revenue Bond-2008

1,665,863

1,665,963

1,669,663

1,676,788

7,125

0.43%

540,955

535,458

411,857

405,517

(6,340)

-1.54%

Lease Purchase Financing 2013***

0

278,170

473,756

473,756

0

0.00%

Capital Revenue Note 2013

0

14,195

519,600

519,600

0

0.00%

Municipal Complex Loan 2014

0

0

0

275,000

275,000

n/a

Advance Refunding Escrow

0

14,339,237

0

0

0

n/a

3,965,374

18,591,267

4,834,895

5,017,491

182,596

3.78%

90.00%

General Obligation Bond-Other

Total General Obligation Bond

Capital Improvement Revenue Bond Series 2010**

Total Revenue Bonds Other Future Debt for Fire Aerial Truck

0

0

100,000

190,000

90,000

Interfund Transfer Budget Amendment

0

1,700,000

0

0

0

n/a

1,400

1,400

2,000

1,400

(600)

-30.00%

1,400

1,701,400

102,000

191,400

89,400

87.65%

$6,001,703

$22,339,209

$6,435,168

$6,785,035

349,867

5.44%

$66,294

($11,251)

$0

$0

$0

n/a

Issuance Costs

Total Other Total Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures *General Obligation Bond 2006 refunding in FY 2013

**Capital Improvement Revenue Bond Series 2010 (aka Build America Bond) issued in December 2010 ***Lease Purchase Financing was initiated in June 2013 for phone system

City of Coral Springs, Florida

61


Debt Service Fund Description The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the repayment of voter-approved long-term general obligation debt, as well as other long-term financing utilized by the City, including but not limited to franchise revenue bonds, capital revenue bonds and notes, lease purchase financing and bank loans. Ad valorem taxes are used to pay debt service on general obligation bonds; debt service obligation on all other financing is allocated to various City funds. The Fiscal Year 2015 Debt Service Fund budget is $6,785,035. This represents an increase of $349,867 or 5.4%- from the Fiscal Debt Service Fund Revenues $6,785,035 Year 2014 budget primarily due to the estimated debt service on a new 2014 Capital Improvement Loan.

Revenues

Debt Service Fund revenues - $6,785,035 Other 0.8%

Revenue sources for the Debt Service Fund Fiscal Year 2015 budget include: Ad valorem taxes: (23.2% of total revenues)

$1,574,394

Ad valorem taxes represent a levy of $0.2038 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value on real and personal property. This debt service millage rate is calculated separately from the operating millage rate and covers the debt service on the City’s general obligation bonds (voted debt). There is no legal debt millage limit established by the state of Florida for municipalities, counties, or independent taxing districts. The City, however, complies with its self-imposed debt policy of limiting its General Fund debt to no more than 12.5% of the total General Fund budget and limiting total outstanding debt to 5% of the City’s total taxable assessed value. For more information, refer to ”Debt Management Policies” in this section of the budget document. Transfers from Other Funds: General Fund Transfer: (69.0% of total revenues) Fire Fund Transfer: (7.0% of total revenues) Water and Sewer Fund Transfer: (0.7% of total revenues)

$4,684,631 $472,860 $50,000

The transfers from these funds are the debt service payments for which each fund bears responsibility for the non-voted outstanding debt, including franchise and capital revenue bonds, a recovery zone bond, and lease purchase financing.

Ad Valorem Taxes 23.2% Fire Fund 7.0%

General Fund 69.0%

Expenditures The debt issues and their projected Fiscal Year 2015 total debt service payments consist of: General Obligation (GO) Bonds: (23.2% of total expenditures)

$1,576,144

• GO Refunding Bond Series 2005A, $4,705,000 This bond was issued July 6, 2005 and matured October 1, 2014. The final debt service payment, due on the first day of Fiscal Year 2015, was $606,156. • GO Refunding Bond Series 2005B, $5,855,000 This bond was issued July 6, 2005 and matures October 1, 2018. The debt service due in Fiscal Year 2015 is a total of $530,516 for principal and interest, which leaves an outstanding balance at year-end of $1,980,000. This bond refunded the GO Series 1998C&D which was originally issued to fund North Community Park and Mullins Gymnasium. • GO Refunding Bond Series 2013, $14,302,475 This bond was issued April 25, 2013 and matures October 1, 2027. Debt service for the year is $437,721 and the outstanding balance will be $14,118,768. Refunding at a 2.18% interest rate, replacing the original 4.2% rate, this bond was originally issued in 2006 to fund the Mullins Master Plan project, which provided additional Public Safety Building space, a new fire station, and parking and access improvements to Mullins Park.

62

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Debt Service Fund Expenditures - $6,785,035 Revenue Bonds, Other Debt: (73.9% of total expenditures)

Debt Service Fund expenditures - $6,785,035

$5,017,491

• Franchise Revenue Bond Series 2014, $9,441,272 To reduce interest costs, the 2004 Franchise Bonds were refunded at a new rate of 1.7%, issued June 3, 2014 to mature September 1, 2020. The 2004 Franchise Revenue bond had previouslyrefunded the 1994, 1996, 1998 and 1999 Series. These bonds were issued to fund various Public Works projects, parks projects, as well as other major projects and infrastructure improvements. Debt service is $1,666,830, and the outstanding balance is $7,934,944.

Other 2.9%

General Obligation Bond 23.2%

• Capital Revenue Bond Series 2008, $16,830,000 Issued August 14, 2008 for the purpose of refunding two capital revenue bonds from the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission, (FIFC 2001A and FIFC 2002B), matures September 1, 2021. Debt service for Fiscal Year 2015 is $1,676,788, and the outstanding balance is $8,780,000. • Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond Series 2010, $5,913,000 As part of the 2009 Federal stimulus package (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), the City issued taxable Recovery Zone Economic Development (RZED) bonds, receiving a rebate from the IRS of 45% of the taxable interest paid. Issued December 14, 2010 with a maturity date of April 1, 2030, the City used the proceeds of the bonds to fund downtown improvements. Debt service net of the expected rebate is $405,517 and the outstanding balance is $4,912,001. • Capital Revenue Note 2013, $4,679,582 Issued July 5, 2013 to mature September 1, 2023, this low interest rate debt (1.95%) funded various capital improvements detailed in the Fiscal Year 2013 Capital Improvement Plan. Debt service is $519,600, and the outstanding balance is $3,814,533. • Lease/Purchase Financing 2013, $2,511,998 A critical technology and infrastructure upgrade was

Revenue Bond 73.9%

funded with a lease/purchase agreement dated June 20, 2013 with a maturity date of December 1, 2017. Debt service for Fiscal Year 2015 is $473,756, and the outstanding balance is $1,354,439. • Municipal Complex Loan 2014, $10,043,000 Funding sufficient to meet the near-term cash flow needs of the municipal complex project was obtained on September 10, 2014 with a maturity date of September 1, 2024. Debt service, consisting of interest only, is budgeted at $275,000 for Fiscal Year 2015. With no principal payments planned until Fiscal Year 2021, the outstanding balance will remain at $10,043,000. Other: $191,400 (2.9% of total expenditures) This is primarily for future debt to purchase an aerial truck for the Fire Department. The following page offers a consolidated debt repayment schedule for the General Obligation Bonds as well as the Revenue Bonds and other debt issuances. For more indepth information regarding the City’s debt, refer to Debt Management on the following pages of this document.

Allocation of Debt Service for Revenue Bonds and Other Debt* for Fiscal Year 2015 Franchise Revenue Bond 2014 General Fund Fire Fund

Capital Revenue Bond 2008

$1,533,970 $1,576,788 $132,860

Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond 2010

$405,517

Capital Revenue Note 2013

$519,600

Lease/ Purchase Financing 2013

$373,756

$100,000

Water & Sewer Fund Total

$1,666,830 $1,676,788

$405,517

$519,600

Municipal Complex Loan 2014

$275,000

Allocations by Fund (Principal & Interest)

$4,684,631

$50,000

$282,860

$50,000

$50,000

$473,756

$275,000

$5,017,491

* Debt Payments on General Obligation Bonds are directly funded by ad valorem taxes.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

63


Debt Service Schedule GO

GO

GO

Fiscal

Refunding

Refunding

Refunding

Year

Series 2005A

Series 2005B

Series 2013

Par Value T.I.C.

2014

2015

2016

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

2031

3.2984%

3.5803%

$14,302,475

430,000.00 96,478.76

55,176.00 290,406.27

DS EB

607,375.00 595,000.00

526,478.76 2,430,000.00

345,582.27 14,247,299.00

P I

595,000.00 11,156.25

450,000.00 80,516.26

128,531.00 309,190.13

DS EB

606,156.25 0.00

530,516.26 1,980,000.00

437,721.13 14,118,768.00

470,000.00 63,736.26

701,333.00 300,144.61

533,736.26 1,510,000.00

1,001,477.61 13,417,435.00

485,000.00 46,603.13

713,822.00 284,719.42

531,603.13 1,025,000.00

998,541.42 12,703,613.00

P I

P I

P I

500,000.00 28,750.00

730,783.00 268,973.23

DS EB

528,750.00 525,000.00

999,756.23 11,972,830.00

P I

525,000.00 9,843.75

742,114.00 252,918.65

DS EB

534,843.75 0.00

995,032.65 11,230,716.00

Loan 2014

OTHER DEBT TOTAL

$5,913,000

$4,679,582

$2,511,998

$10,043,000

$49,418,852

2.7995%

1.9502%

2.4474%

2.4700%

                       ‐             1,225,000             253,608            428,348             39,233.73          444,662.50        151,909.72         91,251.84

             449,307            24,449.64

Franchise

Capital

Capital

Capital

Lease/Pur.

Municipal

Revenue

Revenue

Revenue

Revenue

Agreement

Complex

Series 2014

Series 2008

(RZED) 2010

2013

$9,441,272

$24,862,475

2.1800%

575,000.00 32,375.00

DS EB

2018

$5,855,000

P I

DS EB

2017

$4,705,000

GO TOTAL

1.7002%

$16,830,000 3.8856%

Note 2013

           2,356,263          751,507.43

1,479,436.03            39,233.73       1,669,662.50        405,517.72      519,599.84          473,756.38 $9,441,272          10,055,000          5,172,708         4,251,234            1,784,521              10,043,000

$17,272,299

1,173,531.00       1,506,328.00             1,275,000             260,707            436,701 400,862.64           160,501.62          401,787.50        144,809.96         82,899.06 1,574,393.64

$16,098,768

$3,107,770.17 $   4,587,206          40,747,735

             430,083                            ‐             3,908,819            43,673.82              241,860.55       1,075,532.51

1,666,829.62      1,676,787.50        405,516.96      519,600.06          473,756.39             241,860.55       4,984,351.08 $   6,558,745 $7,934,944             8,780,000          4,912,001         3,814,533            1,354,439              10,043,000 $36,838,917

1,171,333.00       1,532,236.00             1,325,000             268,006            445,216 363,880.87           134,894.04          357,162.50        137,511.48         74,383.40 1,535,213.87        1,667,130.04

$14,927,435

     1,682,162.50        405,517.48

             440,608                            ‐             4,011,066            33,148.11              248,062.10          985,161.63

    519,599.40          473,756.39

           248,062.10

$6,402,708            7,455,000          4,643,995         3,369,317               913,830              10,043,000

1,198,822.00       1,561,834.00             1,375,000             275,509            453,898 331,322.55           108,846.04          304,162.50        130,008.64         65,701.68

     4,996,227.91          32,827,850

1,230,783.00       1,585,010.00             1,430,000             283,222            462,749 297,723.23             82,294.86          249,162.50        122,295.76         56,850.68

     1,679,162.50        405,517.76      519,599.68          473,756.39             248,062.10 $3,255,864             4,650,000          4,085,264         2,452,670                        ‐              10,043,000

     4,993,403.29          24,486,798

1,267,114.00       1,614,862.00             1,490,000             291,150            471,773 262,762.40             55,349.68          191,962.50        114,366.96         47,827.06

                          ‐             3,867,785              248,062.10          657,568.30

1,529,876.40       1,670,211.68

$1,641,002            3,160,000          3,794,114         1,980,897

           248,062.10       4,525,353.30              10,043,000          20,619,013

     1,681,962.50        405,516.96

    519,600.06

P I

1,302,892.00 230,628.08

1,302,892.00       1,641,002.00             1,550,000             299,301            480,972 230,628.08             27,897.04          132,362.50        106,216.22         38,627.50

                          ‐             3,971,275              248,062.10          553,165.36

DS EB

1,533,520.08 9,927,824.00

1,533,520.08       1,668,899.04       1,682,362.50        405,517.22      519,599.50 $9,927,824 $0             1,610,000          3,494,813         1,499,925

           248,062.10              10,043,000

P I

1,328,096.00 201,950.32

1,328,096.00 201,950.32

           1,610,000             307,680            490,351             68,425.00          97,837.28         29,248.54

              1,051,000             3,459,031              248,062.10          443,572.92

DS EB

1,530,046.32 8,599,728.00

1,530,046.32

$8,599,728

     1,678,425.00        405,517.28      519,599.54                        ‐          3,187,133         1,009,574

        1,299,062.10       3,902,603.92                8,992,000          13,188,707

P I

1,357,048.00 172,682.25

1,357,048.00 172,682.25

           316,294            499,913          89,223.78         19,686.70

              2,755,000             3,571,207              222,102.40          331,012.88

DS EB

1,529,730.25 7,242,680.00

1,529,730.25

$7,242,680

      405,517.78          2,870,839

    519,599.70            509,661

        2,977,102.40       3,902,219.88                6,237,000             9,617,500

P I

1,389,632.00 142,743.43

1,389,632.00 142,743.43

           325,148          80,369.14

          509,661           9,938.38

              2,824,000             3,658,809              154,053.90          244,361.42

DS EB

1,532,375.43 5,853,048.00

1,532,375.43

$5,853,048

      405,517.14      519,599.38          2,545,691                     ‐

        2,978,053.90       3,903,170.42                3,413,000             5,958,691

P I

1,415,726.00 112,165.03

1,415,726.00 112,165.03

           334,251          71,266.62

              3,413,000             3,747,251                84,301.10          155,567.72

DS EB

1,527,891.03 4,437,322.00

1,527,891.03

$4,437,322

      405,517.62          2,211,440

        3,497,301.10       3,902,818.72                            ‐             2,211,440

P I

1,450,388.00 80,924.39

1,450,388.00 80,924.39

           343,608          61,909.26

              343,608             61,909.26

DS EB

1,531,312.39 2,986,934.00

1,531,312.39

$2,986,934

      405,517.26          1,867,832

        405,517.26             1,867,832

P I

1,479,744.00 48,985.95

1,479,744.00 48,985.95

           353,228          52,289.94

              353,228             52,289.94

DS EB

1,528,729.95 1,507,190.00

1,528,729.95

      405,517.94          1,514,604

        405,517.94             1,514,604

$1,507,190

     4,524,440.36          16,647,738

P I

1,507,190.00 16,428.37

1,507,190.00 16,428.37

           363,116          42,401.34

              363,116             42,401.34

DS EB

1,523,618.37 0.00

1,523,618.37

      405,517.34          1,151,488

        405,517.34             1,151,488

P I

           373,282          32,235.90

              373,282             32,235.90

DS EB

      405,517.90             778,206

        405,517.90                778,206

P I

           383,732          21,785.88

              383,732             21,785.88

DS EB

      405,517.88             394,474

        405,517.88                394,474

P I

           394,474          11,043.30

              394,474             11,043.30

DS EB

      405,517.30                      ‐

        405,517.30                        ‐

$0

P I DS EB

TOTAL TOTAL TOTAL

64

P I DS

$           4,705,000 $         5,855,000 $        14,302,475 $           24,862,475 $               890,089 $         1,521,956 $          2,712,860 $             5,124,905 $           5,595,089 $         7,376,956 $        17,015,335 $           29,987,380

$9,441,272 $609,017 $10,050,289

$16,830,000 $4,997,646 $21,827,646

$5,913,000 $1,841,032 $7,754,032

$4,679,582 $530,610 $5,210,192

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$   6,526,923

             462,439                            ‐             4,223,420            11,317.58              248,062.10          769,983.48

1,528,506.23       1,667,304.86

$11,230,716

$   6,531,442

             451,392                            ‐             4,117,633            22,364.80              248,062.10          879,145.76

1,530,144.55       1,670,680.04       1,679,162.50        405,517.64      519,599.68          473,756.38             248,062.10       4,996,778.34 $13,728,613 $4,840,874             6,080,000          4,368,486         2,915,419               462,439              10,043,000          28,710,218

$12,497,830

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE

$2,511,998 $134,954 $2,646,952

$29,934,580 $7,504,242 $37,438,821

$   6,521,910

$   6,055,230

$   6,057,960

$   5,432,650

$   5,431,950

$   5,435,546

$   5,430,710

$   1,936,830

$   1,934,248

$   1,929,136

$       405,518

$       405,518

$       405,517


Debt Management The City of Coral Springs is not subject to a legally-imposed debt limit but makes careful use of debt to finance major capital projects, such as new buildings, renovations, infrastructure improvements, and major equipment purchases, per the self-imposed policies detailed below. The City will begin Fiscal Year 2015 with a combined outstanding net debt of $80,543,067. If there are no additional issuances in Fiscal Year 2015, the City’s total combined debt at the end of the fiscal year, September 30, 2015 is anticipated to be $74,440,309. General Obligation Bonds Franchise Revenue Bonds Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes/Loans Water/Sewer Loan State Revolving Fund Loans (W&S)

$16,098,768 $7,934,944 $28,903,973 $7,700,000 $13,802,724 $74,440,409

General Obligation Debt General obligation (GO) bonds allow municipalities to borrow money to pay for capital improvements and projects that benefit the entire community. Repayment of GO bonds is guaranteed by the “full faith and credit” of the City and the ability to raise taxes to pay the debt service via a separate voter approved debt levy. The current dedicated debt millage is $0.2038 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value. Refer to the Debt Service Fund Description for details of each outstanding General Obligation bond issuance.

General Obligation Bonds 2005A Refunding Series

$0

2005B Refunding Series

$1,980,000

2013 Refunding Series

$14,118,768

TOTAL

Debt Management Policies The City finances major capital equipment and facilities based on their expected economic lives. It is not prudent to spend operating cash on assets that have lives greater than five years. This is because long lived capital items are paid for gradually over their useful lives by an annual depreciation charge to the current accounting period. In addition, current relatively low interest rates make debt financing economical and wise compared to cash financing. The state of Florida has not imposed a legal debt limit on municipalities. The City, however, follows a number of self-imposed guidelines and policies in relation to debt management (see Financial Policies in the Appendix). Illustrated here are the two debt service policies.

Outstanding Balance

$16,098,768

Ratings Much like an individual’s credit rating, a bond rating is a measure of an organization’s credit worthiness. The higher the bond rating, the more favorable the interest rates that can be obtained. Coral Springs has the highest bond rating (triple A) from two of the three rating agencies. Due to a change in their methodology, Moody’s downgraded 250 municipalities nationwide, including changing Coral Springs to Aa1 (double A). This slight change will likely not affect the City’s ability to borrow at extremely affordable interest rates.

Rating Agency

GO Bond Rating

Annual General Fund debt service expense is limited to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget.

Moody’s Investor Service

Aa1

The General Fund expenditures for Fiscal Year 2015 are budgeted at $103,226,193. The General Fund annual debt service will be $4,684,631, or 4.5%, well below the selfimposed limit of 12.5%.

Standard and Poor’s

AAA

Fitch

AAA

General obligation debt outstanding shall not exceed 5% of the City’s taxable assessed value. At July 1, the Broward County Property Appraiser’s office advised the City’s taxable assessed value as $8,131,195,392. The 5% policy limit for outstanding general obligation debt would be $406,559,770. The City’s outstanding general obligation debt for Fiscal Year 2015 of $16,098,768 represents only 0.20% of the City’s taxable assessed value.

Recent Issues and Activities On November 4, 2014, Coral Springs voters will vote on a special bond referendum asking to approve a new issue of $12.45 million in General Obligation Bonds to improve the public safety communications system, replace Fire Stations 43 and 95, renovate the Crime Scene Investigation and Evidence storage facility, and build a new Safety Town Building.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

65


Franchise Revenue Bonds

Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds/Loans

Franchise revenue bonds are secured by the issuer pledging specific revenues either from the project(s) being financed and/or other dedicated revenue sources such as franchise fees, utility service taxes, communications services taxes (CST), sales taxes, etc. Current market conditions provided an opportunity to refund the 2004 Franchise Revenue bond and reduce interest costs, with no prepayment penalty, saving approximately $550,000.

Much of the water utility improvements identified in the City’s Water and Wastewater System Master Plan (August 2006) were funded by low-interest loans from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF). SRF loan funds are drawn as they are spent on approved projects. Repayment dates are based on the estimated completion dates of the projects. The City has seven outstanding SRF loans, all but one of which has been finalized. The Forest Hills Wellfield project is not yet complete and the loan amount will be finalized once all draws have been made. While the term for each of these loans is 20 years, the annual interest rate has varied from 2.50% to 3.06% depending on the market rate at the time the loan was executed. The interest rate formula is 60% of the market rate as established using the “Bond Buyer 20-Bond General Obligation Bond Index.

Franchise Revenue Bonds

Outstanding Balance

2014 Refunding Series

$7,934,944

Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes/Loans Capital improvements, equipment, and facility projects are separated into “pay‐as‐you‐go” and “debt financing” classifications. Pay‐as‐you‐go capital items are usually $5,000 or less with short lives (less than four years) or replacement of existing equipment where depreciation has been paid to a sinking fund. Debt financing is used for major, non‐recurring capital purchases with a minimum of four years of useful life. When the City finances capital projects by issuing bonds or other debt, the goal is to amortize the debt over a term not to exceed the average useful life of the project(s) financed.

Capital Revenue Bonds, Notes, Loans

Outstanding Balance

2008 Capital Revenue Refunding Bond

$8,780,000

2010 Taxable Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond

$4,912,001

2013 Capital Revenue Note

$3,814,533

2013 Lease/Purchase Agreement

$1,354,439

2014 Municipal Complex Loan

TOTAL

$10,043,000 $28,903,973

Recent Issues and Activities In 2014, the City enacted its financing strategy for the municipal complex to provide funding sufficient to meet project cash flow needs while minimizing interest and other expenses. After reviewing various maturity and structuring options, it was decided to execute a $10 million borrowing now with another borrowing in approximately one year for the balance of the required funding.

Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budgets adopted in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 included an additional $8.7 million in water and sewer system improvements. Specifically included was a $6.7 million Phase 3 water plant improvement project and a $2 million booster station rehabilitation project. The CIP anticipated utilizing SRF loans to fund these projects. It was determined that similarly low interest rates could be obtained through other sources without adding the administrative burden required by the State Revolving Fund. In December 2012, after conducting a competitive request for proposals process, the City executed a 20 year bank loan of $8,745,000 at an interest rate of 2.29%. Recent Issues and Activities For Fiscal Year 2015, the City plans to issue about $5 million in new Water and Sewer Fund debt for additional capital projects including rehabilitation, replacement and improvement to the City’s water and sewer infrastructure.

Water/Sewer Loans SRF Loan: Lift Station 20A/20B Rehab

$404,380

SRF Loan: Sewer Rehab Phase II

$983,400

SRF Loan: Water Treatment Plant Improvements, Phase 1 and 2

$4,868,834

SRF Loan: Raw Water Supply Wells

$1,555,909

SRF Loan: Transmission, Distribution, Interconnects

$2,800,001

SRF Loan: Source and Treatment

$1,000,255

SRF Loan: Forest Hills Wellfield

$2,189,944

SRF Total 2012 Bank Loan Water/Sewer Total Loans

66

Outstanding Balance

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$13,802,723 $7,700,000 $21,502,723


Debt Service Schedule - Water and Sewer Loans SRF WW822020 Lift Station Rehab Disbursable Amount + Capitalized Interest + Loan Service Fee Authorized Loan Amt $

FY10-FY33

525,646 10,513 536,159

SRF WW061610 Sewer Rehab II

SRF DW0603010 WTP Imprvmnts

SRF DW0603020 Wells

1,037,813 8,943 20,756 1,046,756

5,142,514 289,016 115,771 5,431,530

1,809,728 36,955 40,013 $ 1,846,683

$

$

SRF SRF SRF DW0603030 DW061620 DW061630 Trans/Dist/Intrcon Source/Treatment Forst Hills Wllfld

$

2,983,328 68,813 84,000 3,052,141

$

1,119,826 34,348 1,119,826

$

SRF Totals

Water/Sewer Bank Loan Series 2012

2,310,346 20,800 47,042 2,378,188

14,929,201 424,527 352,443 $ 15,411,283

n/a n/a $ 8,745,000

2014

P I DS EB

22,822 12,104 34,926 427,827

20,822 26,797 47,619 1,025,934

214,859 147,084 361,943 5,089,753

74,133 47,091 121,224 1,632,125

119,275 84,043 203,318 2,922,627

42,952 32,951 75,902 1,044,531

92,953 58,877 151,830 2,285,235

587,816 408,947 996,763 14,428,033

385,000 194,192 579,192 8,095,000

2015

P I DS EB

23,447 11,479 34,926 404,380

42,534 25,993 68,527 983,400

220,919 141,024 361,943 4,868,834

76,216 45,008 121,224 1,555,909

122,626 80,692 203,318 2,800,001

44,276 31,627 75,902 1,000,255

95,291 56,539 151,830 2,189,944

625,309 392,362 1,017,671 13,802,724

395,000 185,376 580,376 7,700,000

2016

P I DS EB

24,089 10,836 34,926 380,291

43,629 24,898 68,527 939,771

227,150 134,793 361,943 4,641,684

78,357 42,867 121,224 1,477,552

126,071 77,247 203,318 2,673,930

45,641 30,261 75,902 954,614

97,688 54,142 151,830 2,092,255

642,626 375,044 1,017,671 13,160,097

405,000 176,330 581,330 7,295,000

2017

P I DS EB

24,749 10,177 34,926 355,542

44,753 23,774 68,527 895,017

233,557 128,386 361,943 4,408,128

80,559 40,666 121,224 1,396,993

129,613 73,705 203,318 2,544,317

47,048 28,854 75,902 907,566

100,146 51,684 151,830 1,992,110

660,425 357,246 1,017,671 12,499,672

415,000 167,056 582,056 6,880,000

2018

P I DS EB

25,427 9,499 34,926 330,115

45,907 22,621 68,527 849,111

240,144 121,799 361,943 4,167,983

82,822 38,402 121,224 1,314,171

133,254 70,063 203,318 2,411,063

48,499 27,403 75,902 859,067

102,665 49,165 151,830 1,889,444

678,718 338,953 1,017,671 11,820,954

425,000 157,552 582,552 6,455,000

2019

P I DS EB

26,123 8,803 34,926 303,992

47,089 21,438 68,527 802,021

246,918 115,026 361,943 3,921,066

85,149 36,076 121,224 1,229,022

136,998 66,320 203,318 2,274,065

49,995 25,908 75,902 809,072

105,248 46,582 151,830 1,784,197

697,519 320,152 1,017,671 11,123,435

430,000 147,820 577,820 6,025,000

2020

P I DS EB

26,838 8,087 34,926 277,154

48,302 20,225 68,527 753,719

253,882 108,061 361,943 3,667,184

87,541 33,683 121,224 1,141,481

140,847 62,471 203,318 2,133,218

51,536 24,366 75,902 757,536

107,895 43,935 151,830 1,676,301

716,842 300,828 1,017,671 10,406,593

440,000 137,973 577,973 5,585,000

2021

P I DS EB

27,573 7,352 34,926 249,580

49,547 18,980 68,527 704,172

261,043 100,900 361,943 3,406,141

90,001 31,224 121,224 1,051,481

144,804 58,514 203,318 1,988,414

53,125 22,777 75,902 704,411

110,610 41,221 151,830 1,565,691

736,702 280,968 1,017,671 9,669,890

450,000 127,897 577,897 5,135,000

2022

P I DS EB

28,328 6,597 34,926 221,252

50,823 17,704 68,527 653,349

268,406 93,537 361,943 3,137,735

92,529 28,695 121,224 958,952

148,872 54,446 203,318 1,839,542

54,763 21,139 75,902 649,648

113,392 38,438 151,830 1,452,299

757,114 260,557 1,017,671 8,912,776

465,000 117,592 582,592 4,670,000

2023

P I DS EB

29,104 5,821 34,926 192,148

52,133 16,394 68,527 601,216

275,976 85,967 361,943 2,861,759

95,129 26,096 121,224 863,823

153,055 50,263 203,318 1,686,487

56,452 19,451 75,902 593,196

116,245 35,585 151,830 1,336,054

778,093 239,578 1,017,671 8,134,683

475,000 106,943 581,943 4,195,000

2024

P I DS EB

29,901 5,024 34,926 162,246

53,476 15,051 68,527 547,740

283,760 78,183 361,943 2,577,999

97,801 23,423 121,224 766,022

157,355 45,963 203,318 1,529,133

58,192 17,710 75,902 535,003

119,169 32,661 151,830 1,216,885

799,655 218,016 1,017,671 7,335,028

485,000 96,066 581,066 3,710,000

2025

P I DS EB

30,720 4,206 34,926 131,526

54,854 13,673 68,527 492,886

291,764 70,179 361,943 2,286,235

100,549 20,676 121,224 665,473

161,776 41,542 203,318 1,367,357

59,987 15,916 75,902 475,017

122,167 29,663 151,830 1,094,718

821,816 195,855 1,017,671 6,513,213

495,000 84,959 579,959 3,215,000

2026

P I DS EB

31,561 3,364 34,926 99,965

56,267 12,260 68,527 436,619

299,993 61,950 361,943 1,986,242

103,374 17,851 121,224 562,099

166,321 36,997 203,318 1,201,036

61,836 14,066 75,902 413,180

125,240 26,590 151,830 969,478

844,592 173,078 1,017,671 5,668,620

505,000 73,624 578,624 2,710,000

2027

P I DS EB

32,426 2,500 34,926 67,539

57,717 10,810 68,527 378,903

308,455 53,489 361,943 1,677,787

106,278 14,946 121,224 455,821

170,993 32,325 203,318 1,030,043

63,743 12,159 75,902 349,437

128,391 23,439 151,830 841,087

868,002 149,669 1,017,671 4,800,618

520,000 62,059 582,059 2,190,000

2028

P I DS EB

33,314 1,612 34,926 34,226

59,204 9,323 68,527 319,699

317,155 44,788 361,943 1,360,633

109,264 11,961 121,224 346,557

175,797 27,521 203,318 854,246

65,708 10,194 75,902 283,729

131,621 20,210 151,830 709,467

892,062 125,609 1,017,671 3,908,556

530,000 50,151 580,151 1,660,000

2029

P I DS EB

34,226 700 34,926 -

60,729 7,798 68,527 258,970

326,100 35,843 361,943 1,034,533

112,334 8,891 121,224 234,224

180,736 22,582 203,318 673,510

67,735 8,168 75,902 215,994

134,932 16,899 151,830 574,535

916,791 100,880 1,017,671 2,991,766

540,000 38,014 578,014 1,120,000

2030

P I DS EB

62,294 6,233 68,527 196,677

335,298 26,645 361,943 699,235

115,490 5,735 121,224 118,734

185,814 17,504 203,318 487,696

69,823 6,079 75,902 146,171

138,326 13,504 151,830 436,209

907,044 75,701 982,745 2,084,721

555,000 25,648 580,648 565,000

2031

P I DS EB

63,898 4,629 68,527 132,778

344,755 17,188 361,943 354,479

118,734 2,490 121,224 (0)

191,034 12,283 203,318 296,662

71,976 3,926 75,902 74,195

141,806 10,024 151,830 294,403

932,204 50,541 982,745 1,152,517

565,000 12,939 577,939 -

2032

P I DS EB

65,545 2,982 68,527 67,233

354,479 7,464 361,943 0

196,401 6,916 203,318 100,260

74,195 1,707 75,902 0

145,373 6,457 151,830 149,030

835,993 25,527 861,520 316,524

2033

P I DS EB

67,233 1,294 68,527 0

149,030 2,800 151,830 (0)

316,524 5,492 322,016 0

100,260 1,399 101,659 (0)

P I

536,159 162,355

1,046,756 302,877

5,431,530 1,724,332

1,846,683 576,621

3,052,141 964,731

1,119,826 384,097

2,378,188 658,417

$ 15,411,283 $ 4,773,429

$8,745,000 $2,101,813

DS

698,514

1,349,632

7,155,862

2,423,304

4,016,872

1,503,923

3,036,605

$ 20,184,713

$10,846,813

City of Coral Springs, Florida

67


Capital Improvement Program The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is an economical and responsible financial plan to ensure quality public services today and in the future. The CIP is a separate budgeting process within the annual operating budget. Collectively, the CIP and the Five-Year Forecast serve as a road map to intelligently plan for the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. The capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2015 is programmed at $41,836,054. This total breaks down as follows: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Equipment Service Fund Public Art Fund Solid Waste Fund Charter School Fund

$21,735,626 $9,457,000 $5,478,528 $5,008,900 $90,000 $36,000 $30,000

The CIP procedure is used to plan, budget, and finance the purchase and/or construction of large capital infrastructure, facilities, equipment, and other fixed assets. The City uses this process to ensure these expensive, long-lived projects are aligned with its strategic direction and that the money is prudently spent. The capital item to be undertaken or purchased, the year in which it will be started, the anticipated capital outlay each year, the estimated impact on the operating budget, and the method of financing the project are all listed in the CIP summaries that follow this description. The six-year Capital Improvement Program includes Fiscal Year 2015 budget and expenditure projections for the next five years. The total capital plan for Fiscal Years 2015 through 2020 is $160,233,403.

Capital expenditure FY2015 ($41,836,054)

Equipment Services 12.0%

Charter School 0.1% Solid Waste 0.1% Fire Fund 13.1%

Water and Sewer 22.6%

Public Art 0.2%

68

General Fund 52.0%

Capital expenditure FY2015-2020 ($160,233,403) Charter School 0.7% Equipment Services 22.7%

Solid Waste 0.2% Fire Fund 5.7%

General Fund 44.7% Water and Sewer 25.8%

Public Art 0.1%

CIP Selection Process The Capital Improvement Program provides detailed information for all CIP projects with capital outlays greater than $5,000 that the City plans to construct, improve, or purchase during Fiscal Years 2015 through 2020. Each department submitting a capital acquisition request completes a Project Description Form. The request includes the following information: project title, department/division, linkage to strategic priority or initiatives, expected life of equipment (when applicable), additional operating cost, additional revenue or income, contingencies, project description, update, alternatives, impact on other departments, and a justification. The CIP is updated annually to make adjustments for changing capital needs, changes in availability and cost of funds, and to add a year of programming to replace the year just completed. The CIP process begins in early January with an evaluation of the Capital budgeting process to determine if there are any changes that will make the process more user-friendly, efficient, or effective. Next, departments conduct a fixed assets inventory including an inventory of vehicles, computers, and printers. One of the key improvements to the process has been to link the Capital Improvement Program to the Strategic Plan. In the spring, capital requirements flowing from the adopted Strategic Plan and Business Plan are identified. Each project recommended for inclusion in the Fiscal Year 2015 capital budget is linked to the Strategic Plan as it relates to the City Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five priorities. The CIP also takes into consideration department needs, the Comprehensive Plan Capital Improvement element, and the Water and Wastewater Master Plan.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses Fiscal Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025

Expenses $4,711,900 $6,216,468 $4,132,838 $3,709,227 $4,229,329 $3,783,134 $4,054,854 $5,668,618 $4,339,395 $3,691,822 $4,383,779

Contributed Depreciation $2,697,199 $2,899,489 $3,116,951 $3,350,722 $3,602,026 $3,872,178 $4,162,591 $4,474,786 $4,810,395 $5,171,174 $5,559,012

Intra Fund Transfer $0 $207,059 $217,412 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Estimated Interest $70,957 $51,520 $20,936 $13,161 $9,707 $3,531 $4,457 $5,579 $0 ($1,594) $13,184

Year-End Balance $5,151,998 $2,093,597 $1,316,057 $970,713 $353,117 $445,692 $557,886 ($630,367) ($159,368) $1,318,391 $2,506,808

The following policy guidelines are used to define a capital expenditure and steer the management of the process: • A capital expenditure is defined as a major construction, expansion, purchase, or major repair/replacement of buildings, utility systems, streets, or other physical structures or property which has an estimated total cost of $5,000 or more and generally has an expected life of at least five years.

This recurring source of money makes the fund selfsufficient. Existing assets are replaced on a life cycle replacement schedule. New equipment can be added through a new initiative if it can be shown to support the Strategic Plan. The table on the left shows the estimated replacement cost of the City’s fleet inventory for the next ten years with corresponding annual contributions required from department users of vehicles, in order to make “pay-as-yougo” fleet purchases. This annual contribution eliminates borrowing money to finance a vehicle’s replacement. In Fiscal Year 2015, the City will invest nearly $4.7M to replace vehicles and equipment that otherwise would be more costly to maintain.

Computer replacement: The Computer Replacement Program is used to purchase and maintain computer hardware (including scanners, laptops, and desktops) and software. This is also a self-sufficient, internal service fund. Existing computer technologies are replaced on a standardized replacement schedule that considers legacy as well as usage. The table below shows the annual investment cost to replace the existing inventory of computers.

• Capital items under $5,000 are generally included in the various Fiscal Year 2015 funds’ operating budgets.

Capital Projects Funding

• Capital improvements are programmed and scheduled based on the City’s projected financial ability to purchase and maintain the capital project. All projects are prioritized and ranked based on criteria including the strength of the linkage between the capital expenditure and the City’s strategic priorities.

General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund operating revenues—these appropriated revenues will generally be used to purchase modest, routine operating capital items.

• General Fund debt service expenditures will not exceed 12.5% of the total annual General Fund budget. • Voter-approved general obligation debt outstanding will not exceed 5.0% of the City’s total taxable assessed valuation. CIP Project Categories: Capital projects are divided into one of three primary categories: Capital improvement projects: The purchase, replacement, maintenance, and repair of infrastructure and fixed assets is budgeted and accomplished through the Capital Improvement Program. Fleet replacement: The entire inventory of vehicles and equipment is evaluated annually in order to prioritize replacement and repairs needed in the upcoming year, based on age, condition, maintenance cost, and expected life of each equipment. The Equipment Services Fund provides for the purchase, replacement, and maintenance of the City’s fleet and other large equipment (such as generators or tillers). This is an internal service fund in which departments are charged for the usage or depreciation of the equipment.

Funding for capital projects can be obtained from any of the following sources:

Franchise revenue bonds and capital revenue bonds—this consists of debt that is secured through the pledge of City General Fund franchise revenues and other non-ad valorem revenues. Water and Sewer revenue bonds—the Water and Sewer Fund is an enterprise fund supported by fees for service rather than by taxes. Revenue bonds are repaid with revenues generated from

Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses Fiscal Planned Contributed Year Expenditures Depreciation 2015 438,450 362,945 2016 1,628,100 381,092 2017 479,200 400,147 2018 660,000 420,154 2019 657,050 441,162 2020 1,680,893 463,220 2021 370,450 486,381 2022 665,850 510,700 2023 526,350 536,235 2024 1,769,600 563,046 2025 391,500 591,199

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Year-end Balance 2,351,821 1,104,813 1,025,760 785,913 570,025 (647,648) (531,718) (686,868) (676,984) (1,883,537) (1,683,839)

69


this fund, not by contributions from the General Fund. Revenue bonds are obtained to increase plant capacity and modernize the Utility system. General obligation bonds—this funding source requires voter approval and is used to finance major capital projects with an expected life of 15 to 30 years. Debt retirement is achieved through a special ad valorem debt millage separate from the General Fund ad valorem operating millage. Variable-rate debt bonds and loans—this funding source will be used to purchase capital items through a financial institution with a contractual obligation specifying payment terms, including principal and interest to be paid over a period of time. Equity financing—this is generally known as “pay-as-you-go” financing and involves dedicating budget surpluses that are generated in previous years to capital purchases. When the City equity finances some of its CIP, it reduces the amount of debt that needs to be issued.

CIP funding sources— Fiscal Year 2015 Funding Source

Budget

Operating General Fund Fire Fund

$200,000 $286,730

Equipment Services Fund

$4,711,900

Water and Sewer Fund

$1,239,000

Equity Financing General Fund Equipment Services Fund Solid Waste Fund Facilities Reserve

$1,165,327 $297,000 $36,000 $886,500

General Obligation Bond

$12,450,000

General Fund Loan

$10,000,000

Grants CDBG Justice Assistance Grant

$501,421 $17,044

HOME Grant

$156,897

SHIP Grant

$561,360

Transportation Enhancement

$405,000

FLDOE Grant

$250,000

CFB Grant Grant Dependent Public Art Fund Charter School Fund

Tax Incremental Financing (TIF)—this captures the future taxes of real estate improvements in a designated area to pay the present cost of these improvements. Prior to being included in the six-year Capital Improvement Program, each potential project is analyzed to determine its financial impact on operations, operating expenditures, and revenues. The total cost of each recommended project is identified as part of the capital budgeting process and associated operating expenses are included in the operating budget. In the CIP, the Project Description Form for each project identifies expected debt service costs, including interest rate and life expectancy assumptions, and operating and maintenance costs for new equipment. Fleet requests are accompanied by a Fleet Replacement Form identifying the vehicle type, quantity, replacement cost, vehicle identification numbers, model type, and specialty items necessary to put the vehicle in service. In addition, current status and condition of each vehicle is required as part of the justification submitted for review (e.g. mileage, life-to-date repair cost, etc). The CIP Review Committee—made up of the City Manager, the department requesting the capital, and staff from the Budget office—discuss all capital requests with further justification, research, and analysis during the meetings. If the need proves to be valid and the capital is part of the City’s overall strategic plan, the project is recommended for approval. The Senior Management Team reviews the entire list of adopted capital projects along with the funding sources and restraints. A final list of projects is recommended to the City Commission by this team for inclusion in the capital budget. In summary, the six-year CIP provides the necessary components of a sound Capital Improvement Program. The table to the left describes the sources of financing the capital budget in Fiscal Year 2015.

$311,798 $90,000 $30,000 $4,583,000

W & S Revenue Bond

$3,635,000

70

Grants—this funding source refers to giving of funds for a specific purpose. Funds may be granted from federal, state, or local sources, such as Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA), Florida Department of Transportation, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Justice Assistance Grant (JAG), Florida Department of Health, etc.

$22,077

Renewal and Replacement Fund Total FY 2015 CIP

Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) loan—this program provides low-interest loans for planning, designing, and constructing drinking water and wastewater projects. This program is also known as a State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan.

$41,836,054

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget Operating Expenses

CIP impact on the operating budget Fiscal Year 2015

CIP projects can affect the City’s operating budget by increasing expenditures offset by anticipated savings or new revenues generated by that project. Major capital projects requested for FY 2015 are comprised mainly of rehabilitation and improvements to the water and sewer facilities, replacements of items such as vehicles, rebuild of City Fire Stations 43 and 95 and the design and initial construction phase of a new Municipal Complex. These projects improve but do not expand the level of service the City provides. The operating impact , therefore, is either negligible or indeterminable at this time due to the early development stages of the projects. The operating impacts of other CIP projects are measurable and have been included in the operating budget. For example, the addition of four fleet items in FY 2015—one truck for Transportation, a van for Communications & Marketing, one truck for Utilities, and one vehicle for Fire Inspection- will have an impact on the City’s operating budget by increasing gasoline and maintenance costs. The additional fuel and maintenance cost for this new fleet is estimated at $7,796 and the annual depreciation charges for the use of this equipment is projected at $30,411. Some capital projects will be associated with the reduction of operating expenses. For example, the University Drive LED Street Light Pilot project is anticipated to result in a 48% reduction in energy. This project is projected to save over $11,000 in energy cost and over $9,000 in maintenance annually.

Operating Capital Operating capital is a funding source for capital requests, vehicles, and equipment that are relatively modest in cost, have a short life expectancy and/or are purchased annually or fairly regularly. Each fund allocates money to make appropriate purchases or capital enhancements, financed through recurring revenues. Projects funded via operating capital in Fiscal Year 2015 total is $ 6,437,630.

Operating Budget $161,821,110

CIP Impact $18,207

Capital Improvement Budget $41,836,054

General Fund In Fiscal Year 2015, capital will impact the City’s general operating fund by $200,000. The replacement of the existing Police and Fire public safety application software will be funded via operating capital as well as a $50,000 Art Walk contingency. This OSPS Software project cost is $150,000 and will replace the OSSI software that ran on the old analog radio system. Fire Fund The Fire Fund’s operating capital totals $286,730. This allocation will be used for on-going improvements and upkeep of fire stations, replacement of dive rescue and tactical rescue training equipment for firefighters, purchase of thermal imaging cameras for search and rescue operations, to provide uniform members with extensive wellness screening and physical exams as well as support the on-going program to install traffic light controllers at major intersections to allow safe and quick access to emergency vehicles. Water and Sewer Fund The Water and Sewer Fund’s operating capital of $1,239,000 will be used for ongoing inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves ensuring all components of the sanitary system will perform as needed during times of emergencies, ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, and replacement of portable generators used during power outages at lift stations. In order to maintain adequate water supply, the City will evaluate sites to upgrade or replace wells identified as low producers of raw water. The City will also begin development of a hydraulic model for the entire water transmission/distribution system providing the ability to more accurately determine where upgrades to the system are required and the relocation project of City facilities in Broward County right-of-way along the Wiles Road widening project will be funded with operating capital in Fiscal Year 2015. Equipment Services Fund In Fiscal Year 2015 the City is projecting a $4,711,900 operating capital expense in the Equipment Services Fund to replace vehicles and equipment that have exceeded their useful life (refer to Fleet Assets for more information.)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

71


Debt Service

Fleet Assets

Debt service refers to the amount of interest and principal the City will pay on its outstanding debt during a fiscal year. In Fiscal Year 2015, the City will continue repayment of a $4.7 million loan to finance capital improvements in the General Fund. The total principal and interest payment for this loan in Fiscal Year 2015 is $519,600. In addition, debt service totaling $275,000 (interest only) is allocated for a new $10 million loan which will be used for the first phase of the Municipal Complex in Fiscal Year 2015.

Replacement of vehicles and fleet equipment is funded in the Equipment Services Fund. This internal services fund provides for the operating and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and major equipment. Fuel, maintenance, and depreciation expenses are determined on a full-recovery basis for each fleet asset type. The allocated amount for each department in the City is budgeted taking into account the expected life of the vehicle/equipment, the type of equipment, fuel and maintenance costs, purchase price, and inflation.

The City has secured long-term financing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program for improvements at the Water Treatment Plant as well as throughout the entire water and sewer system. The interest rate for this financing is 60% of the market rate, resulting in low-cost financing for these improvements over a term of 20 years. Approximately $15 million in SRF financing has been obtained and most of the projects have been completed (i.e. replacement of existing wells, construction of new raw water supply wells, installation of wellheads and transmission lines, and improvements at lift stations).

The City’s entire inventory of vehicles is inspected annually followed by a complete analysis of each fleet item, including mileage, life-to-date repair and maintenance cost, operational condition, and life expectancy. This evaluation helps prioritize replacements and repairs for inclusion in the upcoming budget year. As a result, some vehicles originally scheduled for replacement are found to be in good condition. Therefore, replacement is not necessary. Instead, funding is placed in the budget to perform repairs, thereby extending their useful life. This strategy has resulted in annual cost avoidance for vehicle replacement as well as savings to the General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund operating budgets by reducing the “chargeback” or annual allocation transfer to the Equipment Services Fund.

In Fiscal Year 2015, debt service totaling $1,017,671 is allocated in the Water and Sewer Fund for repayment of existing SRF loans. The City will continue repayment of a $8.7 million bank loan secured in Fiscal Year 2013 for the rehabilitation of booster stations and improvements on the water and sewer system. The interest rate for this loan is 2.29%. Principal and interest repayment for Fiscal Year 2015 is programmed at $580,376. In addition, the City will borrow $4.7 million to continue rehabilitation of booster stations and perform other necessary improvements to the water and sewer system.

Chargeback is a term used to describe the method to reimburse the Equipment Services Fund for the usage of an asset over its expected useful life (also known as funded depreciation) rather than borrowing money to buy the asset at the beginning of its useful life. Depreciation fees collected from departments are held in the Fleet Replacement Fund until the money is needed to purchase fleet items. The total chargeback allocation for Fiscal Year 2015 is $2,697,224 of which $1,979,600 impacts the General Fund, $225,485 is allocated to the Water and Sewer Fund, and $492,139 is charged to the Fire Fund. Vehicles maintenance expenses and gasoline cost are also funded by the Equipment Replacement Fund. This expense is also collected from all applicable departments via interfund transfers. The fuel and maintenance budget for Fiscal Year 2015 totals $3,193,600. This represents a 1.2% increase from Fiscal Year 2014 allocation. The impact to the City’s general operating fund is $2,569,514. The Fire Fund’s allocation for Fiscal Year 2015 is $386,849, and the Water and Sewer Fund’s portion is $237,237.

72

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Grants

FY 2015 Capital projects financed via grants

The City of Coral Springs is continually seeking grant opportunities to help finance projects that support its five strategic priorities and link to Business Plan initiatives. Grants from Federal, Local, and State sources are researched and applied for with the ultimate goal of funding specific projects that meet our customers’ needs, while lowering departmental operating costs. For Fiscal Year 2015, the City projects $2,225,597 in grants to assist with funding of necessary capital projects, as described on the table to the right. This year’s granted funds impact the City’s operating budget by supplementing 5.3% of the total capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2015.

Source of grant

CDBG

JAG FLDOE Grant HOME Grant SHIP Grant CFB Grant Transportation Enhancement Grant Dependent

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Project Existing Walkway Renovations Housing rehabilitation Commercial Facade Pedestrian Lighting for Forest Hills Blvd Youth scholarships Senior recreational activities 39th Street sidewalk design Neighborhood partnership Replace tasers Handgun Replacement Swat Weapons Safety Town Building Housing Rehabilitation Housing Rehabilitation Keep Coral Springs Beautiful Downtown pathways construction Fire Prevention & Safety Sportsplex Lake Dock Splash Pad

Allocation $126,000 $92,655 $80,000 $64,500 $50,000 $44,016 $29,250 $15,000 $10,000 $3,522 $3,522 $250,000 $156,897 $561,360 $22,077 $405,000 $91,798 $100,000 $120,000

73


Capital Improvement Summary by Fund Fund

FY 2014

Name Fire Fund General Fund Public Art Tree Trust Water and Sewer Equipment Services Charter School Solid Waste Total CIP

Budget $1,202,920 $3,153,930 $0 $214,000 $5,351,000 $3,447,585 $591,253 $0 $13,960,688

FY 2015 Adopted $5,478,528 $21,735,626 $90,000 $0 $9,457,000 $5,008,900 $30,000 $36,000 $41,836,054

FY 2016 Plan $450,040 $17,135,293 $50,000 $0 $5,475,000 $6,448,468 $545,653 $330,000 $30,434,454

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Plan $2,344,214 $12,762,288 $0 $0 $6,517,000 $8,132,838 $516,092 $0 $30,272,432

Plan $323,577 $6,975,439 $0 $0 $6,791,500 $3,959,227 $20,000 $0 $18,069,743

Plan $271,000 $6,465,475 $0 $0 $7,213,000 $4,479,329 $30,000 $0 $18,458,804

Plan $288,000 $6,591,782 $0 $0 $5,899,000 $8,383,134 $0 $0 $21,161,916

City Art titled “Everglades” by artist Jan Kolenda and John Foster. Medium: Mural, ceramic relief tile wall- 2003

74

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

Total Cost FY 2014-2020 $9,155,359 $71,665,903 $140,000 $0 $41,352,500 $36,411,896 $1,141,745 $366,000 $160,233,403


CIP Budget by Funding Sourceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;All Funds Funding Source

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Adopted

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

Operating General Fund Fire Fund W&S Fund Equipment Services Fund Total Operating

$592,308 578,072 1,269,000 3,274,110 5,713,490

$200,000 286,730 1,239,000 4,711,900 6,437,630

$355,159 450,040 468,000 6,216,468 7,489,667

$678,239 2,344,214 527,000 4,132,838 7,682,291

$590,739 323,577 1,183,500 3,709,227 5,807,043

$378,239 271,000 513,000 4,229,329 5,391,568

$353,500 288,000 534,000 3,783,134 4,958,634

2,555,876 3,963,561 4,464,500 26,782,896 37,766,833

Equity Financing General Fund Fire Fund Solid Waste Fund Equipment Services Fund Total Equity Financing

1,225,800 400,000 0 173,475 1,799,275

1,165,327 0 36,000 297,000 1,498,327

595,900 0 330,000 232,000 1,157,900

1,204,500 0 0 4,000,000 5,204,500

623,000 0 0 250,000 873,000

489,328 0 0 250,000 739,328

673,000 0 0 4,600,000 5,273,000

4,751,055 0 366,000 9,629,000 14,746,055

439,000 439,000

886,500 886,500

503,900 503,900

484,878 484,878

586,360 586,360

650,480 650,480

562,000 562,000

3,674,118 3,674,118

Grants CDBG Grant Justice Assistance Grant SHIP Grant FLDOE Grant CFB Grant FEMA AFG Dept of Environ Protection Grant Florida DOH Federal Transp. Enhancement TAP Grant HOME Grant Grant Dependent Total Grants

503,592 17,548 0 0 0 176,432 0 210,098 140,000 0 0 5,000 1,052,670

501,421 17,044 561,360 250,000 22,077 0 0 0 405,000 0 156,897 311,798 2,225,597

1,114,155 0 561,360 0 0 0 115,000 76,108 0 0 156,897 0 2,023,520

551,855 0 561,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 156,897 0 1,270,112

202,655 0 561,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 270,000 156,897 0 1,190,912

326,405 0 561,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 156,897 0 1,044,662

455,555 0 561,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 156,897 0 1,173,812

3,152,046 17,044 3,368,160 250,000 22,077 0 115,000 76,108 405,000 270,000 941,382 311,798 8,928,615

Renewal and Replacement Total R&R Fund

4,151,000 4,151,000

4,583,000 4,583,000

3,917,000 3,917,000

3,470,000 3,470,000

3,855,000 3,855,000

4,457,000 4,457,000

3,165,000 3,165,000

23,447,000 23,447,000

Debt Service Loan (General Fund) Revenue Bond (W&S) General Obligation Bond Total Debt Service

0 0 0 0

10,000,000 3,635,000 12,450,000 26,085,000

13,641,814 1,090,000 0 14,731,814

9,124,559 2,520,000 0 11,644,559

3,984,428 1,753,000 0 5,737,428

3,902,766 2,243,000 0 6,145,766

3,829,470 2,200,000 0 6,029,470

44,483,037 13,441,000 12,450,000 70,374,037

Other Funds Charter School Fund Total Charter School Fund

591,253 591,253

30,000 30,000

545,653 545,653

516,092 516,092

20,000 20,000

30,000 30,000

0 0

1,141,745 1,141,745

Tree Trust Fund Total Tree Trust Fund

214,000 214,000

0 0

15,000 15,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

15,000 15,000

Public Art Fund Total Public Art Fund

0 0

90,000 90,000

50,000 50,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

140,000 140,000

$13,960,688

$41,836,054

$30,434,454

$30,272,432

$18,069,743

$18,458,804

$21,161,916

$160,233,403

Reserves General Fund Facilities Total Reserves

Total CIP

City of Coral Springs, Florida

75


General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source Funding Source Operating—General Fund Aquatic Complex Development Services Emergency Medical Services Information Services Police Sportsplex/Tennis Transportation Financial Services Human Resources Operating—General Fund Total Facilities Reserves Center For The Arts Public Works Facilities Reserves Total CDBG Grant Aquatics- Cypress Pool Development Services Parks and Recreation Public Works Transportation CDBG Grant Total Justice Assistance Grant Police Justice Assistance Grant Total General Obligation Bond Parks and Recreation Police General Obligation Bond Total Grant Dependent Parks and Recreation Sportsplex/Tennis Grant Dependent Total Loan Aquatic Complex Aquatics- Cypress Pool Aquatics- Mullins Center For The Arts Development Services Emergency Medical Services Information Services Parks and Recreation Police Public Works Sportsplex/Tennis Transportation Human Resources City Manager Loan Total Tree Trust Fund Center For The Arts Tree Trust Fund Total Federal Transp. Enhancement Grant Development Services Federal Transp. Enhancement Grant Total Equity Financing General Fund Aquatic Complex Aquatics- Mullins Center For The Arts City Manager Information Technology Parks and Recreation Police Public Works Sportsplex/Tennis Transportation Equity Financing General Fund Total HOME Grant Development Services HOME Grant Total SHIP Grant Development Services SHIP Grant Total FLDOH/EMS Grant Emergency Medical Services FLDOH/EMS Grant Total CFB Grant Transportation CFB Grant Total Dept of Environ Protection Grant Transportation Dept of Environ Protection Grant Total TAP Grant Transportation TAP Grant Total FLDOE Grant Parks and Recreation FLDOE Grant Total Total General Fund CIP

76

FY 2015 Adopted

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$0 50,000 0 150,000 0 0 0 0 0 200,000

$50,000 0 23,420 128,239 12,500 7,000 115,000 10,000 9,000 355,159

$50,000 0 0 128,239 50,000 0 450,000 0 0 678,239

$0 0 0 128,239 12,500 0 450,000 0 0 590,739

$0 0 0 128,239 0 0 250,000 0 0 378,239

$55,000 0 0 0 40,500 8,000 250,000 0 0 353,500

$155,000 50,000 23,420 662,956 115,500 15,000 1,515,000 10,000 9,000 2,555,876

275,000 611,500 886,500

0 503,900 503,900

55,000 429,878 484,878

44,500 541,860 586,360

0 650,480 650,480

0 562,000 562,000

374,500 3,299,618 3,674,118

32,016 187,655 62,000 64,500 155,250 501,421

35,000 107,655 60,000 430,000 481,500 1,114,155

35,000 107,655 60,000 0 349,200 551,855

35,000 107,655 60,000 0 0 202,655

35,000 107,655 60,000 0 123,750 326,405

35,000 107,655 60,000 0 252,900 455,555

207,016 725,930 362,000 494,500 1,362,600 3,152,046

17,044 17,044

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

17,044 17,044

900,000 6,450,000 7,350,000

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

900,000 6,450,000 7,350,000

120,000 100,000 220,000

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

120,000 100,000 220,000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,000,000 10,000,000

2,263,000 100,000 47,000 215,000 415,432 134,008 542,324 4,515,000 703,400 324,250 1,422,500 2,950,050 9,850 0 13,641,814

277,500 89,500 20,000 152,000 38,100 114,705 190,000 3,725,000 463,600 417,000 108,000 3,529,154 0 0 9,124,559

170,000 44,500 12,000 80,000 29,670 90,008 150,000 1,515,000 277,400 92,000 95,000 1,428,850 0 0 3,984,428

170,000 32,500 0 261,000 24,050 125,098 495,750 985,000 181,000 92,000 59,000 1,477,368 0 0 3,902,766

160,000 67,500 52,000 210,000 24,050 63,029 105,000 1,160,000 91,000 92,000 121,000 1,683,891 0 0 3,829,470

3,040,500 334,000 131,000 918,000 531,302 526,848 1,483,074 11,900,000 1,716,400 1,017,250 1,805,500 11,069,313 9,850 10,000,000 44,483,037

0 0

15,000 15,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

15,000 15,000

405,000 405,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

405,000 405,000

120,000 35,000 65,000 30,000 315,000 121,000 195,000 98,500 134,000 51,827 1,165,327

40,000 0 0 0 301,000 204,000 0 37,900 13,000 0 595,900

40,000 0 0 0 741,000 404,000 0 9,500 0 10,000 1,204,500

40,000 0 0 0 200,000 303,000 30,000 10,000 40,000 0 623,000

40,000 0 0 0 271,328 158,000 0 10,000 0 10,000 489,328

40,000 0 0 0 250,000 163,000 185,000 10,000 25,000 0 673,000

320,000 35,000 65,000 30,000 2,078,328 1,353,000 410,000 175,900 212,000 71,827 4,751,055

156,897 156,897

156,897 156,897

156,897 156,897

156,897 156,897

156,897 156,897

156,897 156,897

941,382 941,382

561,360 561,360

561,360 561,360

561,360 561,360

561,360 561,360

561,360 561,360

561,360 561,360

3,368,160 3,368,160

0 0

76,108 76,108

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

76,108 76,108

22,077 22,077

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

22,077 22,077

115,000 115,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

115,000 115,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

270,000 270,000

0 0

0 0

270,000 270,000

250,000 250,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

250,000 250,000

$21,735,626

$17,135,293

$12,762,288

$6,975,439

$6,465,475

$6,591,782

$71,665,903

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Major Capital Projects by Location

Capital Projects Citywide Infiltration/inflow correction program Lift station rehabilitation program Galvinized Water Service Replacement Program Fire hydrant replacement program Virtual Infrastructure Growth

Force Main Integrity Evaluation Housing rehabilitation OSPS Software Lift Station Scada Tactical (SRT) Vests

Northwest County Radio Upgrade Water Distribution Model Cast iron water system model Site Select/eval.- 3 new Raw Water Supply Wells Vehicles and equipment replacement

Center for the Arts

Water Treatment Plant

A/C Replacement

New Dump Truck Betti Stradling Park

Westside Complex

Splash Pad Design- Central Stores

East Booster Station Rehabilitation Municipal Complex Design and Construction

Fire Station 43 Rebuild

West Booster Station Rehabilitation

Wiles Road Wiles Road Utilities Relocation

Sportsplex Lake Dock

Tennis Center

NW 40th St

Roof Replacement

Existing Walkway Renovations

Downtown

Coral Springs Medical Center

Pathways construction

New Lift Station

Public Safety Building CSI Building Renovation and Expansion

Mullins Gym Roof Replacement Fire Station 95

Safety Town

Rebuild

Rebuild Safety Town Building

Facility Street name Capital project

City of Coral Springs, Florida

77


Major Capital Projects by Department Department/Fund Development Services

Capital Project

$405,000 Federal Transportation Grant

Housing Rehabilitation

$561,360 SHIP Grant $156,897 HOME Grant

Northwest County Radio Upgrade

Public Works

Parks & Recreation

Equipment Services

$105,000 Equity Financing General Fund

CSI Building Renovation and Expansion

$950,000 General Obligation Bond

Existing Walkways Renovtions

$126,000 CDBG Grant

Roof Replacment and Repair- Mullins Gym/Tennis Center

$425,000 Facilities Reserve

Splash Pad System for Betti Stradling Park

$120,000 Grant Dependent

Sportsplex Lake Dock *

$100,000 Grant Dependent $900,000 General Obligation Bond ($650k) State Grant ($ 250k)

Municipal Complex Design

$1,850,000 General Fund Loan

Municipal Complex Construction

$8,150,000 General Fund Loan

Vehicles and Equipment Replacement

$4,711,900 Equipment Fund operating capital

Westside Complex Construction

Water and Sewer Fund

$1,000,000 W&S Renewal and Replacement Fund

Rehabilitation of East Water Booster Station

$1,928,000 W&S Renewal and Replacement Fund

Lift Station Rehab Program

$1,400,000 W&S Renewal and Replacement Fund

Force Main Integrity Evaluation

$109,000 W&S Renewal and Replacement Fund

Galvinized Water Service Replacement Program

$850,000 Revenue Bond

New Lift Station Near Coral Springs Hospital

$400,000 Revenue Bond

Cast Iron Water Main Replacement

$500,000 Revenue Bond

Lift Station Scada Installation

$585,000 Revenue Bond $1,300,000 Revenue Bond

Fire Hydrant Replacment Program

$104,000 W & S operating capital

Site Select/eval.- 3 new Raw Water Supply Wells

$118,000 W & S operating capital

Water Distribution Model

$100,000 W & S operating capital

Wiles Road Utilities Relocation

$312,000 W & S operating capital

Dump Truck WTP

Center for the Arts Information Technology

$200,000 Equity Financing

Infiltration/Inflow Correction Program

West Booster Station

Fire Fund

$5,500,000 General Obligation Bond

Tactical (SRT) Vests

Safety Town Building City Manager Office

$127,000 W & S operating capital

Rebuild Fire Station 43

$2,500,000 General Obligation Bond

Rebuild Fire Station 95

$2,600,000 $ General Obligation Bond

A/C Replacement

$275,000 Facilities Reserves

OSPS Software

$150,000 Operating General Fund

Virtual Infrastructure Growth

$245,000 Equity Financing General Fund

*includes granted funds and City's match **Major capital projects listed are those $ 100,000 and greater

78

Funding Source

Downtown Pathways Construction Housing Rehabilitation Police

FY 2015 Budget

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Primary General Fund Revenues

Revenue Trends General Fund Revenues

% of General Fund

Fiscal Year 2015 Budget

% Change from FY14 Budget

Ad Valorem (Property) Taxes

34.2%

$35.3 million

4.9%

Electric Utility Service Tax

8.5%

$8.8 million

1.02%

Half-cent Sales Tax

7.4%

$7.7 million

4.05%

Electric Franchise Fee

7.2%

$7.4 million

0%

Communications Services Tax

4.8%

$5.0 million

-7.41%

Solid Waste Franchise Fees

4.6%

$4.7 million

-3.6%

Charges for Service-Parks & Rec

4.5%

$4.6 million

6.55%

State Shared Revenues

3.6%

$3.7 million

5.81%

The primary source of revenue for the City is ad valorem property taxes, which comprises one-third of $103 million total budgeted revenues for the General Fund. The remainder of revenue comes from a wide variety of intergovernmental, franchise, and other demand-driven sources. As part of the Five-Year Forecast, we have made several assumptions about future revenue growth that have a major impact on the resources that we can plan to use. Following is an explanation of some of these assumptions.

Total Fiscal Year 2015 Budget General Fund Revenues: $103,226,193

Ad Valorem Taxes

Ad Valorem Taxes

Source: Broward County Tax Collector Frequency: monthly, EFT

$50.00  $45.00  $40.00

Year-end Projection

$30.00  $25.00  $20.00  $15.00  $10.00

Budget Estimate

$35.00

$ Millions

$5.00

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

$‐ 2003

Ad valorem taxes are levied against the taxable value of real and personal property. The City sets the rate (“millage”) for this tax each year prior to October 1, and this rate is applied to each property’s taxable assessed value as determined by the Broward County Property Appraiser. This revenue can grow through increases to the millage rate and/or taxable values. The City’s millage rate has not changed but values increased for Fiscal Year 2015 by 5.35% and are expected to continue growing as a result of City initiatives.

Electricity Utility Service Tax

Electric Utility Service Tax

$12.00

Source: Florida Power & Light (FPL) Frequency: monthly, EFT

Budget Estimate

$4.00

2015

$6.00

Year-end Projection

$8.00

$2.00

City of Coral Springs, Florida

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

$‐ 2003

$ Millions

The City levies a 10% utility service tax on all electricity payments made within the City, through FPL. Electricity charges are made up of a base rate and a fuel rate. The City receives no tax on fuel rate increases, only on the base rate. When fuel rates increase, there is no effect on this revenue. Because this tax is based on the consumption of electricity, the City expects moderate growth as vacant residential and commercial properties become absorbed and normal activity resumes after the recession.

2014

$10.00

79


Revenue Trends (continued) Half-cent sales tax

1/2 Cent Sales Tax

Source: Florida Department of Revenue Frequency: monthly, EFT

$10.00  $9.00  $8.00

Year-end Projection Budget Estimate

$6.00  $5.00  $4.00  $3.00  $2.00  $1.00

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

$‐

Electricity Franchise Fees (6%)

Electric Franchise Fee

$9.00

Source: Florida Power & Light (FPL) Frequency: monthly, EFT

$8.00  $7.00

$1.00

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

Communications Services Tax

Communications Services Tax

Source: Florida Department of Revenue Frequency: monthly, EFT

$8.00  $7.00  $6.00

Year-end Projection

Budget Estimate 2015

Budget Estimate 2015

$1.00

2014

$2.00

Year-end Projection

$3.00

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2006

2005

2004

2003

$‐

Shared Revenues

State Shared Revenues

$4.50

Source: Florida Department of Revenue Frequency: monthly, EFT

$4.00  $3.50  $3.00  $2.50  $2.00  $1.50  $1.00  $0.50

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2006

2005

2004

$‐ 2003

$ Millions

State shared revenues are comprised of revenues from the state sales tax and the municipal fuel tax. As of January 1, 2014, cities will no longer receive revenues from the alternative fuel user decal fee, which the State estimates as an insignificant negative impact to local government of $0.2 million annually. As the economy recovers, the City predicts this revenue source will show gradual growth.

80

$4.00

2014

$5.00

$Millions

Implemented in 2001, the communications services tax is imposed on retail sales of communications services, comprised of State and local portions. Coral Springs imposes a local tax rate of 5.22%. The State is forecasting a decline in this revenue for Fiscal Year 2015 and a reduced estimate of growth after that due to negative growth rates in wireless service and a forecasted annual decline in landlines. The City is expecting no growth in this revenue as technology changes and consumer preferences shift to services not subject to tax.

2007

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

$‐

The City authorizes FPL to provide electrical service in exchange for a franchise fee to reimburse the City for use of rights-of-way and other public services. FPL bills each customer a portion of their total electric usage. As FPL rates increase and consumption of electricity grows, this revenue will increase. FPL has not had an increase to base rates since 2011 but has petitioned for an increase to build two nuclear power plants. Forecasts show a slow increase (1%) in the consumption of electricity over the coming year.

2008

$2.00

Budget Estimate

$3.00

2015

$4.00

Year-end Projection

$5.00

2014

$6.00 $ Millions

The half-cent sales tax generates the largest amount of revenue for local governments among the state-shared revenue sources currently authorized. For Fiscal Year 2014, taxable sales in Florida finally exceeded the previous peak in Fiscal Year 2007. The State is forecasting increases to reflect future strength in taxable sales related to tourism, motor vehicles, business purchases and household goods. Each city’s share is based on a percentage of population, so as other cities grow faster, this revenue for Coral Springs will not increase in line with the rest of the State.

2007

$ Millions

$7.00


General Fund Five-Year Forecast The General Fund Five-Year Forecast is an integral part of planning the City’s future fiscal position. It is an important tool used to determine a longer-range picture of the City’s financial horizon, as well as the level of risk we face over the next few years as current revenue growth does not keep pace with the growth in operational costs. This model is the framework to peer into the near future to identify the deficits that might await us if we were to take no further action. It helps City staff to conservatively quantify our financial outlook so we can adequately plan and be prepared to meet these challenges. As we map out our financial and operating strategies, we use the model to determine the potential impact of decisions, focusing on long-term solutions rather than short-term “fixes,” which could lead to negative financial impacts in future years. This financial outlook provides an opportunity to both avoid future budget problems and maintain financial stability. The forecast integrates projections of the major drivers of the City’s annual budget, new programs, and the anticipated revenues over the forecast period. Typically, future years show a deficit of revenues over expenditures.

Our success to date has been largely dependent upon planning ahead for the financial realities we project in coming years. The General Fund’s forecast continues to project minimal revenue growth and the need to hold the line on expenditures in order to maintain adequate working capital over the five-year period. The national and state economies are improving at a steady, but slow pace. However, local governments are still experiencing slowly recovering revenues, which will make it difficult to provide both essential services to the community and improvements needed for infrastructure. On the positive side, the General Fund’s beginning working capital will allow us to forecast another year of stable, though lean, operations. As shown in the chart below, the City is presenting a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2015.

General Fund Five Year Forecast Remaining Deficit 0

$0.0

Millions

-1 -2

-$2.5

-3

-$3.3 -$3.9

-4

-$4.4

-5 -6

-$5.5 FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

This chart is for planning purposes and illustrates the potential shortfalls the General Fund could face if no positive action is taken. By Florida law, the adopted budget must be balanced. Financial Strategies will be formulated to address future year shortfalls and will be included in the FY 2015 Business Plan.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

81


82 General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary Schedule

Budget Fiscal Year 2013

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

Revenues/Financing Sources Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Special Assessment Utility Franchise Fees Utility Service Taxes Intergovernmental Revenues Licenses and Permits Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Interfund Transfers Total Revenues Expenditures/Financing Uses City Commission City Manager's Office Human Resources Financial Services Information Services City Attorney's Office Police Department Emergency Medical Services Development Services Public Works Parks and Recreation Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Capital Financing Miscellaneous Total Expenditures Surplus/(Deficit)

% 

$32,428,839 4.2% 1,864,900 29.7% 9,614,259 6.0% 10,102,079 4.7% 19,588,728 0.2% 3,661,531 -11.6% 12,658,085 8.4% 1,979,940 6.3% 4,148,629 2.9% 2,767,293 -51.1% $98,814,283

0.9%

$323,618 2,935,995 1,362,884 2,528,838 2,995,514 839,014 44,411,871 8,875,165 6,375,953 4,234,257 13,896,495 1,654,188 2,059,580 4,400,788 1,920,122

8.4% 4.9% 2.4% 0.6% 12.2% -0.7% -5.2% 1.6% 2.9% 2.3% 47.8% -7.1% 6.0% 83.6% 0.2%

$98,814,283

1.0%

($0)

Budget Fiscal Year 2014

% 

$33,651,176 3.8% 2,103,433 12.8% 10,332,934 7.5% 10,806,725 7.0% 19,291,774 -1.5% 3,643,420 -0.5% 13,380,889 5.7% 2,019,353 2.0% 3,668,386 -11.6% 1,519,503 -45.1% $100,417,593

Adopted Fiscal Year 2015

% 

$35,299,267 4.9% 2,124,467 1.0% 10,134,499 -1.9% 11,045,986 2.2% 19,483,503 1.0% 3,735,836 2.5% 14,550,669 8.7% 2,069,855 2.5% 4,156,756 13.3% 625,355 #####

1.6%

$103,226,193

2.8%

$352,109 8.8% 3,333,225 13.5% 1,452,647 6.6% 2,545,778 0.7% 2,886,654 -3.6% 863,842 3.0% 45,129,246 1.6% 8,878,189 0.0% 6,499,433 1.9% 4,439,581 4.8% 14,135,475 1.7% 1,697,671 2.6% 2,454,747 19.2% 4,283,003 -2.7% 1,465,993 -23.7%

$356,301 3,814,675 1,675,532 2,478,075 3,258,968 997,264 45,386,271 8,952,200 6,710,576 4,608,241 14,314,766 1,593,012 2,692,397 4,884,631 1,503,285

1.2% 14.4% 15.3% -2.7% 12.9% 15.4% 0.6% 0.8% 3.2% 3.8% 1.3% -6.2% 9.7% 14.0% 2.5%

$103,226,193

2.8%

$100,417,593 $0

1.6%

$0

Projected Fiscal Year 2016

% 

$36,534,741 3.5% 2,145,712 1.0% 10,312,689 1.8% 11,269,696 2.0% 20,309,410 4.2% 3,884,449 4.0% 15,025,046 3.3% 2,133,362 3.1% 4,136,678 -0.5% 125,355 -80.0% $105,877,138

2.6%

$372,574 4.6% 3,978,342 4.3% 1,748,561 4.4% 2,591,828 4.6% 3,389,168 4.0% 1,038,438 4.1% 47,406,627 4.5% 9,377,272 4.7% 7,020,385 4.6% 4,771,525 3.5% 14,865,893 3.9% 1,654,814 3.9% 2,379,706 -11.6% 5,853,160 19.8% 1,888,524 25.6% $108,336,816 ($2,459,679)

5.0%

Projected Fiscal Year 2017

% 

$37,996,131 4.0% 2,188,626 2.0% 10,494,235 1.8% 11,497,977 2.0% 20,530,117 1.1% 4,040,931 4.0% 15,676,618 4.3% 2,199,109 3.1% 4,111,847 -0.6% 125,355 0.0% $108,860,947

2.8%

$390,014 4.7% 4,150,934 4.3% 1,825,687 4.4% 2,712,391 4.7% 3,526,298 4.0% 1,082,294 4.2% 49,166,637 3.7% 9,827,293 4.8% 7,348,757 4.7% 4,943,196 3.6% 15,447,179 3.9% 1,719,359 3.9% 2,476,840 4.1% 5,991,668 2.4% 1,551,486 ##### $112,160,032 ($3,299,085)

3.5%

Projected Fiscal Year 2018

% 

$39,515,976 4.0% 2,232,398 2.0% 10,679,204 1.8% 11,730,925 2.0% 20,871,769 1.7% 4,204,490 4.0% 16,474,463 5.1% 2,267,177 3.1% 4,089,242 -0.5% 125,355 0.0% $112,191,000

3.1%

$408,727 4.8% 4,333,079 4.4% 1,907,206 4.5% 2,840,288 4.7% 3,670,848 4.1% 1,128,466 4.3% 51,027,328 3.8% 10,304,069 4.9% 7,697,113 4.7% 5,123,861 3.7% 16,060,881 4.0% 1,786,778 3.9% 2,577,957 4.1% 5,988,293 -0.1% 1,264,650 ##### $116,119,542 ($3,928,542)

3.5%

Projected Fiscal Year 2019

% 

Projected Fiscal Year 2020

$41,294,195 2,277,046 10,867,664 11,968,636 21,222,935 4,375,464 17,192,823 2,337,651 4,143,157 125,355

4.5% 2.0% 1.8% 2.0% 1.7% 4.1% 4.4% 3.1% 1.3% 0.0%

$43,152,434 2,322,587 11,059,682 12,211,211 21,583,888 4,554,208 17,947,346 2,410,618 4,198,647 125,355

4.5% 2.0% 1.8% 2.0% 1.7% 4.1% 4.4% 3.1% 1.3% 0.0%

$115,804,927

3.2%

$119,565,976

3.2%

$428,831 4.9% 4,525,459 4.4% 1,993,441 4.5% 2,976,087 4.8% 3,823,351 4.2% 1,177,111 4.3% 52,992,470 3.9% 10,809,560 4.9% 8,067,002 4.8% 5,314,184 3.7% 16,709,453 4.0% 1,857,207 3.9% 2,683,221 4.1% 5,614,537 -6.2% 1,274,671 0.8%

$450,457 4,728,815 2,084,744 3,120,409 3,984,388 1,228,399 55,073,438 11,345,894 8,460,113 5,514,887 17,395,578 1,930,789 2,792,802 5,614,537 1,285,147

5.0% 4.5% 4.6% 4.8% 4.2% 4.4% 3.9% 5.0% 4.9% 3.8% 4.1% 4.0% 4.1% 0.0% 0.8%

$125,010,396

4.0%

$120,246,584

3.6%

($4,441,657)

Note: This forecast is for planning purposes only and shows potential deficits if no positive action is taken, given known operational and capital needs and conservative projections of revenue. Actual annual budgets will always be balanced, as required by State law. Projected deficits in this model should not be construed as actual shortfalls.

% 

($5,444,419)


Business Plan Contents Introduction................................................................................................................................................................................ 84 Market Environment.................................................................................................................................................................85 Overview............................................................................................................................................................................. 85 Real Estate Trends............................................................................................................................................................ 87 Economic Development................................................................................................................................................ 88 Downtown Coral Springs.............................................................................................................................................. 89 Legislative Issues.............................................................................................................................................................. 89 Emerging Issues................................................................................................................................................................ 90 Demographic Trends...................................................................................................................................................... 91 Service and Operations Strategy..........................................................................................................................................95 A Family-Friendly Community.............................................................................................................................................. 96 New Initiatives................................................................................................................................................................... 96 Ongoing Initiatives.......................................................................................................................................................... 98 A Thriving Business Community....................................................................................................................................... 100 New Initiatives.................................................................................................................................................................100 Ongoing Initiatives........................................................................................................................................................102 An Active, Healthy Community.......................................................................................................................................... 105 New Initiatives.................................................................................................................................................................105 Ongoing Initiatives........................................................................................................................................................107 An Attractive Community.................................................................................................................................................... 108 New Initiatives.................................................................................................................................................................108 Ongoing Initiatives........................................................................................................................................................109 An Innovative, High-Performing Organization.............................................................................................................112 New Initiatives.................................................................................................................................................................112 Ongoing Initiatives........................................................................................................................................................114 Financial Strategy.....................................................................................................................................................................117 Revenue Outlook............................................................................................................................................................119 Five-Year Forecast .........................................................................................................................................................120 Managing Debt and Equity........................................................................................................................................120 Fiscal Year 2015 Capital Improvement Program.................................................................................................121 Solid Waste.......................................................................................................................................................................121 Water and Sewer............................................................................................................................................................122 Fire Fund ...........................................................................................................................................................................123 Measuring Results................................................................................................................................................................... 125 Quarterly Performance Review.................................................................................................................................125 Key Intended Outcome Analysis..............................................................................................................................125 Initiative Analysis............................................................................................................................................................125 Supplier and Partner Performance Data................................................................................................................125 Sustainability Indicators..............................................................................................................................................125 Fiscal Year 2014 KIO Summary...................................................................................................................................126 Composite Indicators....................................................................................................................................................131 Fiscal Year 2014 Initiative Summary........................................................................................................................134 Customer Requirements Analysis..................................................................................................................................... 140 Overview...........................................................................................................................................................................140 Residential Satisfaction Survey Results..................................................................................................................140 Business Survey Summary..........................................................................................................................................145 Workforce Analysis........................................................................................................................................................149 SWOT..................................................................................................................................................................................150 Neighborhood Meetings.............................................................................................................................................151 CityHelpDesk Responses.............................................................................................................................................152 Benchmarking.......................................................................................................................................................................... 153 Process Improvement Teams.............................................................................................................................................. 154 Cross-Functional Teams...............................................................................................................................................154 Special Department Teams.........................................................................................................................................155 Awards and Special Recognitions..................................................................................................................................... 156

City of Coral Springs, Florida

83


Introduction The Strategy Behind the Plan The Business Plan outlines how City resources will be applied within our five priority areas to achieve the objectives determined by the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan represents the second year in the current strategic planning process. Our strategic planning delivers a mission and a set of strategic priorities that provide vision and direction for the City. While it has evolved over the years, true to the spirit of continuous improvement, it is still the linchpin in linking our day-to-day activities with the mission that we aspire to achieve. We often say the Business Plan gives “feet” to our priorities and Key Intended Outcomes, as well as establishes a structure for resource allocation. With the strategic priorities set—and appropriate outcomes identified—the operations of the City are reviewed and redeployed to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific initiatives are developed in response to the priorities identified in the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic priorities, capturing the City’s vision in a specific, directed, and quantifiable form. The Market Environment section is the result of an environmental scan performed prior to the strategic planning process. It is presented in its complete form in the Strategic Planning Workbook and then updated and summarized here in the Business Plan. We look at local demographic and economic market forces to identify emerging issues and items of concern to our residents. Direct customer feedback is solicited through surveys, focus groups, and town meetings, which becomes the basis for the Commission’s strategic planning. Our Service and Operations Strategy is organized by strategic priority to document the steps we are taking to achieve the intended outcomes for each of the priority areas. Key Intended Outcomes, set by the Commission, are the measurable results we intend to achieve. The Financial Strategy provides a summary of the tactics we are employing to maintain our stable financial condition and respond to the lingering effects of the recent severe national recession. To monitor the success of the Business Plan, we use a number of measurements, as detailed in the Measuring Results section. We report survey results as part of the Customer Requirements Analysis, even though they are initially examined during the Commission’s strategic planning.

84

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Market Environment Market Environment Overview While the economy is growing slowly, it continues to gain steam and the momentum is expected to continue. The steady rise in the Index of Leading Economic Indicators and strong consumer demand, driven by increased employment and growth in disposable income, has convinced economists the economy will heat up in the second half of 2014. In fact, GDP is expected to grow by 3.3% in the second quarter of 2014 which is a welcome change from the 1.9% growth in GDP for all of 2013. In fact, economists are expecting GDP growth to be in the 3% range through 2017. Economic sentiment has improved to the point where all economic indicators are now pointing in a positive direction. The national unemployment rate fell to 6.1% in June which is the lowest rate since 2008 and inflation continues to trend below the Fed’s target rate of 2%. The consumer confidence index (base year 1985 = 100) improved three points between May (82.2) and June (85.2) of this year to its highest level since January 2008. While consumer spending has averaged a 2.2% growth rate between 2009 and 2013, consumer spending grew by 3.3% in the first quarter of 2014. This trend of 3% plus growth is expected to continue through 2017. Even the U.S. Department of Energy is predicting that gasoline prices will decline “a few pennies” in 2015. In our previous Environmental Scan we cautioned that political and policy uncertainty at the national level had the potential to dampen the lackluster economic recovery, which in turn could negatively impact the City’s financial health. During the past year, however, the Federal budget and debt ceiling agreement and the Federal Reserve’s decision to reduce its bond purchase program, known as “quantitative easing”, provided the market with a degree of comfort that a sustainable economic

recovery was not only possible but probable. The stock market responded with a 20% increase in the Dow over the past year. In fact, the stock market is up more than 150% since the low in March 2009. Perhaps due to the slow nature of this economic recovery, experts are cautious, sprinkling their growth forecasts with caveats. In recent congressional testimony, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said “although the economy continues to improve, the recovery is not yet complete.” The fly in the ointment is the recent tendency of employers to hire parttime and temporary employees rather than full-time help which limits income growth. Of most concern is the labor under-utilization rate (commonly referred to as “U-6”). U-6 includes the unemployed who are looking for work as well as discouraged workers (i.e., those who have stopped looking for work). Nationally, this figure stands at 12.3% or nearly twice the unemployment rate. The number of discouraged workers in Florida remains stubbornly high due to the large number of workers previously employed in the construction industry who have not been able to secure employment since the housing bubble burst. Although most economists agree that business is basically healthy, we would be remiss if we ignored the potential dangers identified in the Environmental Scan. Therefore, the City will adopt an optimistic yet cautious attitude toward the economy. This is an important distinction because it will guide our financial strategy of projecting a moderate growth philosophy while at the same time taking steps to protect ourselves if the economic recovery is not as strong as hoped.

Yield Curve May Indicate Future Economic Growth 4.00% 3.50%

Historically, the yield curve has had some predictive power for the US economy. A flattening of the curve tends to foretell slower economic growth, while a greater curving, such as the 3/11/2014 data shows, may be a sign of future growth.

3.00% 2.50% 2.00% 1.50% 1.00%

Source: US Department of Treasury,

0.50% 0.00%

Daily Treasury Yield Curve Rates

3 Month

6 Month

1 Year

2 Year

3/12/12

3/11/13

5 Year

10 Year

30 Year

3/11/14

City of Coral Springs, Florida

85


Business Environment is Healthy - Unemployment Rates Recovering 12%

11.2%

10%

9.5%

8.9% 8.5%

8%

10.5% 8.9%

8.8%

7.6%

6%

5.1%

5.0%

4%

3.3%

3.4%

2% 0%

8.7% 8.1%

8.5%

7.6% 7.5%

6.8%

5.4%

6.3% 5.7%

4.7%

Source: FL Dept of Economic Opportunity - Labor Market 4.6%

4.1%

3.3%

3.2%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Coral Springs

2011

National

2012

The unemployment rate fell to 6.1 percent in mid 2014, the lowest since September 2008 when the financial crisis struck full force. Consecutive months of job gains in 2014 makes it clear that the US economy is moving back to full health.

2013

Statistics

May-14

Florida

Recovery is not Robust - Percent Change in GDP Urges Caution 1

5.0%

Bad weather hit much of the US in early 2014, providing a significant drag on the economy, but this was seen as a temporary contraction. Midway through 2014, the economy is still expanding according to The Conference Board Leading Economic Index for the US and may pick up in the second half of the year.

4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0%

Source: US Bureau of Economic Analysis

‐1.0%

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Q4 2012

Q1 2013

Q2 2013

Q3 2013

Q4 2013

Q1 2014

‐2.0% ‐3.0%

Future is Uncertain - CPI Bears ‐4.0% Watching 6.0%

1

The Fed has kept interest rates at historic lows. The focus has been to let the economy gather strength. Inflation, as indicated by the change in the CPI (Consumer Price Index), may become a concern if it exceeds the central bank’s 2 percent target. With an escalating situation in Iraq, a major world oil producer, inflation is expected to push higher in the coming months, posing a potential threat to the City’s ability to forecast and manage expenditures.

5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0% 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013 Apr‐14

‐1.0% MIA/FL

86

US

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

1

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics


Real Estate Trends For Fiscal Year 2015, the City’s total taxable assessed value increased 5.35%. This is the third year in a row that values have gone up, following a 4.08% increase last year and a 1.22% increase in the City’s first year of recovery. This increase in values means one of the City’s primary revenue sources, ad valorem taxes, will increase. However, compared to the surrounding municipalities, Coral Springs is lagging. The average increase for all of Broward County was 7.24% and the City’s non-residential values have seen virtually no growth since 2009.

In April 2014, cash sales in Broward accounted for 39% of all closed sales of single-family homes and 75% of all closed sales of townhouses/condos. These percentages indicate that investors (hedge funds, foreign investors, high net-worth buyers) still play a significant role in the market and, specifically, in the steady increase in sale prices over the past year. At the local level, Coral Springs median sales prices for the first quarter of 2014 were $320,000 for single-family homes and $86,000 for condos. New Residential Development In December 2012, the City Commission approved a change in land use on the former Broken Woods Golf Club to allow for 436 new residential units. City staff worked closely with the property owner to ensure that the maximum amount of buffering would be provided between the proposed development and those properties currently abutting the property. On the north parcel of Broken Woods, the developer has proposed 188 single-family, zero-lot line homes, while on the south parcel, 80 townhomes and 168 three-story, multi-family units are proposed. The developer is currently undergoing site plan review, and construction on this development could commence in late 2014.

Housing Recovery After several years of reduced inventory following the realestate market crash, the current residential real estate market in Broward County is experiencing an increased inventory. According to a FloridaRealtors® recent article, “In April, prices continued to rise, which has two effects on the market. One is that potential sellers are now becoming actual sellers, and secondly, fewer homes are underwater. Also, an uptick in inventory indicates an equal opportunity for buyers and sellers.” According to the Greater Fort Lauderdale Realtors® Monthly Market Summary for April 2014, there has been a 41.2% increase in inventory (active listings) in Broward County, compared to April 2013. Even as the inventory increases, the average percent of original price received for closed single-family sales remained very high at 95% of the listing price in April 2014, with a median 36 days on the market. The median sale price of single-family homes in Broward County was $273,000 in April 2014, an increase of 9% from the year before. Likewise, the median sale price of condos increased to $120,000, over 14% higher than April 2013.

Thirty-six new single family homes have received their certificate of occupancy and have been purchased by new homeowners on the La Placida site now called Daniela Springs. Development of this site also included a pocket park along the north side of the project along La Placida Drive. In summer of 2014, the owners of Coral Springs Country Club proposed building 255 high-rise units on the northern portion of the golf course property fronting Sample Road. The project will also include redevelopment of the golf course clubhouse, tennis courts, and parking. Construction is expected to begin in 2015.

Median Single-Family Home Sales Prices in Broward County $300,000  $280,000  $260,000  $240,000  $220,000  $200,000  $180,000  $160,000  $140,000  $120,000 May‐14

Mar‐14

Jan‐14

Nov‐13

Sep‐13

Jul‐13

Mar‐13

May‐13

Jan‐13

Nov‐12

Jul‐12

Sep‐12

May‐12

Mar‐12

Jan‐12

Nov‐11

Sep‐11

Jul‐11

Mar‐11

May‐11

$100,000

Source: Greater Ft. Lauderdale Realtors Monthly Market Summary reports

City of Coral Springs, Florida

87


Leading Indicator of Foreclosures  Steadily Declining Coral Springs Properties in Some Stage of Foreclosure 5,000

Coral Springs Properties in Lis Pendens/Final Judgment

4,500

This chart shows the total properties in Lis Pendens or Final Judgement, which are the properties actively progressing through the foreclosure process. In total, the City also tracks CET (real estate or bank owned) properties, because, although CET properties have completed the foreclosure process, they may not be occupied, posing a potential hazard.

4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

Source: CoreLogic RealQuest

Economic Development

Source: CoreLogic RealQuest

Resolving Foreclosures

The number of residential properties in some stage of foreclosure (including CETs, which are real estate/bank owned) peaked at nearly 5,500 in May 2010. Since then the figure has dropped to 2,017 as of April 2014 (394 real estate owned; 937 pre-foreclosure; 686 auction), a 63% decrease. Specifically, the number of initial filings (lis pendens) has been steadily declining, while the number of final judgments (auctions) and REOs is increasing, as the cases move through the legal system. The City expects residential foreclosures will continue to decline during 2014, further stabilizing the housing market. Vacancies Start to Fill Up The non-residential real estate cycle started its decline later than the housing market and is expected to follow the housing market to recovery. Vacancy is a good barometer for the economy and the City expects to begin filling up the empty spaces. This is particularly true for retail, with industrial to follow. Over the last two years, the City has attracted major national and regional retailers including Marshalls, Sports Authority, Buca Di Beppo, BJ’s Brewhouse, Bravo Supermarket, and Brass Tap. Scheduled to open in summer 2014 are BJ’s Wholesale Club, and Dick’s Sporting Goods at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Riverside Drive. With the addition of SteinMart and Hobby Lobby, nearly all of the “big box” spaces within the City have been filled. There are a few projects on the horizon that may have a large impact on the City’s nonresidential market in 2014, including three potential largescale development projects in the Corporate Park. Business development continues to grow with 320 new business tax receipts issued since October 2013.

88

The City of Coral Springs is embarking on a new path for economic development. Based on the findings and recommendations of a recently completed Economic Development Strategic Plan, the City will terminate its agreement with the Coral Springs Economic Development Foundation (EDF) and create an Economic Development Office as a City function. In keeping with its responsibility to establish strategic priorities and policies, the City contracted with Angelou Economics, Inc. in September 2013 to do a comprehensive assessment of the City’s current and projected economic environment. The assessment laid out a long term strategy to address the needs of the entire City to assure continued economic health and tax base expansion. On May 28, 2014 Angelou Economics presented its Strategic Recommendations Report to the City Commission. The recommendations were grouped into the following four priorities • Priority 1: Creating a culture for Coral Springs for the next 40 years • Priority 2: Create entrepreneurial opportunities • Priority 3: Develop target industry clusters by repositioning the Corporate Park as an asset to retain, attract, and recruit new employers • Priority 4: Bring economic development within the City government Angelou Economics recommended that economic development responsibilities be transferred to the City in order to ensure the resources are available to develop and implement a detailed work plan. With this move, the City can assure greater fiscal controls and efficiencies in order to realize the recommendations and associated tasks set forth in the Strategic Plan. The agreement between the EDF and the City was terminated as of September 30, 2014.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


To ensure cross-departmental cooperation, proactive initiatives, and accountable management, the City will hire an Economic Development Manager, along with an administrative assistant. As part of the City Manager’s Office, this function will be charged with implementing the recommendations of the Economic Development Strategic Plan. Having this resource in-house will allow for better accountability, fiscal controls, and operational efficiencies.

Legislative Issues

Downtown Coral Springs

Communication Services Tax

Downtown Coral Springs is within the Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) which contains approximately 136 acres in the vicinity of the Sample Road and University Drive intersection. The most prominent buildings dominating this area were originally built based on a suburban model, as standalone buildings. The goal now is to re-develop this area into a cross-connected, attractive, and vibrant downtown that serves as the functional and symbolic center of the City. The CRA works to achieve this goal by preparing the downtown area for private investment and redevelopment. The CRA’s redevelopment plan calls for converting the Downtown into a true destination that is walkable and makes visitors want to stay a while, providing a sense of place. Its initiatives are focused on infrastructure improvements, increasing opportunities for redevelopment in the downtown area, improving communication with business owners and residents of the downtown area, and reducing commercial vacancies. Much of the groundwork has been laid. Broward College opened a satellite center at the northwest corner of Sample and University in October 2012. Many infrastructure improvements have been enumerated and prioritized, including right turn lanes, traffic light mast arms and bus shelters. In May 2013, the City and the CRA, working with the Urban Land Institute, convened a TAP (technical assistance panel) to discuss and give advice on the southwest quadrant of the Sample Road/ University Drive intersection. The TAP specifically addressed the placement of the new municipal complex, as well as housing, parking, redevelopment, and future land use for this area. For Fiscal Year 2015, the City and the CRA will implement pivotal Business Plan initiatives, such as the Downtown Pathway and the Art Walk, to lay the foundation for future progress. The demolition of City Hall South in June 2014 continues the momentum toward a new Municipal Complex that will be a catalyst for the revitalization of Downtown Coral Springs.

The City is most concerned about legislation that will weaken its home rule authority or impose mandates on the City without a corresponding funding source. The following issues reflect the legislative challenges that require attention of the City staff and clear direction to staff through the strategic and business plan.

Revisions have been made to the definition of “information services” to clarify that such services which allow data to be generated, acquired, stored, processed, or retrieved and delivered by an electronic transmission to a purchaser where the primary purpose for the transaction is the processed data or information be excluded from the definition of “communication services” and are not subject to state and local communications services taxes. The bill has no fiscal impact on local governments and no direct economic impact on the private sector. The bill has been approved by the Governor on May 12, 2014 and was effective July 1, 2014. Pension Reform The proposed amendments specified how insurance premium tax revenues must be used in both police and firefighter pension plans. The pension reform sought to revise the legislation by requiring all firefighter pension plans to meet the requirement of Chapter 175, F.S. and police officer pensions to meet the requirements of Chapter 185, F.S. The reform also sought to increase the percentage of average final compensation from 2.0% to 2.75% and clarifies that a maximum of 300 overtime hours may be included for calculating municipal police plan benefits. In addition, there were proposed changes to the Florida Retirement System which included extending the vesting period for members enrolled in the pension plan from 8 years to 10 years. The bill also extends the disability vesting period for non-duty disability from 8 to 10 years. None of the reforms passed both the Senate and House of Representatives but continued efforts bear watching for the future direction of municipal retirement plans. Emergency Communication – E911 Fee Revisions have been made to the Emergency Communications Number E911 System to allow for collection of the E911 fee on prepaid phones. Under current law, the Emergency Communications Number E911 Act imposes a monthly fee of no more than $0.50 on voice communication services. The proposed revision sets the E911 fee at $0.40 per month, while retaining a cap of $0.50. The E911 fee funds costs incurred by local governments to install and operate 911 systems as well as reimburse wireless providers for costs incurred to provide 911 or E911 services. The bill has been approved by the Governor on June 20, 2014 and was effective July 1, 2014.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

89


Emerging Issues Red Light Camera Program Implemented in 2012, the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s red light camera program was designed to deter drivers from running red lights and reduce serious collisions at dangerous intersections in the City. Since the installation of eight cameras at six intersections, the City has seen a decline in the number of accidents due to changes in driver behavior. A multitude of attempts were made throughout the 2014 Legislative Session to water down revenues collected from red light camera infractions and none of the bills were passed. Charter School Funding No legislation addressed the stability of Charter School funding. However, Public Education Capital Outlay (PECO) was given a more stable funding source by shifting a sales tax on electricity to gross receipts. Charter schools received $75 million of the Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PECO funds, $15 million less than the year before. The PECO program provides funding for capital outlay projects for schools that meet certain criteria set forth by state statute. Texting While Driving A bill that would have established texting and driving as a primary offense never received a hearing in the House or Senate nor did a bill that would have banned all cell phone use by minors while operating a vehicle. However, a bill that would have deemed causing the death of a human or viable fetus while texting and driving a manslaughter offense did make it all the way to before the House and through one committee in the Senate only to fail. Commercial Recycling In 2008, the Florida Legislature first established a new statewide recycling goal of 75% to be achieved by 2020. With the help of an experienced consultant, the City conducted a survey of commercial businesses in Coral Springs to evaluate their recycling practices which resulted in the creation of a strategic plan. Commercial recycling represents 19% of the total waste generated in the City. The baseline recycling rate for the commercial sector is 23%. Approximately 80% of currently disposed commercial waste is recyclable or compostable. To achieve the goal of achieving a 75% City-wide recycling rate by 2020, the City of Coral Springs will address the challenges that businesses face in implementing effective recycling efforts. Staff will continue to research the benefits of incentives versus mandates and the effect of education and outreach practices for local businesses.

90

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Demographic Trends

Population trends Under 5

American Community Survey The U.S. Census Bureau’s Decennial Census provides actual counts of population and housing units every ten years, with the most recent one conducted in 2010. In 2014, the 2010 Decennial Census still remains the best source for reporting basic demographic data, such as population counts, age and race/ethnicity, along with housing unit counts, occupancy and tenure. While the Decennial Census Survey provided an array of other socioeconomic data in the past, that practice was discontinued after the 2000 Census and replaced in 2005 by an annual survey called the American Community Survey (ACS). While the ACS does provide more timely data, it has a reduced sample size and greater sampling error. The ACS collects annual survey information continuously nearly every day of the year through a questionnaire mailed to a sample of households, and then aggregates the results over a specific time period. The ACS data is provided as 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates. The 5-year estimate is considered the most reliable socio-economic/ demographic dataset. The analysis below uses the best available data for each category. Where appropriate, trending was done using the 2000 Census data, along with the 2005-2009 ACS 5-year estimates (earliest 5-year estimates available from the ACS) and 2008-2012 ACS 5-year estimates (most recent estimates available from the ACS). A number of trends are worth monitoring as they may indicate the need for a new mix of services. Some trends include the increase in the proportion of residents over the age of 65, the decrease in proportion of school age residents, the rise in college students, and the growing number of multilingual residents. Population In the State of Florida, the most accurate municipal level population estimates in the intercensal years are produced by the University of Florida’s Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR). According to the BEBR’s 2013 estimates, the City of Coral Springs had a population of 122,994, a slight increase over the 2010 Census estimate of 121,096. The 2010 Census reported the gender distribution as 52% female and 48% male. The median age was 36.5 years. Population under

Population age

Age 5-17 7.0% 8.8% 28.4%

Age 18-34

Age 35-49

Age 65+ 7.9%

20.5%

28.1%

23.6%

24.9%

21.2%

23.8%

23.8%

20.8%

7.1% 1990

6.9% 2000

5.8% 2010

21.4%

Data Source: Decennial Census 1990, 2000 and 2010

18 made up 27% of the City’s total population, while senior population (age 65 and over) made up only 8% of the City’s total population. While Coral Springs is a “young” community, especially when compared to Broward County and the United States, there has been some “aging” of the population over the past 20 years. Population under 18 years old has decreased its share of total population by roughly 14% since 1990, while the “baby boomers” group grew significantly – age group 50-64 increased its share of the population by over 130% since 1990. Race and Ethnicity The 1990-2000 comparison of the City’s racial/ethnic make-up shows an increasingly diverse community: This significant change over the past twenty years is best reflected in the growth of the minority population which reached 48% of the City’s total population in 2010, compared to only 13% in 1990. African-American (Non-Hispanic) population has grown considerably, from only 3.2% of the City’s total population in 1990 to 17.1% in 2010. While the minority population as a whole has increased in the past 20 years, it is the Hispanic population that has seen the greatest growth – its share of the City’s total population grew from 7.1% in 1990 to 23.5% in 2010, an increase of 231%.

1990 Growing Hispanic Population Hispanic or Latino Non-Hispanic Other Non-Hispanic Black

90% 80%

Age 5-17 20.8%

Age 50-64

6.0% 14.1%

100%

Under 5 Age 65+ 5.8% 7.9% Age 50-64 20.5%

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

70% 60% 50% 40% 30%

Age 35-49 23.6%

Non-Hispanic White

20%

Age 18-34 21.4%

10% 0% 1990

Data Source: 2010 Census

City of Coral Springs, Florida

2000

2010

Data Source: Decennial Census 1990,  2000 and 2010

91


Households and Families The 2010 Census reported there were an estimated 41,814 households in the City, with the average household size of 2.9 people. Families made up 78% of the City’s households (higher than Broward County’s 63% and the nation’s 66%). This figure includes both married-couple families (55%) and “other” families – female householder, no husband present (17%) and male householder, no wife present (6%). Family households with children accounted for 40% of total households in Coral Springs (higher than Broward County’s 29% and the nation’s 30%). The average family size was 3.3 people. Most of the nonfamily households were people living alone. Nativity and Foreign Born The 2008-2012 ACS estimate reports that 73% of the people living in Coral Springs were native residents of the United States. Thirty percent of these residents were born in Florida. Twenty-seven percent of the people living in Coral Springs were foreign born. Of the foreign born population, 53 percent were naturalized U.S. citizens and 97.5 percent entered the country before the year 2010.

Place of birth Percentage of Foreign Born

Percentage of Native Born

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30%

Top 10 Ethnic Groups for Foreign Born Population Total

% of Population

Jamaica

4,406

3.6%

Colombia

4,201

3.4%

Haiti

3,711

3.0%

Peru

1,669

1.4%

India

1,427

1.2%

Brazil

1,380

1.1%

Venezuela

1,161

0.9%

Trinidad and Tobago

1,094

0.9%

Dominican Republic

1,083

0.9%

Cuba

1,063

0.9%

Top 10 Ethnic Groups by First Ancestry Reported Total

% of Population

Italian

10,038

8.2%

Irish

7,670

6.3%

German

7,223

5.9%

Haitian

5,778

4.7%

Jamaican

5,393

4.4%

American

4,824

3.9%

Russian

4,530

3.7%

English

4,116

3.4%

Polish

3,447

2.8%

French (except Basque)

1,847

1.5%

20% 10%

Geographic Mobility

0% 2000 Census

2005-2009 ACS Estimate

2008-2012 ACS Estimate

While foreign born residents of Coral Springs come from different parts of the world, a great majority (75%) were born in Latin America, 13 percent in Asia, and 8 percent in Europe. It is important to note that two of the top three ethnic groups for foreign born population are the West Indies’ countries of Jamaica and Haiti. Although foreign born population is dominated by Latin American nationalities, the most prevalent ancestry is still European, as noted in the following table.

92

Eighty-five percent of the people at least one year old living in Coral Springs were living in the same residence one year earlier. Those who do move tend to stay in Broward County. Language Among people at least five years old living in Coral Springs, roughly one-third (34%) spoke a language other than English at home. One-fifth (20%) of residents over the age of five spoke Spanish, while 10 percent spoke an Indo-European language. One-third (33%) of those who spoke a language other than English at home reported that they did not speak English “very well”. The number of multilingual residents has increased, though the number and percentage that report they did not speak English “very well” has decreased since the early 2000’s.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Language spoken at home 100% 90% 80%

Other languages

70%

Asian and Pacific Islander

60%

The 2008-2012 ACS provides additional characteristics of occupied housing units. Eighty-one percent of the owner occupied housing units had a mortgage. Roughly 2 percent of all occupied households did not have telephone service. Five percent had no vehicle available and 21 percent had three or more available.

50%

Other Indo-European

Housing Costs

40%

Spanish

30%

English only

The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners was $2,281, nonmortgaged owners $690, and renters $1,310. Fifty percent of owners with mortgages, 20 percent of owners without mortgages, and 62 percent of renters in Coral Springs spent 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

20% 10% 0% 2000 Census

2005-2009 ACS Estimate

2008-2012 ACS Estimate

Education

Housing Characteristics The 2010 Census reported a total count of 45,433 housing units in Coral Springs - 92 percent were occupied and 8 percent were vacant. Among the occupied housing units, 65 percent were owner-occupied and 35 percent were renter-occupied.

The total school enrollment in Coral Springs was approximately 39,000. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment was 3,700 and elementary through high school enrollment was approximately 24,500 children. College or graduate school enrollment was 10,700.

Housing Percentage of Occupied

Ninety percent of people 25 years and over had at least a high school diploma or completed some level of college: 24 percent had a high school diploma only, 10 percent had an associate degree, 35 percent had a bachelor’s degree or higher, 23 percent had some college but no degree. Seven percent had not received their high school diploma.

Percentage of Vacant

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

School enrollment (age 3 and older) 50%

Percetage of Nursery School, Preschool

45% 40%

Percentage of Kindergarten

35% 2000 Census

2005-2009 ACS Estimate

2010 Census

2008-2012 ACS Estimate

30% 25% 20%

According to the 2008-2012 ACS, close to 90% of all housing units in Coral Springs were built between 1970-1999, with a fairly similar share of units built in each of those three decades.

15% 10% 5% 0% 2000 Census

Majority of housing units were built between 1970-1999 0% Built 2010 or later

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

0.10%

Built 2000 to 2009

9.9%

Built 1990 to 1999

27.7%

Built 1980 to 1989

31.6%

Built 1970 to 1979 Built 1960 to 1969

35%

27.4% 2.6%

Built 1950-1959

0.4%

Built 1940 to 1949

0.0%

Built 1939 or earlier

0.3%

2005-2009 ACS Estimate

2008-2012 ACS Estimate

Percentage of Elementary School (Grades 1-8) Percentage of High School Grade (Grades 9-12) Percentage of College or Graduate School

Employment Status and Type of Employer In Coral Springs, 65 percent of the population 16 and over were employed; 26 percent were not currently in the labor force. Eighty-three percent of the people employed were private wage and salary workers; 11 percent were federal, state, or local government workers; and 6 percent were self-employed in their own (not incorporated) business.

Data Source: 2008‐2012 ACS 5‐year estimates

City of Coral Springs, Florida

93


Commuting to Work

Health Insurance

Eighty-one percent of Coral Springs workers drove to work alone, and nine percent carpooled. Among those who commuted to work, it took them on average 27 minutes to get to work. Nearly 40 percent of all workers in Coral Springs travel to work between 30-60 minutes.

During 2008-2012, among the civilian non-institutionalized population in Coral Springs, 80 percent had health insurance coverage and 20 percent did not have health insurance coverage. For those under 18 years of age, 13 percent had no health insurance coverage.

Commute time to work

Poverty

0% 90+ minutes

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

1.10%

60-89 minutes

6.1%

30-59 minutes

38.0%

15-29 minutes

32.1%

<15 minutes

Nine percent of Coral Springs residents had incomes below the poverty level during the 12 months before the ACS survey was conducted. Eight percent of people 65 years old and over were below the poverty level. Seven percent of all families were below the poverty level, 11 percent were related children under 18, and 18 percent of families with a female householder and no husband present had incomes below the poverty level. Poverty thresholds vary depending on the size of the family, number of children under 18, and age of the householder. For instance, in 2012 the threshold was $11,011 for a person 65 years and older living alone. The threshold for a family with two adults and two children was $23,283.

22.7%

Data Source: 2008‐2012 ACS 5‐year estimates

Income The 2008-2012 ACS reported the median household income in Coral Springs at $68,255. Seven percent of households had income below $15,000 a year and 14 percent had income over $150,000 or more. The estimated median family income was $74,857.

Income

Population below poverty level 20% 18% 16% 65 years and over

14% 12%

$80,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000

$74,857 $68,255

All Families

10% $62,353 $64,585

8%

Related children under 18 years

6%

$51,603 $53,046

Families with female householder

4%

$40,000

2%

$30,000

0%

$20,000

2000 Census

$10,000 $0 Median Household Income

Median Family Income

Data Source: Decennial Census 1990, 2000 and 2010

94

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

2005-2009 2008-2012 ACS Estimate ACS Estimate


Service and Service andOperations OperationsStrategy Strategy This Business Plan covers the second year within a two-year Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2014 and 2015. The five priorities identified by the City Commission for this strategic planning cycle set the agenda for this Business Plan, namely: • A Family-Friendly Community • A Thriving Business Community • An Active, Healthy Community • An Attractive Community • An Innovative, High-Performing Organization While the Strategic Plan sets out the vision, the Business Plan outlines tangible plans for making the vision a reality. In each of the priority areas, department directors have developed initiatives that will direct the way the City operates in order to address our five priorities and implement the vision expressed in the Strategic Plan. A Word About Existing Services and Ongoing Initiatives In some sections, we have highlighted initiatives that were in previous Business Plans that are still being implemented in Fiscal Year 2015. Generally, if an initiative is fully operational and integrated into our service package, it will not be mentioned. The emphasis is on multiyear implementation and the evolution of existing initiatives. For more detail about the services we provide and the performance measures we use to manage those services, please reference the departmental sections of the Annual Budget.

Our New Initiatives Initiatives are developed that will assist us in achieving our Key Intended Outcomes. We include those we feel are significant contributors to supporting our strategic priorities or put additional demands on our resources. In this way, we identify the most significant actions we plan to take next year. Fiscal Year 2015 will present new opportunities. Adhering to our successful business model, we will be looking forward to continued recovery from the Great Recession. This Business Plan includes several initiatives designed to proactively prime the engine of economic growth by assisting our existing business community and deploying resources to encourage redevelopment of commercial areas such as the Downtown. In addition, because aesthetics and overall attractiveness of a community have been shown to be essential to draw new businesses and residents, a number of Business Plan initiatives will enhance the City’s appearance and overall safety. Wherever applicable, operating expenditures have been identified for the first year only. Capital expenditures also reflect only the first year of the project, and do not include capital carrying costs.

City of Coral Springs’ Business Model Citizen Input

Data Analysis

Strategic Plan Business Plan Budgets Output to Citizens

City of Coral Springs, Florida

95


A Family-Friendly Community New Initiatives Community Paramedicine Lead Department: Fire/EMS Estimated Revenue: $231,801 (General Fund) Operating Expenses: $337,560 (68.7% General Fund/31.3% Fire) Capital Outlay: Existing Alternative emergency medical services (EMS) models are necessary because of anticipated increases in service demand as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and expansion of Medicaid. EMS is considered an essential resource in achieving the “Triple Aim” of the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The goals are to reduce the cost of health care delivery, improve the health of a population, and improve quality of care. The Coral Springs Fire Department is developing a Community Paramedicine program based on best practices from several agencies throughout the nation. Community Paramedicine is an innovative way to meet the demands of our customers while maintaining a high quality of service. As part of this innovative service model, the City will establish a mobile integrated health care unit using an existing ALS-equipped (advanced life support) vehicle staffed by one Coral Springs Fire Department paramedic and one registered nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant provided by the local hospital.

The rescue vehicle will be outfitted with an examination stretcher and will be stocked with ALS supplies and equipment, as well as all the supplies commonly found in the fast track area of the hospital emergency room (stitching, stapling, diagnostic equipment, soft casting, etc...) The vehicle will eventually carry mobile diagnostic equipment such as a portable radiology machine and portable scanning equipment. A state of the art communication system will allow providers to interact with medical direction via telemedicine. Services provided by the mobile integrated health care unit will include treatment of low severity medical issues, such as basic wound care, x-rays for possible fractures, pediatric fever, and flu-like symptoms. This innovative health care delivery initiative will establish the Coral Springs Fire Department as an active partner in residents’ health care management, with an expanding presence in all stages of treatment including prevention and follow up. To coordinate, implement and deliver the Community Paramedicine initiative, the Department will hire a Public Education Officer (PEO), who will also be called upon to support about 20 on-going educational programs. Some of these programs include Safety Town, Baby Safe Sleep, Choices (distracted driving prevention), Prom Scare, and child seat safety inspections. In addition, the PEO will implement new programs for senior citizens as well as raise public awareness through social media outlets. An existing part-time office assistant will be converted to full-time to support the program’s administrative needs.

FY 2014 Goal

FY 2015 Goal

2,600

2,600

Resident rating of City efforts to prevent crime (Resident Survey)

92%

Resident rating of City Government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)

94%

(Biz) 96%

(Res) 96%

Number of students attending classes at Broward College at Coral Springs Academic Center

3,500

4,000

Coral Springs Charter School graduation rate

95%

95%

A

A

200

200

Key Intended Outcomes City crime rate (crimes/100,000 residents—Calendar Year)

Ratings of Quality of Life (Resident and Business Surveys)

Coral Springs Charter School school grade Injury accidents at or near 15 major intersections in the City

96

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fire Stations 43 and 95

CSI Building Renovation

Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Lead Department: Police

Capital Outlay: $5.1 million

Capital Outlay: $950,000

Fire Station 43 was erected in 1988, before Hurricane Andrew. Fire Station 95 was built eighteen years ago in 1995. Both stations were constructed before the Coral Springs Fire Department became a career force, and were designed to house apparatus and gear, not full-time staff. The Department has since changed from a volunteer department (established in 1971) serving a developing suburban city to a full-time professional department in a city with a growing urban center.

The CSI (Crime Scene Investigations) Unit is a specialized civilian unit of the Coral Springs Police Department, processing crime scenes, including the documentation and collection of evidence. The evidence collected is brought back to and housed in the CSI building, where further in-depth forensic examination is conducted. The CSI Unit also provides assistance to other agencies such as neighboring police departments, Broward Sheriff’s Office, and the State Fire Marshall’s Office.

Additional missions brought on by 9/11 require the Fire Department to respond to emergencies not imagined when these stations were built. Natural disasters like the devastation wreaked on South Florida during the 2005 hurricane season, in which six named storms impacted the State, present a special challenge for ensuring our fire stations weather these storms and preserve our Department’s ability to respond. The architectural and engineering designs have been completed to rebuild Stations 43 and 95 to meet today’s challenges. The new designs ensure these stations meet the recommended safety requirements for the staff who live in the stations and accommodate male and female firefighters with adequate sleeping and working areas to perform their jobs as emergency responders.

The CSI Unit is currently housed in a small, single-story building adjacent to the main, three-story Public Safety Building. This building has not been updated since its original construction in 2001, when it was built to accommodate a staff of eight. Since then, the volume of work has necessitated adding four additional Crime Scene Investigators. As a result of the increased staffing, additional work spaces were integrated into the office area. Likewise, existing workspaces were consolidated to accommodate equipment acquired due to advancements in forensic sciences.

The City plans to obtain a general obligation bond to finance the construction phase of these two fire stations. If the bond issue is approved by voters on the November ballot, construction is planned to begin in Fiscal Year 2015.

Additional Patrol Officers

Such advancements, like those in DNA, have dictated the creation of dedicated areas to handle, document, process, and package evidence to lessen the potential for crosscontamination. The current building cannot accommodate these dedicated areas and staff cannot work on their cases simultaneously without the risk of cross-contamination. An expansion and renovation of the current building will provide dedicated evidence handling space and office space. The expansion will also accommodate the equipment needed to keep pace with technological advancements. The City plans to obtain a general obligation bond to finance the construction of a second floor to the current CSI building and renovate the existing space, to be voted on by residents in November 2014.

Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: $261,408 Capital Outlay: $12,000 In December 2011, the Police Department formed the BEAR (Burglary Enforcement and Reduction) unit to address a rising burglary rate in our city. Seven officers were reallocated from existing manpower to staff the BEAR unit. Using proactive methods, such as analyzing crime statistics to determine times and locations where burglaries are likely to occur, educating residents on crime-prevention tactics, and conducting highvisibility patrols, this unit has effectively reduced the burglary rate. However, a void was left in the Operations Division when the BEAR unit was formed. Three officers were added in Fiscal Year 2013 to lessen the impact and three more are planned to be added in Fiscal Year 2015. This will return the Police Department to staffing levels that ensure an effective and efficient response to the City’s public safety needs.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

97


Ongoing Initiatives

Safety Town Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Appropriation (Grant) Funds: $250,000 (28% of total cost)

Drowning Prevention (2007-2015)

Capital Outlay: $650,000

Lead Departments: Fire/EMS, Communications and Marketing

During the school year, Safety Town hosts about 2,500 kindergarten children from public and private schools throughout Coral Springs teaching them fire safety, pedestrian and bicycle safety, how to cross the street safely, stranger danger and more. There is no charge for the school children.

Operating Expenses: Existing

Appropriations funds were received in 2014 to help offset the cost to replace the 18 year old “Safety Town” trailer with a concrete building. Replacement of the current trailer is necessary due to the wear and tear, roof issues and overall repair needed to make the trailer safe for the children who pass through on an almost daily basis. This building will be used to provide a comprehensive early childhood, hands-on safety education program designed to introduce all kinds of safety situations to children between the ages of 4 ½ and 6 ½.

University Drive LED Street Light Pilot Lead Department: Public Works

Drowning is a leading cause of death among kids and, in Florida, is the number one cause of death in children under age five. Too many families in and around Coral Springs have experienced this unimaginably horrible family tragedy. In a majority of the drowning deaths, the child has been seen five minutes or less before being missed and subsequently found in the pool. The City makes it a priority to heighten community awareness and focus on prevention efforts. The Coral Springs Fire Department, together with various local partners, administers a program called “Watch Your Kid, You’ll Be Glad You Did”. This effort coordinates with community groups to present educational sessions that raise community awareness and provide pool safety instruction. Multiple media approaches are employed to reach as many people as possible, including numerous public service announcements. The City will continue this effort, and will look for new and improved program enhancements for Fiscal Year 2015.

Capital Outlay: $20,000 Falling prices are spurring a global transition from older lamp technologies to the much-touted improved safety and efficiency of LED street lights. FDOT (Florida Department of Transportation) has initiated numerous pilot programs around the State, catching the attention of local communities. LED lighting provides a true, color-rendering, white light, compared to the yellowish glow of today’s high pressure sodium lamps. Proponents claim this white light improves vision for motorists and pedestrians, allowing for faster, easier recognition of movement along roadways, providing more reaction time. The white light may also promote a more lively, friendly atmosphere, making architecture appear more authentic. Some studies show LED lighting contributes to an enhanced feeling of safety, allowing people to recognize faces and colors more easily. LED lights have been shown to reduce energy consumption up to 50% and last longer, resulting in energy and maintenance savings. In order to verify the presumptive benefits of LED street lights, the City will retrofit 11 existing light fixtures on a section of University Drive, between 28th Street and 31st Street. After installation, message boards will be posted along University Drive to encourage public feedback and comment. An evaluation will be made to determine if the benefits of LED truly exist without jeopardizing mandated lighting standards.

98

Public Safety Dispatch Equipment Upgrade (2013-2015) Lead Department: Police Capital Outlay: $5.5M This project’s goal is to replace the existing analog communication equipment with an improved technology system. The current communication system is more than 15 years old and critical components of the system are no longer supported by the manufacturer. A study was conducted to analyze the existing public safety radio system and the alternative solutions for the upgrade. This project provides an opportunity not only to upgrade the technology, but also to provide interoperability with other agencies, a necessary factor in coordinating large-scale emergency response. The City plans to obtain a General Obligation Bond to finance the acquisition of the new dispatch equipment, to be voted on by residents in November 2014.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Public Safety Technology Upgrade (2013-2015)

Teen Political Forum (2008-2015)

Lead Department: Information Services

Lead Department: Human Resources

Capital Outlay: $150,000

Operating Expenses: $7,500

The City has an ongoing program to bring technology up to date for emergency responders who rely on state of the art software to deliver concise and reliable information when fighting crime in the community, conducting forensic analysis and investigations. The City is in the process of migrating to a new enterprise software system because the system in place since the early 1990’s, SunGard’s H.T.E. AS/400 software, is no longer being developed and supported. Implementation of a replacement is occurring in phases.

The purpose of the Teen Political Forum is to have city and county elected officials enlighten students with their personal experiences in public office and address teen issues of interest, concluding with a Q & A from the student audience. This is a great educational opportunity for students to talk directly to their elected officials and feel that their voices are heard on topics that are significant to them. A Steering Committee, made up of select high school students, plans and implements the program, under the supervision of City staff, which further develops their leadership skills.

Currently the software being considered for the Police Department is OneSolution Public Safety (OSPS), which provides a Windows look and feel that is more user-friendly and runs on a less expensive hardware system. The contract negotiations for OSPS begin in August 2014 and are expected to be complete by the end of 2014. Information Services has determined that the processing capacity for OSPS currently exists in the City. The Police Department is scheduled to begin the upgrade in 2015 with full deployment expected by 2016.

Multi-cultural Events (1995-2015)

The event is open to all high school students who live in Coral Springs or who attend local high schools: Coral Springs High, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High, Coral Glades High, Coral Springs Charter, J. P. Taravella High and Coral Springs Christian Academy. Service hours are offered for attending the Forum. Students who are home-schooled or attend private schools and live in Coral Springs are also welcome. The 2014 event was attended by approximately 950 students. The City plans to host this successful event again in Fiscal Year 2015.

Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing Each year, the City promotes a number of events and programs to strengthen the ethnic, religious and cultural bond within the community. By focusing on diversity and respect, we become stronger as an inclusive community and add value to our lives through understanding, acceptance and appreciation of others. These events and programs are designed to appeal to every segment of the population from students, teachers to families and businesses. In Fiscal Year 2015, the following events and programs will be held. • 25th Anniversary of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration • Worldfest • National Day of Prayer • CommuniTea • Celebration of International Day of Peace • International Dinner Dance In addition, diversity/leadership programs will be conducted in elementary, middle and high schools to raise awareness and respect for different cultures, religions and disabilities, with special emphasis on anti-bullying.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

99


A Thriving Business Community New Initiatives

Economic Development Office

40-Year-Old Building Inspections Lead Department: Development Services Operating Expenses: Existing In January 2006, Broward County adopted a 40-Year-Old Building Safety Inspection Program, the goal of which is to minimize the public’s exposure to safety hazards caused by aging, dilapidated structures. This County program requires structural and electrical safety inspections be conducted on large (3,500 square feet or larger) commercial and multi-family buildings that are 40 years old or more. Exempted from this program are single-family residences and duplexes, federal and state buildings, Broward County schools, and buildings under 3,500 square feet. The City Building Official receives a list of the buildings meeting this program’s criteria every year from Broward County and a Notice of Inspection letter is sent to each applicable property owner. The property owner has 90 days to submit structural and electrical safety inspection reports from an architect or engineer to the Building Division for review, incurring a $300 review fee. No additional City staffing or expenses are planned in order to fully meet the requirements of this program. This initiative is being highlighted this year because as the City ages, the number of buildings subject to this Broward County requirement is increasing. In Fiscal Year 2013, 43 properties fell under the requirements of this program. In Fiscal Year 2014 an estimated 55 properties reached their 40 year anniversary, and in Fiscal Year 2015 another 44 buildings are expected to be subject to the County’s safety requirements.

Lead Department: City Manager’s Office Operating Expenses: $250,000 As a result of a previous initiative, a consulting firm developed an Economic Development Strategic Plan to work toward future economic prosperity for the City. A key component of this Plan is to establish an Economic Development Office within the City’s organizational structure, instead of outsourcing these efforts to the Economic Development Foundation. To ensure cross-departmental cooperation, proactive initiatives, and accountable management, the City will hire an Economic Development Manager, along with an administrative assistant. As part of the City Manager’s Office, this position will be charged with implementing the recommendations of the Economic Development Strategic Plan. Having this resource in-house will allow for better accountability, fiscal controls, and operational efficiencies.

Center for the Arts Improvements Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $340,000 As part of a four-year improvement plan, the City will begin necessary repairs and upgrades at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. The Center provides the cultural lifeblood of the community, with approximately 200,000 people visiting the facility each year for the finest in music, dance, comedy and more. Improvements are needed in order to keep up with the demands of the variety of offerings. For Fiscal Year 2015, the City will replace the wheelchair lift between the second and third levels, replace the electrical panel and hydraulic stage lift, and expects to replace six air conditioning units.

Key Intended Outcomes Business rating of the image of the City (Business Survey)

96%

below State

below State

9%

9%

Retail vacancy rate (CoStar Jan-Mar report)

100

FY 2015 Goal

above the average of six comparison cities

Net new taxable value as % of Total Taxable Assessed Value (BCPA) Coral Springs’ June unemployment rate

FY 2014 Goal

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Enhance Fire Inspection Services

Business Tax Amnesty

Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Lead Department: Development Services

Operating Expense: $88,863

Operating Expenses: Existing

Capital Outlay: $36,000

Imposition of a local business tax provides revenue to support City services provided to those businesses. It also allows the City to be aware of the types and numbers of businesses operating in the City, which helps in planning for economic development and other needed services for the future. Chapter 10 of the Land Development Code, Section 1011(b), states that any business that operates without first obtaining a local business tax receipt is subject to a penalty of twenty-five percent (25%) of the business tax receipt amount for that year. It also states that a business that does not pay the required business tax within 150 days of the initial notice of tax due is subject to a penalty of $250 and additional administrative costs. These penalties mirror those found in Florida Statutes Chapter 205, Section 205.053.

In 1990, the Fire Inspection Division of the Coral Springs Fire Department employed four full-time inspectors to complete approximately 2,800 annual fire inspections, for an average of 700 inspections per inspector each year. Today, there are approximately 6,500 annual fire inspections to complete with only five fire inspectors to complete them, for an average of 1,300 inspections per inspector each year. In 2013, the Division did not complete all inspections, falling short by well over 1,000. Broward County fire code requires that all businesses are inspected by a certified fire inspector “no less than annually.” Over the years, the time it takes to inspect any given property has increased for a variety of reasons. There have been an increased number of violations due to aging buildings. Disengaged and economically-impacted business owners have been reluctant to voluntarily maintain their businesses and repair cited items in a timely manner. This causes multiple re-inspections, and required attendance at special magistrate hearings if the owners are non-compliant. Increased training requirements to meet new ISO goals have resulted in the fire inspectors spending less time in the field. To ensure that 100% of annual fire inspections are completed in a calendar year, a new fire inspector will be added to existing staff. This will provide a safer environment for our citizens and fire personnel. Completing fire inspections on schedule ensures: • Violations are cited sooner. • Violations are corrected in a timely manner. • Inspectors have time to be properly trained in plan review. • Inspectors are able to complete continuing education for required recertification hours. Interaction between fire inspectors and customers will be greatly improved with a regular inspection schedule of their business, allowing more time to fully explain violations. By educating the customer, we can promote proactive fire safety behavior, not just reactive.

Because these penalties add up quickly, the City will offer an amnesty program. The City previously offered an amnesty program in Fiscal Year 2010 and again in Fiscal Year 2011, which allowed first-time applicants to avoid the late fees and penalties. Only a small portion of the eligible businesses took advantage of the program. To increase participation levels, staff will reference businesses which have paid their County business tax, professions which are registered with the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, and other resources to determine which businesses are eligible for the amnesty program. The City Commission will consider an ordinance and resolution to activate this amnesty program, which should be effective October 1, 2014. The amnesty period is expected to be one year, providing ample time to research eligible businesses, notify them of the program, and process their applications. Waiving these late fees and penalties for a limited time for businesses applying for a business tax receipt for the first time will ease the financial burden of late fees and penalties and allow the business to operate within the legal parameters set by the City.

Realtors’ Summit Lead Department: Economic Development Office Operating Expenses: Existing In order to promote the City and foster economic growth, an outreach program will be developed to ensure the real estate community has all the information it needs to adequately market the City of Coral Springs. The newly formed Economic Development Office will be tasked with building an alliance with commercial brokers to share the City’s Economic Development Strategic Plan and solicit input on how best to obtain the objectives.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

101


Ongoing Initiatives

To date, a great deal of progress has been made. Approximately 5.9 acres have been assembled to accommodate the Municipal Complex and associated uses on the south side of Sample Road. Existing buildings (City Hall South and bank drive-thru) have been demolished.

Municipal Complex (2007-2015) Lead Department: City Manager’s Office Operating Expenses: Existing The existing City Hall (North) was built in 1967. Because it was originally built as a real estate sales center, it was not designed to serve as a municipal complex. The City moved its operation to the site in 1976, intending to use it as a temporary location. The facility is outdated and functionally obsolete. Among its many deficiencies include a lack of energy efficiency, failure to meet many modern ADA accessibility standards, significant security and life safety limitations, not hurricane-resistant, and lack of sufficient parking and public meeting space. In short, the current structure does not meet the needs of the community. For example, the City Commission Chambers can only accommodate 37 visitors which is wholly inadequate for a city with nearly 125,000 residents. A 2007 study concluded that to accommodate the City’s operational needs for the next 25 years as well as to consolidate its operation into a single site, a structure of at least 65,000 square feet would be needed, roughly double the size of the current City Hall North structure. In addition, 250 parking spaces would be required.

In Fiscal Year 2014, the City took steps necessary to move this project forward. An architect was selected to design the architectural and engineering aspects of the Complex, the City hired an in-house construction project manager to shepherd the project, a comprehensive space plan was developed, and financing options have been explored. The architect, Song & Associates, presented the Commission with their conceptual design for the Complex. The Commission approved the concept and recommended that Song & Associates be retained to complete the design and engineering. In Fiscal Year 2015, the conceptual design will progress into a schematic design, then into a design development phase, and finally, the design will be completed with construction documents. All necessary permits will be obtained, a contractor will be hired, and construction is scheduled to start by September 2015.

2015-2016 Short-Range Transportation Improvement Plan

2014-201 Short Ran Transporta Improvem Plan

8 ! ( SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

3 ! (

WESTVIEW DR

C " )

1 ! (

1 ! (

C " )

D " )

CORAL RIDGE DR

CORAL SPRINGS DR

A " )

E " )

D ) " )" G " ) I

L

EW VI

11 ! ( 11 ! ( D " )

DR

F " ) RAMBL EW

3 ! (

OO D DR

3 ! (

! ( 12

Proposed/Under Construction 2015-2016

! (

10 ! (

µ

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

City Roadway Resurfacing Program Sidewalk/Pathway Improvements Mast Arm Installation w/Video Detection (Broward County) Wiles Road West End Beautification (2015) Downtown CRA Infrastructure Project (NW 31 Ct, Art Walk) Downtown Pathway (Transportation Enhancement Grant) Wiles Road - Rock Island Road to US 441 - Widen 4-6 lanes Coral Ridge Drive/Sawgrass Expressway - sidewalk connections, east-west 9 Bus Shelters 10 Entryway Improvements (Sidewalk, lighting, landscaping, and entry feature) 11 Alleyways Refurbishment Program 12 Regional Bike Trailhead (Broward County) 13 NW 110 Avenue Bike Lanes and Sidewalk (2017)

" )

W ATLANTIC BLVD

RIVERSIDE DR

1 ! (

STATE ROAD 7

D RD

" )

H " )

ISLAN

2 ! (

D

ROYAL PALM BLVD

E AK

10 ! ( 3 3 7 ! ! ! ( ( (

" )

9 ! ( 6 B ! ( 5 9 " ) ! ( ! ( B " ) 6 ! (

C " )

3 ! (

RO CK

SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

W SAMPLE RD

! ( 1 ! (

3 ! (

C

RIVERSIDE DR

C " )

13 ! (

2

WILES RD

UNIVERSITY DR

3 ! (

3 ! (

4 ! (

A B C D E F G H I

0

FY 2015 BUDG MAP SERIES

Alleyways Refurbishment Program Bus Shelters City Roadway Resurfacing Program Sidewalk/Pathway Improvements Master Parking and Alleyway Resurfacing Right Turn Lane (Shadow Wood Blvd. westbound) Royal Palm Blvd. Entryway Improvement Lane Reduction (4 lanes to 2 lanes), Add Bike Lane Mast Arm Installation

Created: May 2014

Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area

102

0.5

Miles

Completed 2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

0.25

#10121 ihouseh 5-6-5014


Traffic Management (2010-2015)

City staff will work with MPO (Metropolitan Planning Organization) staff to implement projects that improve regional connectivity, including the initiative to extend the Sawgrass Expressway east to I-95, and to ensure that federal funds for the Gateway Mobility Hub, located at Sample Road and University Drive, become available in 2016. City staff will work with the NW City Planners Consortium to secure funding through the MPO and Broward County to perform a “Congestion Management/ Livability Planning” effort along Sample Road as a precursor to developing premium transit service along that corridor. City staff will continue to monitor development within the Downtown LAC (Local Activity Center) to determine traffic impacts of new development and will monitor the proposed development within the “Wedge Area” of Parkland.

Lead Department: Development Services Operating Expenses: Existing The Transportation Improvement Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 shows the efforts planned or underway to ensure that acceptable levels of service and safe driving conditions are maintained in the City. The Traffic Management Team meets monthly to address issues pertaining to the safe and efficient use of the roadway network. Projects include traffic calming, road widening, road resurfacing, turn lanes at intersections, as well as pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements. In 2013, a new sidewalk on NW 38th Drive between University Drive and NW 85th Avenue was constructed. In Fiscal Year 2014 a new sidewalk is being built along NW 85th Avenue, NW 38th Street, and NW 84th Avenue between NW 38th Drive and NW 40th Street. Construction of the Downtown Pathway will begin in Fiscal Year 2014 and will be completed in Fiscal Year 2015 with the use of a Federal Transportation Enhancement grant. The City will work with the County on signal improvements to enhance mobility and connectivity at several of the City’s major intersections. This initiative will be funded and implemented by the County Public Works and Transportation Department. Broward County is planning several improvements including updated traffic signal synchronization and the installation of new mast arms with pedestrian countdown signals (see Short Range and Long Range Maps).

Temporary speed humps within Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) areas have all been converted to permanent structures. In Fiscal Year 2015, $18,430 is budgeted to purchase replacement speed cushion parts, signage, and pavement markings to make the speed humps more visible. In Fiscal Year 2016, projected maintenance costs remain at $18,430, which includes the purchase of three additional replacement speed cushions. Replacement of speed cushions will be coordinated with the City’s roadway resurfacing program so replacement will occur after resurfacing. City staff will continue to respond to citizen requests for traffic calming by performing traffic studies to determine whether thresholds of speed and volume meet the criteria of the traffic calming program.

Long-Range Transportation Improvement Plan

SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

WESTVIEW DR

10 ! (

10 ! (

12

KE

EW VI

13 ! (

13 ! (

! (

13 13 ! ( ! ( 10 ! (

10 ! (

RAMBLEWOO W ATLANTIC BLVD

RIVERSIDE DR

10 ! (

D DR

D RD

10 ! (

W SAMPLE RD

! (

ROYAL PALM BLVD

10

DR

4 ! (

13 ! (

10 ! (

LA

13 ! ( 5 ! (

RIVERSIDE DR

13 ! (

12 ! (

13

13 ! ( ! (( 1 6 ! 11 ! A 7 ! ( " ( ) ! (

! (

3 ! (

RO CK

10 ! ( 13

CORAL SPRINGS DR

! ( 10

ISLAN

10 ! (

13 ! (

CORAL RIDGE DR

SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

B " )

10 ! (

13 ! (

13 ! (

13 ! (

9 ! (

9 ! (

UNIVERSITY DR

13 ! (

13 ! ( 13 ! (

WILES RD

10 ! (

13 ! (

10 ! ( 2 ! ( 8 ! (

STATE ROAD 7

13 ! (

13 ! (

Lon Tra Im

10 ! (

10 ! (

Future

1. University Drive/Sample Road - Add SB, EB and WB right turn lanes 2. University Drive/Wiles Road - Add NB, SB, EB, and WB left turn lanes - Add NB and SB through lanes 3. Sample Road/Coral Springs Drive - Add EB and WB right turn lanes 4. Sample Road/Riverside Drive - Add EB right turn lanes Add NB and SB left turn lanes 5. Sample Road/NW 85th Avenue - Add NB and SB left turn lanes 6. Coral Hills Drive - Sample Road to NW 29th Street Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 7. NW 33rd Street - Coral Hills Drive to NW 99th Way Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 8. University Drive - NW 40th Street to Sawgrass Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 9. Wiles Road - University Drive to Rock Island Road Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 10. Multi-Modal Improvements (2040 LRTP, Comp Plan) 11. Proposed Transit Center 12. Downtown Pathways 13. Future Sidewalks

" )

F

Completed

A. University Drive/ Sample Road - Add NB and EB right turn lanes, Bus Bay and Sidewalk Improvements (Completed 2007) B. Sample Road/Sportsplex Drive, install traffic signal (Completed 2006)

Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area #10127 ihouseh 5-14-5014

City of Coral Springs, Florida

103


Downtown Redevelopment (2013-2015) Lead Department: City Manager’s Office Partner: Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Capital Outlay: $3.6M (Economic Recovery Zone funding) During Fiscal Year 2013, the City began to explore alternatives for the best use of the Downtown area in terms of public gathering opportunities, future activities, and the connectivity between the public and private spaces with the ultimate goal of creating a sustainable Downtown. As an on-going effort, the City will continue discussions of the anticipated gateway hub, amphitheater and other civic uses within the Downtown. The City and CRA have enumerated and prioritized the infrastructure improvements that will occur in the downtown area. These improvements include the installation of a turn lane on Sample Road, the redevelopment of NW 31st Court Promenade, NW 32nd Street and NW 94th Avenue streetscaping, Sample Road median landscaping improvements, and matching walkway grants. Resurfacing is planned for Fiscal Year 2015 following the construction of the turn lane. These enhancements will provide pedestrian and bicycling connections which together will create a “sense of place” that residents and commercial owners have been seeking for the past several years.

Electronic Permitting Feasibility Study (2014-2015) Lead Department: Development Services Operating Expenses: $5,000 Electronic permitting, or E-permitting, offers customers improved, simplified service while giving the Building Division the tools needed to better serve our diverse community. All permitting services are to be ultimately performed on-line under E-permitting, streamlining the process. Demand from the business and development communities is driving the need to change the City’s permitting process. Experts in these fields use on-line services in their daily lives and are requesting E-permitting. The City would also benefit from the reduced need for office and storage space. All plans are submitted and archived electronically. Plan review is more efficient because multiple reviews can be conducted simultaneously. Broward County has led the way in developing an E-permitting platform, embarking on a five phase plan to have all Building and Environmental services offered solely on-line. The City began researching E-permitting products in Fiscal Year 2014, defining resources necessary to implement the system. In Fiscal Year 2015, we will continue to research alternative products on the market and work with Broward County as they develop their E-permitting process and platform.

104

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


An Active, Healthy Community New Initiatives

Mullins Gym Roof Replacement

NW 40th Street Bike Path Renovation Lead Department: Public Works Grant Funding (CDBG): $126,000 The NW 40th Street Bike Path Renovation project will inspect, study, design, and plan modifications to existing asphalt and pedestrian walkways. Maintaining the existing asphalt bike paths is costly and will continue to increase in the future as the asphalt gets older and breaks down due to dryness and root intrusion. This project will eliminate high maintenance costs of repairing asphalt bike paths and provide safe pathways for pedestrians and bicyclists. This initiative will replace the existing asphalt sidewalks with concrete sidewalks and will include new bike paths along NW 40th Street between Riverside Drive and NW 76th Avenue.

Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $225,000 The Mullins Gymnasium is going on 15 years old and the original roof has numerous leaks. Many patches have been done, but as soon as one leak is fixed, another one opens up. If the leaks occur over the wood floor, the damage to the floor would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to repair. It is important to replace the roof before it causes further damage. The City hosts over 45 tournaments and events each year at the Mullins Gymnasium, not to mention hundreds of classes and summer camps. Replacing the roof will ensure that the facility remains open, available and in top condition for our customers.

NW 40th Street Bike Path Map

FY 2014 Goal

FY 2015 Goal

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

96%

Youth volunteer hours (Volunteer Services report)

18,000

18,000

Athletic league participation

8,100

8,100

Sports Commission: Number of room nights

3,600

4,000

Number of riders on intracity bus routes

90,000

90,000

Key Intended Outcomes Resident rating of appearance of Parks and Recreation facilities (Resident Survey)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

105


Tennis Center Lighting Improvements

Aquatic Complex 50 Meter Pool Design

Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Operating Expenses: $50,000

Operating Expenses: $65,000

Courts 1 and 6 at the Tennis Center were designed for tournament level play and for television coverage. The fixtures on these courts are over 20 years old and light levels are far below the original design criteria. In order to attract top-level tournaments which include night play, it is necessary to replace the light fixtures to ensure correct lighting levels. Currently this facility is unable to host top level USTA and other tournaments which have night matches. Once this project is complete, the Tennis Center will be a viable facility to enhance the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amateur sports efforts.

The 50 meter pool at the Aquatics Complex is aging and has numerous issues that must be addressed. A number of cracks and leaks have developed, resulting in a significant loss of water. This leakage is costing an additional $10,000-$15,000 annually. The gutters are disintegrating and hydraulic problems have developed.

New Resident Outreach Lead Department: Communications and Marketing Operating Expenses: $30,000 Approximately 7,200 new residents (homeowners and renters) move to Coral Springs each year. By not having a communication outreach program for this group, the City is missing a valuable opportunity to deliver its message and encourage residents to be more active and involved. This program will target the new residents with a package mailed to their homes. It will introduce the elected officials, share information about City amenities and services, highlight volunteer opportunities, and communicate the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organizational values.

106

Additionally, this pool has a depth of four feet. New minimum standards for Olympic-size pools is five feet or deeper. This 50 meter pool, the mainstay of the Aquatics Center, may no longer qualify to host the national competitive events upon which this City prides itself. In order to prevent these issues from becoming health and safety hazards, and to continue attracting national, collegiate and Olympic swimmers and events, the City will develop design and engineering plans for the repair or replacement of this pool. Once designed, construction would be expected in Fiscal Year 2016.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Ongoing Initiatives Playground Equipment Replacement (2012-2015) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Capital Outlay: $86,000 This program enacts a plan to ensure that playground equipment in all City parks is replaced every 15 years. There are currently 33 playgrounds throughout the City in neighborhood and Community parks. All playground equipment and surfaces are inspected regularly by maintenance staff and a certified playground inspector to assure continued safety, as well as to meet all the updated Americans with Disabilities Act requirements for playgrounds. Because playground equipment has a life expectancy of about 15 years, the City has created a schedule that provides for replacing the equipment over that time frame. This program allows better planning of the funding of the equipment. In Fiscal Year 2015, Kiwanis and Lakeview Parks are scheduled to be upgraded.

Half-marathon and 5K Run/Walk (2013-2015)

Downtown Pathway (2012-2015)

Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Lead Department: Development Services

Operating Expenses: $15,000

Federal Transportation Enhancement Grant: $140,000 (FY 2014); $405,000 (FY 2015)

The City, in conjunction with In the Zone Event and Sports Management and the Coral Springs Medical Center, has made the half marathon and 5K road race an annual event. With a turnout of 1,400 participants at the inaugural event, held March 30, 2013, and another great turnout at the second hosting on March 29, 2014, the City intends to continue this popular event. The purpose is to encourage active, healthy lifestyles while providing positive exposure to the City and local businesses.

In 2011, the MPO (Metropolitan Planning Organization), awarded the City a Transportation Enhancement grant for construction of the Downtown Pathway. This project will construct a pathway along Ben Geiger Drive (NW 29th Street) and Coral Hills Drive. It will include native landscaping, pedestrian lighting, and areas for public art. Design was completed and approved by FDOT (Florida Department of Transportation) in 2014. An agreement between FDOT and the City will be entered into to enable the City to begin construction. Prior to that agreement, the City will construct a portion of the Pathway within an easement provided by the Harbor Chase Assisted Living Facility, located on Ben Geiger Drive. Demolition of the existing asphalt sidewalk will be scheduled once the FDOT agreement is finalized.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

107


An Attractive Community New Initiatives

Humane Unit Building Design

ArtWalk at NW 31st Court Lead Department: Development Services Operating Capital: $50,000 Capital Outlay: $90,000 (Public Art Fund) The ArtWalk is a project with the CRA to transform an existing canal in the Downtown area into a linear urban plaza and make it accessible to the public. The plaza will provide an eastwest connection between the Downtown Pathway project, University Drive, and The Walk. This project will provide formal space for events, such as the Green Market and BizArt, and will include several locations for public art installations. As one of the initial steps toward the success of the Municipal Complex, the purpose of the ArtWalk is to serve as a catalyst for the redevelopment of Downtown. Design has been completed and a construction manager has been contracted. Funding has been allocated from a variety of sources, most notably the Recovery Zone Economic Development Bond. For Fiscal Year 2015, a street-scaped entryway will be created along NW 31st Court to highlight the southern boundary of the ArtWalk and concrete pads on which to install public art will be built. In subsequent years, the City will issue calls for artists to commission new art pieces and provide temporary display of artwork for years to come.

Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: $30,000 The Humane Unit is a specialized civilian unit of the Coral Springs Police Department. The Unit consists of three members whose primary responsibility is to enforce the City ordinances, codes, and state statutes regarding animal issues. The members respond to citizen complaints regarding stray and injured animals and animal bites. They conduct all the care and feeding duties for impounded animals and supervise general maintenance of the retention facility. The Unit is housed at the Westside Complex, consisting of an office building, a portion of which is needed for cat cages, and an attached building to house dogs. The office area is a 10’x10’ room. This room holds all three members’ work stations and the space is not sufficient for this. The oldest area of the structure is the dog runs. This area consists of eight runs, which are not heated or air conditioned. Future added storage needs should be considered to store supplies such as dog food and other supplies to run the facility, such as cleaning and animal care items. Design of a new facility will take place in Fiscal Year 2015 with construction expected the following year.

Key Intended Outcomes

FY 2014 Goal

FY 2015 Goal

Ratings of cleanliness of City streets and public areas (Resident and Business Surveys)

(new Biz)

93%

Ratings of City efforts at maintaining quality of neighborhoods (Resident and Business Surveys)

(new Biz)

85%

Fuel consumed by City operations (diesel and unleaded)

405,000

400,000

110

110

Pounds of recycled materials per capita

108

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Code Lien Amnesty Program

Community Beautification Award (2014-2015)

Lead Department: Development Services

Lead Department: Development Services

Estimated Revenue: $250,000

Operating Expenses: $1,000

Operating Expenses: $19,000

From 2001 to 2005, the Coral Springs Garden Club, along with the City of Coral Springs Neighborhood and Environmental Committee (NEC), sponsored the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coral Springs Looking Goodâ&#x20AC;? beautification awards program. Residents and businesses were encouraged to nominate properties that make a particular effort to enhance their property through landscaping. After Hurricane Wilma in October 2005, the program was abandoned.

Chronically non-compliant properties have daily Code Compliance liens which can escalate to unreasonable amounts that far exceed the value of the property. Without an amnesty program, many property owners in this situation choose not to remedy the violations nor pay anything toward the lien amount. This perpetuates a negative impact on the noncompliant property and surrounding community. The amnesty program is expected to allow a sufficient period of time to provide notice to non-compliant properties and individuals with judgements, determine eligibility, and process applications. Waiving these late fees and penalties will only be allowed after the property owner has brought the property up to code. This amnesty program eases the financial burden of the lien while improving the overall aesthetics of the City.

Ongoing Initiatives Neighborhood Partnership Program (2014-2015) Lead Department: Development Services Grants and Other Operating Expenses: $35,000 South Florida has been hit hard over the past several years by a number of landscape pests such as Ficus Whitefly and Rugose Spiraling Whitefly. These two pests together have led to an overall decline in the aesthetic appearance of properties throughout the City. In 2014 there was no decline in whitefly activity and the mild winter gave the insect an opportunity to continue feeding and reproducing without any interruption. With no reason to believe that the whitefly problem will decrease in the near future, it has become necessary for the City to increase its efforts to provide additional grant funds. This project will continue to expand the existing Neighborhood Partnership Program (NPP) to include grants for whitefly remediation for the most severely affected properties. In an ongoing effort to improve the overall aesthetics of the City, there will be a focus on small condominium associations and rental properties along arterial roadways.

In May 2013, the NEC revitalized the program with a first round of nominations in early 2014. Seventeen properties were nominated and evaluated. Winners in each category were recognized at an awards banquet in May 2014. One new aspect of the beautification awards is that winners are given a sign to display for a limited time, advertising that they have won this award. By holding this event annually and incorporating the signs, awards, and media coverage, the intent is to encourage other residents and businesses to upgrade their properties to be eligible for future nominations and awards. This will lead to an overall improvement in the aesthetics of the City.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

109


Aquatic Complex Entrance (2013-2015)

CDBG Action Plan (2011-2015)

Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Lead Department: Development Services

Capital Outlay: $120,000 (Allocated in FY 2013)

FY 2015 CDBG Allocation: $626,776

During Fiscal Year 2012 the Aquatic Complex underwent renovations and expansion of several areas within the facility. As a result of these upgrades it was determined that a new entrance plaza was needed to create an aesthetically pleasing and functional area when entering this facility. The design of this entrance is underway and includes aspects to welcome and delight visitors to this nationally recognized training center. New elements will include aesthetically pleasing items such as new planters, paving, landscaping, shades and lighting.

Each year, the City is required to complete an Action Plan as a part of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The plan describes specific projects and activities the City will undertake in the coming year to address priority needs identified in the five year plan. These priorities include providing a suitable living environment, providing decent and affordable housing, and expanding economic opportunities. The CDBG program is funded through the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The program primarily benefits low-to-moderate income City residents and focuses on low-to-moderate income neighborhoods. Following is a list of the projects proposed in the 2014-2015 Action Plan. • NW 40th Street Bike Path Renovation: $126,000 • Home Repair: $92,655 • Commercial Façade Program: $80,000 • Design Pedestrian Lighting for Forest Hills Blvd.: $64,500 • Youth Scholarship Program: $50,000 • Senior Recreational and Functional Training: $32,016 • NW 39th Street Improvements: $29,250 • Neighborhood Partnership: $15,000 • Senior Recreation and Therapeutic Program: $12,000

Re-Engage for Good (2013-2015)

• Planning and Administration: $125,355

Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $11,827 In 2012, the City of Coral Springs received a grant from the Community Foundation of Broward to capitalize on the time, talent and experience of retired or soon to retire baby boomers by engaging them in the work of community improvement and social change. The “Keep Coral Springs Beautiful” project was created to engage baby boomers in leading a group of volunteers in a litter removal program similar to Adopt A Street. The program assisted the City in meeting its goal of beautifying the community and positively impacting the environment. This project was a great success and resulted in 28 baby boomers engaged in volunteer work, 1,178 pounds of litter picked up and 121 volunteers participating. The City of Coral Springs was invited to apply for a second round of funding that was awarded in July 2014. The City proposed to enhance the current “Keep Coral Springs Beautiful” program by separating recyclable material in the litter that is collected and creating a Fundraising Team of Boomers to ensure sustainability of the program after the funding ends. The goal for the recycling component is to have a positive impact on the environment and teach valuable lessons to volunteers regarding the importance of recycling and how it affects the Earth.

110

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Waste Transfer Station Improvements (2014-2015)

Atlantic Boulevard Entryway (2013-2015)

Lead Department: Public Works

Lead Departments: Development Services, Parks and Recreation

Capital Outlay: $36,000

Capital Outlay: $269,921 (Allocated in FY 2013)

The Waste Transfer Station, located at 126th Avenue and Wiles Road, accepts bulk trash, yard waste and source-separated recyclables during its operating hours on the weekends and designated holidays. On the first Saturday of every month, the transfer station also accepts paint, fluorescent light bulbs, and electronic equipment delivered to the station by residents. This is a free service for residents of Coral Springs.

In Fiscal Year 2014, a completely enhanced Royal Palm Boulevard entryway at the east end of the City was unveiled. This initiative will build on that effort to similarly improve Atlantic Boulevard, creating a unique sense of arrival into the City at the major entryways. The design includes planting additional large shade trees, understory landscaping, seasonal plantings, decorative lighting, roadway pavers, and updated signs. Public art was installed in 2014 and is included in the overall design. Construction will take place in two phases, with phase one expected to occur in Fiscal Year 2015.

The purpose of this project is to make the facility more user friendly, which is being driven by the introduction of household hazardous waste collection in 2014, and the construction of a new private facility on the eastern boundary of the transfer station. The station currently is in poor condition and not organized in a manner conducive to safe and effective operations. A general upgrade is needed to create designated areas for the collection of hazardous waste. Traffic circulation patterns need to be improved. Security cameras are needed to monitor illegal dumping and unauthorized access by commercial vehicles. Design of these and other improvements will take place in Fiscal Year 2015, funded by the Solid Waste Fund.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

111


An Innovative, High-Performing Organization New Initiatives

Misdemeanor Diversion

Communications Survey Lead Department: Budget, Strategy, and Communication Operating Expenses: Existing In the ten years since the City conducted its last Communications Survey, the methods of communication have changed dramatically. The shift from print to digital communication has had a significant impact on the way people choose to receive their information. While we include questions on communication in the biennial resident and business surveys, the data from these surveys is not sufficient to develop an effective communications strategy. The breadth of the data gathered from a targeted Communications Survey that includes responses from both businesses and residents will allow us to allocate our advertising dollars in the areas that will have the greatest impact and reach. Several other cities are conducting similar surveys, and that comparative data will be a valuable tool in measuring our success in reaching our audience.

Lead Department: City Attorney’s Office Estimated Revenue: $150,000 Operating Expenses: $115,484 The City offers non-violent first time offenders an opportunity to participate in a Misdemeanor Diversion Program. The purpose is to rehabilitate first time offenders and mitigate the potential negative consequences on a person’s livelihood from the creation of a court case. When a defendant is issued a Notice to Appear in County Court for a qualifying offense, an information sheet is given to them outlining the program. The person must contact the City Attorney’s Office within three business days from the issuance of the Notice to Appear. The City Attorney’s Office reviews the case file and makes a final determination if the offender qualifies for the program. If so, defendants must attend a rehabilitative instructional program and pay a required fee. Upon successful completion of the program, the offender’s case will be closed and will not be filed in court.

112

Key Intended Outcomes

FY 2014 Goal

FY 2015 Goal

Satisfaction ratings with City communications (Resident and Business Surveys)

(Biz) 95%

(Res) 95%

Employee satisfaction rating (Employee Survey)

92%

92%

Maintain AAA bond ratings

AAA

AAA

Ratings of value for tax dollars and fees (Resident and Business Surveys)

(Biz) 55%

(Res) 80%

Ratings of customer service (Resident and Business Surveys)

(Biz) 95%

(Res) 95%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Network Support

Compensation Study

Lead Department: Information Services

Lead Department: Human Resources

Operating Expenses: $169,250

Operating Expenses: $40,000

The City has recently implemented numerous technology initiatives to improve productivity, efficiency, and stability of City technology services. As these efforts were occurring, many other technology projects had to be postponed. In order to maintain the new environment while properly managing the backlog of postponed projects, Information Services needs to add two additional Network Specialists to their staff.

In order to evaluate the overall competitiveness of the City’s compensation system, a consultant will be engaged to offer expertise regarding trends in compensation practices and policies, as well as classification and compensation theory and methodologies. The current broadbanding compensation system is 20 years old.

This additional staff will provide these immediate and necessary functions: • Dedicated support that provides instant response to critical issues. • Cross-trained staff to provide more dynamic support and trouble-shooting for end users. • Project-oriented focus on PC deployments, hardware inventory, and asset management. • Increased efficiency to better meet service level agreements and key intended outcomes. • Immediate support to Police and Fire with dedicated personnel experienced in Public Safety.

Realign Volunteer Services Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing Since the inception of the City’s volunteer program 20 years ago, Volunteer Services has been a part of the Police Department. This worked well when the focus was to provide opportunities for residents interested in volunteering within the Police Department.

The City will look to develop a compensation philosophy and conduct a review of existing salary ranges. The ongoing maintenance process will be reviewed to ensure sustainability of the competitiveness and equitability of the implemented salary structure.

Statistical Analysis for Fire/EMS Lead Department: Fire/EMS Operating Expenses: $30,000 Fire; $30,000 EMS The Coral Springs Fire Department does more than just fight fires. Staff is responsible for EMS, inspections, investigations, prevention, training, emergency management, and other services that are important to the community. The Fire Department is required to track and report data to several agencies, some of which include the National Fire Incident Report System (NFIRS), EMSTARS, ISO, FEMA, and ICMA. In addition, we regularly report performance data to the City of Parkland. Adding a data analyst to the staff will enhance the Fire Department’s analysis of programs, services, systems, and performance. Benefits of creating this new position include improving resource allocation, gaining insights into problems, and identifying training needs.

However, the program has grown over the years and now includes volunteer opportunities throughout all City departments. With Volunteer Services having a similar role as Human Resources, i.e. recruitment and placement of volunteers in City departments, along with retention and recognition initiatives, it makes sense that Volunteer Services would realign with Human Resources. This move will increase awareness of City-wide volunteer assignments and streamline processes as well as having a more focused approach to attracting, retaining and motivating volunteers. Our “human resources” are vital to carrying out the City’s mission, and combining the efforts of paid and volunteer resources will strengthen our ability to achieve that goal.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

113


Ongoing Initiatives

Electronic Data Back-up and Storage (2013-2015) Lead Department: Information Services

Enterprise Software (2013-2015) Lead Department: Information Services Capital Outlay: Allocated in FY2014 In Fiscal Year 2013, the City began the planning phase to modernize the current enterprise software application (i.e., Sungard H.T.E.) or replace it with a different enterprise resource program (ERP). The goal is to streamline the financial, budgeting, human resources, building, permitting, asset management, Code Compliance, and licensing processes throughout the City. The Code Compliance and Business Tax divisions of Development Services were the first to transition in Fiscal Year 2014. OneSolution allows these divisions to more efficiently manage code compliance cases and business tax receipts and to share information easily City wide. Customers are able to access and submit code-related information online. OneSolution will also allow businesses to apply, renew, update, and pay for business tax receipts online. The Building division of Development Services will work on its transition in Fiscal Year 2015. Staff will have the ability to standardize permit pricing, automate permit invoicing and routing, enhance inspections scheduling and reports, and improve internal communication. The system will give residents and customers the ability to schedule inspections online. Also contemplated for Fiscal Year 2015 is the migration of all Finance related applications, Human Resources, and Budget. All other departments will follow after implementation of this phase.

Capital Outlay: $315,000 With the growing requirements to process data in a more efficient manner, the need for capacity continues to increase at a rapid rate. Information Services is required to provide this increased capacity on an annual basis. This project is to grow the data storage infrastructure based on increased departmental requirements. The current environment will support the City’s needs for 2014, but will not address the projected requirements for 2015 and beyond. Additionally, based on application changes and growth requirements by City departments, Information Technology will have to stay ahead of user demands. To accomplish this task, additional server hardware will be needed. This project will address that need as well as replace existing servers that are obsolete.

Stormwater Utility Fee Study (2014-2015) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $70,000 Preliminary analysis is complete in establishing a stormwater utility fee assessment in the City of Coral Springs. At least 17 municipalities in Broward County currently have a stormwater utility fee assessment. The primary purpose of this assessment is to quantify the financial impact of stormwater runoff from each parcel within the City on the needs of the City’s stormwater management system. Parcels with high impervious ground coverage generate more stormwater runoff which must be handled by the City’s system. A numerical correlation of the impact of each parcel has been calculated. The funding from this Stormwater Utility would be used to manage and maintain the City’s existing stormwater management system and to construct improvements to address flooding issues. Results of the preliminary analysis (Phase 1 of 3) will be presented during early Fiscal Year 2015 to determine the feasibility of implementing a stormwater utility fee. If the City decides to proceed, the next two phases will include additional analysis to justify and defend the assessment calculations, and required legal documentation and procedures.

114

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Summary of Fiscal Year 2015 Initiatives

A Family-Friendly Community Community Paramedicine

Fire/EMS

Fire Stations 43 and 95

Fire/EMS

Additional Patrol Officers

Police

CSI Building Renovation

Police

Safety Town

Parks and Recreation

University Drive LED Street Light Pilot

Public Works

Drowning Prevention (ongoing)

Fire/EMS , Communications and Marketing

Public Safety Dispatch Equipment Upgrade (ongoing)

Police

Public Safety Technology Upgrade (ongoing)

Information Services

Multi-cultural Events (ongoing)

Human Resources

Teen Political Forum (ongoing)

Human Resources

A Thriving Business Community 40-Year-Old Building Inspections

Development Services

Economic Development Office

City Manager’s Office

Center for the Arts Improvements

Public Works

Enhance Fire Inspection Services

Fire/EMS

Business Tax Amnesty

Development Services

Realtors’ Summit

Economic Development Office

Municipal Complex (ongoing)

City Manager’s Office

Traffic Management (ongoing)

Development Services

Downtown Redevelopment (ongoing)

City Manager’s Office

Electronic Permitting Feasibility Study (ongoing)

Development Services

An Active, Healthy Community NW 40th Street Bike Path Renovation

Public Works

Mullins Gym Roof Replacement

Public Works

Tennis Center Lighting Improvements

Parks and Recreation

New Resident Outreach

Communications and Marketing

Aquatic Complex 50 Meter Pool Design

Parks and Recreation

Playground Equipment Replacement (ongoing)

Parks and Recreation

Half-marathon and 5K Run/Walk (ongoing)

Parks and Recreation

Downtown Pathway (ongoing)

Development Services

City of Coral Springs, Florida

115


Summary of Fiscal Year 2015 Initiatives An Attractive Community Art Walk at NW 31st Court

Development Services

Humane Unit Building Design

Police

Code Lien Amnesty Program

Development Services

Neighborhood Partnership Grants (ongoing)

Development Services

Community Beautification Award (ongoing)

Development Services

Aquatic Complex Entrance (ongoing)

Parks and Recreation

Re-Engage for Good (ongoing)

Public Works

CDBG Action Plan (ongoing)

Development Services

Waste Transfer Station Improvements (ongoing)

Public Works

Atlantic Boulevard Entryway (ongoing)

Development Services, Parks and Recreation

An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Communications Survey

Budget, Strategy, and Communication

Misdemeanor Diversion

City Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

Network Support

Information Services

Realign Volunteer Services

Human Resources

Compensation Study

Human Resources

Statistical Analysis for Fire/EMS

Fire/EMS

Enterprise Software (ongoing)

Information Services

Electronic Data Back-up and Storage (ongoing)

Information Services

Stormwater Utility Fee Study (ongoing)

Public Works

116

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Strategy Financial Strategy Introduction

Use of Surpluses

An improving local and regional economy bodes well for the near term future of the City’s financial outlook. For example, as mentioned in the Environmental Scan, the region’s unemployment rate is expected to remain below the national average. Additionally, the region has the highest Gross Metro Product of any MSA in the state and all signs point toward an above moderate growth rate. Talk about a turn-around – the region’s fastest growing sector is expected to be the Construction sector with an average annual growth rate of ten percent through 2017. By comparison, the next highest growth sector, the Professional and Business Services sector, is expected to grow an average of four percent per year.

One important component of our long-term planning is utilizing all identified surpluses in all funds to pay for the following years needed capital items. Each year we carefully comb all our funds to determine if any surpluses exist. Instead of leaving those funds idle, or worse, spending them on ongoing operating expenses, we invest them in needed capital improvements. As surpluses are declining it is more important than ever that future surpluses, beyond satisfying the appropriate financial reserve policy, be earmarked to provide a funding source for future capital expenditures, foregoing the need to borrow or issue additional debt, thereby avoiding future interest expense. For example, a critical component of the Fiscal Year 2014 financial strategy was to use nearly $600,000 in equity to finance the purchase of public safety technology and park improvements and used another $400,000 set aside in the Facilities Reserve to fund the replacement of roof and air conditioning units in city-owned facilities. Paying for these infrastructure projects with equity, rather than through borrowing, allowed the City to avoid approximately $250,000 in interest over the life of that loan. A significant portion of the expected Fiscal Year 2015 surplus will be used to invest in our information technology infrastructure thereby avoiding further interest costs.

The City’s healthy financial position can be attributed to our long-term financial planning that identifies emerging issues that may affect our ability to provide the level and type of service our customers expect. We were able to minimize the financial impact of the Fiscal Year 2015 budget on our residents by relying on sound financial practices, not gimmicks, such as refraining from using debt or one-time revenues for ongoing expenses, and putting off necessary capital repairs and improvements. A snapshot of our current position shows an increase in Total Taxable Assessed Values, projected increases in reserves, and achieving a structural balance between expenditures and revenues. Other highlights in this financial strategy include: • Keeping the operating millage rate the same, at $4.5697. • Increasing the voter-approved debt service millage rate by 0.2% from $0.2033 to $0.2038 or $1.78 per typical singlefamily home. • Increasing water and sewer rates 3.5%, in accordance with the 2013 Water and Wastewater Rate Study. • No increase in the Fire Special Assessment Fee for single-family homes. • Increasing the residential Solid Waste Special Assessment from $220.92 to $225.84 per single-family household. • No increase in user fees.

Managing Debt Another key component of our long-term planning is managing existing debt through refunding, retirement, and defeasance of our debt. For example, the City refunded the General Obligation Bond Series 2006 for a net present value savings of over $1 million, the savings passed directly to tax payers in the form of a reduced “voter approved debt” millage rate.

$10.0000 $9.0000

Total Millage Less than Fiscal Year 2013

$8.0000 $7.0000 $6.0000 $5.0000

Total $4.8603

Total $4.7730

Total $4.7735

$0.2906

$0.2033

$0.2038

$4.5697

$4.5697

$4.5697

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

$4.0000 $3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000

Operating Millage

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Debt Millage

117


Depreciation Funding depreciation of vehicles and computers is another vital component of our financial strategy. This innovative “pay-asyou-go” approach saved us over $600,000 a year in avoided debt service for vehicle replacement and saved another $50,000 a year in avoided debt service for computer replacement. The City will continue to fund vehicle and computer depreciation on an annual basis to ensure we can replace our vehicles and technology when necessary, thereby avoiding the issuance of additional debt. The Fiscal Year 2015 budget includes a $250,000 contribution from the Law Enforcement Forfeiture Fund. State and federal law strictly defines the limited uses of police forfeiture funds. One defined legal use is the funding of School Resource Officers (SROs). The City has used nearly $5 million from the Forfeiture Fund for SRO salaries since Fiscal Year 2010. The $250,000 contribution budgeted in Fiscal Year 2015 is the same amount used last year. Finally, we will continue to pursue strategies to diversify our revenue stream, particularly our property tax base. Growing and further diversifying the economic base will provide a more solid foundation that will foster development to better enable the City to withstand future economic downturns. Fostering Commercial Development A key component to building a stronger, more vibrant future for the City of Coral Springs is the expansion of our commercial tax base. Roughly one-third of the City’s revenue comes from property taxes which are the City’s single largest revenue source. Property taxes are determined by the assessed value of real property within the City limits. In other words, increasing assessed values is vital to increasing revenue. As shown in the table below, these efforts appear to be paying off. After several years of declining property values, the City’s Total Taxable Assessed Value increased 3.63% between Fiscal Year 2013 and Fiscal Year 2014 then increased 5.35% between Fiscal Year 2014 and Fiscal Year 2015.

FY 2012

Total Taxable Assessed Value Just (Market) Value

118

FY 2013

We can proactively encourage the development and redevelopment of the City’s commercial areas such as the Corporate Park and the University Drive-Sample Road intersection by investing in the infrastructure necessary to attract businesses and by offering incentives. In addition, the City will attract businesses, events, and residents by fighting crime, grime, and decline by investing in aesthetic improvements, public safety, and education. The City commissioned an Economic Development Strategic Plan to guide these development efforts. The Plan’s recommendations are grouped into four priority areas: • Creating a culture for Coral Springs for the next 20 years • Create entrepreneurial opportunities • Develop target industry clusters by repositioning the Corporate Park as an asset to attract, retain, and recruit new employers • Bring economic development with the City government The report concluded, “In Coral Springs, there is a consciousness that to prepare for the next 20 years, the city must change. That consciousness led the City of Coral Springs to undertake this project. That consciousness can become a profound competitive advantage as City Springs repositions itself for the future.” This Economic Strategic Plan, which is based on information about the community from Coral Springs residents, businesses, and community leaders, will not ensure the City’s future economic prosperity without a commitment to rely on our existing Strategic Planning Process to develop a longterm approach to planning the implementation of these recommendations. Just as we leaned on these methods to exit the great recession on sound financial footing, we will rely on our Core Values and solid principles of financial management to guide our journey toward long-term financial sustainability. Moreover, this strategy will allow the City to continue to provide the same quality of services our customers have come to expect and preserve our community’s quality of life.

FY 2014

% Increase

FY 2015

% Increase

$7,354,960,847

$7,447,599,475

$7,717,933,025

3.63%

$8,131,195,392

5.35%

$9,981,116,910

$9,969,079,580

$10,453,861,780

4.86%

$11,422,074,800

9.26%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenue Outlook

Communications Services Tax Communications services tax revenue  $8.00

The City’s intergovernmental, franchise, and other demanddriven revenues fluctuate with the economy. As the City learned during the recession, a slumping economy leads to lower retail sales, which in turn, translate to lower sales tax revenue. Less traveling leads to lower fuel tax revenue. Declining economic growth leads to less construction, less renovation, fewer home improvements, and thus declining revenue. Positive economic growth, on the other hand, promises to reverse this trend.

$7.00  $6.00

$Millions

$5.00  $4.00  $3.00  $2.00  $1.00

Most economists are expecting the economy to grow at a modest rate during the coming year. However, rather than growth returning to normal levels quickly, the economy is expected to continue moving slowly but steadily upward. We have, therefore, adopted a moderate growth philosophy for Fiscal Year 2015 revenue estimates.

2020

2018

2018

2019

2017

2017

2020

2016

2016

2019

2015

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

$‐

Electric Franchise Fee revenue Electricity Franchise Fees (6%)  $9.00  $8.00  $7.00

Property Tax Revenue

As mentioned previously, Total Taxable Assessed Values (TAV) increased by 3.63% last year and are rising by 5.35% in Fiscal Year 2015. In addition, the City Commission raised the ad valorem millage to $4.5697 in Fiscal Year 2013 from $4.3939. The purpose of this tax increase was to enhance service levels rather than to pay for on-going expenses. As shown in the chart, the combination of these two factors has successfully reversed the decline in this primary revenue source. Other Major Revenues The next top five revenue sources for the City barely total ($33.6 million) property tax revenue ($35.3 million). Due to changes

Property Tax Revenue Property tax revenue trend

$5.00  $4.00  $3.00  $2.00  $1.00

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

$‐ 2003

The primary source of revenue for the City is ad valorem property taxes, which comprises one-third of $103 million total budgeted revenues for the General Fund. The remainder of revenue comes from a wide variety of intergovernmental, franchise, and other demand-driven sources. Between Fiscal Year 2007 and Fiscal Year 2012 property tax revenue receipts declined by more than $4 million which represents a 12% decrease. The reasons for this decline reflect the double whammy of property tax relief legislation and the economic recession. For Fiscal Year 2015, ad valorem tax revenue is expected to be nearly back to Fiscal Year 2007 levels.

$ Millions

$6.00

in legislation and consumer behavior, the Communications Services Tax revenue looks to be 10% ($550,000) below budget for Fiscal Year 2014. Going forward, the State is estimating negative growth rates for wireless service and a decline in landlines, meaning it is unlikely that this revenue will recover to previous levels. With falling fuel prices, the electric franchise fees, which are based in part upon the fuel surcharge, are expected to fall 7% ($484,000) short of Fiscal Year 2014 budget and the Local Option Gas Tax looks to be 9% ($114,000) below expectations. To offset these declines, the City has had to look to charges for services, diligently collecting court fines, business tax licenses and landlord registration fees. Overall, we anticipate revenues to be slightly lower than Fiscal Year 2014 budget estimates. But due to the departments carefully managing their expenses, Fiscal Year 2014 will be closed with a small surplus.

$36,000,000 $35,000,000 $ Millions

$34,000,000 $33,000,000 $32,000,000 $31,000,000 $30,000,000 $29,000,000 FY 2007

FY 2008

FY 2009

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

Revenue $35,337, $33,678, $31,880, $31,302, $31,252, $31,142, $32,726, $33,651, $35,299,

City of Coral Springs, Florida

119


Five-Year Forecast

Five-Year Forecast: General Fund

The Five-Year Forecast is an integral part of planning the City’s future fiscal position. It is an important tool used to determine a longer-range picture of the City’s financial horizon, as well as the level of risk over the next few years as current revenue growth does not keep pace with operational costs.

0

Remaining Deficit $0.0

Millions

-1 -2

-$2.5

-3 -$3.3 This model is the framework to peer -$3.9 into the near future to identify the -4 deficits that might await us if we were -$4.4 to take no further action. It helps City staff to conservatively quantify our -5 -$5.5 financial outlook so we can adequately plan and be prepared to meet these FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 -6 challenges. As we map out our financial This chart is for planning purposes and illustrates the potential shortfalls the General Fund could and operating strategies, we use the face if no positive action is taken. By Florida law, the proposed budget must be balanced. Financial model to determine the potential impact Strategies will be formulated to address future year shortfalls and will be included in the Fiscal Year of decisions, focusing on long-term 2015 Business Plan. solutions rather than short-term “fixes,” which could lead to negative financial impacts in future years. Direct Debt Per Capita This financial outlook provides an opportunity to both avoid One indicator of financial health, net direct bonded longfuture budget problems and maintain financial stability. The term debt per capita, has had a positive trend for the past 12 forecast integrates projections of the major drivers of the City’s years. This ratio measures the amount of long-term debt the annual budget, new programs, and the anticipated revenues over the forecast period. Typically, future years show a deficit of City carries - excluding Water and Sewer fund debt because it is an enterprise fund. Due to our aggressive debt retirement revenues over expenditures. and refunding policy, the City has been able to decrease this Our success to date has been largely dependent upon planning from a high of $833 in 1998 to $430 in Fiscal Year 2013. The ahead for the financial realities we project in coming years. City will continue to retire or refund the City’s debt when The forecast continues to project minimal revenue growth market conditions are attractive, and will also continue our and the need to hold the line on expenditures in order “pay-as-you-go” philosophy for financing capital equipment to maintain adequate working capital over the five-year replacement including vehicles and computers. period. The national and state economies are improving at a steady, but slow pace. However, local governments are still Future Debt Issuance experiencing slowly recovering revenues, which will make it The Fiscal Year 2015 budget does not include any new general difficult to provide both essential services to the community government debt issuance. Staff will continue to monitor and improvements needed for infrastructure. On the positive side, the General Fund’s beginning working capital will allow us outstanding bonds for economically beneficial refunding opportunities. Looking forward, the City will borrow to fund the to forecast another year of stable, though lean, operations. The balance of the new municipal complex once the project’s cost City is presenting a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2015. is known; depending on market conditions, this borrowing may occur within Fiscal Year 2015 or 2016. Additionally, voters will weigh in on a referendum for public safety general obligation bonds in November 2014. If that bond issue is approved, the In the past several years, the City has invested heavily in our City will issue these bonds in Fiscal Year 2015. parks and technology. We have also dedicated new resources to improving the aesthetic appeal of our facilities and the City at large. To enable staff to complete the projects that were already funded, both by cash and bond proceeds, neither an additional borrowing nor a significant appropriation of equity is included in the proposed budget.

Managing Debt and Equity

As part of the City’s financial strategy that was put into place at the beginning of the recession, reserves were used over several fiscal years to soften the impact of declining revenues. The City has always maintained a contingency reserve of 17% of the general fund budget, but it is time to start replenishing the savings for another rainy day.

120

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2015 Capital Improvement Program The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a long-range plan for the timely replacement and maintenance of the City’s equipment and facilities. Financing options for capital needs are examined to determine the best source for each project including operating fund balances, capital reserves, grants, outstanding debt, and rating agency criteria for borrowing. Because submitted capital requests exceeded available financing, decisions about which requests to fund in the upcoming year’s capital budget and which ones to schedule for the future consideration were made based on a project prioritization funding exercise conducted by senior management. The highest priority projects are proposed for funding in the capital budget. Those are projects that satisfy a regulatory requirement, are tied to a new initiative, achieve the City’s strategic goals and objectives, maintain or improve a standard of service, contribute to the enhancement of aesthetic value, or maintenance programs that protect the City’s infrastructure. As a result of this evaluation, the adopted capital expenditures for Fiscal Year 2015 are programmed at $41.8 million, of which nearly $21.7 million is being proposed for projects in the General Fund. The Water and Sewer Fund is budgeting $9.5 million in capital improvements to the City’s water and wastewater infrastructure, contingent upon approval of low interest loans to finance $3.6 million of these infrastructure improvements. The Equipment Services Fund’s budget for replacement of vehicles is $4.7 million. This allocation also includes funding to perform repairs and preventive maintenance on 27 vehicles and equipment in order to extend their useful life. These assets were originally scheduled for replacement in Fiscal year 2015. Maintaining the complete fleet inventory in optimal condition through continued preventive maintenance has allowed the City to prioritize its replacement schedule of vehicles and equipment, avoiding additional replacement cost. The Fire Fund is budgeting $5.4 million in capital improvements, of which $5.1 million will be part of a bond referendum in November.

The City has applied for various state and federal grants such as CDBG (Community Development Block Grants), Florida Department of Education, Transportation Enhancement grants, and Justice Assistance grants. These funds supplement $2.2 million of the total capital investment for the upcoming year. Other financing sources include operating capital supported by revenues, and equity. In Fiscal Year 2015, operating capital is estimated at $200,000 for the General Fund, $286,730 for the Fire Fund, $4,711,900 for the Equipment Services Fund and $1,239,000 for the Utilities Fund. Projects funded by the Public Art Fund total $90,000 and $30,000 from the Charter School Fund. The City will be able to fund over $1 million of its General Fund capital projects using equity and almost $0.9 million via reserves from Facilities Fund. Equity from the Solid Waste Fund ($36,000) and the Equipment Service Fund ($297,000) will be used for improvement and construction projects. Additionally, tax payers will vote on $12.45 million of funding for projects as part of a bond referendum in November.

Solid Waste With the dissolution of the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District on July 3, 2013, the City revamped its solid waste process. A Solid Waste enterprise fund was established to collect the residential solid waste assessment and directly pay collection and disposal costs for residential waste and recycling. This process provides the City a clear picture of the costs involved. As of January 1, 2014 the City engaged Waste Pro as the City’s hauler of residential solid waste and recyclables, as well as commercial garbage hauler, ending a 15 year relationship with Waste Management. Waste Pro offers an automated collection process and an online customer relations system to track issues and concerns. With this overhaul, residents received a significantly lower solid waste assessment, $220.92, the lowest assessment since 2005. The new collection and disposal contracts allow for annual increases limited to the change in CPI (Consumers Price Index), so the assessment will increase to $225.84 for the coming year.

Single-Family Solid Waste Assessment

Residential Solid Waste Residential SolidAssessment Waste Assessment $255.00

$250.20 $246.72 $243.00

$250.00 $245.00

Retired bond for  North Plant

$240.00 $235.00

$233.64

$232.20

$230.00 $226.32 $225.00 $220.00

$227.16

Retired bond for  South Plant

$225.84

$220.92

Contract awarded to Waste Pro

$215.00 $210.00 $205.00

FY FY FY FY FY 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY FY FY FY 2012 2013 2014 2015

121


Water and Sewer

Recycling The City has a goal to recycle 75% of its solid waste stream by 2020 and implementing single-stream recycling, which does not require sorting or separating items, was a big first step toward that goal. New recycling carts, purchased with at $1.7 million grant from the Resource Recovery Board, were distributed to every single-family home and multi-family complexes in conjunction with the change-over to the new hauler, Waste Pro, at the end of 2013. These are large, upright, lidded carts that roll-out easily to the curb, enhancing the convenience of use for residents. To encourage residents to fill these bright blue containers, a recycling rewards pilot program was launched in April 2014. Each recycling cart contains a radio frequency identification chip that captures information about recycling participation. Every time a resident recycles, their home is credited in the rewards program, making them eligible for savings at local businesses. The rewards are tiered, so the more a resident recycles, the better the reward. Commercial Recycling Commercial recycling initiatives are projected to play a major role in the City achieving its 75% recycling goal. City staff will advance this effort through a number of actions, including developing a list of businesses without recycling service coupled with follow-up outreach and education. Effective programs will be identified and success stories shared with other businesses. Staff will explore opportunities to increase service at multi-family complexes - more carts or increased collections. Property managers will be encouraged to establish on-site support that will help encourage and monitor participation, post information such as door hangers and posters, as well as promote use of apartment recycling bins and bags. Waste Transfer Station

A water and wastewater rate study completed in 2013 overhauled the rate structure and created a financial plan designed to accommodate increased operating expenses, charges from Broward County, debt service, and funding of capital projects through Fiscal Year 2023. The rate study included a recommended 3.5% annual rate adjustment in order to meet the current and projected financial requirements of the City’s utility system. This rate increase, effective October 1, 2014, will result in a $2.02 monthly increase for the average residence. Funding Infrastructure Improvements The City’s water and sewer infrastructure requires ongoing repair and maintenance to ensure the safe, efficient operation of the utility. To meet these capital requirements, the City secured long-term financing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF) for improvements at the Water Treatment Plant as well as throughout the entire system. The interest rate for this financing is 60% of the market rate, resulting in low-cost financing for a term of 20 years. Over $15 million in financing has been obtained for the replacement of existing wells, construction of new raw water supply wells, installation of wellheads and transmission lines, and improvements at lift stations. In Fiscal Year 2015, debt service totaling $1,017,670 is allocated in the Water and Sewer Fund for repayment of SRF loans. In Fiscal Year 2014, the City began repayment of an $8.7M bank loan secured during 2012 to continue rehabilitation of booster stations and complete Phase III of water treatment plant improvements. The interest rate for this loan is 2.29% with a debt service of $580,376 for Fiscal Year 2015. In this fiscal year, the City will secure a $4.7M low interest bank loan to finance the following capital improvements:

Every weekend, Coral Springs residents are able to take • $850,000 for replacement of galvanized water pipes advantage of the free waste transfer station at the end of Wiles throughout the City’s utility service area to ensure proper Road. The station accepts large quantities of bulk trash, yard flow of water and effective operation of water lines. waste and source-separated recyclables. In addition, on the first Saturday of each month, the station accepts paint, fluorescent • $400,000 for the design and construction of a new lift station light bulbs, and electronic equipment from residents. As located near Coral Springs Medical Center in order to provide the area around the waste transfer station undergoes greater capacity and efficiency at the lift station serving the development, the City needs to improve and maintain this medical center. facility to dispel the notion that this is a “City dump”. Revenue Bond Designs will be drawn up in Fiscal Year 2015 to enhance Water and Sewer Fund forecasted debt SRF service $5,000,000 the appearance, traffic flow, and security of the waste $3,307,200 transfer station. $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000

$579,192

$1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000

$ 755,404

$891,629

$985,703

$1,123,281

$1,251,823

$1,397,685

$1,004,138

$1,031,164

$1,017,670

$1,017,670

$1,017,670

$1,017,670

$1,017,670

$1,017,670

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

$0

122

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


• $920,000 for the removal and replacement of all cast iron water mains with ductile iron or polyvinyl chloride pipes to prevent pipe failure. • $585,000 for the installation of new Scada system in all 50 lift stations enabling monitoring by in-house personnel. • $670,000 for the repair and replacement of weakened sewer force mains as recommended by the study of existing conditions. • $1,300,000 for the rehabilitation of the existing West water booster station replacing critical components of the station. Operating capital funds will be used for ongoing inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves ensuring all components of the sanitary system will perform as needed during times of emergencies, ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, and replacement of portable generators used during power outages at lift stations. In order to maintain adequate water supply, the City will evaluate sites to upgrade or replace those wells identified as low producers of raw water. The City will also begin the development of a hydraulic model for the entire water transmission/distribution system providing the ability to more accurately determine where upgrades to the system are required. Additionally, in accordance with Florida statutes, the City will begin the project for the relocation of City facilities in Broward County right of way along the Wiles Road widening project corridor.

Fire Fund Three of the City’s five fire stations have been renovated or completely rebuilt to make them suitable for a full-time, professional department rather than a volunteer force. Architectural and engineering designs have been completed for the remaining two stations. The plan is to rebuild Stations 43 and 95 to meet today’s challenges. The new designs ensure these stations meet the recommended safety requirements for the staff who live in the stations and accommodate male and female firefighters with adequate sleeping and working areas to perform their jobs as emergency responders. Coral Springs voters will vote on a bond referendum to approve $12.45 million in general obligation bonds for public safety infrastructure. A portion, $5.1 million, will be used to finance the construction phase of these two fire stations. If the bond issue is approved by voters on the November ballot, construction is planned to begin in Fiscal Year 2015. Coral Springs has one of the lowest fire assessment fees for a single-family home in the area. The Fire Department will be adding five positions. Adds to staff include a Public Education Officer, Training Officer, Data Analyst, Fire Inspector, and conversion of a part-time Office Assistant to full-time. The equivalent of three of these positions will be paid for from the Fire Fund. There will be no increase in the fire assessment fee for single-family homes.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

123


124

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Measuring Results Measuring Results Quarterly Performance Review

Initiative Analysis

Overview

The Fiscal Year 2014 Business Plan included 54 initiatives. Departments completed 41 initiatives and will continue working on 12 through Fiscal Year 2015. The initiatives that are still “in progress” include large-scale technology implementations and construction projects.

The City has developed a performance measurement and management system to align department services and programs with the City Commission’s seven strategic priorities. The system enables departments to systematically measure results and make timely adjustments when results fall short of expected performance levels. Three components make up the system: a quarterly performance reporting program, composite indicators that measures the overall financial and service operation position, and the State of the City report. These elements play an important part in the City’s overall Business Plan and help keep the organization on target. Departmental Measures A total of 109 performance measures have been established to measure results achieved through services and programs provided by the City’s operating and support departments. Fourteen results are based on ratings from the resident or business surveys. Twelve measures are marked “not reported” this year. Ten are dependent upon results of the resident survey and two are based on the Tennis survey; neither survey was conducted this year. These surveys are conducted every other year. Three are marked “not available” because of the transition to a new database; the reports are still being written and tested. Of the available 94 results, 73 (78%) of the measures met their goals for Fiscal Year 2014 and 7 (7%) were within 95% of their goal. Fourteen goals (15%) were not achieved.

Key Intended Outcome Analysis Twenty-six Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) have been established, all of which support at least one of the five strategic priorities. Performance goals for each KIO were developed as part of the City Commission’s Fiscal Years 20142015 Strategic Plan. As of the end of Fiscal Year 2014, 22 of those goals have been met and two were within a few percentage points of goal.

One initiative, to redevelop a parcel of land along University Drive at Cardinal Road into a gateway park, has been put on hold because the state would like to widen University Drive.

Supplier and Partner Performance Data The City’s most important suppliers, partners, collaborators, and distributors are those that provide direct service to customers. A waste hauler picks up and processes trash and recycling. Professional Facilities Management operates the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. Charter Schools U.S.A. manages and staffs the City’s charter middle and high school. Advanced Cable Communications provides the infrastructure for television programming. Median mowing is accomplished through a group of contractors. Service standards are part of the contracts with these organizations; the standards spell out customer requirements and are discussed through periodic regularly scheduled meetings. For instance, City management meets quarterly with the principals of schools in the City to assess our partnership with them regarding athletic field use, after school programs, leadership development, etc.

Sustainability Indicators In Fiscal Year 2009, the City created a list of sustainability indicators to track a broad spectrum of green and sustainability benchmarks. The indicators of fuel use, electricity use, and paper consumption warrant the most attention because they impact not only our environment, but directly affect City expenditures as well. Some of the other indicators include linear feet of sidewalk improvements, number of trees planted, water consumption, and number of certified backyard habitats.

Two goals for the year have not been achieved: • Net new taxable value as a percentage of total taxable value was less than six comparison cities. • The number of riders on intracity bus routes was lower than goal. There were fewer riders during the months of January, April, and May as compared to those months the year before. Ratings for nine residential survey questions are used as Key Intended Outcomes.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

125


Fiscal Year 2014 KIO Summary Strategic Planning Cycle Fiscal Year 2014-2015 Fiscal Year 2014 KIO Summary Key Intended Outcomes FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Actual

FY 2014 Goal

A Family-Friendly Community 2,688.8

2,485.3

2,600

2,278.2 

N/R

92%

— 

N/R

98%

— 

4 Ratings of Quality of Life (Resident and Business Surveys)

(Biz) 96%

(Res) 96%

(Biz) 96%

97% 

Number of students attending classes at Broward College 5 at Coral Springs Academic Center

not open

4,391

3,500

4,440 

97%

98%

95%

98% 

7 Coral Springs Charter School school grade

A

A

A

A 

8 Injury accidents at or near 15 major intersections in the City

200

139 

96%

N/R

1 City crime rate (crimes/100,000 residents—Calendar Year) Resident rating of City efforts to prevent crime (Resident Survey) Resident rating of City Government for respecting religious and 3 ethnic diversity (Resident Survey) 2

6 Coral Springs Charter School graduation rate

A Thriving Business Community 9 Business rating of the image of the City (Business Survey)

96%

96% 

0.15%

above the average of 6 comp cities

11 Coral Springs' June unemployment rate

7.1%

5.7%

below State

12 Retail vacancy rate (CoStar Jan-Mar report)

8.7%

8.0%

9%

6.1% 

N/R

96%

— 

18,318.5

15,693

18,000

18,776

15 Athletic league participation

8,105

8,711

8,100

8,475

16 Sports Commission: Number of room nights

3,149

4,325

3,600

3,943

96,625

90,595

90,000

84,581

N/R

93%

93% (new)

99% 

N/R

84%

85% (new)

95% 

Net New Taxable Value as % of Total Taxable Assessed Value 10 (BCPA)

CS 0.14% Comp avg 1.15%

4.8% 

An Active, Healthy Community 13

Resident rating of appearance of Parks and Recreation facilities (Resident Survey)

14 Youth volunteer hours (Volunteer Services report)

17 Number of riders on intracity bus routes

An Attractive Community Ratings of cleanliness of City streets and public areas (Resident and Business Surveys) Ratings of City efforts at maintaining quality of neighborhoods 19 (Resident and Business Surveys) 18

20 Fuel consumed by City operations (diesel and unleaded) 21 Pounds of recycled materials per capita

405,000

408,358 gal 407,253 gal

401,977

98.98

103.37

110

118.3 

(Biz) 81%

(Res) 95%

(Biz) 81%

78% *

93%

92%

95% 

AAA

AAA

S&P AAA AAA Fitch AAA  Moody's Aa1

(Biz) 57%

(Res) 86%

(Biz) 55%

76% 

(Biz) 95%

(Res) 95%

(Biz) 95%

94% *

A Professional, High-Performing Organization 22

Satisfaction ratings with City communications (Resident and Business Surveys)

23 Employee satisfaction rating (Employee Survey) 24

Maintain AAA bond ratings (Two required)

Ratings of value for tax dollars and fees (Resident and Business Surveys) 26 Ratings of customer service (Resident and Business Surveys) 25

FY 2014 KIO Summary Met or exceeded goal Within 95% of goal Did not meet goal

126

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

22 2 2 26

 * 


Department Performance Measurements

City Attorney and Risk Management (3) 1) Preparation of Legislation (resolutions, ordinance, orders) within 10 workdays of request when accompanied by backup material 2) Number of days lost from on the job injuries per 100 employees (new for FY 2013; formerly in Human Resources) 3) Percentage of subrogation eligible dollars recovered (new beginning FY 2013) City Manager's Office Management and Budget Office (6) 1) Internal customer satisfaction rating 2) Process 100% of budget transfers within 24 hours of receipt 3) Facilitate or support cross-functional process improvement teams 4) Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation award 5) Payroll regular salaries adopted budget versus actual, net of policy changes 6) Produce monthly financial statements within seven business days of period close

FY 2013 Actual

100%

99%

99%

97%

*

42.5

29.5

49

27.53

60%

40%

35%

98% 100% 4 Yes 0.4% 1 day

95% 100% 2 Yes ±2% <7 days

99% 100% 3 Yes -1.4% 1 days

     

100%

95%

100%

4 hours

2 hours

96% 100% 3 Yes 0.3% 1 day

City Clerk's Office (2) 1) Percentage of agenda packages completed and distributed at least 5 days prior to the next City Commission meeting (new beginning FY 2013) 2) Number of hours of staff time per meeting spent preparing summary minutes (new beginning FY 2013) Communications and Marketing (5) 1) Customer satisfaction with communications (Internal Survey) 2) Awareness of Coral Springs magazine by new residents (Resident Survey) 3) Average number of unique page views on website 4) Number of episodes produced for What's Happening 5) Number of new promotional/informational campaigns developed Development Services Community Development (10) 1) Department customer satisfaction rating (composite) 2) Cycle time for small permits by the Zoning Division (Building Plan Review) 3) Cycle time for sign permits by the Zoning Division (Building Plan Review) 4) Cycle time for plan reviews (new and major/minor) by the Zoning Division (Development Review Committee) 5) Comprehensive Plan consistency with Department of Community Affairs (DCA) 6) Number of housing units rehabilitated using public financial assistance per $100,000 housing rehabilitation 7) Average number of days from the receipt of the resident's application for rehabilitation assistance to application approval (new beginning FY 2013) 8) Timeliness ratio of CDBG spending: annual CDBG allocation available by July 31 9) Number of trees planted within the City 10) Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year Building (2) 1) Requested inspections completed within one day 2) Percent of plan reviews completed within 15 working days Code Compliance (4) 1) Percent of code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administrative/judicial process 2) Percent of survey respondents satisfied with City efforts at maintaining the quality of their neighborhoods (Resident Survey) 3) Percent of survey respondents satisfied with the City's efforts to suuport quality neighborhoods (Business Survey - new beginning FY 2013 ) 4) Process new business tax applications within 5 business days 90% of the time (new beginning FY 2014 )

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY 2012 Actual

100% — 131,063 12 36

98% 84% 135,602 12 38

94% — 115,000 12 30

100% — 140,826 12 47

100% 1.5 days 1.3 days

97% 1.5 days 1.7 days

95% 2 days 2 days

99% 1.9 days 1.9 days

  

9 days

6.5 days

8 days

9 days

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

3.20

3.60

2.75

39.5 days

45 days

34 days

1.47 1,185 15

2.02 1,221 13

1.50 1,000 15

1.43 482 14

  

100% 99%

100% 95%

95% 90%

100% 98%

 

80%

84%

75%

N/A

N/A

84%

N/R

87%

87%

95%

90%

N/A

N/A

 N/R

  

N/A: Delayed reporting due to transition to ONESolution

Construction Management Support (1) 1) Build the following City construction projects within budget and on time: City Hall/City Hall South Building Demolition

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Yes

Yes

127


Department Performance Measurements (continued)

Financial Services (6) 1) Internal customer satisfaction rating (Financial Services Internal Survey) 2) Percentage of purchase requisitions under $10,000 processed within 24 hours 3) Water billings past due more than 180 days as percentage of outstanding bills 4) Number of repeat items in management letters prepared by the City’s external auditors (new beginning FY 2013) 5) Percentage of invoices paid within 30 days 6) Out of stock level of the total inventory at Central Stores Fire/EMS (8) 1) Maintain Fire Rescue quality standards: —Response time of eight minutes or less for 90% of all Fire/EMS calls —A minimum of fourteen firefighters on scene within ten minutes 90% of time for all structural fires 2) Provide inspection report to customer within 12 days from date of inspection 3) Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy: —Florida Firefighter Minimum Standards classes —EMT classes —Specialty classes (new beginning FY2014) 4) Percentage of customers who are satisfied with the quality of the Fire Department (Resident Survey) 5) Percentage of customers who are satisfied with the quality of the emergency paramedics (Business Survey)

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

91% 89% 2.3%

95% 78% 1.9%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 92% 90% 3%

99% 86% 2%

 * 

0

0

0

0

99.9% 2.00%

99.8% 2.2%

99% 2.50%

99% 2.50%

 

93% 100% 8 days 7 5 — 99%

91%

90%

97%

100%

90%

100%

6 days

12 days

N/A

N/A

8 4

7 4 50

7 5 93

  

99.7%

N/R

99%

97%

*

N/A: Delayed reporting due to transition to ONESolution

Human Resources (11) 1) Percentage of employees who agree with the statement “I would recommend working for the City to a friend” 2) Employee engagement index (new beginning FY 2013) 3) Percentage of employees who feel Human Resources provides quality services 4) Percentage of employees that are satisfied with liaison services 5) Percentage of employees that are satisfied with wellness activities 6) Percentage of employees who believe benefits are in line with needs 7) Quality of hire satisfaction (new beginning FY 2013) 8) Sick hours per employee 9) Percentage of minority applicants per recruitment 10) Percentage of employees who agree with "I am satisfied with the access to training resources to assist in my professional development." 11) Respond to customer requests within 48 hrs —and close service request within one week Information Services (5) 1) Number of IS Development Projects implemented in accordance with City’s Business Plan and IS Work Program 2) Customer satisfaction rating from survey of Information Services 3) Meet service level agreement regarding network availability (new beginning FY 2013) 4) Meet service level agreement regarding application availability (new beginning FY 2013) 5) Meet service level agreement regarding server availability (new beginning FY 2013)

128

90%

93%

90%

95%

84% 96% 92% 91% 80% 100% 57.8 63%

90% 95% 92% 90% 90% 90% 48 45%

87% 98% 96% 92% 93% 100% 67.4 65%

*       

85%

90%

85%

96% 100%

95% 96%

100% 100%

97% 98%

28 99%

24 99.0%

10 95%

13 98%

100.0%

99.5%

100.0%

99.6%

98%

100.0%

100.0%

98%

99.8%

90% 90% 91% 91% 60.4 59%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

 


Department Performance Measurements (continued)

Parks and Recreation Parks (3) 1) Quality service rating for appearance of recreation/athletic facilities (Resident Survey) 2) Customer service rating for parks and recreation staff (Resident Survey) 3) Safety rating of neighborhood parks (Resident Survey) Recreation (3) 1) Customer service rating of summer recreation program 2) Cost recovery ratio for the Recreation Division 3) Number of riders on community buses

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

— — —

96% 96% 92%

— — —

— — —

N/R N/R N/R

99% 63% 97,060

98% 68% 90,595

98% 60% 90,000

100% 68% 84,581

  

81% 72%

84% 76%

65% 50%

85% 76%

 

Aquatics (9) 1) The combined cost recovery for the Aquatic Services Division: —Aquatic Complex —Aquatic Services Division 2) Increase members and reduce member turnover: —Aquatic Complex membership —Aquatic Complex membership turnover —Cypress Pool average daily pool usage —Mullins Pool average daily pool usage 3) Maintain customer service ratings: —Aquatic facility —Cypress Park Pool —Mullins Park Pool

4,951 38% 364 117

3,868 33% 343 117

5,000 49% 250 120

3,517 49% 243 95

  * 

98% 98% 100%

99% 100% 99%

92% 92% 92%

98% 99% 99%

  

Sportsplex (1) 1) Revenue generated from Sportsplex concessionaires

$231K

$180K

$180K

$226K

Tennis (7) 1) Combined cost recovery ratio 2) Tennis lesson revenue 3) Maintain customer service ratings at the Tennis Center 4) Membership turnover at the Tennis Center 5) Customer service rating for court maintenance at the Tennis Center 6) Number of tennis special events 7) Number of tennis teams

57% $293K 94% 28% 79% 27 48

55% $272K 94% 21% 79% 36 139

60% $320K 90% 30% 90% 25 50

56% $255K — 15% — 36 65

 

City of Coral Springs, Florida

N/R

 N/R

 

129


Department Performance Measurements (continued)

Police (12) 1) Police Department's overall quality rating (Resident Survey) 2) Percentage of customers who has contact with or knows their neighborhood officers (Resident Survey) 3) Percentage of residents who feel that Coral Springs has remained as safe or become a safer place to live (Resident Survey) 4) Average Police response time (from time of call to arrival) 5) Stabilize the burglary rate at a 0% increase adjusted for population (Source: Uniform Crime Report) 6) Maintain 0% increase in crime rate as adjusted for population (Source: Uniform Crime Report) 7) Clearance rate for crimes (Source: Uniform Crime Report) 8) Reduce or maintain percent change in number of robberies (Source: Uniform Crime Report) (new beginning FY 2013) 9) Traffic crashes per 1,000 citizens 10) Number of high school students that are awarded safe driving certificates at graduation (new beginning FY 2013) 11) Satisfaction rating by businesses (Business Survey) (new beginning FY 2013) 12) Safety rating by businesses (Business Survey) (new beginning FY 2013) Public Works (11) 1) Department’s overall quality service rating (Resident Survey) 2) Achieve a 90% customer satisfaction rating on janitorial services (new beginning FY2014) 3) Availability rate of all vehicles/equipment for all departments 4) Facilities routine work orders completed within 15 working days 5) Percent of hydrants inspected (new beginning FY2014) 6) Service 400 valves per year (new beginning FY2014) 7) Pot hole repair response time 8) Complete litter removal of 159 miles of road rights-of-way in five working days 9) Number of times wastewater flow exceeds 9.79 mgd per month for three consecutive months 10) Water usage per capita (for Coral Springs Water District) 11) Percent of "unaccounted for" water

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

95%

43%

FY 2014 Goal Actual —

N/R

N/R

N/R

4:31

-32.2%

-8.33%

34.7%

26.9%

35

34

71%

2011 4:47 2011 28% 2011 8.88% 2011 27% 2011 2011 32

2012 4:45 2012 -10.4% 2012 -7.59% 2012 30.4% 2012 -13.3% 2012 33

114

126

130

262

92%

93%

92%

*

81%

83%

96%

92%

N/R

90%

83%

94% 90% 100% 400 3 days 5 days

93% 92% 100% 1,122 <1 day 6.6 days

*      

97% 97%

97% 93%

1.5 days

1 day

2013 5:00 0%

2013 2013

0% 2013 28% 2013 0%

2013

8.58

0

0

0

93 gal/day 9.23%

91.6 gal/day 4.75%

100 gal/day <10%

91.85 gal/day 5.68%

 

Fiscal Year 2014 Results

130

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

Met or exceeded goal Within 95% of goal Did not meet goal

73 7 14 94

 * 

Not available Not reported

3 12

N/A N/R

Total

109


Composite Indicators The following indicators were carefully chosen to give an overall representative snapshot of our financial and operating results. These measures correspond with the City’s mission and longtime focus areas: property values, safety, educational opportunity, customer satisfaction, recreation participation, community involvement, and employee productivity. Although we began tracking these results in 1994 as part of the Composite Index, for brevity we only show the post-2004 results.

Residential Property Value

Residential Property Values $9.0

$8.3

Billions

$8.0

Good $7.7

$7.6

$7.0

$6.5

$6.2

$5.7

$6.0

$5.4

$5.2

$5.0

$5.4

$5.5

$5.7

Source: Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office

$4.0

Residential taxable assessed property values decreased drastically in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011. The decrease is due to property tax legislation passed in January 2008 and is indicative of the national recession which began in 2008. Values are slowly increasing.

$3.0 (Property values reflect calendar year rather than fiscal year.)

$2.0 $1.0 $0.0

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

Non-residential Property Percentage Non-Residential Property Values The decrease in residential property values (see chart above) caused the increase in nonresidential as a percentage of total value. Nonresidential includes commercial/industrial sites, as well as agricultural, institutional, government and miscellaneous real estate. As residential values improve, non-residential values should ease back to about 20%.

35%

As a % of Total Property Values

30% 25%

Good 27.9%

22.6%

22.1%

21.2%

20%

20.1%

28.8%

27.4%

26.5%

26.2%

21.9% 19.7%

Source: Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office

15% (Property values reflect calendar year rather than fiscal year.)

10% 5% 0%

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

Crime Rate Crime Rate

Good

3,500

Incidents of major crimes per 100,000 population

3085.5 3,000 2,500

2731.4 2500.5 2259.3

2583.9

2530.1

2559.1

2688.8 2469.4

2485.3 2278.2

2,000

Source: City of Coral Springs Police Department and Florida Department of Law Enforcement Crime Report

1,500 (Crime figures are calculated utilizing calendar year rather than fiscal year)

1,000 500 0

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

City of Coral Springs, Florida

There was a decrease in incidents of major crimes per 100,000 population. The increase in FY 2012 was due to a 4% rise in the number of indexed crimes (3,271 from 3,145) coupled with a lower population number. The 2010 Census for Coral Springs was 4% less than prior estimates by BEBR. The rise in the crime rate from FY 2009 to FY 2010 was the result of a mathematical anomaly. While the number of crimes decreased during this period, the population upon which the ratio is based decreased at a faster rate.

131


Customer Satisfaction Survey Customer Satisfaction

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

93%

92%

92%

95%

95%

95%

95%

Projected

93%

No survey conducted; used prior year result

95%

95%

No survey conducted; used prior year result0

93%

No survey conducted; used prior year result

100%

No survey conducted; used prior year result

The City has consistently received high ratings in customer satisfaction from our residents. The overall satisfaction rating decreased in Fiscal Year 2009, yet ratings for departments and services increased. Results from the 2011 and 2013 surveys show a steady return to historically high levels. The Residential Survey is conducted every other year.

Good

Source: 2013 Resident Survey conducted by ETC Institute.

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

Volunteers in Government

Volunteers in Government

Good

600 500

458

463

479

454

463

494

519

509

520

540 496

400 300 200 Source: Database of Boards and Committees

100 0

Members of City committees and boards are counted as volunteers for this indicator. The number of volunteers in government reached an all-time high of 540 for Fiscal Year 2013 due to participation in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th Anniversary Committee and decennial Charter Review Committee. Three boards were dissoved during Fiscal Year 2014, causing a decrease in the number of volunteers that year.

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

Athletic League Participants

Athletic League Participants Some of the activities offered by the Parks and Recreation Department are basketball, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse, and cheerleading. Independent teams and programs, though not counted in this measure, also utilize City facilities. The recent declines are due primarily to the number of participants moving from recreational leagues to more competitive travel leagues, whose participants are not included in this measure.

Good

14,000 12,000

11,624

11,150 10,151

10,000

9,500 8,500

8,000

8,763 7,792

8,158

8,105

8,711

8,475

6,000 Source: City of Coral Springs Parks and Recreation Department

4,000 2,000 0

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

Employee Satisfaction

Employee Satisfaction

Good

100%

80%

40%

20%

0%

95%

97%

95%

95%

97% 90%

93%

Survey conducted during Q4

60%

94%

93%

All employees are surveyed annually by the Human Resources Department to determine overall job satisfaction.

95%

Same result used for FY 2012 and 2013

91%

Source: City of Coral Springs Human Resources Department Employee Survey

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

132

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Employee Productivity Employee Productivity

Good It will take fewer than six full-time employees to generate one million dollars of revenue, down from 10.91 in Fiscal Year 1994.

12.0 Employees Per Million Dollars of Revenue 10.0 8.0 6.0

6.94

6.57

6.39

5.97

5.77

5.77

5.60

Source: Annual Budget 5.39

5.13

5.18

5.17

4.0 2.0 0.0

(Calculation includes full-time employees for all funds divided by Net Revenues)

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

School Overcrowding School Overcrowding Overcrowding has continually decreased for Coral Springs schools since FY 2002. Enrollment and capacity numbers are provided by the Broward County School District.

Good

150% % Capacity Student Stations 125%

114%

100%

112%

104%

96%

95%

92%

92%

93%

92%

90%

Source: Broward County School Board

89%

75% 50% 25% 0%

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

(Percentages reflect academic year rather than fiscal year.)

Accidents at Major Intersections The number of accidents at major intersections has been revised to track the number of injury accidents at or near 15 intersections. The 15 intersections were chosen based on recent crash data. This measure is currently a Key Intended Outcome (KIO) and will be reported on a quarterly basis.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

133


134

Fiscal Year 2014 Initiative Summary A Family-Friendly Community Initiative 1 Park Security Cameras 2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

2 Fire Station 43 and 95 Design 2014

3

Fuel System for Emergency Power Generators 2014

4

Replace Pedestrian Footbridge on 87th Avenue 2014

5 Crime Scene Investigator 2014 6

Street Lighting Improvements (2012-2014) Ongoing

7

Playground Equipment Replacement Program (2012-2014) Ongoing

8

Public Safety Dispatch Equipment Upgrade (2013-2014) Ongoing

Department(s) Police

Fire

Update as of the Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2014

% Complete

The cameras at Betti Stradling Park are working with no issues. Work at Cypress Park has begun and is almost finished. Work at North Community Park should begin shortly. Both Cypress and North Community Parks will be complete by the end of this fiscal year.

Complete

100%

(1) Station 43 - The architect has been selected for the design of the station. The purchasing department is negotiating the terms of the contract at this time. We expect to send a referendum to the voters for a General Obligation Bond in November to finance the construction. If approved, the plan is to demolish the current property and build a new station similar to station 71 (the construction committee will be involved in the process). (2) Station 95 - The architect has been selected for the design of the station. The purchasing department is negotiating the terms of the contract at this time as well. We expect to send a referendum to the voters for a General Obligation Bond in November to finance the construction. If approved, the plan is to do a complete renovation of the existing building. If it turns out not to be feasible to renovate, we will look to demolish the current property and build a new station similar to station 71 (the construction committee will be involved in the process). (3) Station 109 - All the plans have been approved, and permits have been issued. The work has begun and is scheduled to be completed by January of next year. The construction committee has been involved, and most of (if not all) the request from the committee have been accommodated. There are regular construction meeting that the fire department is involved in. (4) Station 80 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; We have hired a company to evaluate the cracking issues we are having with the concrete driveways.

In Progress

80%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

In Progress

75%

This project consists of a portable fueling system enabling a vehicle with trailer and 500 gallon diesel tank to move to various sites to fill generators in the field. The truck has been received. The trailer and tank to be received in September 2014. The new steel footbridge was delivered and installed at the end of 87th Avenue on July 16th. Public Works The Streets crew installed concrete sidewalks and ramps leading to the footbridge. All of the work was completed before the start of the new school year. In November 2013, we hired an additional Crime Scene Investigator, who has been a true asset Police to the Unit. This person has been trained to retrieve, document, and process DNA evidence; increasing the efficiency of the Police Department. The final draft of the Street Light Policy is complete. As of August 31st, 925 street lights have Public Works been reported and repaired. The Jaycee Park playground has been completed and is in operation. The Three Mountain Park playground was removed because of safety issues and new playground equipment was Parks and Recreation installed. Both Jaycee Park and Three Mountain Park playgrounds are in operation and are ADA accessible. Public Works Fleet

Police

Status

The upgrade will not be complete until the end of the calendar year because of ongoing legal negotiations concerning the Coconut Creek tower.


City of Coral Springs, Florida

9

Dangerous Intersection Safety Program (2012-2014) Ongoing

Police

10

Public Safety Technology Upgrade (2013-2014) Ongoing

Police

-The additional camera at the northbound approach at 441 and Wiles did NOT occur due to the video validation study showing a low number of violations at that approach. -We began our Special Magistrate Program in January of 2014. We have had 15 hearings, all resulting in wins for the City. Several more hearings are scheduled, but the majority of violators opt to pay the violation rather than proceed to a Special Magistrate Hearing. The program is running smoothly. -A quarterly review of injury crashes during the same time period for intersections that have a red light camera in place indicated a substantial drop when compared to numbers for the same locations in the previous year; injury crashes dropped from 10 in the third quarter of 2012-2013, to 8 in the same quarter this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a reduction of 20%. -During Q4, discussions were held in reference to expanding our Dangerous Intersection Safety Program. Xerox, our current vendor, was not interested in expanding the program so representatives from American Traffic Solutions (ATS) met with City officials to discuss the possibility of conducting video validation of dangerous intersections within our City. Discussions will continue with ATS to determine if the City would be interested in partnering with them in an effort to expand and possibly replace our current program. -The THI software has been installed and is functioning. -Blue Team has been purchased, installed, and is currently being used. -Cry Wolf was procured, installed, and implemented. Waiting for implementation of OneSolution in order for them to be interfaced together.

Complete

100%

In Progress

95%

135


136

A Thriving Business Community Initiative 11 Municipal Complex 2014

Department(s)

Update as of the Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2014

Status

% Complete

City Manager's Office Phase 1 Complete

Complete

100%

Q4: The Building Division completed over 93 pre-submittal owner builder meetings. These meetings helped homeowners navigate the permitting and submittal process. In addition, we continue to hold pre-design, pre-construction, in-progress and wrap-up meetings. Staff conducted City Commission Workshop for the fences and sent out a survey to fence Development Services contractors. GOVNow is available and provides public access to Code Compliance and Business Tax. Q3: A Building representative and code staff participated in the Government Academy presentations. Code Compliance staff met with 3 community associations to discuss questions and concerns within their community.

Complete

100%

City Manager's Office CRA to review scope on September 9th.

In Progress

40%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

In Progress

20%

MPO has entered into an agreement with HNTB, Inc. to perform the Education Corridor Transit NW Broward Consortium for Planning Study. The Consortium met with representatives of Kimley-Horn and Associates to discuss a 17 Transportation Improvements (2012- Development Services SR7/Sample Road Multi-Modal Assessment Study they are preparing for FDOT. The study will 2014) Ongoing assess alternatives to improve transit operations at the intersection of Sample and SR7.

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

12

Development Services Outreach Program 2014

13 Downtown Parking Study 2014 14 Corporate Park Drainage Study 2014

Public Works

Report presented to the Commission at the July workshop.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

15

Electronic Permitting Feasibility Study 2014

In August 2014, we attended a local E-permitting seminar hosted by a neighboring city. We were able to learn about some of the challenges and opportunities in launching an Epermitting platform. For the remainder of the fiscal year, we are focused on the configuration of the ONESolution Development Services Building Permit System. The IVR configuration process is running parallel with ONESolution implementation. We anticipate on-line components of ONESolution will be used in inspection scheduling and permit payment. Further research will be conducted in the upcoming fiscal year on E-permitting software platforms.

16

Sample Road Enhancement Study 2014

City Manager's Office Waiting to receive scope from Traffic Engineer.

18

Traffic Management (2010-2014) Ongoing

Broward County determined that a traffic diverter on Atlantic Blvd. at Ramblewood Plaza is not warranted. Speed cushions are being replaced on NW 21 Street and NW 104 Avenue due to Development Services deteriorating conditions. Complaints about speeding in alleys have been followed up with requests for speed studies being performed by Broward County to determine whether additional speed limit signs are needed.

19

Downtown Redevelopment (20132014) Ongoing

City Manager's Office Contract has been executed and project is in for permitting.

Complete

100%

City Manager's Office Strategic Recommendation approved by the City Commission.

Complete

100%

The Job Outreach Database is being promoted through our Social Media outlets and was Budget, Strategy and highlighted in the 2014 State of the City Report. We currently have close to 1,000 job seekers Communications and more than 60 employers registered in the database.

Complete

100%

Economic Development Strategic 20 Plan Implementation (2013-2014) Ongoing 21

Job Outreach Database (2010-2014) Ongoing


An Active, Healthy Community Initiative 22

Enhance Sports Commission Resources 2014

Department(s)

Update as of the Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2014 Status All funds have been expended for this year. We added five events that have not previously been funded. We are looking to fill a few vacant spots on the Commission and have advertised Parks and Recreation Complete for applicants. We are also working with the Ft. Lauderdale Sports section of the Convention Bureau to assist with promoting our facilities.

23 Cypress Hall Renovation 2014

All work was completed in August including the restrooms. The kitchen has new tile flooring, Parks and Recreation new doors, new cabinets and granite counter tops. The Hall has a new commercial-grade wood laminated floor. The restrooms have new tiles, lighting, and fixtures.

24 Event Cross Promotion Pilot 2014

Parks and Recreation

50th Anniversary Celebration (2012-2014) Ongoing

Development Services

25

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Downtown Pathways (2012-2014) 26 Ongoing 27

Half-marathon and 5K Run/Walk (2013-2014) Ongoing

Teen Political Forum (2009-2014) 28 Ongoing

29

Multi-cultural Events (2005-2014) Ongoing

30 Car Club (2007-2014) Ongoing

% Complete 100%

Complete

100%

Waiting for the installation of TV's at the Aquatic Complex and possibly the Gym and Tennis Center (last ones depending on availability of funds).

Complete

90%

The following 50th anniversary events occurred in Q3: Pioneer Day, the Signature Concert at Sportsplex featuring Bruce in the USA, Veteran’s Salute and the Holiday parade.

Complete

100%

In Progress

90%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Q4: Easement Agreement between the City and Ventas, the property owner of Harbor Chase, was approved and the sidewalk was constructed. Local Agency Program (LAP) Agreement Development Services certifications will be submitted to FDOT for approval prior to entering into the LAP Agreement to receive funding for the Downtown Pathway project. Parks and Recreation Event went off on time and within budget. Already working on plans for next years event.

137

The Teen Political Forum gives our youth the opportunity to meet their elected officials in person, ask questions, and play an interactive role in the community. This year’s event drew Human Resources close to 900 students from our local high schools. The 2015 event that will take place on January 27th and will have its kick off meeting on September 2014. • Martin Luther King Day – January 2015 will mark the 25th Anniversary of the City’s MLK Celebration and plans are underway to celebrate with a concert of "The Temptations Review" featuring Dennis Edwards in addition to a Business Luncheon on Friday, January 16th. Also, an Art/Exhibit Contest will be held for local students as well as a Leadership/Diversity day for middle and high schools students. • WorldFest – will be held on Sunday, April 12th, 2015, at the Sportsplex. • Weekend of Peace Celebration – The Multi-Cultural Committee has started discussion of plans to celebrate the 2014 International Day of Peace. The traditional early morning breakfast Human Resources event will be held on Friday, September 19th at the Peace Garden, in conjunction with local schools who submit Pinwheels for Peace and entertainment. • International Dinner Dance – will be celebrated on Saturday, September 27th at the C.S. Marriott. The country of Greece will be highlighted this year and is sure to be a fun event, focusing on the cuisine, music and entertainment of this colorful country. • CommuniTea – no update at this time • Family Success Center – no updates at this time. Staff continues to work closely with the Family Success Center staff to assist our residents in need. All events and activities for the Car Club are completed for the year. The Car Club held its annual Car Show as part of the Family Fun Day that was held in February. This years event was Parks and Recreation held at the Downtown site and the turn out was more than double than when the event was held at Sportsplex. The feedback from the public was excellent.


138

An Attractive Community Initiative University Drive/Cardinal Road 31 Gateway Park 2014 Community Beautification Award 32 2014

Department(s) Parks and Recreation Development Services

33 Aquatic Complex Entryway 2014

Parks and Recreation

34 Atlantic Boulevard Entryway 2014

Development Services, Parks and Recreation

35 Enhance Litter Removal 2014

Public Works

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

36 White Fly Remediation Grants 2014

Development Services

37 Utility Maintenance 2014

Public Works Utilities

38 Enhance Recycling Program 2014

Public Works

39 Commercial Recycling Study 2014

Public Works

40

Mullins Park Revitalizationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Phase III (2013-2014) Ongoing

41

CDBG Action Plan (2011-2014) Ongoing

42

Median Master Plan (2013-2014) Ongoing

43

Royal Palm Entryway Construction (2013-2014) Ongoing

44

Hazardous Waste Collection 2014 Ongoing

Update as of the Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2014 Status This project has been put on hold due to the State wanting to widen University Drive. We are On Hold waiting to see how that would effect this project. Q3: The awards banquet was held on May 8th and representatives of all winners were present Complete to receive their awards. The entrance is underway and should be nearly complete by the end of September. The walls have been formed out, the sails have been manufactured and should be installed by mid In Progress September. The landscaping is ordered and will be in by the end of September. Staff continues to work with RW Plaza owner to seek approval of obtaining a sign easement. Our City team is working with the owner to minimize impact or reevaluate scope to focus on In Progress south side for Phase 1. Labor and equipment are in service. The average cycle time for de-littering 159 miles of rights Complete of way is 5.2 days. Five neighborhood partnership grants for the remediation of White Fly damage were Complete approved by the City Commission this quarter. Total grant amount was $20,230.25. A total of 22 lift station wet wells were cleaned, 682 water valves inspected, 522 dead end Complete water valves were exercised, and 742 fire hydrants were maintained. Recycling tonnages are up by approximately 100 tons per month when comparing the months Complete of December 2013 to May 2014.

25% 100% 90%

30% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Complete

100%

This Phase of the Mullins Park Improvements is complete. This year's improvements include resurfacing the basketball and tennis courts. In addition we have completed all the black vinyl fencing on the basketball and tennis courts and on the Aiello Football Field. The press box is Parks and Recreation installed and in use. The new pathway and the stamped asphalt projects were completed. The 10 directional signs for the park have been ordered and should be installed by the end of the fiscal year. landscaping upgrades throughout the park were also completed.

Complete

100%

NW 85th Avenue Construction and New Sidewalk Study are under construction. Commercial Façade - Colonial Building received certificate of completion in late August. Contractor is completing the punch list. Project completion scheduled for September 15, 2014; The current Development Services projects are underway: 1) Andy Plaza Inc. (Coral Springs Diner); 2) Five home repair projects funded by CDBG ; 3) The Senior Programs and the Youth Scholarship programs. FY2014/2015 Annual Action Plan was approved by the City Commission on July 16, 2014.

In Progress

55%

The Wiles Road medians landscapes upgrades were completed. The installation of the new Parks and Recreation irrigation system on Coral Ridge Dr., south of Atlantic Blvd. to the C-14, canal was also completed.

Complete

100%

Development Services, Ribbon Cutting was held June 11th. Maintenance will be handled by the contractor for the Public Works first year.

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Public Works

Report presented to the Commission at the July workshop.

% Complete

Collection on the first day of the month at the Waste Transfer Station has averaged 200 users. A Monday collection event is scheduled for Labor Day.


An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Initiative 45 Social Media Plan 2014

46 SharePoint Implementation 2014

47 West Side Master Plan 2014 48 Health and Wellness Program 2014

City of Coral Springs, Florida

49

Employee Wellness and Rewards Strategy 2014

50

Explore Additional Grant Opportunities 2014

51

52

53

54

Department(s) Update as of the Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2014 Budget, Strategy and We have developed a draft social media policy and training plan. Communications Q4: A vendor was selected for the public record request enhancements and the development is underway. Additionally, to improve stability a new production server is currently being configured. The next phase of development has not yet being decided by the Steering Information Services Committee but plan to do so should take place in the next upcoming quarter. Q3: The Request System is in production. All liaisons have been trained and over 100 requests have already been processed through the system. Public Works Fire

Human Resources

Conceptual site plan has been completed. The Department sent all of its sworn members through the exam process. There were several members that benefited from earlier detection of illnesses. We are in the process of launching the pier fitness portion of the program. -A three month "Wellness Pilot Program" took place between May and July with a total of 82 participants. The Pilot was administered by Five Point issuing a pedometer for each participant and creating baseline metrics with their weight and blood pressure. Steps, exercise and wellness activities were tracked for a three months period and a Sneak Rewards drawing was conducted each week. The program concluded with an awards luncheon on August 11th. The pilot met with success so we will begin another quarterly program on October 20th open for all interested employees. -An onsite Blood Draw was held at the end of June and all employees and spouses were eligible to participate. Results were mailed directly to their homes. Employees that participated were issued a $20 gift card.

139

Budget, Strategy and New full-time grant coordinator started on February 10th. Communications The staff along with the help CDW, have completed the wired network, voice network and 100% of the wireless initiative. We have initiated the project to replace the VOIP/Telephone IT Infrastructure Modernization (2013Information Services 2014) Ongoing system for the Center for the Arts and is expected to be completed by the end of October 2014. The City’s new brand continues to be implemented throughout the City. All departments, City Branding Phase except Police and Fire, are now using their new businesses cards and letterhead, work on the Budget, Strategy and II—Implementation (2013-2014) entryway sign at Royal Palm and Atlantic is near completion; we have started the process of Communications Ongoing wrapping the City’s buses; and the City’s fleet is being rebranded as vehicles receive their preventive maintenance service. The VineLight Fire Analysis Software has been fully implemented and is being transmitted daily. The file cleanup for the migration of One Solution has been completed for projects. Enterprise Software (2013-2014) Approximately 75% of the Vendor Name cleanup is also completed. as well as 60% of the Information Services Ongoing Miscellaneous Receivables cleanup. Fixed Assets cleanup has started. The testing of One Solution for the Finance/Payroll/Human resources has started and the security set up is moving forward. Crowe Horwath has completed their Fuel and Fleet audit. Results were presented to the City Internal Auditor (2012-2014) City Commission Commission at the August 27 Workshop. Results of future audits will be presented at future Ongoing workshops.

Status

% Complete

Complete

100%

In Progress

75%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

Complete

100%

In Progress

98%

Complete

100%

In Progress

50%

Complete

100%


Customer Requirements Analysis Overview

Survey respondents by general location

In an effort to closely align the City’s scarce resources with the needs and expectations of our residents, we use a number of “listening devices” to gather credible and useful data. This customer input is a critical piece of the Strategic Planning process. Our business model demands that we know our customers’ needs and expectations. Through citizen and business surveys, SWOT analyses, Slice of the Springs meetings and good, old-fashioned customer contact, we gain an understanding of our customers views.

Residential Satisfaction Survey Results Overview ETC Institute administered surveys to residents in the City of Coral Springs during February and March of 2013. The purpose of the surveys was to assess satisfaction with the quality of City services and to gather input about priorities for the community. Methodology A seven-page survey was mailed to a random sample of 3,000 households in the City of Coral Springs. Approximately seven days after the surveys were mailed, residents who received the survey were contacted by phone. Those who indicated that they had not returned the survey were given the option of completing it by phone or over the Internet. A total of 1,221 completed surveys (41% response rate). The results for the random sample of 1,221 households have a precision of at least +/-2.8% at the 95% level of confidence. There were no statistically significant differences in the results of the survey based on the method of administration (phone vs. mail). In order to understand how well services are being delivered in different areas of the City, ETC Institute geocoded the home address of respondents to the survey. The map shows the physical distribution of respondents to the resident survey based on the location of their home. A minimum of 200 surveys were completed in each of the six areas shown on the map. The results for each area have a precision of at least +/- 6.9% at the 95% level of confidence. In addition to conducting GIS mapping, the City had residents rate the quality of City services on a 5-point scale in 2011 and 2013 rather than a 4-point scale, which was used in previous years. The change in scale was done for two reasons: (1) to allow the City to compare its results to state and national averages that are maintained by ETC Institute and (2) to more critically evaluate the City’s performance over time. For trending purposes, ETC Institute compared the sum of the non-negative responses from 2009, 2011 and 2013.

140

Source: ETC Institute 2013 Coral Springs Resident Satisfaction Survey

Trends The Composite Satisfaction Index is derived from the mean rating given for all major categories of city services that are assessed on the survey. The index is calculated by dividing the mean rating for the current year by the mean rating for the base-year (year 2009) and then multiplying the result by 100. The Composite Customer Satisfaction Index for the City of Coral Springs stayed the same from 2011 to 2013. When analyzing the long-term trend, the City improved 3 points from 100 in 2009 to 103 in 2013. The chart shows how the Composite Satisfaction Index for the City of Coral Springs, the State of Florida, and the United States have changed since 2009. While the results for the City of Coral Springs stayed the same, the Florida average declined by 1 point and the U.S. average improved by 2 points. Long-Term Trends Despite the number of decreases in non-negative ratings from 2011 to 2013, Coral Springs continues to show improvement long term. Of the 36 items rated in both 2009 and 2013, nonnegative ratings either improved or stayed the same in 30 areas. The significant increases and decreases among all of the items that were assessed from 2009 to 2013 are listed below; changes of 3% or more were considered significant.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Overall Composite Customer Satisfaction Index 2009 vs. 2011 vs. 2013

Short-Term Trends Although overall satisfaction stayed the same from 2011 to 2013, there were significant changes in non-negative ratings in some of the specific areas that were assessed on the survey. The significant increases and decreases among all of the items that were assessed from 2011 to 2013 on the survey are listed below; changes of 3% or more were considered significant. The significant short-term increases in non-negative ratings from 2011 to 2013 are: • City TV Channel 25/99’s show called “In the Loop” (+4%) • City Commission meetings on City TV Channel 25/99 (+3%

Coral Springs’s Ratings Stayed the Same From 2011 to 2013 While the  Florida Average Declined

Source: ETC Institute 2013 City of Coral Springs Community Survey

The significant long-term increases in non-negative ratings from 2009 to 2013 are listed below:

The significant short-term decreases in non-negative ratings from 2011 to 2013 are listed below: 1 •

Adequacy of City street lighting (-6%)

• Condition of neighborhood streets (-5%) • Enforcement of the exterior maintenance of residential property (-5%)

• City Commission meetings on City TV Channel 25/99 (+18%)

• Feeling of safety walking alone in your neighborhood after dark (-5%)

• City TV Channel 25/99’s show called “In the Loop” (+15%)

• Feeling of safety in business areas after dark (-4%)

• City TV Ch. 25 on Adv. Cable or 99 on ATT UVerse (+14%)

• City efforts maintaining quality of neighborhoods (-4%)

• Feeling of safety in business areas after dark (+9%)

• Feeling of safety walking alone in your neighborhood in general (-3%)

• How quickly police respond to emergencies (+8%) • City senior center (+7%)

• Enforcement of the exterior maintenance of commercial property (-3%)

• City’s website-CoralSprings.org (+7%)

• Code Enforcement Division Services (-3%)

• Coral Springs as a place to live (+7%) How Coral Springs Compares to Other Communities

• Coral Springs News Magazine (+6%) • Communication between City & residents (+6%)

Overall Satisfaction

• Code Enforcement Division Services (+3%)

The City of Coral Springs is setting the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services. Seventy-six percent (76%) of the residents surveyed in the City of Coral Springs were satisfied (ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the overall quality of City services compared to a national average of just 57% and a Florida average of 60%.

• Feeling of safety in business areas during daytime (+3%)

Satisfaction with Specific Areas

• Condition of major City streets (+3%)

The City of Coral Springs rated at or above the U.S. and Florida averages in 43 of the 44 areas that were assessed on the survey. The individual areas were Coral Springs was setting the standard for service delivery (rating 15% or more above the national average) among other U.S. communities are:

• Customer service by City employees (+6%) • City parks & recreation programs (+3%) • How quick EMS personnel respond to emergencies (+3%)

• Customer service by parks & recreation staff (+3%) • As a place where City respects religious & ethnic diversity (+3%)

• Coral Springs aquatic/pool facilities (+33%)

• Quality of services provided by City (+3%) The only area that showed a significant long-term decrease in non-negative ratings from 2009 to 2013 was the feeling of safety in parks and recreation facilities (-3%).

• Public works (streets and drainage) (+29%) • City communication with residents (26%) • Condition of major City streets (+23%)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

141


Residential Survey Trends

• How well the City is planning for the future (+22%)

2013

• Bulk trash pickup service (+22%) • Condition of neighborhood streets (+20%) • Availability of information about recreation programs (+19%) • Customer service provided by City employees (+19%)

2011

As a place to raise children

97% 96%

As a place to live

97% 97% 93% 95%

As a place to live no matter who you are

• As a City that is moving in the right direction (+17%)

92% 94%

As a City that is moving in the right direction

• Number of City parks (+17%) • Availability of information about City services (+17%)

92% 92%

As a place to work 50%

• City efforts to inform residents about local issues (+17%)

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Source: ETC Institute 2013 City of Coral Springs Community Survey

• City parks and recreation programs (+16%)

Major Findings

• Outdoor athletic facilities/fields (+16%) • Walking and biking paths in the City (+16%) • Curbside recycling service (+16%) • Cleanliness of City streets and other public areas (+15%) The individual areas were Coral Springs was setting the standard for service delivery (rating 15% or more above the Florida average) among other Florida communities are listed below: • Coral Springs aquatic/pool facilities (+31%) • How well the City is planning for the future (+26%)

• Major City Services. The major city services that were rated best included: the quality of fire services (91%), the quality of emergency medical services (89%), the overall quality of City parks and recreation (84%) and the quality of police services (84%). Residents were least satisfied with code enforcement services (54%). • Services that residents thought should receive the most increase in emphasis over the next two years. The major city services that residents thought should be emphasized most over the next two years were: (1) police services, (2) maintaining the quality of neighborhoods in the City, and (3) the Code Enforcement Division services.

• City communication with residents (+20%) • Bulk trash pickup services (+20%) • Availability of info about recreation programs (+17%)

Residential Survey Trends 2013

2011

• City parks and recreation programs (+16%)

96%

Quality of life

• Quality of services provided by the City (+16%) • As a City that is moving in the right direction (+16%)

96%

95%

Quality of services provided by City

95%

• Outdoor athletic facilities/fields (+16%) • Quality of recreation programs for youth (+16%)

92%

How well the City is planning for the future

92%

• Availability of information about City services (+16%) • City efforts to inform you about local issues (+16%)

86%

Value for City taxes and fees

94%

50%

60%

70%

Source: ETC Institute 2013 City of Coral Springs Community Survey

142

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

80%

90%

100%


• Public Safety Services. The public safety services that were rated best included: how quickly EMS personnel respond to emergencies (86%), how quickly fire personnel respond to emergencies (82%), and how quickly police respond to emergencies (81%). Residents were least satisfied with how often police officers patrol neighborhoods (48%). The public safety services that residents thought were most important to emphasize over the next two years were: (1) the City’s efforts to prevent crime and (2) how often police patrol neighborhoods.

Importance-Satisfaction Assessment Matrix

• Parks and Recreation Services. The areas of parks, recreation, and social services that were rated best included: the number of city parks (88%), the maintenance of city parks (86%), outdoor athletic fields/ facilities (85%) and the appearance of 5 Source: ETC Institute 2013 City of Coral Springs Community Survey parks and recreation facilities (85%). Residents were least satisfied with the City senior center (57%). The parks and recreation services that Other Findings residents thought were most important to emphasize over • Eighty-three percent (83%) of residents reported they read the next two years were: (1) the maintenance of city parks, (2) the Coral Spring’s magazine “all of the time” or “sometimes;” walking and biking paths in the City and (3) the maintenance 15% reported they read the magazine “seldom” or “never” of parks and recreation facilities. and 2% did not know. • Solid Waste Services. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of the • Forty-seven percent (47%) of those surveyed thought the residents surveyed who had an opinion were satisfied (rating taxes they pay to the City of Coral Springs are just right; 29% of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with residential trash collection of the residents thought the taxes they pay are too high, 1% services; 87% were satisfied with curbside recycling, and 81% thought taxes were too low, and the remaining 23% felt that were satisfied with the bulk trash pickup. while taxes remain high, the city is providing a higher level of • City Communications. Seventy-three percent (73%) of the service than expected. residents surveyed who had an opinion were satisfied (rating • The City services or facilities that were used most often were: of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the quality of the City the Coral Springs Center for Performing Arts (58%), police News Magazine; 73% were satisfied with the city’s website services (50%) and City Hall in the mall (47%). (coralsprings.org), and 70% were satisfied with the availability of information about city programs and services. • Infrastructure/Maintenance Services. The areas of maintenance that were rated best included: overall satisfaction with the condition of major City streets (82%) and the overall condition of neighborhood streets (79%). Residents were least satisfied with the adequacy of street lighting (63%). The areas of maintenance that residents thought were most important to emphasize over the next two years were: (1) adequacy of city street lighting, (2) cleanliness of streets and other public areas and (3) the condition of major City streets.

• The top four reasons residents indicated they originally made the decision to move to Coral Springs were: the nice neighborhoods (64%), the quality education system (56%), housing (55%) and the location (50%). • Sixty-one percent (61%) of residents, who had an opinion, were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the overall effectiveness of the City’s efforts to address public school issues; 26% were “neutral” and 13% were dissatisfied. • Nearly half (47%) of residents felt they had a good understanding of the important issues facing the City of Coral Springs; 34% did not and 19% did not know. • Sixty-three percent (63%) of residents think the City of Coral Springs is continually improving as a place to live; 23% disagreed and 14% did not know.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

143


Opportunities for Improvement

Priorities within Departments/Specific Areas

In order to help the City identify opportunities for improvement, ETC Institute conducted Importance-Satisfaction (I-S) Priorities Analysis. This analysis examined the importance that residents placed on each City service and the level of satisfaction with each service. By identifying services of high importance and low satisfaction, the analysis identified which services will have the most impact on overall satisfaction with City services over the next two years. If the City wants to improve its overall satisfaction rating, the City should prioritize improvements in services with the highest Importance Satisfaction (I-S) ratings.

The second level of analysis reviewed the importance of and satisfaction of services within departments and specific service areas. This analysis was conducted to help departmental managers set priorities for their department.

Based on the results of the Importance-Satisfaction (I-S) Priorities Analysis, ETC Institute recommends the following: Overall Priorities for the City by Major Category The first level of analysis reviewed the importance of and satisfaction with major categories of City services. This analysis was conducted to help set the overall priorities for the City. Based on the results of this analysis, the major services that are recommended as the top two opportunities for improvement over the next two years in order to raise the City’s overall satisfaction rating are listed below in descending order of the Importance-Satisfaction rating:

Based on the results of this analysis, the services that are recommended as the top priorities within each department over the next two years are listed below: • Public Safety: frequency of police patrols in neighborhoods • Parks and Recreation: none of the areas rated had an I-S rating above 0.10, so the City should sustain is current efforts. • Maintenance: adequacy of city street lighting Source: ETC Institute, City of Coral Springs 2013 Residential Survey

• Efforts to Maintain Quality Neighborhoods • Code Enforcement Services

144

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Business Survey Summary

Business Survey: Bottom line up front

Overview

Businesses have a very positive perception of the City

In an effort to closely align the City’s scarce resources with the needs and expectations of our residents, we use a number of “listening devices” to gather credible and useful data. This customer input is a critical piece of the Strategic Planning process. Our business model demands that we know our customers’ needs and expectations. Through citizen and business surveys, SWOT analyses, Slice of the Springs meetings and good, old-fashioned customer contact, we gain an understanding of our customers views. Purpose and Methodology During the spring of 2014, ETC Institute administered a survey to businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The purpose of the survey was to gather feedback from Coral Springs business owners and senior managers to identify ways improve the quality of City services. The survey was administered by phone to a random sample of 403 businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The overall results of the survey have a precision of at least +/-5.0% at the 95% level of confidence. Major Findings Overall Satisfaction with City Services Forty-one percent (41%) of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was higher than their expectations; more than half (53%) of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was meeting their expectations and only 6% felt the quality of City services was below their expectations.

Satisfaction improved in zoning and street maintenance, but decreased slightly in other areas The top two reasons businesses plan to stay in Coral Springs are: (1) the City’s positive image and (2) the City’s low crime low If the City wants to enhance overall satisfaction among businesses with City services, the City should emphasize improvements in (1) trash collection services and (2) code compliance.

Satisfaction with Specific City Services, Departments, or Programs Seventy-six percent (76%) or more of the businesses surveyed were “satisfied” or “neutral” with all 16 of the City services, departments or programs assessed on the survey. The City services, departments, or programs that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon the combined percent of businesses who were “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” were: • Emergency Paramedics (97%) • Fire Inspection (97%) • Streets Maintenance (96%) • Police Department (96%)

Overall Quality of Services Provided by the City Overall Quality of Services Provided by the City

• Water Billing (94%)

By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know/not sure)

8% 7%

Higher than your expectations

18% 20%

Most (94%) of the businesses surveyed rated the City’s customer service as “very good” or “good;” only 6% of businesses rated the City’s customer service as “poor.”

30% 32% 53% 50%

Expectations met

2014 2012 2008 2007

68% 69%

5% 4% 6% 5%

Below your expectations

Significantly below your expectations

Satisfaction with City Customer Service

11% 14%

Significantly higher than your expectations

1% 1% 1% 0% 94% 96% 94% 96%

Total: Higher/Meeting Expectations

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Overall Ratings of the City’s Customer Service Overall Ratings of Customer Service By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know/not sure)

Very Good

40% 37% 37%

Good

57% 61%

2014 2012 2008

57%

Customer service ratings remain very high

5% 3% 3%

Poor

1% 0% 0%

Very Poor

94% 98% 97%

Total: Very Good/Good 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

(excluding don’t know/not sure)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

145


Satisfaction with City Efforts to Improve Coral Springs Businesses were asked how satisfied they were with the City’s efforts to improve various aspects of the Coral Springs. The items that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses were:

Reasons Why Businesses Decide to Locate to

Reasons BusinessesCoral Decide to Locate Here Springs

By percentage of business respondents who rated the item as a 3, 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale

Low crime rate Overall image of the City

Extremely Important (5)

Telecommunications/utilities/other infrastructure Attitude of local government toward business

• Clean city streets and public areas (99%)

Very Important (4)

Access to Sawgrass Expressway

• Work on road conditions (95%)

Important (3)

Level of taxation

• Support quality neighborhoods (95%) • Support the availability of customer parking (91%) • Events bringing residents from surrounding towns (91%)

Quality of schools Proximity of important businesses

0%

20%

40%

60%

80% 100%

Satisfaction with City Codes and Regulations The City codes and regulations that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were: • Paint color regulations (92%) • Trash disposal regulations (91%) • Requirements for proper business appearance maintenance (90%) • Business parking regulations (90%)

Reasons for Moving to Coral Springs When asked to indicated which issues they felt were most important in their decision to locate their business in Coral Springs, the items that businesses identified as most important, based upon the combined percentage of “extremely important,” “very important” and “important” responses, were: • Low crime rate (91%) • Overall image of the City (88%) • Telecommunications/utilities/other infrastructure (87%)

Importance of City Services

• Attitude of local government toward business (86%)

The three City services, departments, or programs that businesses felt were most important to their organization were:

• Access to Sawgrass Expressway (85%)

• Police Department (40%)

Reasons Business Will Stay in Coral Springs for the Next 10 Years

• Fire Inspection (32%)

The top reasons businesses indicated that they would stay in Coral Springs for the next 10 years were:

• Trash Collection Service (29%)

• Low crime rate (32%)

Overall Perceptions of the City

• Overall image of the City (29%)

Businesses were asked to indicate how satisfied they were with various items that may influence their perceptions of the City. The items that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were:

• Access to Sawgrass Expressway (29%)

• Overall quality of life (97%) • Overall image of the City (96%) • Overall feeling of safety (96%) Ratings of the Physical Appearance of the City Eighty percent (80%) of the businesses surveyed rated the physical appearance of the area where their business is located as “excellent” or “good;” 17% rated it as “average,” and only 3% rated it as “poor”

146

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


How likely would you be to recommend Coral

Likelihood Cityto asfriends, a business Springs of asrecommending a business location family and co-workers? location to friends, family and co-workers By percentage of respondents

Very Likely 50% Likely 26%

• Attitude of employees (93%) • Stability of the City’s labor force (90%)

Do Not Know 1% Not Likely 5%

When asked to rate the labor pool in Coral Springs, the items that showed the highest positive ratings, based upon a combined percentage of “excellent,” “good” or “average” responses, were: • Productivity of the workforce (94%)

Somewhat Likely 14%

Not Likely At All 4%

Ratings of the Labor Pool in Coral Springs

• Availability of labor (90%)

Only 9% would NOT recommend Coral Springs to others

Communication Use of the City’s Website Fifty-six percent (56%) of the businesses surveyed indicated their organization had not used the City’s website, 42% of businesses had used the City’s website and 2% did not remember.

A “Business Friendly” Community Likelihood of Recommending the City as a Business Location Most (90%) of the businesses surveyed were “very likely,” “likely” or “somewhat likely” to recommend Coral Springs as a business location to friends, family and coworkers; only 9% were “not likely” or “not likely at all” to recommend Coral Springs as a business location and 1% did not know.

Satisfaction with Various Communication Services The communication related services that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were:

Ratings of the City’s Business Atmosphere Compared to Two Years Ago

• City’s website: www.CoralSprings.org (99%)

Forty percent (40%) of the businesses surveyed felt the City’s business atmosphere was “better” compared to two years ago; nearly half (46%) of the businesses surveyed felt the City’s business atmosphere was the same compared to two years ago but felt it was “good,” 8% felt it was the same compared to two years ago but that it was “bad” and 6% felt it was “worse” compared to two years ago.

• www.csbizassist.org (96%)

Overall Business Atmosphere Rating Overall Business Atmosphere Rating By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know/not sure)

40% 32% 27% 39%

Better

48%

60%

2014

9% 6% 4% 4%

No change, but poor

2012 2008 2007

6% 12% 9% 10%

Worse

86% 82% 87% 87%

Total: Better/No change, but good

0%

20%

40%

• www.WorkCoralSprings.org (96%) Best Ways to Communicate With Businesses The top three ways that respondents felt it would best for the City to communicate with businesses were: direct mail (57%), emails (51%), and newsletters (37%).

Bestfor Ways for the City to Communicate Best Ways the City to Communicate with with Businesses Businesses By percentage of respondents

46% 50%

No change, but good

• www.businessENews.org (97%)

60%

80%

100%

Direct Mail Emails Newsletters Brochures City Webiste Personal calls Social Media Business Forums Workshops e HelpDesk City TV

57% 51% 37% 20% 20% 20% 15% 11% 10% 9% 7%

0%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

20%

Direct Mail and Email are the preferred methods of communication with the City 40%

60%

147


Overall Ratings of City Communication Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the businesses surveyed rated the City’s communication with businesses owners and managers as “very good” or “good;” 17% rated the City’s communication with business owners and managers as “poor” and 5% rated it as “very poor.”

Ratings of Property City Property Taxes Compared Ratings of City Taxes Compared to Other to Other Communities Communities By percentage of respondents

29%

Higher

39%

43%

4% 6% 4% 6%

Lower

Conducting Business with the City Online

2014 2012 37%

More than half (53%) of the businesses surveyed were interested in conducting business with the City online; 41% were not interested and 6% were unsure. Of the businesses who were interested in conducting business with the City online, most (88%) were interested in applying for City permits online and most (88%) were interested in paying City bills online.

AreBusinesses Businesses Interested in Conducting Are Interested in Conducting Business Business with the City On-Line? with the City On-Line? By percentage of respondents

Yes 53%

33%

Don't Know/Unsure 6%

About the same

25%

25%

0%

10%

31%

2008 2007

26%

21%

Don't know/ Not sure

45%

20%

29%

30%

40%

50%

Property Taxes How Property Taxes Compare to Surrounding Communities Thirty-seven percent (37%) of businesses felt the City’s property taxes were “about the same” compared to surrounding communities; 33% felt property taxes were higher compared to surrounding communities, 4% felt they were lower and 26% did not know. Ratings of the Amount of Property Taxes

No 41%

Businesses were asked to indicate their agreement with various statements regarding the amount of property taxes they were paying in relation to the quality of City services they were receiving. The results are provided below: • 53% of the businesses surveyed felt property taxes were just right for the amount and quality of City services they were receiving. • 24% of businesses felt property taxes were too high for the quality of City services they were receiving. • 22% of businesses felt property taxes were high but felt the City was providing more services at a higher quality than expected. • 1% of businesses felt property taxes were too low for the amount and quality of City services they were receiving.

Ratings ofRatings City Property Taxes of City Property Taxes By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know)

53% 57%

Property taxes are just right for the amount and quality of City services received

41% 42% 22% 19% 20%

Property taxes are high but, the City's is providing more services at a higher quality than expected

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

2008 2007

38% 26% 1% 0% 1% 1%

0%

148

2012

24% 24%

Property taxes are too high for the quality of services received

Property taxes are low for the amount and quality of City services received

2014 31%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%


Workforce Analysis

Other Findings The City services, departments or programs that businesses used most often were: • Fire Inspection (81%), Street Maintenance (73%) and Street Drainage (72%). The City services, departments or programs that used least often were: the Planning (11%), Building Division Call Center (12%), Zoning (12%) and Community Development (12%). Three-fourths (75%) of businesses indicated that they had not taken advantage of the new sign regulations; 13% had taken advantage of the new regulations and 12% did not know. Sixty-five percent (65%) of the businesses surveyed reported that they would know who to call or where to go if they had a complaint or comment about City services, 34% did not and 1% were unsure. Businesses generally felt that City events had a positive impact on the City. • When asked to rate the impact of various events on the City, eighty-nine percent (89%) of businesses felt the Festival of the Arts had a positive impact on the City, 87% felt the Holiday Parade had a positive impact on the City, 86% felt the Our Town event had a positive impact on the City, 85% felt the Green Market had a positive impact on the City and 78% felt the Kruel Classic had a positive impact on the City. Three-fourths (75%) of the businesses surveyed indicated they would support a City ordinance that requires businesses in Coral Springs to participate in a recycling program; 18% were not supportive and 7% were not sure. Nearly all (96%) of the businesses surveyed did not feel that they had workforce training needs that were not being met; only 1% did have workforce training needs that were not being met and 3% were not sure.

The latest organization survey was conducted during December 2013. Participation in the survey was open to all fulltime and part-time employees. For purposes of this analysis, full-time and part-time results were combined for all questions. A total of 483 (437 full-time, 40 part-time, and 6 did not specify) employees completed surveys in 2013. This was one of the largest response rates since the City began administering employee satisfaction/engagement surveys. Overall employee satisfaction remains high at 95% (46% of which selected the top box score “strongly agree”), slightly up from the 2012 survey results but consistent with surveys conducted during the last several years. The average score for each category from the most recent survey are noted below: • Strategic Direction 95% • Equipment and Resources 90% • Leadership and Managerial Effectiveness 89% • Work Environment 90% • Empowerment 87% • Communication 86% • Professional Development 90% • Employee Recognition 81% Since the onset of the 2012 survey, the City has continued to monitor an internal employee engagement index. The engagement index includes questions from five different categories and provides a comprehensive view of subjects that are tied to employee engagement levels. The combined overall engagement rating remains at 87%, this correlates with the City’s consistently high employee satisfaction levels. The average scores for the categories within the engagement index are noted below: • Work Environment 83% • Empowerment 83% • Leadership and Managerial Effectiveness 96% • Professional Development 91% • Employee Recognition 84% Data Segmentation The survey results were segmented and reviewed for variations based on tenure, position level, work environment and employment status. No significant deviations were identified.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

149


SWOT

Conclusions/Actions Citywide survey results are communicated internally following a preview with the City Manager and senior management team. Meetings are facilitated annually by Human Resource Partners through each Department Director to share feedback from the current year and review survey trend data. Based on departmental feedback, Human Resources will facilitate employee focus groups as needed for employees to provide more in-depth feedback and opportunities for improvement. Human Resources A combined survey for all support service functions including Financial Services, Risk Management, Human Resources and Information Services was administered in September 2013. The human resources quality rating of 96% (41% of which selected the top box score “strongly agree”), continues to be a positive indicator of overall performance. Eight- one percent of employees were satisfied with the City’s benefits package, which is lower than similar feedback received 2012. Three other key department measures showed slight variability, but still remained high:

During February and March 2013, 190 participants (63 volunteers—the majority serving on advisory boards and committees, 120 employees, and six “other”respondents) completed the SWOT exercise. Prior SWOT exercises included 130 participants in 2011, 138 participants in January 2009 ,and 56 respondents in April 2006. Each respondent was asked to rank five strengths, five weaknesses, five opportunities, and five threats to the community. The list of options came from prior SWOT exercises, the most recent Visioning event, and the branding research. Below is a summary of the top ranked issues for each category. Strengths • Safe community • Fiscally responsible • Good schools • Quality of life • Well-run City government

• Liaison Services 92% (top box strongly agree of 39%) • Wellness Satisfaction (same for 2013) 91% (top box strongly agree of 32%)

Weaknesses

• Training Applicability 88 % (top box strongly agree of 21%)

• Crime/perception of crime

Future Staffing Needs

• Difficult for businesses

The City continues to monitor projected turnover from anticipated retirements among the police, fire and other City departments. Recruitment is ongoing for Law Enforcement Officers and Law Enforcement Trainees. Turnover not attributed to retirement continues to remain low and all vacancies continue to be re-evaluated prior to initiating recruitment processes. The City continues to carefully manage attrition levels and looks for new ways to re-organize employee groups more effectively to support operational demands.

• Lack of Downtown / None of the options

• Speeding drivers

• Outdated City facilities Opportunities • Nightlife • Business development • Corporate Park • Economic development • Youth/teen programs Threats • Crime • Economic downturn • Reputation difficult to do business • Negligent landlords • Unemployment

150

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Neighborhood Meetings The City completed its nineteenth year of the “Slice of the Springs” Town Hall meetings. The meetings were held on November 21, 2013 (Southwest and Southeast), February 20, 2014 (Center West and Town Center) and March 13, 2014 (Northside and Northeast). The number of attendees at this year’s meetings (a total of approximately 195 in the entire meeting series) was a significant increase over the last couple years (total attendance was 132 in 2012-2013 and 142 in 2011-2012). This year, the Communications and Marketing Department sent out a pre-meeting survey to an extensive email list, which included previous years’ Slice meetings attendees as well as other residents. The survey included a question on the issues affecting the community, which helped City staff cater its presentation to the residents. Since this survey seems to have helped draw more attendees, staff will incorporate a survey prior to future Slice meetings. City staff from various departments presented on a number of important topics – Downtown development, new logo/ branding, new garbage contract, new businesses opening in the City, new artwork, Code Compliance, crime statistics, and Public Works improvements. Residents expressed their appreciation to City staff for maintaining a high quality of life in the City, while also expressing their specific concerns, some of which mirror previous years’ comments. The top concerns were:

Meeting survey results show that 100% of attendees who completed the survey found the meeting to be “productive or very productive” and would recommend the meeting to other residents. Roughly one-third were first-time attendees. The attendees averaged 20 years as City residents. The Slice meetings are taped and replayed on CityTV on Advanced Cable Communications Channel 25 (Ch. 725 in HD) and Channel 99 on AT&T U-Verse. Meetings are also streamed online through the City’s Videos on Demand at www.coralsprings.org/vod. This year the Communications and Marketing Department streamed the Town Center/Center West and Northside/Northeast meetings live. Staff will research whether an interactive component could be implemented next year. Slice meetings continue to provide an opportunity for residents to interact directly with staff members from various City departments, including Police, Fire, Community Development, Code Compliance, Building, Public Works and Parks and Recreation. A follow-up letter was sent to the attendees, providing additional information, addressing outstanding issues not answered during the meeting and reinforcing important community information. It has always been a very important aspect of “Slice of the Springs” effort to have accountability in the follow-up, and staff continues to acknowledge the importance of addressing all concerns/ complaints voiced by the residents in the meeting.

• Poor street lighting in certain areas • Speeding/traffic calming • Code compliance issues • Trash/litter in certain public areas • Whitefly infestation Attendees were also asked to fill out a survey to assess the meeting and express any additional concerns. Those concerns/ complaints were subsequently entered into the City’s Help Desk system, allowing the appropriate staff to address each case, assuring a timely response to the residents’ concerns. This process also helps to identify residents’ issues as the City prepares its annual Business Plan and budget.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

151


CityHelpDesk Responses

For Fiscal Year 2014 the top five departments that received the most comments were: code compliance, trash pickup, police, permit inquiries, and park facilities. Some of the reoccurring comments/concerns were:

The overall amount of comments received through CityHelpDesk FY 2014 was 1,517. This is a significant increase of 77% when compared to FY 2013 comments. There are several factors that may have contributed to this upsurge of comments. There has been a slight increase in the number of comments for Code Compliance. There continues to be abandoned and/ or foreclosed homes in the City that require repair and upkeep. In January 2014, the City switched from Waste Management to WastePro for trash pickup which generated an influx of comments. Since the inception of the Make a Call, Make a Difference program police continue to receive complaints about suspicious activity, in turn, lowering the amount of burglaries that occur. Street maintenance complaints increased slightly but litter complaints remained low. The continuation of the Keep Coral Springs Beautiful project, funded by Community Foundation of Broward, has helped in improving the aesthetics of right of ways that had been heavily littered in the past resulting in a decrease in litter complaints.

• Code Compliance (24% of comments): landscape maintenance; trees and hedges; insects and rodents; dirty roofs; trash, litter and debris

Comparison of top helpdesk topics

The city has implemented an online HelpDesk, which collects comments, complaints, requests, and even compliments from residents and businesses. All the comments are assigned to an appropriate department, and are replied with an initial response within two business days, with a final resolution (or a timetable for a resolution) within one week. Trends in HelpDesk comments are later reported regularly to the City Manager’s Office to be used to identify areas of major concerns to our residents and businesses. This process allows us to determine areas of the City that is in need of process changes, customer service training, or realignment of resources.

• Trash Pickup (13% of comments): initial confusion with trash pickup day as the City changed its service to WastePro, trashbins left outside, pickup running late, hazardous material pickup arrangements, trashbin size concerns • Police (10% of comments): redlight camera ticket inquiries; issues with neighbors – pets and noise; suspicious activity; speeding • Building permits (9% of comments): open and expired permit inquiries

Department

FY 2013

FY 2014

Percent change

Code

348

363

4% increase

Trash Pickup

47

200

77% increase

Police

121

149

19% increase

Expired Permits

101

141

28% increase

Park Facilities

101

80

21% decrease

Street maintenance

59

61

3% increase

• Park facilities (5% of comments): need for garbage and/ or recycling bins at parks; suspicious activity; issues with food or drinks not allowed in parks; lost and found; park maintenance; lighting; availability of mulch

152

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Benchmarking ICMA Overview

ICMA comparison cities

The City of Coral Springs has been participating in the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) Center for Performance Measurement (CPM) data collection efforts for over a decade. During the last year, ICMA-CPM has undergone major changes. It has undertaken significant evaluation, research, and design efforts to revitalize performance management and analytic activities. It is now known as the ICMA Center for Performance Management and Analytics. With the name change comes two major functional changes: â&#x20AC;˘ Streamlined service areas and a focus on core and outcome measures, shifting the data collection burden from roughly 5,000 individual measures to 500. â&#x20AC;˘ New, state of the art software platform with improved reporting and analytic capabilities.

Bellevue, WA

Olathe, KS

Columbia, MO

Peoria, AZ

Elk Grove, CA

Portsmouth, VA

Fort Collins, CO

Savannah, GA

Mc Allen, TX

Sparks, NV

Of the 127 jurisdictions participating in the ICMA Performance Management and Analytics program for 2013, Coral Springs compares itself to 10 other municipalities chosen because of demographic similarities such as overall population, percent youth population, and median household income. Almost all of the cities in the comparison group operate under a council-manager form of government.

Since this is a transition period, many of the measures we typically review are not readily available. Comparison Cities The data are used to analyze the performance of the City of Coral Springs relative to other localities based upon uniform performance data reported through annual program templates (questionnaires). The most current data available is for Fiscal Year 2013. When the data were compiled, 127 local governments were members of the ICMA-CPM.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

153


Process Improvement Teams When the annual Environmental Scan indicates that customer requirements have significantly changed or when performance measures show that a service or delivery system needs improvement, a process improvement team is convened. If the issues are significant, the team will be a Cross-Functional Process Improvement Team with representatives from Financial Services, Information Services, Human Resources, the department that owns the process, and stakeholder departments.

Cross-Functional Teams

All City teams follow a six-step process improvement methodology. They refine the problem statement based on initial research and data gathering. The problem is analyzed through flow charting and reviewing more detailed data on the process. Additional data are collected as needed. Often data are stratified to gain insight. For instance, cycle time data might be put in subsets by time of day, day of week, and time of year. The team uses the data to form a hypothesis on what component(s) of a process is under-performing and how customers (often in a focus group) react to the hypothesis. More data are gathered to explore the best ideas. When the team is clear on “what is broken,” solutions are generated, in part by benchmarking. The best solutions are tested, refined and then implemented through an action plan. Stakeholders and customers are consulted in all phases. The team develops measures to monitor results and uses the results to develop further refinements.

• Complaint Tracking Team

Cross-functional teams and departmental teams do research to improve performance. These team efforts may be part of a routine cycle of review, in reaction to stakeholder or customer input (complaint data), or because performance data suggests an improvement is needed.

The City has benefited from the work of many cross-functional teams over the years. • Garage Team • Employee Health Benefits Team • Customer Service Standards Team • Police Vehicle Team • Water Billing Team • Time=Life Team • Tennis Center Team • Code Enforcement Team • Strategic Planning/Budgeting Process Team • Recreation Summer Hires Team • Compensation and Classification Team • Police False Alarm Team • Fire Inspection Team • Fire Response Time Team • Aquatics Fitness Center Team • Internal Review against Sterling Criteria • Fleet Preventive Maintenance Team • Building Division Plans Review Team • Construction Project Management Team • Student Leaders in Government Team • Business Intelligence Team • Online Requests and Complaints Team • Police False Alarm Team II • Visioning Team • Citation System Improvement Team • Boardwalk Replacement Team • Police Report Writing Team • Administrative Citation Team • Payroll Revision Team • Baldrige Application Writing Team • iVantage HR System Implementation Team • Utility Billing Team • Neighborhood Stabilization Program Team • Emergency Management Team (on-going) • Events Team • Fire Department Strategic Planning Team

154

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Special Department Teams With continuous quality improvement as a core value, many process improvement teams are convened within departments. The City has gained impressive results through Special Department Teams over the years. •

Premier Fleet Team

New Employee Orientation Team

Juvenile Deferred Prosecution Team

Northwest Regional Park Team

Buckle Up Team

Police Team

Human Resources Employment Procedures Team

Public Works Comprehensive Evaluation of Process

Finance Comprehensive Evaluation of Process

Permit Invoicing Team

Occupational License Team

Police Human Resources Team

Code Enforcement Team

Assistant Chief’s Team

Project Coordinator Team

Police Fleet and Facilities Team

IS-GIS

Integrated Financial Software Review Team

EMS Data Improvement Team

Urban Search and Rescue Team

Flushing Program Team

Water Pros

Rape Agression Defense Team

Fire Training Academy Team

Tennis Maintenance Team

Irrigation Team

FCIC/NCIC Verification Team

Human Resource Information Systems Team

EMS Report Writing Team

Help Desk Team

Police Staff Inspection

Economic Decision-Making Model Team

Fire/EMS Committee

Code Administrative Team

City of Coral Springs, Florida

155


Awards and Special Recognitions The City of Coral Springs is the first state or local government in the nation to receive the coveted Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, a Presidential honor that recognizes U.S. companies for organizational performance excellence. The City claimed the award in 2007, the very first year it was available to non-profit organizations. Of 84 total applicants, Coral Springs was one of 13 non-profits to apply and one of only four to receive a site visit in its category. All of the applicants were evaluated rigorously by an independent board of examiners in seven areas: leadership; strategic planning; customer and market focus; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; workforce focus; process management; and results. The award was presented at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. in April 2008. Twice in past years, a governor’s panel has said Coral Springs is run better than most businesses. And twice those efforts have earned Coral Springs the Governor’s Sterling Award (1997, 2003), which recognizes leadership and management. The Governor’s Sterling Award is given to organizations and businesses in Florida that have successfully achieved performance excellence within their management and operations. Each winner undergoes a series of in-depth assessments and evaluations by Sterling examiners that analyze productivity and organizational performance. Coral Springs was the first municipality to be awarded this state sanctioned, Baldrige-based quality award.

In 2004, Coral Springs was the first city to win the Florida City of Excellence award. This prestigious award recognizes overall excellence in a city government. The program is designed to focus public attention on all the good things cities do to improve the quality of life in Florida and honor outstanding city leaders and cities for their excellent, innovative and highly praised programs. Cities are judged on a number of categories including: governance and administration, city leadership, intergovernmental cooperation, citizen outreach and involvement, technology, innovative programs and services, and fiscal management.

Wall Street’s three major rating agencies continue to uphold the City’s underlying bond rating, the rating of our bonds without insurance. The City’s general obligation bonds maintain the highest rating of ’AAA’ from Standard and Poors (S&P) and Fitch and affirmed “Aa1” rating from Moody’s. These high ratings demonstrate our city very strong capacity to meet its financial commitments, and are earned only by a few cities in the nation. Over the years our High Grade ratings have saved the City millions of dollars in interest costs.

In 2013, the Coral Springs Police Department, received the “Law Enforcement Accreditation with Excellence” awarded by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA®). Our City Police first became accredited in November 1988. The Department has to comply with national and state standards, every three years, in order to maintain its’ accredited status. To be awarded with “Excellence” is an additional honor that shows a superlative performance within these accreditation programs. The purpose of CALEA’s Accreditation Programs is to improve the delivery of public safety services, primarily by: maintaining a body of standards, developed by public safety practitioners, covering a wide range of up-to-date public safety initiatives; establishing and administering an accreditation process; and recognizing professional excellence. The program has become the Gold Standard for an agency to voluntarily demonstrate their commitment to excellence in law enforcement.

156

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


In 2012, and for the third time, Coral Springs has made the Money magazine’s list of the Top 100 best places to live across the nation. The cities were ranked on economic opportunity, income, job growth and affordability, quality of life, crime, quality of schools, arts and leisure, park space and stress-related ailments. The city has ranked as the number one city in Florida twice, more recent in 2010, being 44th on the overall list. The magazine highlighted the City’s array of leisure and sports facilities. Coral Springs also scored highly on safety and was recognized for its excellent public schools, racial diversity, attractive home prices and air quality index. Coral Springs Fire Academy is a three-time winner of this celebrated award for its ability to bring about realistic, innovative and cost effective training programs to Florida and abroad. The philosophy of the Coral Springs Fire Academy is to provide the solid foundation for an entry-level firefighter, as well as advanced training programs that will enhance the performance and career development of all firefighters. The entire curriculum is developed and presented in compliance with all local, state and federal standards. The Fire Service Awards are coordinated through the Bureau of Fire Standards and Training (BFST) by State Fire Marshal’s Office annually and are sponsored by the Fire Training Director’s Association among other Fire Service related organizations. The BFST Standards Section governs the many Certified Firefighter Training Centers located throughout the State, ensuring the facilities, the curriculum, and the instructors are within State Statutes and Administrative Code. The American Heart Association has named the City a Start! Fit Friendly company for its health and wellness programming, earning the Association’s Gold recognition level. Organizations earning this level of award must offer a combination of fitness activities, nutrition training and promote a culture of wellness. City employees have access to many health and wellness resources, such as discounted gym memberships, Weight Watchers at Work, smoking cessation, yoga, exercise and weight loss contests and so much more.

The International City/County Management Association honored the City with its Certificate of Excellence for superior performance measurement programs and results. Only 14 jurisdictions in North America received this award, which is the highest level of recognition given by ICMA’s Center for Performance Measurement. This award pays special tribute to our efforts in identifying and reporting to the public key outcome measures, surveying of residents and employees, as well as the pervasiveness of performance measurement in our organization’s culture.

Tree City USA is a renowned national program administered locally by state foresters using four standards to evaluate a community’s commitment to their urban forest resource. The National Arbor Day Foundation, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters, annually recognizes communities that effectively manage their public tree resources. Coral Springs has earned the Tree City USA recognition each year since 1985. In 2006 the City of Coral Springs earned the distinction of Sterling Tree City USA for earning the Tree City USA Growth Award more than 10 years in a row.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

157


158

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Performance Budget Contents Performance Budget Overview..........................................................................................................................................162 Understanding Departmental Performance Budgets......................................................................................162 Department Budgets.............................................................................................................................................................164 City Attorney....................................................................................................................................................................164 City Commission.............................................................................................................................................................166 City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office....................................................................................................................................................167 Development Services.................................................................................................................................................172 Financial Services...........................................................................................................................................................179 Fire/EMS.............................................................................................................................................................................182 Human Resources..........................................................................................................................................................188 Information Technology..............................................................................................................................................192 Parks and Recreation....................................................................................................................................................195 Police..................................................................................................................................................................................204 Public Works.....................................................................................................................................................................209

City of Coral Springs, Florida

159


Budget Process Map

January

February

March

Workbooks Compiled & “Hot Topics” Identified

Commission Workshop

April

May

June

Strategic Plan Resident / Business Survey (as scheduled) Management SWOT Exercise

Final Draft Published

KIO’s Set

Business Plan Select Initiatives

Environmental Scan

Departmental Budget Packages Distributed for Business Plan, Staffing, Operating Budget, CIP & Replacement Programs

Operating Budget & Performance Measures

Quarterly PM Report

Budget Client Feedback

Five-Year Forecast

Packages Returned

CMO/Dept. Meetings

Business Plan Workshop

Staffing & Capital Line Item Review Performance Measures

Quarterly PM Report

Capital Budget Fleet Process Review

160

Replacement Programs Distributed and Conduct Fleet Budget Meetings

Replacement Programs Updated Fixed Asset Inventory Distributed

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

New Capital Requests

Prioritize Capital Funding


July

August

September

Note: The Strategic Plan is a multi-year plan. In certain years the Business Plan Environmental Scan is the first element.

Business Plan Presentation

October

November

December

Elections

New Commission Orientation

City of Coral Springs Strategic Planning & Performance Measurement Process Map January 2014

Composite Index

Fund Summaries Balanced First Budget Hearing To Next Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quarterly PM

Proposed Budget Prepared

To Environmental Scan

Second Budget Hearing Quarterly PM Report

Quarterly PM Report

Adopted Budget Published

Budget Adopted

Budgeted Purchases

Proposed CIP Prepared

Fiscal Year Ends

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Fixed Asset Inventory Updated

161


Performance Budget Overview Understanding Departmental Performance Budgets The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement—the statement must identify the particular purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes—a listing of the fundamental business processes that the department is designed to provide. Outputs— indicate the volume, frequency or level of service provided. New Initiatives—new services or the removal of existing services as they relate to the Strategic Plan. A list of the new initiatives follows. Organization Charts—outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—the budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, overtime and other pay including vacation payment incentive, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, retirement contributions, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, utilities, services and other costs. • Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000. Objectives and Performance Measures—the objectives focus on particular program accomplishments that will be attained within the current year. All objectives are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each performance measure includes explicit links showing how program objectives and their indicators are directly related to KIOs and strategic priorities that they support. .

162

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Sample Performance Budget Page jTitle

nNew Initiatives

Indicates the department.

Business Plan Initiatives for this department, if available.

kMission

oRevenues and Expenditures

Developed by the department, this is a statement that identifies the particular purpose for the department.

A summary of the budgeted departmental revenues and expenditures.

lCore Processes and Outputs

pPerformance Linkage

A listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department.

The Strategic Priority and Directional Statement that support the department’s performance measures.

mOrganization Chart

qPerformance Measures

An organization chart showing the breakdown of programs, divisions and personnel.

The actual historical performance and future goals for the department.

d E xp en

Missio

j

n

k

roc Core P

e ss e s a

nd O u

by Pro

gram

torney City At itures: Expend mary m Sum Progra torney At ty Ci l ta To ry Catego ary By Summ l Persona s Benefit es Expens Other n Litigatio Total

in the ts with out reemen e with s and ag complianc cts ntract Contra are co sure contract ep pr en and to e ew vi , am fr ents • Re e. st time agreem enienc shor te ely 20 0 inconv n and oximat vendor is entatio ew appr l repres inistration. Th d or revi ga d/ le an y an el m are es. versies y City ad and tim • Prep cts, and leas ution ec tive mission and lic l contro Prosec contra ide eff in lega mission’s po m n. e City olation To prov the City Co m litigatio ents th icipal Vi to City Co lit y. un M d handle advice alously repres enting the l liabi City. ion an rs and ia at em te ze nt tig pl at te ce Li of the m offi d to im res and po utor y behalf te at it on st m t su ise on l cour is com izing expo ra dv A de • im d Fe of min State an ear in es. risk. • App inquiri limiting citizen staff. ches to ond to sp approa Re dates to d • n, an entive gal up io le ev at pr tr ng t inui minis rs of law sel abou nt . g ad un co rs in t ty Co te Br Ci • presen e mat ch and l mat te ission, in and Resear istrativ Comm mit tees in al re Act. admin icipate e City m Forfeitu ment/ • Part and co ties. esent th raband employ ating • Repr gned boards a Cont ate in cial du d oper id ip an ic si or offi r rt Fl as on all thei • Pa missi rce the ning to ty Com y enfo pertai . es for Ci ressivel eetings • Agg l servic ency m ide lega ate ag in • Prov ments. rd bo and su other depart ission cts and Comm , contra d City lutions • Atten es. es, reso ion. nc na dinanc ely fash are ordi d 50 or • Prep ents in a tim tions an resolu docum ely 10 0 at im prox are ap • Prep

torney City At

itures

o

tegory and Ca FY 2012 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2013 Budget

7 $474,38 169,432 89,663 48,073 55 $781,5

2 $515,38 175,320 135,864 0 66 $826,5

6.00 0.8%

6.00 0.8%

8 $470,52 182,791 185,695 0 14 $839,0 6.00 0.7%

m ge fro $ Chan dget FY13 Bu

2 $502,65 165,078 177,266 4,557 53 $849,5 6.00 0.8%

m ge fro % Chan dget FY13 Bu 2.96% 2.96%

$24,828 8 $24,82

2 $863,84 42 $863,8

3 $849,55 53 $849,5

4 $839,01 14 $839,0

6 $826,56 66 $826,5

5 $781,55 55 $781,5

FY 2013 tual Est. Ac

FY 2014 Budget

0 $495,72 185,570 182,552 0 42 $863,8

5.35% 1.52% -1.69% n/a 2.96%

$25,192 2,779 (3,143) 0 8 $24,82

0.00% n/a

0.00 n/a

6.00 0.7%

E's

FTE's wide FT tal City % of To

tputs

l

Cit y Att

ce M orman

easure

s

n anizatio ing Org erform FY 2011 ual High-P Act sional, ey es rn of to Pr Goal City At Priority: A eness Effectiv gic ) Strate ment Type: rs de re nce, or na Measu di 100% tions, or nied by 99% (resolu pa slation accom re: Measu ation of Legi quest when re ar of ep 1) Pr kdays 10 wor l within materia backup

Perf

p

FY 2012 ual Act Goal 99%

100%

FY 2014 Goal

q

FY 2013 ual Act Goal 99%

99%

99%

orney

6 rney City Atto6 (2502)

rney City Atto rney City Atto nfilled) Deputy torney (u t City At Assistan osecutor Pr al ip Munic ant e Assist Executiv cretary Legal Se

m n Litigatio Outside

nt) Equivale sitions r of Po ll-Time Numbe r of FTEs (Fu n Number be sio mber = Left Nu mber = Num rtment/Divi pa Right Nu mber = De Nu Center

City of Coral Springs, Florida

163


City Attorney Mission

Litigation and Municipal Violation Prosecution

To provide effective and timely legal representation and advice to the City Commission and City administration. This office zealously represents the City in legal controversies and is committed to implementing the City Commission’s policy of minimizing exposures and potential liability.

• Advise on statutory matters and handle litigation. • Appear in State and Federal court on behalf of the City. • Respond to citizen inquiries. • Bring about preventive approaches to limiting risk.

Core Processes and Outputs

• Participate in and present continuing legal updates to staff.

Research and Counsel

• Aggressively enforce the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act.

• Represent the City Commission, City administration, and all assigned boards and committees in all matters of law pertaining to their official duties.

General Insurance Fund (Workers’ Compensation, Property and Casualty)

• Participate in employment/administrative matters.

• Provide legal services for City Commission and operating departments. • Attend City Commission and subordinate agency meetings.

• Procure insurance coverages.

• Prepare ordinances, resolutions, contracts and other documents in a timely fashion.

• Review and respond to all claims.

• Prepare approximately 100 resolutions and 50 ordinances.

• Receive and process all workers’ compensation claims.

Contracts • Review and prepare contracts and agreements within the shortest time frame to ensure contract compliance without vendor inconvenience. • Prepare and/or review approximately 200 agreements, contracts, and leases.

Administer and maintain City’s insurance programs for workers’ compensation, general, professional, vehicle liability, and property insurance.

• Coordinate and facilitate Safety Evaluation Committee meetings, reporting all incidents and accidents to the Committee. Risk Management • Administer City’s risk management policies.

New Initiatives An Innovative, High-Performing Organization

City Attorney's Office

General Insurance Fund (8801) / 1

Risk Management Coordinator

City Attorney (2502) / 5.75

Misdemeanor Diversion

Outside Litigation

Deputy City Attorney Assistant City Attorney (0.75)* Municipal Prosecutor Executvie Assistant (2) (Department/ Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) *Position split 75% City Attorney Div. 2502; 25% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001

164

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category City Attorney Revenues: City Attorney Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$150,000 $150,000

$150,000 $150,000

Expenditures: Program Summary City Attorney Total

$826,566 $826,566

$849,553 $849,553

$863,842 $863,842

$997,264 $997,264

$133,422 $133,422

15.45% 15.45%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Litigation Total

$515,382 175,320 135,864 0 $826,566

$502,652 165,078 177,266 4,557 $849,553

$495,720 185,570 182,552 0 $863,842

$589,509 217,620 189,623 512 $997,264

$93,789 32,050 7,071 512 $133,422

18.92% 17.27% 3.87% n/a 15.45%

6.00

6.00

6.00

5.75

(0.25)

-4.2%

FTE's

General Insurance Fund Revenues: Transfers Interest Income Recoveries Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$2,564,554 37,980 151,070 $2,753,603

$2,718,097 14,810 138,058 $2,870,964

$3,176,379 50,000 85,000 $3,311,379

$3,322,897 25,000 85,000 $3,432,897

$146,518 (25,000) 0 $121,518

4.61% -50.00% 0.00% 3.67%

Expenses: Program Summary Workers' Compensation Property Casualty Total

$1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004 $2,983,076

$1,460,708 1,506,701 52,588 $3,019,997

$1,449,400 1,730,979 131,000 $3,311,379

$1,481,400 1,820,097 131,400 $3,432,897

$32,000 89,118 400 $121,518

2.21% 5.15% 0.31% 3.67%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Total

$90,091 871,161 2,021,824 $2,983,076

$91,741 797,095 2,131,161 $3,019,997

$107,667 1,013,675 2,190,037 $3,311,379

$114,691 1,016,601 2,301,605 $3,432,897

$7,024 2,926 111,568 $121,518

6.52% 0.29% 5.09% 3.67%

1.50

1.50

1.50

1.50

0.00

0.0%

FTE's

FY 2015 Budget

n/a n/a

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

Performance Measures City Attorney Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Preparation of Legislation (resolutions, ordinance, orders) within 10 workdays of request when accompanied by backup material 2) Number of days lost from on the job injuries per 100 employees (new for FY 2013; formerly in Human Resources) 3) Percentage of subrogation eligible dollars recovered (new beginning FY 2013)

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

99%

99%

99%

97%

99%

49

29.5

49

27.53

49

47%

60%

40%

35%

47%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2015 Goal

165


City Commission Mission

An Innovative, High Performing Organization

To provide the Charter offices clear policy direction toward making the City of Coral Springs the premier community in which to live, work and raise a family. A Family-Friendly Community Augment the quality of life that defines the hometown feel of our community by assuring public safety and good schools, promoting arts and culture, capitalizing on the strength in our diversity, and embracing our inclusive, welcoming nature. A Thriving Business Community Continue to provide fiscal benefit and economic stability to the City by encouraging and supporting economic development and redevelopment as well as expansion and retention of existing businesses.

The City is committed to ethical governance, adherence to its Core Values, transparency, innovation, collaboration, and exceeding customer expectations by delivering high-quality programs and services that meet the needs of an increasingly diverse community.

Core Processes • Provide policy direction for City operations. • Promote public participation in government through regular and special City Commission meetings, public hearings and workshops. • Encourage partnerships with the private and nonprofit sectors to resolve local issues.

An Active, Healthy Community

City Commission 6 (0100) 1

Influence and support an environment that promotes active, healthy, and enriched lifestyles for residents of all ages. Focus on leisure, cultural, recreational, and sporting activities and events that infuse event dollars into the local economy.

Senior Office Asssistant

An Attractive Community Take proactive measures to preserve and enhance the community’s appearance and maintain of its vital infrastructure. Lead by example in the stewardship and conservation of natural resources.

1

Mayor (0100) 0

Vice-Mayor 1 (0100) 0

Commissioner 3 (0100) 0

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTE's (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category City Commission Expenditures: Program Summary City Commission Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$277,534 $277,534

$271,867 $271,867

$352,109 $352,109

$356,301 $356,301

$4,192 $4,192

1.19% 1.19%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Total

$95,768 86,885 94,881 $277,534

$108,770 74,121 88,976 $271,867

$124,906 109,240 117,963 $352,109

$128,448 110,248 117,605 $356,301

$3,542 1,008 (358) $4,192

2.84% 0.92% -0.30% 1.19%

5.00

5.00

6.00

6.00

0.00

0.0%

FTE's

166

FY 2015 Budget

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget


City Manager’s Office Mission

Management and Budget Office Monitor City’s financial condition and provide financial strategies to ensure fiscal solvency.

To provide support and systems that empower City departments to anticipate and meet customer expectations and carry out City Commission policy initiatives.

Prepare biennial/triennial Strategic Plan, annual Business Plan, annual budget document, and Capital Improvement Program.

Core Processes and Outputs

• Produce the City’s Business Plan, budget document and Capital Improvement Program.

City Manager’s Office Organize and mobilize City departments to address the seven priorities established by the City Commission.

• Process biennial/triennial Strategic Plan including the Environmental Scan, the SWOT Analysis and the Strategic Planning Workshop Presentation.

• Complete strategic activities for the City Commission’s five priority areas.

Maintain Performance Measurement System.

• Provide overall management of all City operations in a way that empowers employees to exceed customer expectations. • Provide effective communication between the City Commission, staff, residents and other customers. • Continue to attract quality businesses to the City of Coral Springs. Chart Title

• Produce Departments’ Quarterly Performance Reports. Aggressively seek grants on behalf of the City and oversee administration of grant funding. Collaborate with Police and Fire pension boards, Charter School Advisory Committee, and other committees.

Manager's Office City City Manager’s Office

City Manager (0501) / 6.5 Executive Assistant to City Manager Executive Assistant (2)

Deputy City Manager* (0501) Community Redevelopment Agency (3200) / 1

Budget, Strategy, and Communications

Deputy City Manager (0501)

Director Budget, Strategy, Communications (1901)

City Clerk's Office (3501) / 5

CRA Coordinator

Economic Development (0502) / 2

Communications and Marketing (0604) / 6

Communications and Marketing Manager

Management and Budget Office (1901) / 6

Senior Financial Analyst (4) Grant Coordinator

Economic Development Manager Principal Office Assistant Creative Services Coordinator (2) Construction Project Manager (0501)

City Clerk

Assistant City Clerk Records Mgmt. Coordinator Senior Office Assistant Principal Office Assistant

Editor/Producer Broadcast Communications Coordinator Writer/Media Relations Coordinator

City of Coral Springs, Florida

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (FullTime Equivalent) *Position split 50% City Manager's Office Div. 0501; 50% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001

167


City Manager’s Office (continued) Communications and Marketing Communicate public information in an effective, creative manner.

• Provide for records disposal to the fullest extent permissible by Florida law, and the cost effective, legal maintenance of permanent records for all City departments.

• Publish three editions of Coral Springs magazine, Annual State of the City Report, and other informational publications.

Serve as the director of municipal elections as required by the City Charter and Florida Statutes.

• Provide writing, design, photography and other graphic services for print, digital and video formats.

Economic Development

• Provide multimedia, video and photographic support, and produce public service announcements and programming for use by the broadcast media. • Develop and manage the City’s web sites, including coralsprings.org and workcoralsprings.org. • Produce programming and manage the City’s TV station, Channel 25. • Provide special event promotion. Handle media relations. • Produce programming and schedule the City’s radio station, 1670 AM.

Promote absorption of existing vacant commercial, industrial and retail space by continuing to maintain and develop relationships with the top real estate experts in Broward County. Set the stage for new development as well as redevelopment while the economy improves and our proactive approach sparks opportunities in selected targeted industry sectors. • Complete Economic Development Strategic Plan. • Reduce vacancy rates in commercial, industrial, and retail sectors. • Assist, support, and grow business in Coral Springs. • Continue to increase local property values through key tenant improvement projects.

City Clerk Serve as Secretary of the City.

Maximize the potential of the Coral Springs Corporate Park.

• Oversee City Commission agenda process which includes creation of bimonthly agendas, coordination of over 500 agenda memoranda, duplication and distribution of agenda material to interested parties, and continue to encourage the City’s “paperless agenda” environment. • Inform citizenry of public hearings by advertising pursuant to Florida law. Provide public notice for approximately 300 public meetings annually. • Manage codification and distribution to subscribers of the Municipal Code, both the general volume and Land Development Code. • Attend and prepare minute summaries for advisory boards and committees.

Maintain a competitive business environment. Attract high-value industries and businesses. Implement Downtown infrastructure improvements on City Center planning as catalysts for Downtown Redevelopment.

New Initiatives A Family-Friendly Community Drowning Prevention (ongoing) with Fire/EMS A Thriving Business Community

Serve as the City’s records custodian by preserving the integrity of the City’s official records, which encompasses business transactions, law and policy making, and property matters.

Economic Development Office

• Maintain an historical database of over five million document images Citywide from 1963 to the present and respond to public records requests.

Municipal Complex (ongoing)

• Maintain a database of public meetings via audio tapes, CD-ROMs and summaries of the meeting proceedings, and respond to more than 1,500 customer requests for information annually.

Realtors’ Summit

Downtown Redevelopment (ongoing) An Active, Healthy Community New Resident Outreach An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Communications Survey

168

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

City Manager's Office Revenues: City Clerk Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$11,930 $11,930

$21,251 $21,251

$23,321 $23,321

$24,253 $24,253

$932 $932

4.00% 4.00%

Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Economic Development Management & Budget Office Communications &Marketing CRA City Clerk Total

$878,449 0 601,208 720,520 0 486,019 $2,686,196

$891,905 0 581,803 793,964 0 464,244 $2,731,916

$1,013,983 0 713,348 982,390 72,401 551,103 $3,333,225

$1,104,246 254,514 703,646 1,102,932 74,122 575,215 $3,814,675

$90,263 254,514 (9,702) 120,542 1,721 24,112 $481,450

8.90% n/a -1.36% 12.27% 2.38% 4.38% 14.44%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,710,097 606,458 369,641 0 $2,686,196

$1,731,028 555,192 445,696 0 $2,731,916

$2,005,679 714,626 612,920 0 $3,333,225

$2,254,056 829,837 723,282 7,500 $3,814,675

$248,377 115,211 110,362 7,500 $481,450

12.38% 16.12% 18.01% n/a 14.44%

20.50

20.50

23.50

26.50

3.00

12.8%

FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

169


Performance Measures Management and Budget Office Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Internal customer satisfaction rating 2) Process 100% of budget transfers within 24 hours of receipt 3) Facilitate or support cross-functional process improvement teams

FY 2013 Goal Actual 95% 98%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 95% 99%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

2

4

2

3

2

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 4) Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation award 5) Payroll regular salaries adopted budget versus actual, net of policy changes 6) Produce monthly financial statements within seven business days of period close

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

±2%

0.4%

±2%

-1.4%

±2%

<7 days

1 day

<7 days

1 days

<7 days

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

94%

98%

94%

100%

94%

79%

84%

79%

115,000 12

135,602 12

115,000 12

140,826 12

115,000 12

30

38

30

47

30

Communications and Marketing Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Customer satisfaction with communications (Internal Survey) 2) Awareness of Coral Springs magazine by new residents (Resident Survey) 3) Average number of unique page views on website 4) Number of episodes produced for What's Happening 5) Number of new promotional/informational campaigns developed

City Clerk's Office Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Percentage of agenda packages completed and distributed at least 5 days prior to the next City Commission meeting (new beginning FY 2013) 2) Number of hours of staff time per meeting spent preparing summary minutes (new beginning FY 2013)

170

FY2015 Goal 95%

FY2015 Goal

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

95%

95%

100%

95%

4 hours

2 hours

4 hours

100%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

FY2015 Goal


City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name Loan Municipal Complex Construction Municipal Complex Design Loan Total Operating General Fund Corporate Park Assessment Study Operating General Fund Total Equity Financing General Fund Van Equity Financing General Fund Total Total City Manager's Office

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$0

$8,150,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$8,150,000

0 0

1,850,000 10,000,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1,850,000 10,000,000

40,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

40,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

30,000 30,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

30,000 30,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$10,030,000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$10,030,000

171


Development Services Mission

Coordinate and implement neighborhood revitalization and enhancement efforts through continued coordination with residents and other government agencies.

To plan and facilitate quality development and redevelopment, enhance citywide aesthetics through education by complying with local regulations, and provide professional services to the community.

• Conduct three Slice of the Springs meetings and ensure 93% of attendees find the neighborhood meeting productive. • Collaborate on 15 neighborhood partnerships (formal and informal).

Core Processes and Outputs

Implement state and federal programs (CDBG, NSP, HOME, SHIP opportunities).

Community Development

• Screen applicants for home repair programs resulting in 55 grants being awarded each year.

Continue to provide technically sound and professional recommendations to the City Commission, along with the various boards and committees appointed by the City Commission.

Continue to provide accurate plan review to ensure compliance with land development regulations and architectural design guidelines in order to encourage an attractive and quality aesthetically pleasing community.

• Maintain the City’s recertification of its Comprehensive Plan. • Maintain department customer satisfaction rating at 95%.

• Administratively review 50 Development Review Committee and Architectural Review Committee projects.

• Incorporate the Public Art Program and Coral Springs Museum of Art to provide more comprehensive approach towards the arts.

• Process 15 petitions for various land development actions.

Current Date 9/15/2014

• Process 550 paint approval forms.

Development Services

Development Services Director of Development Services (3100) / 4

Executive Assistant

Code Compliance

Development Services Coordinator

Assistant Director of Development Services (3100)

(5403) / 23

Engineering* (5901)

Building

/ Const. Mgmt* (As needed)

(5100 - 5304) / 27

*Contractual Services

Code Compliance Manager

Code Compliance Administrator

Code Compliance Supervisor (2)

Community Development (3001-3004) /12

Planning & Zoning (3001) / 4

Chief Building Official (5101)

Senior Office Assistant

Neighborhood Services (3004) / 8

Senior Office Assistant (2)

Code Compliance Officer (10)

Planning & Zoning Manager

Chief Planner

Tax Collection Specialist (2)

Inspector I

Associate Planner (2)

Senior Planner

Assistant Planner

Transportation Planner

Deputy Bldg. Official/ Chief Structural Inspector

Env. Coordinator / City Forester

Inspector II (5)

Comm. Dev. & Housing Administrator

Inspector I (2)

Office Assistant

Neighborhood Coord. Assistant

Electrical (5302) / 4

Chief Inspector Inspector II (3)

Plumbing

Mechanical

(5303) / 1

(5304) / 2

Chief Inspector

Chief Inspector

Museum Director Assistant Planner/Housing Admin. (Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent)

Inspector II

172

Sr. Permit Serv. Rep. (4) Permit Services Rep. (5)*

Structural (5301) / 8

Principal Office Assistant (3)

Dev. Serv. Administrator (5101)

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

*Three positions are contractual


Development Services (continued) Assist the public (residential and commercial) with general zoning information and aesthetic issues. • Maintain cycle time for new DRC plan reviews at eight days by the Zoning Division.

• Provide plan reviews and issue approximately 8,000 building permits. • Complete requested inspections within one day 95% of the time.

• Conduct 1,600 zoning inspections.

• Process approximately 2,600 open permit search requests within three business days.

• Maintain cycle time for sign permits and small permits at two days by the Zoning Division.

• Process 600 record requests.

• Continue to process designer and monument signs to increase the aesthetic appeal while staying business-focused.

• Issue 20,000 notification postcards to permit holders and property owners.

Collect and evaluate sustainability data.

• Respond to 50,000 incoming calls for Building and Code Compliance divisions via the Customer Care Center.

• Monitor and observe the sustainability of the City through the Neighborhood and Environmental Committee.

Code Compliance

• Ensure the ecological integrity of environmentally sensitive lands through regular inspections, exotic species removal, and general preventive maintenance.

Respond to emergency complaints in a timely manner and to other citizen requests, questions, and complaints within 48 hours.

• Continue to monitor 1,500 volunteer hours per year dedicated towards enhancing the environment.

Educate the public on the City’s Code of Ordinances in order to achieve compliance with the code to preserve and enhance aesthetics citywide.

• Support Sawgrass Nature Center in becoming an ecotourism destination through assistance in grant writing, media outreach, intergovernmental coordination, and material support where feasible. Implement the objective of environmental monitoring and improving a sustainable urban forest, with specific emphasis on tree canopy replacement. Provide technical support to various City departments, including the Community Redevelopment Agency effort in conjunction with Downtown Coral Springs. • Provide detailed analysis on current topics affecting the City, such as tracking properties in foreclosure on a monthly basis. • Research and apply for various grants that support department objectives and improve mobility and connectivity within the City. Oversee day-to-day operations of the Coral Springs Museum of Art.

• Provide education to property owners and occupants on City codes and ordinances. • Coordinate and implement programs on code compliance issues in conjunction with other departments including Public Works and Police. • Perform over 30,000 code compliance/business tax field inspections, neighborhood preservation inspections, and abandoned property maintenance for approximately 11,000 cases. • Promote voluntary compliance through collaboration with property owners, residents, business owners, and neighborhoods. • Address and resolve problems on difficult cases, such as abandoned or nuisance properties, or those properties whose owners are financially distressed. • Support volunteer Code Rangers partnered with Code Compliance Officers and administrative staff.

Building

• Collect illegal signs from our street rights-of-way.

Provide prompt, professional, and courteous customer service to the entire community for all plan reviews, building permits, and field inspections to ensure conformance of construction in the City with the Florida Building Codes.

• Process 3,000 lien inquiries.

• Conduct plan reviews in 15 days or less 90% of the time.

Support business development in the City by working with business owners and outside agencies to educate business owners on laws, regulations, and ordinances, and by processing Business Tax applications in a timely manner.

• Conduct approximately 21,000 building inspections.

• Process 6,200 business tax receipts.

• Process 4,300 contractor license insurance information requests.

• Administer Landlord Registration Program and Neighborhood Preservation Program.

• Schedule 5,000 residential inspection related appointments.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

173


Development Services (continued) Engineering Provide engineering inspection on select City projects, right-ofway permits, and developer-provided infrastructure. • Assist City in administering recovery zoning bond funds. • Ensure NPDES and MS4 requirements are upheld and maintained on construction sites greater than one acre. • Issue approximately 125 driveway permits.

New Initiatives A Thriving Business Community 40-Year-Old Building Inspections Business Tax Amnesty Traffic Management (ongoing) Electronic Permitting Feasibility Study (ongoing)

• Provide approximately 300 engineering plan reviews. • Complete requested inspections within one day each. • Perform approximately 500 inspections.

An Active, Healthy Community Downtown Pathway (ongoing) An Attractive Community

Construction Management

ArtWalk at NW 31st Court

Provide support for select City projects to ensure projects are completed on time and within budget.

Code Lien Amnesty Program

Provide support for economic development and private/public development partnerships.

Neighborhood Partnership Program (ongoing)

• Assist City in administering recovery zoning bond funds. • Ensure NPDES and MS4 requirements are upheld and maintained on construction sites greater than one acre.

Community Beautification Award (ongoing)

CDBG Action Plan (ongoing) Atlantic Boulevard Entryway (ongoing) with Parks and Recreation

• Issue approximately 125 driveway permits. • Provide approximately 300 engineering plan reviews. • Complete requested inspections within one day each. • Perform approximately 500 driveway inspections.

174

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$92,822 2,298,646 2,381,152 (151) $4,772,469

$118,843 2,116,480 2,691,398 30 $4,926,751

$107,563 2,480,983 2,667,781 0 $5,256,327

$111,865 2,571,786 2,548,248 0 $5,231,899

$4,302 90,803 (119,533) 0 ($24,428)

4.00% 3.66% -4.48% n/a -0.46%

Expenditures: Program Summary Development Services Community Development Building Code Compliance Engineering Total

$270,432 1,096,996 2,478,616 1,731,910 163,668 $5,741,622

$333,343 1,271,654 2,353,898 1,571,654 185,984 $5,716,533

$494,909 1,255,543 2,618,197 1,944,784 186,000 $6,499,433

$506,430 1,267,023 2,661,464 2,010,938 264,720 $6,710,575

$11,521 11,480 43,267 66,154 78,720 $211,142

2.33% 0.91% 1.65% 3.40% 42.32% 3.25%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Grants and Aids Total

$3,477,763 1,515,328 746,531 2,000 $5,741,622

$3,493,480 1,374,664 835,915 12,474 $5,716,533

$3,867,269 1,659,276 957,888 15,000 $6,499,433

$3,942,429 1,696,276 1,056,495 15,375 $6,710,575

$75,160 37,000 98,607 375 $211,142

1.94% 2.23% 10.29% 2.50% 3.25%

60.00

60.00

65.00

66.00

1.00

1.5%

Development Services Revenues: Community Development Building Code Compliance* Engineering Total *Includes Business Tax revenue

FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

175


Performance Measures Development Services Community Development Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Department customer satisfaction rating (composite) Strategic Priority: A Thriving Business Community Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 2) Cycle time for small permits by the Zoning Division (Building Plan Review) 3) Cycle time for sign permits by the Zoning Division (Building Plan Review) 4) Cycle time for plan reviews (new and major/minor) by the Zoning Division (Development Review Committee) 5) Comprehensive Plan consistency with Department of Community Affairs (DCA)

FY 2013 Goal Actual 95% 97%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 95% 99%

FY2015 Goal 95%

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal

FY2015 Goal

2 days

1.5 days

2 days

1.9 days

2 days

2 days

1.7 days

2 days

1.9 days

2 days

8 days

6.5 days

8 days

9 days

9 days

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 6) Number of housing units rehabilitated using public financial assistance per $100,000 housing rehabilitation 7) Average number of days from the receipt of the resident's application for rehabilitation assistance to application approval (new beginning FY 2013) Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 8) Timeliness ratio of CDBG spending: annual CDBG allocation available by July 31 9) Number of trees planted within the City Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Demand Measure: 10) Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year

176

FY 2013 Goal Actual 3.60

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

3.60

2.75

2.90

45 days

34 days

45 days

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

1.50 1,000

1.50 1,000

45 days

39.5 days

2.02 1,221

FY 2013 Goal Actual 15

13

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

1.43 482

FY 2014 Goal Actual 15

14

1.50 1,000

FY2015 Goal 15


Performance Measures Building Measure: 1) Requested inspections completed within one day 2) Percent of plan reviews completed within 15 working days Code Compliance Measure: 1) Percent of code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administrative/judicial process 2) Percent of survey respondents satisfied with City efforts at maintaining the quality of their neighborhoods (Resident Survey) 3) Percent of survey respondents satisfied with the City's efforts to suuport quality neighborhoods (Business Survey - new beginning FY 2013 ) 4) Process new business tax applications within 5 business days 90% of the time (new beginning FY 2014 ) *Delayed reporting due to transition to ONESolution Construction Management Support Measure: 1) Build the following City construction projects within budget and on time:

FY 2013 Goal Actual 95% 100%

FY 2014 Goal 95% 100%

90%

90%

95%

98%

FY2015 Goal 95% 90%

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

75%

84%

75%

*

75%

75%

84%

75%

87%

95%

90%

*

*

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

FY2015 Goal

City Hall/City Hall South Building Demolition

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fire Station 43

Yes

Fire Station 95

Yes

Safety Town

Yes

CSI Building

Yes

Municipal Complex

Yes

Atlantic Blvd Entryway

Yes

City of Coral Springs, Florida

177


Development Services CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

CDBG Grant $15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

Pathways Sidewalk Demolition

30,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Housing Rehabilitation- CDBG

223,169

92,655

92,655

92,655

92,655

92,655

92,655

555,930

Neighborhood Partnership

Commercial Faรงade CDBG Grant

$90,000

0

80,000

0

0

0

0

0

80,000

268,169

187,655

107,655

107,655

107,655

107,655

107,655

725,930 145,540

Loan Traffic Calming Atlantic Boulevard Entryway Loan

10,000

0

29,670

38,100

29,670

24,050

24,050

0

0

385,762

0

0

0

0

385,762

10,000

0

415,432

38,100

29,670

24,050

24,050

531,302 50,000

Operating General Fund Art Walk NPDES Permit and Revisions Operating General Fund

0

50,000

0

0

0

0

0

69,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

69,000

50,000

0

0

0

0

0

50,000

140,000

405,000

0

0

0

0

0

405,000

140,000

405,000

0

0

0

0

0

405,000

250,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

250,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Federal Transportation Enhancement Grant Downtown Pathways Construction Federal Transportation Enhancement Grant Equity Financing General Fund City Hall South Relocation Lease Equity Financing General Fund HOME Grant Housing Rehabilitation-HOME HOME Grant

0

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

941,382

0

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

156,897

941,382

SHIP Grant Housing Rehabilitation-SHIP SHIP Grant Total Development Services

178

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

3,368,160

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

561,360

3,368,160

$1,360,912

$1,241,344

$864,012

$855,582

$849,962

$849,962

$6,021,774

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Services Mission

• Purchase over $32 million in goods and services. • Monitor the budget through monthly financial reports.

Financial Services To preserve the City’s strong financial condition by creating responsible financial strategies, effectively managing the City’s resources, and providing analysis and recommendations that ensure optimal economic outcomes.

• Refinance and restructure City’s outstanding debt. Monitor City’s financial condition and provide financial strategies to ensure fiscal solvency. Maintain all water and wastewater customer accounts. • Process over 146,000 utility bills including standby.

Center for the Arts To provide a diverse schedule of programming for all residents, reduce the deficit of the venue, and deliver high quality customer service to all.

Center for the Arts Coordinate event management and production. Program national tours.

Core Processes and Outputs

Provide theater and meeting room rentals.

Financial Services

• Host 365 meetings.

Provide financial policy, cash management, debt management, accounting, payroll, accounts payable, purchasing, central stores, and utility billing for the City.

• Accommodate over 122,000 theater attendants.

• Produce the City’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

• Museum hosts 105 events and 190 classes.

• Process over 12,000 accounts payable checks and prepare over 26,000 payroll checks.

• Accommodatew over 35,000 museum attendees.

• Reconcile and track over 50 different funds.

Catering services and concessions.

Facilitate Museum exhibitions, programming, and events.

Box Office services.

• Process over 3,000 purchase orders.

Financial Services Financial Services

Director of Financial Services* (1501)

Administration (1501) / 2.25 City Controller (0.50)** Senior Office Assistant

Accounting Services (1601) / 7

Revenue & Collection (1602) / 6

Accountant ( 3 ) Water Billing Representative ( 4 ) Fin. Reporting & Compliance Admin Accounting Assistant Payroll Coordinator Billing Operations Technician Payroll Technician Senior Accounting Assistant

(Departm ent/ Division Num ber) / Num ber of FTEs (FullTim e Equivalent) *Position split 75% Financial Services Adm . Div. 1501; 25% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001 **Position split 50% Financial Services Adm . Div. 1501; 50% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Purchasing (1701-1702 ) / 9 Administration (1701) / 5 Purchasing Administrator Purchasing Agent II ( 3 ) Senior Office Assistant Central Stores (1702) / 4 Central Stores Coordinator Purchasing Assistant ( 3 )

179


Financial Services (continued) Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Financial Services Revenues: Revenue and Collection Total Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Museum * Accounting Utility Billing Sub-Total Purchasing Administration Central Stores Sub-Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$247,215 $247,215

$298,210 $298,210

$258,000 $258,000

$268,320 $268,320

$10,320 $10,320

4.00% 4.00%

$377,083 104,840 629,483 529,818 $1,641,224

$534,674 0 541,140 481,180 $1,556,994

$573,486 0 575,481 520,784 $1,669,751

$468,620 0 576,699 542,333 $1,587,652

($104,866) 0 1,218 21,549 ($82,099)

-18.29% n/a 0.21% 4.14% -4.92%

$654,260 252,367 $906,627

$549,383 262,709 $812,092

$585,985 290,042 $876,027

$593,149 297,274 $890,423

$7,164 7,232 $14,396

1.22% 2.49% 1.64%

Total

$2,547,851

$2,369,086

$2,545,778

$2,478,075

($67,703)

-2.66%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,546,718 791,643 206,099 3,391 $2,547,851

$1,442,407 555,713 372,466 0 $2,370,586

$1,455,257 639,629 450,892 0 $2,545,778

$1,403,989 623,014 451,072 0 $2,478,075

($51,268) (16,615) 180 0 ($67,703)

-3.52% -2.60% 0.04% n/a -2.66%

26.00

26.00

25.00

24.25

(0.75)

-3.0%

FTE's *Transferred to Development Services

180

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Performance Measures Financial Services Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Internal customer satisfaction rating (Financial Services Internal Survey) 2) Percentage of purchase requisitions under $10,000 processed within 24 hours

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

95%

95%

92%

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

93%

90%

78%

90%

86%

88%

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency

FY 2013 Goal Actual

Measure: 3) Water billings past due more than 180 days as percentage of outstanding bills

6) Out of stock level of the total inventory at Central Stores

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

3.2%

1.9%

3%

2%

3%

0

0

0

0

0

99%

99.8%

99%

99%

99%

2.25%

2.2%

2.50%

2.50%

2.50%

4) Number of repeat items in management letters prepared by the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s external auditors (new beginning FY 2013) 5) Percentage of invoices paid within 30 days

FY2015 Goal

Financial Services CIP by funding source Funding Source

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Project Name

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

Operating General Fund Mailing/Postage Machine

0

0

10,000

0

0

0

0

10,000

Operating General Fund Total

0

0

10,000

0

0

0

0

10,000

$0

$10,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$10,000

Financial Services Total

City of Coral Springs, Florida

181


Fire/EMS Mission To preserve life and property through emergency medical services, fire suppression, risk reduction, public education, and community partnerships.

Oversee the daily operations pertaining to Inspections, Prevention, Suppression, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and Training. • Provide contractual Fire/EMS service to the City of Parkland and provide Fire/EMS to unincorporated Broward County. • Provide automatic aid to the cities of Margate, Coconut Creek, and Tamarac. Provide additional mutual aid response in accordance with federal, state, and local agreements.

Core Processes and Outputs Administration Manage and administer the fire department’s budget, policies, and procedures while providing department-wide leadership and direction.

Commit to continuous involvement in major organizations and committees on a national, state and local level that affect the delivery of emergency services. Fire Suppression and Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

Responsible for the direction and development of approximately 400 members of the organization.

Respond to all types of fire-related emergencies within the City. Provide basic and advanced emergency medical care to victims of illness or injury.

• Personnel include nine fire administrative staff, 145 shift personnel, four fire academy administrative staff, 11 fire inspection staff, 100 emergency service instructors, and 140 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members.

• Respond to a projected 14,000 calls for service. • Maintain an average response time of 8 minutes or less at least 90% of the time.

Fire/EMS Fire/EMS

Fire Chief* (4601)

Administration* (4601 ) / 3.5

Communication Services* (4602 ) / 1.84

Suppression* (4801) / 91.52

Telecommunicator (0.69) Deputy Fire Chief (0.5) Division Chief Administration (0.5) Emergency Call Taker (1.15) Senior Office Assistant (1.0) Fire Equipment Technician (0.5) Data Analyst (0.5) *All positions are split 50% Fire Adm. Div. 4601; 50% EMS Div. 4702

*All positions are split 23% Comm. Svc. Div. 4602; 77% EMS Comm. Svc. Div 4703

Emergency Medical Services* (4702) / 60.9

EMS-Communication Services (4703) / 6.16

EMS Training (4705) / 1

Deputy Fire Chief (0.5)** Telecommunicator (2.31) Assistant Chief Training Officer Division Chief Administration (0.5)** Emergency Call Taker (3.85) Assistant Fire Chief (1.26) *All positions are split 77% EMS Comm. Svc. Div 4703; 23% Comm Svc. Div. 4602 Battalion Chief (1.14) Fire Captain (11.4) Rescue Lieutenant (18.6) Rescue Lieuteneant (11.4) Driver Engineer/Paramedic (15.5) Firefighter/Paramedic (19) Driver Engineer/EMT (3.1) Firefighter/EMT (0.38) Firefighter/Paramedic (31) Driver Engineer/Paramedic (9.5) Firefighter/EMT (0.62) Driver Engineer/EMT (1.9) Fire Equipment Technician (0.5)** *All positions are split 62% FirePublic Education Officer (0.38) Suppression Div. 4801; 38% EMS Div. Data Analyst (0.5)** 4702 Training Inspection **Position split 50% Fire-Supression Div. Senior Office Assistant(1.0)** (4805) / 2.5 (4901) / 10.62 4801; Fire Training Div. 4805 Principal Office Assistant

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent)

Division Chief Fire (0.5)** Assistant Fire Chief (1.74) Battalion Chief (1.86) Fire Captain (18.6)

*All positions are split 38% EMS Div. 4702; 62% Fire-Supression Div. 4801 **Position split 50% EMS Div. 4702; 50% Fire Adm. Div. 4601

Division Chief Training Center (0.5) Fire Marshal Senior Office Assistant Fire Inspection Captain Training Officer Fire Inspector II (7) Public Edication Officer (0.62)* Senior Office Assistant *Position split 62% Fire-Inspection Div. 4901; 38% EMS Div. 4702

182

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fire/EMS (continued) • Provide treatment and transport approximately 9,000 patients to area hospitals.

Fire Inspection

Continue to acquire and utilize state of the art equipment to ensure the highest level of care to the community

Perform approximately 6,400 annual fire inspections and approximately 5,600 re-inspections on all commercial properties and applicable multi-family residential units. Perform fire and life safety inspections of all public and private schools.

• Provide a Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) medic program to support local police departments.

Perform approximately 1,100 permit inspections and review approximately 1,300 sets of plans annually.

• Provide a specialty water rescue unit.

Provide annual fire safety and prevention education through Safety Town and various educational programs to the community. Provide hands-on fire extinguisher training to the public.

• Provide inter-facility transport services to the community.

• Maintain a ready fleet of apparatus consisting of 7 front line ALS transport units, 3 reserve ALS transport units, 5 front line advanced life support (ALS) pumpers, 2 ALS aerial apparatus, 3 reserve ALS pumpers, and 1 reserve ALS aerial apparatus. • Maintain a ready fleet of support service apparatus to include a mobile air support unit, a dive rescue boat, a special events cart, and an incident support trailer. Training Provide comprehensive training programs to enhance the skills of firefighters and their ability to deliver the highest level of service while safely responding to emergency incidents. Provide required medical, fire, and inspection related recertification training in accordance with national, state, and local regulations for members of the Coral Springs Fire Department.

Conduct fire investigations on all fire related incidents to determine origin and cause while working closely with local law enforcement and the Florida State Fire Marshal’s Office.

New Initiatives A Family-Friendly Community Community Paramedicine Fire Stations 43 and 95 Drowning Prevention (ongoing) with Communications and Marketing

Deliver entry level, recertification, and advanced level courses in fire, EMS, and technical rescue to Firefighters / EMS personnel nationally and internationally.

A Thriving Business Community

Provide various levels of training to military, federal, state, and local law enforcement personnel.

An Innovative, High-Performing Organization

Enhance Fire Inspection Services

Statistical Analysis for Fire/EMS

Provide training and education to the residents and businesses within the community. Research and evaluate the newest technology and procedures in the fire and EMS fields to enhance the delivery of services to the public. Organize the Fire Explorer Program, a career development program geared towards high school students who are interested in a career in the fire-rescue profession.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

183


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$9,904,003 5,323,341 1,980,275 15,072 6,526 7,938 0 $17,237,155

$10,356,868 5,413,774 2,016,809 77,000 54,000 26,457 400,000 $18,344,908

$10,566,521 5,535,573 2,273,716 55,000 55,020 5,888 0 $18,491,718

$209,653 121,799 256,907 (22,000) 1,020 (20,569) ($400,000) $146,810

2.02% 2.25% 12.74% -28.57% 1.89% -77.75% -100.00% 0.80%

$2,710,931 1,751 0 $2,712,682

$2,125,224 2,907 0 $2,128,131

$2,714,444 1,751 0 $2,716,195

$3,027,838 1,751 $3,029,589

$313,394 0 0 $313,394

11.55% 0.00% n/a 11.54%

$19,198,142

$19,365,286

$21,061,103

$21,521,307

$460,204

2.19%

Fire/EMS Revenues: Fire Fund Fire Fund Special Assessment Intergovernmental Revenue Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenues Fines and Forfeitures Partial Year Assessment Appropriated Fund Balance Sub-Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$9,319,912 5,135,476 1,898,873 47,620 70,545 13,034 0 $16,485,460

EMS-General Fund Emergency Medical Services Contract Services Training Sub-Total Total Revenues Expenditures: Program Summary Fire Fund Administration Communication Services Suppression Training Volunteers Inspection Contract Services (Parkland) Prevention Capital Debt Service Interfund Transfers Non-Departmental Sub-Total

$538,977 120,233 11,216,600 1,018,693

$540,643 121,503 11,675,875 1,249,734

$579,558 125,124 11,961,947 1,102,133

$534,268 169,504 12,135,531 1,409,498

1,153,375 0 0 229,407 232,860 154,228 1,564,093 $16,228,465

1,167,796 0 0 291,513 282,860 163,291 1,558,151 $17,051,366

1,198,142 0 0 578,072 382,860 581,339 1,835,733 $18,344,908

1,374,349

EMS-General Fund Emergency Medical Services Communication Services Training Sub-Total

$8,316,559 403,167 219,615 $8,939,341

$8,044,773 386,895 191,900 $8,623,568

$25,167,806

Total Expenditures Summary by Category Fire Fund Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Expenses Capital Training Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service EMS-General Fund Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total Total FTE's Fire EMS Total FTE's

184

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

286,730 472,860 192,002 1,916,976 $18,491,718

($45,290) 44,380 173,584 307,365 0 176,207 0 0 (291,342) 90,000 (389,337) 81,243 $146,810

-7.81% 35.47% 1.45% 27.89% n/a 14.71% n/a n/a -50.40% 23.51% -66.97% 4.43% 0.80%

$8,223,784 423,851 197,364 $8,844,999

$8,327,217 431,891 193,091 $8,952,199

$103,433 8,040 (4,273) $107,200

1.26% 1.90% -2.17% 1.21%

$25,674,934

$27,189,907

$27,443,917

$8,188,277 3,816,302 1,024,605 229,407 1,018,693 1,564,093 154,228 232,860 $16,228,465

$8,192,083 4,087,738 1,207,642 309,865 1,249,734 1,558,150 163,291 282,860 $17,051,362

$8,448,187 4,090,570 1,326,014 978,072 1,102,133 1,835,733 181,339 382,860 $18,344,908

$9,054,168 3,721,483 1,438,001 286,730 1,409,498 1,916,976 192,002 472,860 $18,491,718

$605,981 (369,087) 111,987 (691,342) 307,365 81,243 10,663 90,000 $146,810

7.17% -9.02% 8.45% -70.68% 27.89% 4.43% 5.88% 23.51% 0.80%

$5,628,859 2,386,820 894,973 28,689 $8,939,341

$5,435,571 2,244,021 938,164 5,812 $8,623,568

$5,478,517 2,360,559 1,005,923 0 $8,844,999

$5,603,640 2,294,879 1,041,680 12,000 $8,952,199

$125,123 (65,680) 35,757 12,000 $107,200

2.28% -2.78% 3.55% n/a 1.21%

$25,167,806

$25,674,930

$27,189,907

$27,443,917

$254,010

0.93%

103.84 65.16 169.00

103.84 65.16 169.00

107.84 65.16 173.00

109.98 68.02 178.00

2.14 2.86 5.00

2.0% 4.4% 2.9%

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$254,010

0.93%


Performance Measures Fire/EMS Strategic Priority: A Family-Friendly Community Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 1) Maintain Fire Rescue quality standards: —Response time of eight minutes or less for 90% of all Fire/EMS calls —A minimum of fourteen firefighters on scene within ten minutes 90% of time for all structural fires

FY 2014 Goal Actual

90%

91%

90%

97%

90%

90%

100%

90%

100%

90%

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 2) Provide inspection report to customer within 12 days from date of inspection 3) Perform annual fire inspections on all commercial properties and applicable multi-family residential units (new beginning FY 2015) 4) Provide public education programs to residents ages 5-8 (new beginning FY 2015) 5) Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy: —Florida Firefighter Minimum Standards classes —EMT classes —Specialty classes (new beginning FY2014) —Paramedic class (new beginning FY2015) 6) Percentage of customers who are satisfied with the quality of the Fire Department (Resident Survey) 7) Percentage of customers who are satisfied with the quality of the emergency paramedics (Business Survey) 8) Maintain Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) force (new beginning FY 2015) 9) Maintain Fire Explorers program participation (new beginning FY 2015)

FY2015 Goal

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2013 Goal Actual 12 6 days days

FY 2014 Goal Actual 12 n/a days

FY2015 Goal 12 days 6,400 4,000

6 4

8 4

7 4 50

7 5 93

7 4 50 1

95%

99.7%

99%

99%

97%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

100 40

185


EMS CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

Loan $0

$0

$15,000

$0

$0

$15,000

$0

$30,000

Lifepaks

0

0

56,000

57,680

59,411

61,193

63,029

297,313

Power Lift Stretchers

0

0

36,000

0

0

0

0

36,000

Stair Chairs

0

0

0

27,319

0

0

0

27,319

Auto Ventilation Units

0

0

0

0

0

17,390

0

17,390

Dive Rescue Equipment

Portable Radio Equipment

0

0

0

29,706

30,597

31,515

0

91,818

Suction Units

0

0

14,008

0

0

0

0

14,008

39,408

0

134,008

114,705

90,008

125,098

63,029

526,848

Chest Compression Devices

$8,100

$0

$13,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$13,000

Health and Fitness Program

31,308

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23,420

0

0

0

0

23,420

39,408

0

23,420

0

0

0

0

23,420

Loan Total Operating General Fund

Manikins Operating General Fund Total FEMA AFG Grant Health and Fitness Program

125,232

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

FEMA AFG Grant Total

125,232

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

36,450

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

36,450

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Manikins

0

0

70,260

0

0

0

0

70,260

Combat Casualty

0

0

5,848

0

0

0

0

5,848

0

0

76,108

0

0

0

0

76,108

$0

$233,536

$114,705

$90,008

$125,098

$63,029

$626,376

Florida DOH Grant Chest Compression Devices Florida DOH Grant Total FLDOH/EMS Grant

FLDOH/EMS Grant Total EMS Total

186

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fire CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name General Obligation Bond Rebuild Fire Station 43 Rebuild Fire Station 95 General Obligation Bond Total Grant Dependent Fire Prevention & Safety Grant Dependent Total FEMA AFG Grant Physical Exams and Health Screenings FEMA AFG Grant Total Florida DOH Grant Training Mannequins Florida DOH Grant Total Operating-Fire Fund Dive Rescue Equipment Tactical Rescue Training Equipment Traffic Pre-Emption Portable Radio Replacement Thermal Imagers Training Tracking Software Structure Burn Replacement Gas Meters Flashover Replacement Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Fire Stations Painting & Improvements Overhead Bay Door Replacement Training Mannequins Physical Exams and Health Screenings Academy 3rd Floor Fire Inspector SUV (new position) Ford Escape Fire Prevention & Safety-FEMA grant match Operating-Fire Fund Total Equity Financing Fire Fund Design & Eng. for Fire Stations 43 and 95 Equity Financing Fire Fund Total Fire Total

FY 2014 Budget $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 51,200 51,200 0 173,648 173,648 0 0 0 20,000 37,800 30,000 15,000 0 0 10,000 356,500 38,090 0 57,882 12,800 0 0 0 578,072 0 400,000 400,000

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$2,500,000 2,600,000 5,100,000 0 91,798 91,798 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25,000 65,000 20,000 0 32,000 15,000 0 0 0 0 30,899 0 0 68,000 0 26,000 4,831 286,730 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,000 0 33,000 16,000 17,000 10,000 0 0 34,040 0 0 68,000 252,000 0 0 450,040 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 65,000 20,000 0 34,000 17,000 0 0 10,000 0 30,214 0 0 68,000 2,100,000 0 0 2,344,214 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25,000 0 20,000 40,000 35,000 17,000 0 0 0 0 118,577 0 0 68,000 0 0 0 323,577 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,000 0 36,000 17,000 0 10,000 0 0 120,000 0 0 68,000 0 0 0 271,000 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,000 0 36,000 17,000 17,000 0 10,000 0 120,000 0 0 68,000 0 0 0 288,000 0 0 0

$2,500,000 2,600,000 5,100,000 0 91,798 91,798 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50,000 130,000 120,000 40,000 206,000 99,000 34,000 20,000 20,000 0 453,730 0 0 408,000 2,352,000 26,000 4,831 3,963,561 0 0 0

$5,478,528

$450,040

$2,344,214

$323,577

$271,000

$288,000

$9,155,359

City of Coral Springs, Florida

187


Human Resources Mission

Core Processes and Outputs

Human Resources

Recruitment

The Human Resources Department is committed to providing expertise in attracting, developing, and sustaining a high quality workforce committed to excellent service.

Recruit top talent by coordinating advertising, screening, interviewing, testing, selection, employee database management.

Health Fund

• Timely processing of job applications to identify the most qualified candidates.

To provide Coral Springs employees and their families with a competitive benefits package consisting of a comprehensive, yet cost effective program for health, life, and long-term disability benefits.

Employee Development Provide training and development opportunities in the areas of compliance, customer service, leadership development and other topics identified through needs analysis. • Offer training through a variety of methods including instructor-led, e-learning, webinars, forums, mentoring, shadowing, books, and articles. • Develop leadership training programs and other professional development options in support of the City’s succession planning process.

Chart Title

Human Resource Human Resources

Director of Human Resources* (1000)

Human Resources

Community Relations

(1000) / 7

(1001) / 3

Senior Human Resources Coordinator

Community Relations Manager

Human Resources Partner (1.5)** Human Resources Analyst Pension Administrator

Community Relations Coordinator

HR Support Specialist

Office Assistant

Senior Office Assistant City Hall in the Mall

Volunteer Services

(1007) / 2

(1008) / 1

Senior Community Relations Coordinator

Volunteer Services Coordinator

Senior Office Assistant Health Fund

General Insurance Fund

(8501) / 1.5

(8801) / 0.5

Senior Human Resources Coordinator

188

Human Resources Partner (0.5)**

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

(Department/ Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) *Position split 50% Human Resources Div.1000; 50% Health Fund Div. 8501 **Position split 50% Human Resources Div. 1000; 50* General Insurance Fund Div. 8801


Human Resources (continued) Compensation and Classification

Community Relations/Citizens Services/City Hall in the Mall

Support the development and maintenance of the Citywide broad band classification system, preparation and maintenance of classification specifications, preparation and maintenance of job descriptions, and completion of salary surveys.

• Act as a clearinghouse for citizen requests for information and service via the City’s Help Desk.

• Perform a comprehensive review of the City’s classification and compensation system to ensure competitive salaries to enable the City to hire and retain the best qualified employees. • Timely and accurate processing of payroll change authorizations. Compliance/Safety Coordinate Citywide safety programs. • Provide effective methods to ensure a safe work environment including safety training, committee meetings, library, events and programs. Employee Relations Partner with departments to provide guidance and consultation on human resource matters. • Develop, communicate and implement policies. • Discretely manage employee relations issues. • Effectively manage collective bargaining negotiations.

• Provide an added level of service and convenience by coordinating various new and existing city, county, state and federal programs and services at our City Hall in the Mall satellite location. • Human Resources staff serve as liaisons on the MLK Committee, Multicultural Advisory Committee, and the Customer-Involved Government Committee. • Plan and organize community, multi-cultural and educationrelated events, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend Celebration, State of the City Reception, Unitown, Uniteens, Unikids, Teen Political Forum, National Day of Prayer, International Dinner Dance, Worldfest, and other ethnic festivals. Quality Feedback Initiatives Provide strategic direction and support for the City’s internal quality initiatives and coordinate the annual support services survey, organization survey, and department director/ supervisor 360-degree assessments. • Coordinate the City’s Sterling/Baldrige efforts including coordination of the Citywide survey.

Benefits Administration

New Initiatives

• Administer Police and Fire retirement plans.

A Family-Friendly Community

• Provide administrative support for general employee retirement plan, self-insured comprehensive medical and dental plan, and fully insured vision plan. Ensure that the aggregate and specific reinsurance coverage is maintained.

Multi-cultural Events (ongoing) Teen Political Forum (ongoing) An Innovative, High-Performing Organization

• Limit health care costs to less than the medical inflation rate.

Realign Volunteer Services

• Provide fully insured basic life insurance, employee paid supplemental group life, long-term disability coverage, and wellness programs to all eligible employees.

Compensation Study

City of Coral Springs, Florida

189


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

Human Resources Revenues: City Hall In The Mall Total Expenditures: Program Summary Human Resources Community Relations Volunteer Services* City Hall In The Mall Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$587,518 $587,518

$647,927 $647,927

$638,647 $638,647

$648,075 $648,075

$9,428 $9,428

1.48% 1.48%

$767,566 273,969 0 285,345 $1,326,880

$779,145 269,853 0 289,165 $1,338,163

$837,984 285,483 0 329,180 $1,452,647

$898,036 281,895 148,850 346,751 $1,675,532

$60,052 (3,588) 148,850 17,571 $222,885

7.17% -1.26% n/a 5.34% 15.34%

$863,444 313,122 148,184 2,130 $1,326,880

$864,793 287,178 182,995 3,197 $1,338,163

$894,251 344,739 213,657 0 $1,452,647

$968,463 373,514 333,555 0 $1,675,532

$74,212 28,775 119,898 0 $222,885

8.30% 8.35% 56.12% n/a 15.34%

11.25

11.25

12.25

13.00

0.75

6.1%

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

*Division transferred from the Police Department Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total FTE's

Health Fund Revenues: Transfers Interest Income Recoveries Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$11,350,581 $10,102,139 $11,645,097 30,032 12,249 45,000 1,244,749 1,417,931 1,158,000 $12,625,362 $11,532,319 $12,848,097

$11,991,268 35,000 1,390,000 $13,416,268

$346,171 -10,000 232,000 $568,171

2.97% -22.22% 20.03% 4.42%

Expenses: Program Summary Health-Dental Long Term Disability Life Insurance Total

$10,991,335 $11,192,892 $12,577,537 144,500 154,951 144,500 121,630 126,845 126,060 $11,257,465 $11,474,688 $12,848,097

$13,124,718 160,350 131,200 $13,416,268

$547,181 15,850 5,140 $568,171

4.35% 10.97% 4.08% 4.42%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Total

$98,746 $101,597 $101,527 9,612,250 9,766,107 11,007,010 1,739,560 1,546,469 1,606,984 $11,257,465 $11,474,688 $12,848,097

$135,707 11,430,531 1,850,030 $13,416,268

$34,180 423,521 110,470 $568,171

33.67% 3.85% 6.35% 4.42%

1.50

0.25

20.0%

FTE's

190

1.25

1.25

1.25

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Performance measures Human Resources Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Percentage of employees who agree with the statement “I would recommend working for the City to a friend” 2) Employee engagement index (new beginning FY 2013) 3) Percentage of employees who feel Human Resources provides quality services 4) Percentage of employees that are satisfied with liaison services 5) Percentage of employees that are satisfied with wellness activities 6) Percentage of employees who believe benefits are in line with needs 7) Quality of hire satisfaction (new beginning FY 2013)

FY 2014 Goal Actual

90%

93%

90%

95%

90%

95%

84%

90%

87%

90%

97%

96%

95%

98%

90%

92%

92%

92%

96%

90%

91%

91%

90%

92%

90%

90%

80%

90%

93%

90%

90% 48 45%

100% 57.8 63%

90% 48 45%

100% 67.4 65%

90% 48 45%

90%

85%

90%

85%

90%

8) Sick hours per employee 9) Percentage of minority applicants per recruitment 10) Percentage of employees who agree with "I am satisfied with the access to training resources to assist in my professional development." (new beginning FY 2013 )

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency

FY2015 Goal 100% 100%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 100% 97% 100% 98%

FY 2013 Goal Actual 100% 95% 100% 96%

Measure: 11) Respond to customer requests within 48 hrs —and close service request within one week

FY2015 Goal

FY 2013 Goal Actual

Human Resource CIP by funding source

Funding Source

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Project Name

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

Loan E-Learning Platform Loan Total

$0

$0

$9,850

$0

$0

$0

$0

$9,850

0

0

9,850

0

0

0

0

9,850

20,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

9,000

0

0

0

0

9,000

12,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

32,000

0

9,000

0

0

0

0

9,000

$0

$18,850

$0

$0

$0

$0

$18,850

Operating General Fund Storefront Sign at City Hall in Mall Update Conference Room Furniture Update Security System at City Hall in Mall Operating General Fund Total Human Resources Total

City of Coral Springs, Florida

191


Information Technology Mission

Application Development and Integration

To successfully integrate people, process and technology by fostering partnerships and consistently delivering solutions that serve as the foundation of City operations.

Core Processes and Outputs The Information Services department provides voice and data services to over 1,000 staff at 35 locations. The voice network includes over 275 mobiles devices and over 900 wired devices, approximately half of which are related to CISCO VOIP service switches (Public Safety, City Hall, Center for the Arts and Tennis Center). The remaining lines provide basic telephone service (CENTREX) from AT&T. The data network consists of systems that can access a full suite of general purpose software tools, as well as 142 business applications and services. Elements of the data network consist of computing platforms, local area networks (LAN), the wide area network (WAN), and a wireless infrastructure.

Develop and maintain business applications, integrating them with the production computing environment. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade three AS/400 computing systems and the 35 HTE integrated applications that are operational on this platform. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade nine NetWare and 53 NT (a Microsoft operating system) servers, and the 97 applications and services that are server based. Infrastructure Management Plan, manage, and maintain a production environment (platforms, LANs, and WAN) in accordance with service level agreements related to security, reliability, availability, and performance of voice and data services. • Maintain and administer the City’s WAN, consisting of CISCO routers and switches at all City locations.

Computing platforms in the network include AS/400, file servers, and application servers. Access to a computing platform from most locations is accommodated via LAN, which, in turn, is interconnected to form the City’s WAN.

Information Technology Information Technology

Director of Information Technology (2001) / 21.25 Project Support Specialist Applications Administrator

Senior Programmer Analyst (3)

GIS/Data Administrator

Network Administrator

Senior CADD and GIS Tech (0.75)*

Senior Programmer Analyst (2)

Programmer Analyst

Senior Network Specialist (2)

Applications Administrator (Project Management)

Database Analyst (2) Applications Analyst-Asset Mgmt.(0.50)** Programmer Analyst Network Specialist (2) (Department/Div ision Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equiv alent) *Position split 75% Information Technology Div . 2001; 25% Public Works-Utilities-Adm. Div 6001 **Position split 50% Information Technology Div . 2001; 50% Public Works-Utilities-Adm. Div 6001

192

Production Support Specialist

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Information Technology (continued) Provide and support desktop access to general purpose software tools, business applications and data across multiple computing platforms, and external services, data, or applications. • Maintain and administer the fully integrated voice and data network that consists of over 900 voice and data drops. The network serves all City locations with technology from CISCO systems. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade the City’s mobile computing environment for Police, Fire, Code Compliance, and Fleet Management. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade the GIS and AutoCADD computing platforms and applications serving departmental needs City-wide. • Maintain, administer and provide information relative to the City’s library of plat maps, as-builts, and design drawings.

Customer Service Provide “on demand” service and support for system and security administration, problem resolution or coordination, acquisition research and assistance, and information requests relative to tools, data, and applications. • Respond to over 8,100 requests for service per year. Project Management Provide timely assistance and/or information required to satisfy customer requests and/or align their expectations to service delivery capabilities.

New Initiatives A Family-Friendly Community Public Safety Technology Upgrade (ongoing) An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Network Support Enterprise Software (ongoing) Electronic Data Back-up and Storage (ongoing)

Performance Measures Information Technology Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Workload

FY 2013 Goal Actual

Measure: 1) Number of IT Development Projects implemented in accordance with City’s Business Plan and IT Work Program

15

24

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 2) Customer satisfaction rating from survey of Information Technology 3) Meet service level agreement regarding network availability (new beginning FY 2013) 4) Meet service level agreement regarding application availability (new beginning FY 2013) 5) Meet service level agreement regarding server availability (new beginning FY 2013)

FY 2014 Goal Actual 10

13

FY2015 Goal 8

FY2015 Goal

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

95.0%

99.0%

95%

98%

95%

99.7%

100.0%

99.5%

100.0%

99.5%

98.0%

99.6%

98%

100.0%

98%

98.5%

100.0%

98%

99.8%

98%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

193


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

Information Technology Revenues: Information Technology Total

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from FY14 Budget

$16,935 $16,935

$16,368 $16,368

$16,305 $16,305

$20,000 $20,000

$19,800 $19,800

($200) ($200)

Expenditures: Program Summary Computer Services Total

$2,533,073 $2,533,073

$2,687,017 $2,687,017

$2,714,483 $2,714,483

$2,886,654 $2,886,654

$3,258,968 $3,258,968

$372,314 $372,314

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,346,776 492,916 693,381 0 $2,533,073

$1,363,728 534,420 788,869 0 $2,687,017

$1,379,737 489,599 821,857 23,290 $2,714,483

$1,416,127 551,507 919,020 0 $2,886,654

$1,594,540 620,230 1,044,198 0 $3,258,968

$178,413 68,723 125,178 0 $372,314

19.00

19.00

19.00

19.25

21.25

2.00

FTE's

Information Technology CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name Loan Desktop Computing Environment Email Retention and Anti-spam Filtering Network/Internet Infrastructure City Data Back-up and Recovery-Data Storage Computer Training Lab Uptime Monitoring Contractual Services One Solution Public Data Storage (removed per IS) Loan Total Operating General Fund OSPS Software Operating General Fund Total Equity Financing General Fund Server Replacement SharePoint Interaction Voice Response (IVR) Service Virtual Infrastructure Growth Equity Financing General Fund Total Information Technology Total

194

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$221,428 63,000 120,000 0 22,896 65,000 0 0 542,324

$0 30,000 100,000 0 0 0 0 0 190,000

$0 30,000 0 0 0 50,000 0 0 150,000

$250,000 30,000 150,000 0 25,750 0 0 0 495,750

$0 0 0 0 0 65,000 0 0 105,000

$471,428 153,000 370,000 0 48,646 180,000 0 0 1,483,074

0 0

150,000 150,000

128,239 128,239

128,239 128,239

128,239 128,239

128,239 128,239

0 0

662,956 662,956

0 105,000 150,000 0 255,000

70,000 0 0 245,000 315,000

61,000 50,000 0 240,000 301,000

501,000 60,000 0 240,000 741,000

0 70,000 0 200,000 200,000

71,328 40,000 0 200,000 271,328

0 40,000 0 250,000 250,000

703,328 260,000 0 1,375,000 2,078,328

$465,000

$971,563

$1,059,239

$478,239

$895,317

$355,000

$4,224,358

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Parks and Recreation Mission

Core Processes and Outputs

To serve as a sports and entertainment destination to the residents of Coral Springs and northwest Broward County by providing exceptional leisure opportunities, beautification of the City, and support in reaching the City Commission’s strategic priorities. We are focused on exceeding customer expectations through a philosophy of providing quality services, well-maintained facilities, and customer-friendly and attentive staff.

Maintenance Coordinate overall management of Parks and Recreation divisions. • Maintain quality athletic fields and courts for over 1,150 organized sports teams. • Maintain 49 parks totaling 765 acres including buildings, structures, landscaping, irrigation and equipment. • Maintain safe and clean tennis facilities at Tennis Center, Cypress Park Tennis Center, other City parks, and two middle schools.

Chart Title

• Maintain ten pools, a 7,500 square foot fitness center, a fullservice swim shop, and three concession venues.

Parks and Recreation Parks & Recreation

Director of Parks & Recreation (8102) Senior Office Assistant (8116)

Aquatics Services (8300's) / 16

Recreation & Sportsplex Tennis (8200's) / 8 - (7810) / 1 - (8400's) / 3

Aquatics Manager (8303)

Cypress Pool (8301) / 3

Parks & Recreation Coordinator Parks & Recreation Associate (2) Mullins Pool (8302) / 2

Parks & Recreation Associate (2) Aquatics Complex (8303) / 11

Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation (7810)

Recreation Superintendent (8208)

Parks & Rec Associates (6)

Parks Superintendent (8101)

Sportsplex/ Tennis (7800's and 8400's)

Activity Center (8204) / 1

Sportsplex (7810) / 1

Recreation Service (8205) / 5

Executive Assistant

Parks & Rec Coordinator (4)

Tennis Center (8409) / 2

Parks & Rec Coordinator

Summer Recreation (8208) / 1

Parks Lead Worker

Parks & Rec Coordinator Park Technician (2)

Parks & Rec Coordinator Parks Technician (2)

Principal Office Assistant

Landscape (8118) / 15

Maintenance Worker (6) Parks Services Coordinator (2)

Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker (6)

North Community Park (8103) / 9 Parks & Rec Coordinator Parks Technician (2)

Parks Lead Worker Maintenance worker (5)

Neighborhood Park (8116) / 16

Recreation Superintendent Transportation (8209) / 1

Parks & Rec Coordinator

Maintenance Worker

Parks Technician (3)

Bus Driver

Parks Lead Worker (3) Parks Technician Maintenance Worker (9) Irrigation (8119) / 8 Parks Services Coordinator Parks Technician (2) Maintenance Worker (5) Environmentally Sensitive Land (8121) / 1

Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker (10)

Parks & Rec Coordinator

Athletics (7812) / 5

Gymnasium* (8210) (Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent)

Beautification (8117) / 1

Parks Lead Worker

Mullins Park (8102) / 11

Aquatics Manager Parks & Rec Technician

Parks Administrator (8117)

Cypress Park (8101) / 11

Cypress Tennis (8401) / 1

Parks & Rec Coordinator

Prin. Office Assistant Parks & Recreation Coordinator

Parks (8100's) / 72 - (7812) / 5

*No Staff in this Division

Parks & Rec Coordinator Maintenance Worker (2)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Parks Technician Parks Lead Worker

195


Parks and Recreation (continued) New Initiatives

Landscape and Irrigation Install, repair, and maintain irrigation systems, landscaping, and athletic turf in parks, medians, and all public buildings, facilities and grounds.

A Family-Friendly Community Safety Town An Active, Healthy Community

Recreational Programming Provide programming for seniors, teens, special needs populations, preschoolers, after-school, summer recreation, and at-risk youth among others. • Conduct 32,000 swim classes annually to over 4,000 participants through three different Learn to Swim programs.

Tennis Center Lighting Improvements Aquatic Center 50 Meter Pool Design Playground Equipment Replacement (ongoing) Half-marathon and 5K Run/Walk (ongoing) An Attractive Community

Administrative Services Manage new park construction and existing facility enhancements. Develop, implement, and monitor the budget and strategic plan for Parks and Recreation.

Aquatic Complex Entrance (ongoing) Atlantic Boulevard Entryway (ongoing) with Development Services

City representative to sports groups, Kreul Classic, Sports Coalition Committee, and Sports Commission. Negotiate reciprocal use agreements with schools, both public and private. Prepare grants and inter-local, reciprocal use, and lease agreements. Revenue collection for permits, rentals, clinics, summer recreation and other programs. • Generate over $320,000 in tennis lesson revenue and over $450,000 in gross sales at the Swim Shop. Coordinate and secure sponsorships and advertising. Negotiate and administer contracts of third-party contractors providing a variety of services to facility customers. Scheduling Provide field and court permits for 19 City-recognized sports programs, independent leagues and organizations, and drop-in groups. • Accommodate over 4,000,000 park visitors to all sites. • Accommodate 500,000 Aquatic Complex participants and visitors. • Host 118,000 tennis players. Transportation Provide community and senior bus service.

196

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Parks and Recreation Revenues: Parks Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Sub-Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$104,891 291,842 39,211 96,487 $532,431

$111,837 269,138 28,078 98,412 $507,465

$111,000 286,235 41,211 101,019 $539,465

$119,325 307,703 44,302 108,596 $579,926

$8,325 21,468 3,091 7,577 $40,461

7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50% 7.50%

Recreation Mullins Activity Center $45,736 Recreation Center 21,489 Summer Recreation 612,155 Transportation Services* 177,357 Gymnasium 414,761 Sub-Total $1,271,498 *Includes Community Bus Program Revenues

$44,162 20,273 543,076 171,552 421,985 $1,201,048

$59,507 21,410 622,448 177,552 407,000 $1,287,917

$63,970 23,016 600,000 178,858 437,525 $1,303,369

$4,463 1,606 (22,448) 1,306 30,525 $15,452

7.50% 7.50% -3.61% 0.74% 7.50% 1.20%

$279,250 15,400 120,917 329,433 $745,000

$259,062 18,668 128,385 307,363 $713,478

$286,799 22,148 148,180 387,850 $844,977

$307,711 27,470 159,293 416,940 $911,414

$20,912 5,322 11,113 29,090 $66,437

7.29% 24.03% 7.50% 7.50% 7.86%

$153,307 66,662 1,506,124 $1,726,093

$140,846 73,067 1,653,434 $1,867,347

$153,513 75,950 1,558,592 $1,788,055

$165,027 81,646 1,700,486 $1,947,159

$11,514 5,696 141,894 $159,104

7.50% 7.50% 9.10% 8.90%

$4,275,022

$4,289,338

$4,460,414

$4,741,868

$281,454

6.31%

Expenditures: Program Summary Parks Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Beautification Landscape Irrigation Environmentally Sensitive Land Sub-Total

$1,029,043 1,257,388 708,478 1,372,886 937,934 1,267,274 550,748 138,093 $7,261,844

$1,078,449 1,271,920 736,763 1,434,432 1,005,065 1,243,224 542,930 141,927 $7,454,710

$1,176,762 1,316,823 793,558 1,542,097 1,194,304 1,343,622 584,659 171,020 $8,122,845

$1,179,826 1,336,899 806,102 1,558,234 1,172,270 1,360,696 597,917 173,746 $8,185,690

$3,064 20,076 12,544 16,137 (22,034) 17,074 13,258 2,726 $62,845

0.26% 1.52% 1.58% 1.05% -1.84% 1.27% 2.27% 1.59% 0.77%

Recreation Activity Center Recreation Services Summer Recreations Transportation Services Gymnasium Sub-Total

$90,430 417,849 542,819 337,733 423,397 $1,812,228

$92,023 408,635 527,658 366,410 381,924 $1,776,650

$106,862 443,379 620,683 399,213 412,687 $1,982,824

$109,050 452,836 633,000 403,447 381,982 $1,980,315

$2,188 9,457 12,317 4,234 (30,705) ($2,509)

2.05% 2.13% 1.98% 1.06% -7.44% -0.13%

Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex Athletic Complex Cypress Tennis Tennis Center Sub-Total

$327,151 470,436 215,303 581,586 $1,594,476

$321,763 464,681 221,483 566,583 $1,574,510

$340,110 466,609 225,159 614,257 $1,646,135

$276,317 514,848 224,126 654,065 $1,669,356

($63,793) 48,239 (1,033) 39,808 $23,221

-18.76% 10.34% -0.46% 6.48% 1.41%

Aquatics Services Cypress Pool Mullins Pool Aquatics Complex Sub-Total

$282,340 243,715 1,863,560 $2,389,615

$279,083 209,863 1,970,136 $2,459,082

$311,038 256,575 1,816,058 $2,383,671

$309,678 261,289 1,908,438 $2,479,405

($1,360) 4,714 92,380 $95,734

-0.44% 1.84% 5.09% 4.02%

$13,058,163

$13,264,952

$14,135,475

$14,314,766

Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex Athletic Complex Cypress Tennis Tennis Center Sub-Total Aquatics Services Cypress Pool Mullins Pool Aquatics Complex Sub-Total Total Revenues

Total Expenditures

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$179,291

1.27%

197


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Parks and Recreation (continued) Expenditures: Summary By Category Parks Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$2,759,617 1,488,972 3,006,202 7,053 $7,261,844

$2,899,300 1,366,930 3,168,390 20,090 $7,454,710

$3,109,615 1,620,477 3,371,303 21,450 $8,122,845

$3,152,328 1,650,729 3,360,649 21,984 $8,185,690

$42,713 30,252 (10,654) 534 $62,845

1.37% 1.87% -0.32% 2.49% 0.77%

Recreation Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

$747,691 215,837 848,700 0 $1,812,228

$739,623 192,877 842,150 2,000 $1,776,650

$835,870 224,655 922,299 0 $1,982,824

$856,652 229,475 894,188 0 $1,980,315

$20,782 4,820 (28,111) 0 ($2,509)

2.49% 2.15% -3.05% n/a -0.13%

Sportsplex/Tennis Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

$598,161 233,055 763,260 0 $1,594,476

$582,258 206,895 775,562 9,795 $1,574,510

$623,153 236,628 780,154 6,200 $1,646,135

$607,649 233,832 821,520 6,355 $1,669,356

($15,504) (2,796) 41,366 155 $23,221

-2.49% -1.18% 5.30% 2.50% 1.41%

Aquatic Services Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

$940,066 377,011 1,072,538 0 $2,389,615

$968,001 335,157 1,155,924 0 $2,459,082

$1,016,973 394,826 971,872 0 $2,383,671

$1,020,426 398,418 1,060,561 0 $2,479,405

$3,453 3,592 88,689 0 $95,734

0.34% 0.91% 9.13% n/a 4.02%

Total Expenditures

$13,058,163

$13,264,952

$14,135,475

$14,314,766

$179,291

1.27%

Expenditures - All Divisions Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total Expenditures

$5,045,535 $5,189,182 $5,585,611 2,314,875 2,101,859 2,476,586 5,690,700 5,942,026 6,045,628 7,053 31,885 27,650 $13,058,163 $13,264,952 $14,135,475

$5,637,055 2,512,454 6,136,918 28,339 $14,314,766

$51,444 35,868 91,290 689 $179,291

0.92% 1.45% 1.51% 2.49% 1.27%

72.00 8.00 9.00 16.00 105.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

FTE's Parks Recreation Sportsplex/Tennis Aquatic Services Total FTE's

198

68.00 8.00 9.00 16.00 101.00

72.00 8.00 9.00 16.00 105.00

FY 2015 Budget

72.00 8.00 9.00 16.00 105.00

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget


Performance Measures Parks and Recreation Parks Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Quality service rating for appearance of recreation/athletic facilities (Resident Survey) 2) Customer service rating for parks and recreation staff (Resident Survey) 3) Safety rating of neighborhood parks (Resident Survey) Recreation Strategic Priority: An Active, Healthy Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Customer service rating of summer recreation program

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

94%

96%

94%

94% 92%

96% 92%

— —

— —

94% 92%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 98% 100%

FY2015 Goal 98%

FY 2013 Goal Actual 60% 68%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 60% 68%

FY2015 Goal 60%

FY 2013 Goal Actual 90,000 90,595

FY 2014 Goal Actual 90,000 84,581

FY2015 Goal 90,000

FY 2013 Goal Actual 98% 98%

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 2) Cost recovery ratio for the Recreation Division Strategic Priority: A Family-Friendly Community Measurement Type: Demand Measure: 3) Number of riders on community buses

City of Coral Springs, Florida

199


Performance Measures Aquatics Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 1) The combined cost recovery for the Aquatic Services —Aquatic Complex —Aquatic Services Division Strategic Priority: An Active, Healthy Community Measurement Type: Demand Measure: 2) Increase members and reduce member turnover: —Aquatic Complex membership —Aquatic Complex membership turnover —Cypress Pool average daily pool usage —Mullins Pool average daily pool usage

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

60% 50%

65% 50%

84% 76%

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

5,500 49% 205 120

5,000 49% 250 120

3,868 33% 343 117

Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 3) Maintain customer service ratings: —Aquatic facility —Cypress Park Pool —Mullins Park Pool

FY 2014 Goal Actual

92% 92% 92%

92% 92% 92%

99% 100% 99%

FY 2013 Goal Actual $180K $273K

Strategic Priority: An Active, Healthy Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 3) Maintain customer service ratings at the Tennis Center 4) Membership turnover at the Tennis Center 5) Customer service rating for court maintenance at the Tennis Center 6) Number of tennis special events 7) Number of tennis teams

200

98% 99% 99%

65% 50%

FY2015 Goal 5,000 49% 250 120

FY2015 Goal 92% 92% 92%

FY 2014 Goal Actual $180K $226K

FY2015 Goal $198K

FY 2013 Goal Actual 60% 55% $272K $320K

FY 2014 Goal Actual 60% 56% $320K $255K

FY2015 Goal 50% $300K

FY 2013 Goal Actual 90% 94% 30% 21%

FY 2014 Goal Actual 90% — 30% 15%

FY2015 Goal 90% 30%

90% 25 60

90% 25 50

Tennis Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 1) Combined cost recovery ratio 2) Tennis lesson revenue

3,517 49% 243 95

FY 2013 Goal Actual

Sportsplex Strategic Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 1) Revenue generated from Sportsplex concessionaires

85% 76%

FY2015 Goal

79% 36 139

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

— 36 65

90% 25 60


Parks and Recreation CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

CDBG Grant $50,000

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

10,000

12,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

62,000

60,000

62,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

362,000

0

900,000

0

0

0

0

0

900,000

0

900,000

0

0

0

0

0

900,000

Artificial Turf Fields

0

0

1,500,000

1,400,000

0

0

0

2,900,000

Building Furniture

0

0

30,000

0

25,000

0

0

55,000

Cypress Park Renovations

0

0

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

500,000

ESL Site Upgrades

0

0

20,000

75,000

50,000

50,000

0

195,000

Fence Replacement

0

0

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

500,000

Fencing

0

0

20,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

40,000

150,000

Field Renovationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mullins/Cypress

0

0

75,000

75,000

0

0

0

150,000

Gym Sidewalks and Landscaping

0

0

30,000

0

0

0

0

30,000

Irrigation Upgrades

0

0

75,000

75,000

75,000

0

0

225,000

Linear Park Renovations

0

0

125,000

125,000

125,000

125,000

100,000

600,000

Little League Building

0

0

600,000

0

0

0

0

600,000

MIR 5000 Irrigation System

0

0

5,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

45,000

Mullins Park Renovations

0

0

50,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

450,000

Neighborhood Parks Renovations

0

0

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

1,000,000

North Community Park Renovations

0

0

50,000

50,000

50,000

100,000

100,000

350,000

Paint Buildings

0

0

15,000

0

0

0

25,000

40,000

Park Amenities

0

0

25,000

25,000

30,000

40,000

40,000

160,000

Pathway Lighting @ Mullins

0

0

200,000

0

0

0

0

200,000

Resurfacing Basketball/Tennis/Hockey

0

0

100,000

125,000

0

0

225,000

450,000

Skateboard Park Equipment Replacement

0

0

300,000

0

0

0

0

300,000

Storage Buildings at Cypress Park

0

0

150,000

0

0

0

0

150,000

Landscape Beautification

0

0

70,000

70,000

70,000

70,000

70,000

350,000

Light Fixture Replacement Program

0

0

500,000

1,000,000

400,000

0

0

1,900,000

0

0

4,515,000

3,725,000

1,515,000

985,000

1,160,000

11,900,000

Youth Recreation Scholarship Sr. Recreactional & Therapeutical Activity CDBG Grant Total

$300,000

General Obligation Bond Safety Town Building (Construction) General Obligation Bond Total Loan

Loan Total Operating General Fund

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Irrigation Equipment

18,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

University Dr and/or Sample Entryway Signs

40,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

75,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Irrigation Pump Replacement

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Operating General Fund Total

138,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mullins Park Revitalization

183,000

0

100,000

100,000

100,000

50,000

50,000

400,000

Median Master Plan

115,000

0

75,000

75,000

50,000

0

0

200,000

Splash Pad Systems- Betti Stradling Park

15,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

15-year Playground Replacement

80,000

86,000

86,000

86,000

185,000

140,000

45,000

628,000

Irrigation Equipment

0

10,000

18,000

18,000

18,000

18,000

18,000

100,000

Mullins Gym Interior Renovations

0

25,000

100,000

300,000

100,000

0

100,000

625,000

393,000

121,000

204,000

404,000

303,000

158,000

163,000

1,353,000

0

250,000

0

0

0

0

0

250,000

0

250,000

0

0

0

0

0

250,000

0

120,000

0

0

0

0

0

120,000

120,000

0

0

0

0

0

120,000

$1,453,000

$4,779,000

$4,189,000

$1,878,000

$1,203,000

$1,383,000

$14,885,000

3 Pick up Trucks

Event Cross Promotion Cypress Hall Renovations

Equity Financing General Fund

Equity Financing General Fund Total FLDOE Grant Safety Town Building (Construction) FLDOE Grant Total Grant Dependent Splash Pad Grant Dependent Total Total Parks

City of Coral Springs, Florida

201


Parks and Recreation-Aquatics CIP by funding source

Funding Source Project Name CDBG Grant Sr. Rec and Therapeutical Activity CDBG Grant Total Loan 25-Meter Pool Cover Replacement Canopy Program Chemical Feeder Repl for 3 Pools Cooling/Misting System Deck Staining—Aquatics Deck Staining—Cypress Dive Well Upgrades Dryland Training Area Enclosed Flume Slide Filter Room Upgrade Fitness Center Expansion Funbrellas Replacement Landscaping Program Lane Line Replacement Locker Room Upgrades Motor pump Repl- 3 pool sites Play Feature Replacement Pool Furniture Replacement Spectator Seating Shade Prog Starting Block Replacement Window Replacement Door Replacement Wind Screen Replacement Security System Upgrades Carpeting/Flooring/Fitness Center Fencing Replacement Portable Shade Shelters Support Meeting Room Aquatic Complex Upgrades Endless Pool Lifeguard Chair Replacement Mullins Park Pool Upgrades Pool Vacuum—Aquatics Pool Vacuum—Cypress Pool Vacuum—Mullins Pool Resurfacing—Cypress Pool Heater Replacement Pool Heater Replacement—Mullins Pool Heater Repl—Cypress Pool Covers- Cypress New 50 Meter Pool Upgrades Scoreboard Replacement Pool Covers- Mullins Dive Well A & E Plans Aquatic Complex Renovations Event Parking Lot Upgrades Loan Total Operating General Fund Motor Pump Repl— 3 pool sites 3-Meter Platform Replacement 50-Meter Pool Cover Replacement Patio Furniture Replacement Lighting Program (Energy Efficient) Painting Interior/Exterior Operating General Fund Total Equity Financing General Fund Diving Board Replacement Fitness Equipment Replacement Motor Pump Repl— 3 pool sites Timing System Replacement Pool Resurfacing—Mullins 50-Meter Pool Design Equity Financing General Fund Total Total Aquatics Compex

202

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$34,423 34,423

$32,016 32,016

$35,000 35,000

$35,000 35,000

$35,000 35,000

$35,000 35,000

$35,000 35,000

$207,016 207,016

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

13,000 5,000 10,000 17,500 6,500 22,500 175,000 30,000 0 60,000 225,000 5,000 5,000 12,500 15,000 15,000 7,500 0 35,000 65,000 17,500 6,000 6,500 5,000 10,000 10,000 7,000 60,000 0 0 7,500 0 10,000 0 7,000 35,000 34,000 20,000 20,000 15,000 1,000,000 35,000 15,000 15,000 100,000 250,000 2,410,000

0 0 10,000 0 0 0 0 0 50,000 60,000 0 0 0 12,500 0 15,000 7,500 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,000 0 0 0 0 25,000 0 0 10,000 7,000 0 0 35,000 20,000 25,000 0 0 0 0 0 100,000 0 387,000

0 0 10,000 0 0 12,000 0 0 0 0 0 5,000 0 0 0 15,000 7,500 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,000 0 7,000 0 35,000 0 25,000 0 0 0 0 0 100,000 0 226,500

0 0 10,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15,000 7,500 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,000 0 0 0 35,000 0 25,000 0 0 0 0 0 100,000 0 202,500

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5,000 0 0 0 15,000 7,500 20,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,000 0 7,000 0 35,000 25,000 25,000 15,000 0 0 15,000 0 100,000 0 279,500

13,000 5,000 40,000 17,500 6,500 34,500 175,000 30,000 50,000 120,000 225,000 15,000 5,000 25,000 15,000 75,000 37,500 20,000 35,000 65,000 17,500 6,000 6,500 5,000 20,000 10,000 7,000 60,000 0 25,000 7,500 0 50,000 7,000 21,000 35,000 174,000 65,000 120,000 30,000 1,000,000 35,000 30,000 15,000 500,000 250,000 3,505,500

15,000 55,000 0 0 0 0 70,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15,000 30,000 0 10,000 35,000 65,000 155,000

15,000 0 30,000 0 20,000 0 50,000

15,000 0 0 20,000 0 30,000 50,000

15,000 0 0 0 0 0 0

15,000 0 0 0 0 0 0

15,000 0 30,000 0 25,000 0 55,000

75,000 0 60,000 20,000 45,000 30,000 155,000

0 30,000 0 10,000 0 0 40,000

0 30,000 0 10,000 0 0 40,000

0 30,000 0 10,000 0 0 40,000

0 30,000 0 10,000 0 0 40,000

0 30,000 0 10,000 0 0 40,000

15,000 180,000 0 60,000 35,000 65,000 355,000

$187,016

$2,535,000

$512,000

$301,500

$277,500

$409,500

$4,222,516

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Parks and Recreation- Sportsplex CIP by funding source

Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

Grant Dependent Sportsplex Lake Dock

$0

$100,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$100,000

Grant Dependent Total

0

100,000

0

0

0

0

0

100,000

Additional Tennis Courts

0

0

170,000

0

0

0

0

170,000

Artificial Turf Fields

0

0

700,000

0

0

0

0

700,000

Brick Paver Recondition

0

0

8,500

0

9,000

0

10,000

27,500

Carpet Replacement

0

0

8,000

0

0

0

0

8,000

5,000

0

8,000

0

9,000

0

10,000

27,000

Loan

Dog Park Exercise Equipment Exterior Painting—Clubhouse

0

0

10,000

0

0

0

12,000

22,000

Interior Painting—Clubhouse

0

0

10,000

0

0

12,000

0

22,000

Landscape North Parcel

0

0

200,000

0

0

0

0

200,000

Park and Aquatics Signage

0

0

8,000

0

0

0

0

8,000

Replace Clubhouse Furniture

0

0

17,000

0

0

0

0

17,000

Replace Windscreens and Nets

0

0

8,000

0

9,000

0

10,000

27,000

Resurfacing Track and Courts

0

0

25,000

60,000

0

0

0

85,000

Shade Shelters—Athletics

0

0

17,000

0

0

0

0

17,000

Shade Shelters—Clubhouse

0

0

5,000

0

0

0

5,000

10,000

Shade Shelters—Tennis Courts

0

0

8,000

0

0

8,000

0

16,000

Fencing—Tennis Courts

0

0

20,000

8,000

8,000

9,000

9,000

54,000

Paint Vinyl Tennis Courts—Tennis Ctr.

0

0

10,000

10,000

0

0

0

20,000

Renovate Baseball Infield

0

0

30,000

0

0

0

0

30,000

Replace Kitchen Appliances

0

0

15,000

0

0

0

0

15,000

Athletic Complex Park Amenities

0

0

30,000

0

30,000

0

35,000

95,000 170,000

Tennis Center Renovations

9,900

0

50,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

Replace Windows- Phase II

25,000

0

25,000

0

0

0

0

25,000

0

0

40,000

0

0

0

0

40,000

39,900

0

1,422,500

108,000

95,000

59,000

121,000

1,805,500

Fence Replacement & repair Loan Total Operating General Fund Exterior Painting—Athletics

0

0

7,000

0

0

0

8,000

15,000

Operating General Fund Total

0

0

7,000

0

0

0

8,000

15,000

Tree Trust Fund Landscape North Parcel Tree Trust Fund Total

14,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

14,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Equity Financing General Fund Resurface Tennis Courts

0

40,000

0

0

40,000

0

0

80,000

Paint/Recushion Courts-Tennis Ctr.

0

44,000

13,000

0

0

0

25,000

82,000

Replace light fixtures on stadium courts Equity Financing General Fund Total

0

50,000

0

0

0

0

0

50,000

0

134,000

13,000

0

40,000

0

25,000

212,000

$234,000

$1,442,500

$108,000

$135,000

$59,000

$154,000

$2,132,500

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

Sportsplex Total

Tree Trust Fund CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name Tree Trust Fund Landscape North Parcel* Landscape Median from B. Beiger to Entrance Landscape Drop-Off Island Master Tree Plan Royal Palm Entryway* Tree Trust Fund Total

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$14,000 0 0 25,000 175,000

FY 2016 Plan $0 0 0 0 0 $0

$0 10,000 5,000 0 0 $15,000

$0 0 0 0 0 $0

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2019 Plan $0 0 0 0 0 $0

FY 2020 Plan $0 0 0 0 0 $0

Total Cost FY 2015-2020 $0 0 0 0 0 $0

$0 10,000 5,000 0 0 $15,000

203


Police Mission

Core Processes and Outputs

To provide professional, high quality and effective police service in partnership with the community.

Administration Administer the financial, operational and capital budgets of the department. Manage the overall working of the Police Department to provide a safe and secure community environment. Provide public informational services. Identify specific training needs of department personnel.

Police Chief of Police (4101) / 2

Special Response Team* (4107)

Executive Assistant

Operations Deputy Chief (4201) Special Events* (4108)

Executive Assistant (4201)

Operational Support

Criminal Investigations

Special Operations

Senior Office Assistant (4301)

Patrol Unit (4201) / 113

General Investigations (4301) / 19

K-9 Unit (4203) / 6

Dive Team* (4114)

Special Investigations (4302) / 16

Law Enforcement Captain

Law Enforcement Sergeant

Law Enforcement Captain

Law Enforcement Sergeant (2)

Law Enforcement Lieutenant (4)

Law Enforcement Officer (5)

Law Enforcement Sergeant

Investigator (10)

Investigator (11)

Victim/Family Advocate (2)

Criminal Investigations Specialist (2)

Principal Office Assistant (2)

Law Enforcement Sergeant (12) Law Enforcement Officer (84)

Strategic Enforcement Team (4204) / 10

Traffic Accident Investigator (9) Senior Office Assistant

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant

Traffic Unit (4202) / 10

Law Enforcement Sergeant

Law Enforcement Officer (8)

Humane Unit (4205) / 3

Crime Analyst Principal Office Assistant (2) Crime Scene Investigation (4305) / 11

Crime Scene Investigations Unit Supervisor

Motorcycle Officer (9) Humane Officer (3)

Latent Fingerprint Examiner Crime Scene Technician (6)

Bicycle Unit (4209) / 6

Evidence Specialist (3)

Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer (5)

Substation Unit (4211) / 4

Law Enforcement Officer (4) (Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) * No full-time staff assigned to these divisions

BEAR Unit (4212) / 7

Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer (6)

204

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Investigations

Juvenile

Investigate property crimes such as burglaries, thefts etc., and violent crimes such as batteries, assaults, domestic violence, child abuse (physical, sexual, and neglect), elderly abuse, adult sex crimes, homicide, and aggravated battery.

Operate the School Resource Officer program and present educational program at all grade levels. Coordinate court-ordered community service hours program for juveniles and adults.

Patrol

New Initiatives

Receive, process, and dispatch both emergency and nonemergency calls for Police and Fire Rescue.

A Family-Friendly Community

â&#x20AC;˘ Respond to 170,000 projected calls for service and incident response.

Additional Patrol Officers

Support Functions

Public Safety Dispatch Equipment Upgrade (ongoing)

CSI Building Renovation

Process all external and internal requests for reports and information.

An Attractive Community Humane Unit Building Design

Coordinate fleet and facility maintenance.

Office of Professional Standards (4102) / 2

Administration Deputy Chief (Funded in 4110)

Vice and Intelligence (4103) / 14

Fiscal Management (4110) / 5

Communications (4502) / 29

Community Services

Human Resources (4104) / 5

Law Enforcement Sergeant Senior Office Assistant

Law Enforcement Sergeant

Human Resources Administrator

Communications Administrator

Deputy Police Chief

Investigator (12)

Background Investigator

Telecommunicator (19)

Fiscal Accreditation Administrator

Intelligence Analyst

HR Support Specialist

Communications Tech. Coordinator

Senior Office Assistant

Principal Office Assistant

Communications Shift Supervisor (6)

Principal Office Assistant (2)

Traffic Technician

Emergency Call Taker (2)

Off Duty Detail (4109)

Training (4210) / 5

Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer (2)

Community Involvement (4207) / 2

Law Enforcement Officer

Emergency Management (4115) / 1

Central Records (4501) / 7

Emergency Management Coordinator

Community Involvement Coordinator

Records Supervisor Principal Office Assistant (4) Office Assistant (2)

Range Master Crime Lab Technician

Building/Fleet (4503) / 5

Senior Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Facilities Technician (2)

Youth Liaison (4303) / 19

School Crossing Guards* (4206)

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant (2) Youth Liaison Officer (15) Principal Office Assistant

P/T Custodian

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) *No full-time staff assigned to these divisions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

205


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category FY 2012 Actual

Police Revenues: Office of the Chief Off-Duty Detail Total

$1,721,380 331,060 $2,052,440

Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Office of the Chief $322,376 Vice/Intelligence 2,537,920 Human Resources 373,765 Off-Duty Detail 268,164 Communications Center 2,521,753 Fiscal Management 915,531 Special Response Team 176,040 Sub-Total $7,115,549 Administration-Community Services Youth Liaison 1,913,898 Emergency Management 82,821 Community Involvement 318,464 Training 795,878 Volunteer Services* 132,089 Central Records 442,564 Crossing Guards 410,781 Building and Fleet Maintenance 509,990 Sub-Total $4,606,485

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$1,758,423 307,439 $2,065,862

$2,027,093 410,613 $2,437,706

Operations Patrol Unit Special Events Traffic Unit Sub-Total

$273,947 $273,947

$2,139,186 427,037 $2,566,223

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget $112,093 16,424 $128,517

5.53% 4.00% 5.27%

3.07% 0.92% 1.52% 2.05% 1.01% 4.16% 2.88% 1.60%

$253,322 2,358,619 358,991 219,020 2,448,843 927,093 199,497 $6,765,385

$261,109 2,389,082 378,451 290,831 2,584,136 938,398 207,869 $7,049,876

$269,126 2,411,129 384,191 296,785 2,610,192 977,458 213,856 $7,162,737

$8,017 22,047 5,740 5,954 26,056 39,060 5,987 $112,861

2,233,983 83,358 348,194 850,158 129,183 458,770 457,262 527,694 $5,088,602

3,311,159 86,225 362,269 829,413 138,375 461,774 445,555 553,741 $6,188,511

3,322,675 90,167 254,959 816,286 0 488,953 438,872 547,723 $5,959,635

$11,516 3,942 (107,310) (13,127) (138,375) 27,179 (6,683) (6,018) ($228,876)

0.35% 4.57% -29.62% -1.58% -100.00% 5.89% -1.50% -1.09% -3.70%

($116,015)

-0.88%

Sub-total Administration $11,722,034 $11,853,987 *Division transferred to Human Resources in FY 2015 Office of Professional Standards Office of Professional Standards Sub-Total

FY 2015 Budget

$290,460 $290,460

$13,238,387

$13,122,372

$260,091 $260,091

$264,832 $264,832

$4,741 $4,741

1.82% 1.82%

$19,161,706 96,856 1,980,567 $21,239,129

$17,379,283 125,578 1,797,159 $19,302,020

$17,727,945 102,003 1,899,600 $19,729,548

$18,132,955 111,635 1,904,608 $20,149,198

$405,010 9,632 5,008 $419,650

2.28% 9.44% 0.26% 2.13%

Special Operations Strategic Enforcement Team Humane Unit K-9 Substation Unit Bicycle Unit BEAR Unit Sub-Total

$1,585,424 219,596 967,914 635,104 953,162 0 $4,361,200

$1,670,710 213,115 904,695 459,270 913,714 1,026,453 $5,187,957

$1,699,343 231,502 1,088,872 606,840 928,923 1,119,112 $5,674,592

$1,598,145 237,696 1,117,371 610,321 908,031 1,118,380 $5,589,944

($101,198) 6,194 28,499 3,481 (20,892) (732) ($84,648)

-5.96% 2.68% 2.62% 0.57% -2.25% -0.07% -1.49%

Criminal Investigations General Investigations Special Investigations Crime Scene Investigations Dive Team Sub-Total

$2,887,382 2,418,739 918,956 11,978 $6,237,055

$2,632,374 2,306,188 926,136 13,275 $5,877,973

$2,843,995 2,337,924 1,026,855 12,854 $6,221,628

$2,856,951 2,322,415 1,067,460 13,099 $6,259,925

$12,956 (15,509) 40,605 245 $38,297

0.46% -0.66% 3.95% 1.91% 0.62%

$31,837,384

$30,367,950

$31,625,768

$31,999,067

$373,299

1.18%

Total

$43,833,365

$42,512,397

$45,124,246

$45,386,271

$262,025

0.58%

Summary By Category Personal* Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$21,445,712 17,545,629 4,834,222 7,802 $43,833,365

$22,322,272 14,890,861 5,164,863 134,401 $42,512,397

$23,732,456 15,951,087 5,423,413 17,290 $45,124,246

$24,119,828 15,777,387 5,470,650 18,406 $45,386,271

$387,372 (173,700) 47,237 1,116 $262,025

1.63% -1.09% 0.87% 6.45% 0.58%

295.00 294.63

295.00 294.63

299.00 298.63

301.00 301.00

Sub-Total Operations

Positions FTE's

206

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

2.00 2.38

0.67% 0.80%


Performance Measures Police Strategic Priority: A Family-Friendly Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Police Department's overall quality rating (Resident Survey) 2) Percentage of customers who has contact with or knows their neighborhood officers (Resident Survey) 3) Percentage of residents who feel that Coral Springs has remained as safe or become a safer place to live (Resident Survey) 4) Average Police response time (from time of call to arrival)

FY 2013 Goal Actual 95% 95% 45%

43%

75%

71%

7) Clearance rate for crimes (Source: Uniform Crime Report) 8) Reduce or maintain percent change in number of robberies (Source: Uniform Crime Report) (new beginning FY 2013)

45% 75%

4:45 2012 0% -10.4% 2012 0% -7.59% 2012 28% 30.4% 2012

4:31 2013 0% -32.2% 2013 0% -8.33% 2013 28% 34.7% 2013

-5%

0%

26.9%

-5%

2013

-13.3%

5:00

35

33

35

34

2014 35

120

126

130

262

135

2012 9) Traffic crashes per 1,000 citizens 10) Number of high school students that are awarded safe driving certificates at graduation (new beginning FY 2013)

FY2015 Goal 95%

2014 5:00 2014 0% 2014 0% 2014 29% 2014

2012 5:00

5) Stabilize the burglary rate at a 0% increase adjusted for population (Source: Uniform Crime Report) 6) Maintain 0% increase in crime rate as adjusted for population (Source: Uniform Crime Report)

FY 2014 Goal Actual

2013

Strategic Priority: A Thriving Business Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 11) Satisfaction rating by businesses (Business Survey) (new beginning FY 2013) 12) Safety rating by businesses (Business Survey) (new beginning FY 2013)

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

93%

92%

83%

96%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

207


Police CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

General Obligation Bond Northwest County Radio Upgrade CSI Building Renovation and Expansion General Obligation Bond Total

$0

$5,500,000

0

950,000

0

6,450,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$5,500,000

0

0

0

0

0

6,450,000

950,000

Justice Assistance Grant Handgun Replacement Taser Replacement Traffic Homicide Invest. Enhancement

0

3,522

0

0

0

0

0

3,522

12,548

10,000

0

0

0

0

0

10,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,000

3,522

SWAT Weapons/Handguns Justice Assistance Grant Total

0 3,522

17,548

17,044

0

911 UPS Batteries

0

0

Ballistic Shields and Breaching Tools

0

0

Bicycle Replacements for Bike Unit

0

Communications Center Carpet Repl

0

0

0

0

17,044

10,000

0

8,000

0

0

18,000

0

12,000

0

0

0

12,000

0

10,800

0

0

0

0

10,800

0

0

18,000

0

0

18,000

0

36,000

Communications Chair Repl

0

0

0

10,800

0

0

0

10,800

Computer/Hi-Tech Forensic Analysis Unit

0

0

6,000

35,000

71,000

0

0

112,000

CRT PC Replacement

0

0

0

0

13,400

0

0

13,400

EOC Improvements

0

0

15,000

15,000

0

0

0

30,000

Gym Equipment Replacement

0

0

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

25,000

Handgun Replacement

0

0

10,000

10,000

0

10,000

5,000

35,000

Intelligence Software Upgrades

0

0

20,000

0

0

20,000

0

40,000

License Plate Reader

0

0

0

0

32,000

0

0

32,000

Lighting at Gun Range

0

0

7,100

0

0

0

8,000

15,100

Morphotrak Latent Station

0

0

0

0

100,000

0

0

100,000

Loan

Painting Public Safety Facilities

0

0

20,000

10,000

10,000

40,000

15,000

95,000

Prisoner Transport Van

0

0

45,000

0

0

0

0

45,000

Radio Tower UPS Batteries

0

0

6,000

0

0

12,000

0

18,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,000

5,000

Replacement Gas Masks and Filters

0

0

0

26,000

0

0

0

26,000

Rubber Flooring at Public Safety

0

0

20,000

0

0

38,000

0

58,000

Ruggedized Laptops

0

0

12,000

0

0

0

0

12,000

Seal Coating Driveways

0

0

45,000

0

0

0

0

45,000

Surveillance Equipment

0

0

0

225,000

0

0

0

225,000

Replacement Bikes for Substation Unit

Taser Replacement

0

0

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

50,000

Total Station Replacement

0

0

0

0

0

15,000

0

15,000

Video Forensics System

0

0

7,500

5,000

10,000

0

0

22,500

VIN Tracking Device

0

0

0

9,800

0

0

0

9,800

Wireless Motor Kit

0

0

5,000

0

5,000

0

0

10,000

Safety Town Improvements

0

0

5,000

5,000

0

5,000

0

15,000

K-9 Tactical Vests

0

0

0

7,000

0

0

0

7,000

Talon Robot Enhancements

0

0

50,000

0

0

0

0

50,000

BearCat Enhancements

0

0

35,000

0

0

0

0

35,000

Rapid ID Devices

0

0

12,000

55,000

0

0

0

67,000

Carpet Replacement Public Safety

0

0

11,000

15,000

5,000

0

5,000

36,000

SWAT Weapons

0

0

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

40,000

Obstacle Course

0

10,000

0

0

0

0

10,000

Imaging Processing Equipment

0

0

0

0

0

0

30,000

30,000

Humane Unit

0

0

300,000

0

0

0

0

300,000

0

0

703,400

463,600

277,400

181,000

91,000

1,716,400

AVL Security Display Replacement

0

0

12,500

0

12,500

0

12,500

37,500

Gran Tex

0

0

0

0

0

0

28,000

28,000

Loan Total Operating General Fund

5,000

0

0

0

0

0

5,000

5,000

Security Cameras @ Parks

50,000

0

0

50,000

0

0

0

50,000

Vehicle for Parking Enforcers

25,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

80,000

0

12,500

50,000

12,500

0

40,500

115,500 45,000

Replcmt. Bikes for Substation Unit

OSPS Software Operating General Fund Total Equity Financing General Fund Ballistic Helmets Livescan Radar Gun Replacement Tactical (SRT) Vests Police Unit FF&E Humane Unit design Equity Financing General Fund Total Police Total

208

0

20,000

0

0

0

0

25,000

25,000

0

0

0

30,000

0

0

30,000

0

40,000

0

0

0

0

40,000

80,000 225,000

0

105,000

0

0

0

0

120,000

20,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

30,000

0

0

0

0

30,000

45,000

195,000

0

0

30,000

0

185,000

410,000

$6,662,044

$715,900

$513,600

$319,900

$181,000

$316,500

$8,708,944

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Public Works Mission

Core Processes and Outputs

Public Works

Public Works Administration

To support Coral Springs in becoming the premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family by providing quality facilities, infrastructure and customer-focused services to both internal and external customers.

Coordinate overall department management, administration, and budget.

Utilities

Oversee the contractual responsibilities of the solid waste franchise holder. Streets

To provide the City utilities service area with a reliable and safe water supply that is adequate for all customer needs including fire protection; and to ensure that wastewater is collected and disposed of properly in accordance with all regulations and standards as set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Broward County Health Department and the Broward County Environmental Protection Department.

Perform repair and maintenance of City-owned streets, bike paths and parking areas. • Maintain 96.5 miles of bike paths and sidewalks. • Maintain 224 center lane miles of City streets. • Inspect 8 miles of state roads and 32 miles of county roads. • Resurface 7 miles of roadway.

Equipment Services

• Clean and maintain over 6,500 drains.

To support all departments of the City by maintaining and repairing all vehicles and equipment in a timely and costeffective manner.

• Install 6,945 linear feet of new sidewalks.

Public Works Public Works

Director of Public Works* (5501)

Administrative Services (5501) / 2.5

Solid Waste Recycling (5502)

Public Works Analyst (0.5 )** Civil Engineer (0.5)* Senior Office Assistant

*Position split 50% Public Works Div. 5501; 50% Utilities Adm. Div. 6001 **Position split 50% Public Works Div. 5501; 50% Facilities Mgmt. Div. 5801

Streets (5601) / 21

Facilities Management (5801) / 4.5

Equipment Maintenance (5701) / 15

Streets Superintendent Facilities Superintendent Lead Worker (2) Electrician Senior Office Assistant Facilities Technician Equipment Operator II (3) Carpenter Streets Technician (7) Public Works Analyst (0.5) Project Technician Neighborhood Service Worker (5) Office Assistant

Fleet Superintendent Lead Mechanic Mechanic (10) Mechanic/Fire-Evt Generator Technician Senior Office Assistant

Utilities (6001-6005) / 40.25 Utilities Operation Mgr. (6001)

Administration* (6001) / 6.25 Deputy City Manager (0.5)** Civil Engineer (0.5)*** Sr. CADD /GIS Tech. (0.25)**** Apps. Analyst-Asset Mgmt. (0.5)***** Senior Office Assistant Office Assistant

Water Distribution (6002) / 10

Water Treatment (6003) / 15

Field Operations Supervisor Water Conservation Coordinator Equipment Operator II Utilities Service Technician Utilities Locator Technician Utilities Service Worker (4)

Wastewater Treatment* ( 6004 ) *No staff in this division

Chief Water Plant Operator Utilities Maintenance Supervisor Utilities Mechanic (2) Senior Water Plant Operator (6) Water Plant Operator (4) Utilities Service Technician

Wastewater Collection (6005) / 9 Utilities Coordinator Utilities Instrumentation Equipment Operator II (2) Lift Station Mechanic Video Inspection Technician Asset Management System Technician Utilities Service Technician (1)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (FullTime Equivalent) *Total FTE also includes the following position split: 50% Director of Public Works (5501), 25% Director of Financial Services (1501), 50% City Controller (1501), and 25% Assistant City Attorney (2502) **Position split 50% City Manager's Office Div. 0501; Utilities Adm. Div. 6001 ***Position split 50% Public Works Div. 5501; 50% Utilities Adm. Div. 6001 ****Position split 25% Utilities Adm. Div. 6001; 75% Information Technology Div. 2001 *****Position split 50% Utilities Adm. Div. 6001; 50% Information Technology Div. 2001

209


Public Works (continued) Facilities

New Initiatives

Perform in-house or contract for maintenance, repair, and minor construction of all City buildings.

A Family-Friendly Community

• Maintain 662,170 square feet of City facilities.

University Drive LED Street Light Pilot A Thriving Business Community

Utilities

Center for the Arts Improvements

Perform management, administration, and support for the daily operation of water treatment, water plant maintenance, water distribution, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment. • Produce an average of 6.1 million gallons per day of treated water. Equipment Services

An Active, Healthy Community 40th Street Bike Path Renovation Mullins Gym Roof Replacement An Attractive Community Re-Engage for Good (ongoing)

Repair and maintain all City vehicles including fire, police, and small engine equipment. • Maintain more than 800 vehicles/equipment and over 400 pieces of small engine equipment.

Waste Transfer Station Improvements (ongoing) An Innovative, High-Performing Organization Stormwater Utility Fee Study (ongoing)

Prepare specifications for new equipment and vehicle purchases. Provide specialized equipment installation for public safety vehicles. Repair and service motorcycles for the City of Margate.

210

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

Public Works Revenues: Administrative Services Streets Total

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$335,043 47,125 $382,168

$419,705 47,387 $467,092

$273,518 47,125 $320,643

$311,600 48,303 $359,903

$38,082 1,178 $39,260

13.92% 2.50% 12.24%

Expenditures: Program Summary Administrative Services Solid Waste Recycling Sub-Total

$269,207 19,862 $289,069

$343,909 31,630 $375,539

$376,351 128,175 $504,526

$290,557 130,088 $420,645

($85,794) 1,913 ($83,881)

-22.80% 1.49% -16.63%

Streets Facilities Management Total

$3,039,687 683,797 $4,012,553

$2,998,017 678,256 $4,051,812

$3,251,943 658,112 $4,414,581

$3,339,895 847,701 $4,608,241

$87,952 189,589 $193,660

2.70% 28.81% 4.39%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,406,476 639,824 1,966,229 24 $4,012,553

$1,372,000 554,546 2,125,266 0 $4,051,812

$1,504,504 681,729 2,228,348 0 $4,414,581

$1,516,487 678,101 2,409,603 4,050 $4,608,241

$11,983 (3,628) 181,255 4,050 $193,660

0.80% -0.53% 8.13% n/a 4.39%

27.70

27.70

28.50

28.00

(0.50)

-1.8%

FTE's

FY 2012 Equipment Services Actual Revenues: Fuel/Maint/Chargeback Transfers $5,314,668 Fleet Services to other entities: City of Parkland 84,088 City of Margate/Coconut Creek 3,495 Interest Income 109,075 Appropriated Fund Balance 5,114,438 Auction 138,054 Total $10,763,818 Expenses: Program Summary Equipment Maintenance Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Depreciation Interfund Transfers Equipment Purchases Total FTE's

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

$5,451,840

$5,724,387

$5,890,824

$166,437

2.91%

179,168 3,431 52,463 2,024,740 135,964 $7,847,606

90,000 5,000 80,000 3,447,585 103,000 $9,449,972

45,000 3,500 50,000 4,970,409 103,000 $11,062,733

(45,000) (1,500) (30,000) 1,522,824 0 $1,612,761

-50.00% -30.00% -37.50% 44.17% 0.00% 17.07%

$10,608,010 $10,608,010

$7,750,682 $7,750,682

$9,449,972 $9,449,972

$11,062,733 $11,062,733

$1,612,761 $1,612,761

17.07% 17.07%

$731,637 347,366 2,097,297 2,317,272 3,213,989 1,900,449 $10,608,010

$767,562 354,659 2,157,239 2,446,483 0 2,024,740 $7,750,683

$809,750 359,874 2,263,978 2,568,785 173,475 3,274,110 $9,449,972

$829,384 370,394 2,156,831 2,697,224 297,000 4,711,900 $11,062,733

$19,634 10,520 (107,147) 128,439 123,525 1,437,790 $1,612,761

2.42% 2.92% -4.73% 5.00% 71.21% 43.91% 17.07%

15.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

0.00

0.00%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

211


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

Water and Sewer Fund FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 Utilities Actual Actual Budget Revenues: $8,410,260 $7,896,688 Water $8,158,708 Wastewater 10,350,718 10,666,161 11,837,157 Private Fire Line Fee 20,282 20,942 23,438 Meter Sales 14,736 13,120 12,000 Backflow Recertification Adm. Fee 19,550 17,325 18,000 Misc. Income 16,389 96,459 11,000 Charges for Service 128,048 215,780 181,500 Appropriated Fund Balance 1,940,000 80,580 1,600,000 Interest Income 52,239 68,146 45,000 Total $20,700,670 $19,588,773 $21,624,783 Expenses: Program Summary Administration Water Distribution Water Treatment Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection Sub-Total Non-Departmental Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total Non-Departmental Total FTE's

Solid Waste Fund Revenues: Program Summary Solid Waste Non Franchise Total Expenditures: Summary By Category Operating Expenses Interfund Transfers Total FTE's

212

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$8,173,072 12,251,457 24,141 12,360 18,180 11,330 186,945 1,928,000 43,250 $22,648,735

$276,384 414,300 703 360 180 330 5,445 328,000 (1,750) $1,023,952

3.50% 3.50% 3.00% 3.00% 1.00% 3.00% 3.00% 20.50% -3.89% 4.74%

$680,029 1,019,999 2,813,892 6,615,366 1,235,259 $12,364,545

$881,622 1,068,823 2,917,928 5,513,827 1,231,394 $11,613,594

$201,593 48,824 104,036 (1,101,539) (3,865) ($750,951)

29.64% 4.79% 3.70% -16.65% -0.31% -6.07%

$9,096,507 $9,642,375 $9,260,238 $19,438,545 $19,588,774 $21,624,783

$11,035,141 $22,648,735

$1,774,903 $1,023,952

19.17% 4.74%

$1,995,528 925,869 9,425,185 17,963 $12,364,545

$2,144,838 994,637 8,455,708 18,411 $11,613,594

$149,310 68,768 (969,477) 448 ($750,951)

7.48% 7.43% -10.29% 2.49% -6.07%

$9,096,506 $9,642,375 $9,260,238 $19,438,547 $19,588,783 $21,624,783

$11,035,141 $22,648,735

$1,774,903 $1,023,952

19.17% 4.74%

40.25

1.50

3.87%

$537,639 870,944 2,337,571 5,492,397 1,103,487 $10,342,038

$1,783,057 828,300 7,717,409 13,275 $10,342,041

35.50

FY 2012 Actual

$529,226 810,121 2,445,239 5,128,042 1,033,771 $9,946,399

$1,767,428 835,923 7,341,899 1,158 $9,946,408

35.50

FY 2013 Actual

38.75

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$ Change from % Change from FY14 Budget FY14 Budget

$0 $0

$0 $0

$3,827,185 $3,827,185

$4,157,009 $4,157,009

$329,824 $329,824

8.62% 8.62%

$0 0 $0

$0 0 $0

$3,106,900 720,285 $3,827,185

$4,121,009 36,000 $4,157,009

$1,014,109 (684,285) $329,824

32.64% -95.00% 8.62%

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

0.00

n/a


Performance Measures Public Works Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Effectiveness Measure: 1) Department’s overall quality service rating (Resident Survey) 2) Achieve a 90% customer satisfaction rating on janitorial services (new beginning FY2014) Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Efficiency Measure: 3) Availability rate of all vehicles/equipment for all departments 4) Facilities routine work orders completed within 15 working days 5) Percent of hydrants inspected (new beginning FY2014) 6) Reduce total flow by 1,000 gallons per day in lift stations through I&I program (new beginning FY2015) 7) Service 400 valves per year (new beginning FY2014) 8) Pot hole repair response time 9) Perform 300 miles of street sweeping per year to meet NPDES standards (new beginning FY 2015) 10) Complete litter removal of 159 miles of road rights-ofway in five working days (new beginning FY2015) Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Workload Measure: 11) Inspect and clean 9,600 storm drains per year (new beginning FY2015) Strategic Priority: An Attractive Community Measurement Type: Demand Measure: 12) Number of times wastewater flow exceeds 9.79 mgd per month for three consecutive months (new beginning FY2015) 13) Water usage per capita (for Coral Springs Water District) 14) Percent of "unaccounted for" water

FY 2013 Goal Actual 93%

92%

FY 2014 Goal Actual

FY2015 Goal

92%

90%

83%

90%

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

93%

97%

94%

93%

94%

96%

93%

90% 100%

92% 100%

90% 100%

FY2015 Goal

-365,000 3 days

1 day

400 3 days

1,122 <1 day

750 3 days 300

6.6 days

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

5 days

FY2015 Goal 9,600

FY 2013 Goal Actual

FY 2014 Goal Actual

0

0

0

0

100 gal/day <10%

91.6 gal/day 4.75%

100 gal/day <10%

91.85 gal/day 5.68%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2015 Goal 0 discontinue <10%

213


Public Works CIP by funding source Funding Source

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Project Name

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

CDBG Grant Pedestrian Lighting for Forest Hills Blvd

$64,500

$430,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$494,500

64,500

430,000

0

0

0

0

494,500

CDBG Grant Total Facilities Reserves Air Conditioning Maint/Replacement

300,000

75,000

167,400

108,378

229,860

338,480

250,000

1,169,118

0

425,000

300,000

300,000

300,000

300,000

300,000

1,925,000

Roof Replacement and Repair Miscellaneous Office Renovations

15,000

15,000

15,000

0

0

0

0

30,000

Pressure Cleaning—CH North

10,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

0

0

0

15,000

Repairs and Upgrades—EDF

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

72,000

0

75,000

0

0

0

0

0

75,000

Air Conditioning Contingency Interior Painting CH North Facilities Reserves Total Loan

9,000

4,500

4,500

4,500

0

0

0

13,500

346,000

611,500

503,900

429,878

541,860

650,480

562,000

3,299,618 125,000

Parks Sign Replacement

0

0

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

Speed Hump Repair and Restripe

0

0

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

60,000

38,000

0

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

150,000

Street Light Upgrades Car Charging Station—NW Regional Library

0

0

15,000

0

0

0

0

15,000

Drainage and Swale Improvements

0

0

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

125,000

Replace Security Gate at Westside

25,000

0

25,000

0

0

0

0

25,000

Wiles Rd. West End Beautification

0

0

100,000

0

0

0

0

100,000

0

0

5,000

5,000

0

0

0

10,000

35,000

0

58,000

125,000

0

0

0

183,000

Exterior Painting -CH North Corporate Park Drainage Improvements

0

0

29,250

195,000

0

0

0

224,250

98,000

0

324,250

417,000

92,000

92,000

92,000

1,017,250

Pedestrian Lighting 38th Drive Loan Total Equity Financing General Fund

0

8,500

9,000

9,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

57,000

190,800

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

57,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

70,000

0

0

0

0

0

70,000 175,900

Drainage System Permit Renewal Equipment for Litter Removal Crew Commercial Recycling Feasibility Study Storm Water Assessment Study

0

20,000

28,900

247,800

98,500

37,900

9,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

0

36,000

330,000

0

0

0

0

366,000

0

36,000

330,000

0

0

0

0

366,000

$810,500

$1,626,050

$856,378

$643,860

$752,480

$664,000

$5,353,268

University Dr. LED Street Light Pilot Program Equity Financing General Fund Total

48,900

Equity Solid Waste Fund Waste Transfer Station Improvements Equity Solid Waste Fund Total Public Works Total

Equipment Services CIP by funding source Funding Source Project Name Operating-Equipment Services Fund Contingency for Equip Purchases Vehicles and Equipment Replacement Cab & Chassis Truck- transportation Operating-Equipment Services Fund Total Equity Financing Equipment Fund Emergency Power and Fueling System Westside Guard Dwelling Replacement of Inground Vehicle Lifts West Side Complex Master Plan West Side Complex Construction Generator Retrofits Equity Financing Equipment Fund Total Total

214

FY 2015 Budget

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2016 Plan

FY 2017 Plan

FY 2018 Plan

FY 2019 Plan

FY 2020 Plan

Total Cost FY 2015-2020

$30,000 3,244,110 0 3,274,110

$32,000 4,630,400 49,500 4,711,900

$35,000 6,181,468 0 6,216,468

$39,000 4,093,838 0 4,132,838

$44,000 3,665,227 0 3,709,227

$50,000 4,179,329 0 4,229,329

$53,000 3,730,134 0 3,783,134

$253,000 26,480,396 49,500 26,782,896

0 85,000 11,475 32,000 45,000 0 0 173,475

0 0 15,000 32,000 0 200,000 50,000 297,000

0 0 0 32,000 0 200,000 0 232,000

0 0 0 0 0 4,000,000 0 4,000,000

0 0 0 0 0 250,000 0 250,000

0 0 0 0 0 250,000 0 250,000

0 0 0 0 0 4,600,000 0 4,600,000

0 0 15,000 64,000 0 9,500,000 50,000 9,629,000

$5,008,900

$6,448,468

$8,132,838

$3,959,227

$4,479,329

$8,383,134

$36,411,896

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Transportation CIP by funding source Funding Source

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Project Name

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

CDBG Grant $0

$126,000

$481,500

$349,200

$123,750

$252,900

$1,333,350

116,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

29,250

0

0

0

0

0

29,250

141,000

155,250

481,500

349,200

0

123,750

252,900

1,362,600

110th Ave. Sidewalk & Drainage

0

0

0

1,385,623

0

0

0

1,385,623

Alley Refurbishment Program

0

0

209,300

166,031

300,000

316,968

103,891

1,096,190

Existing Walkways Renovation 85th Ave. South of Sample Improvement New Sidewalk Evaluation, Report, and Study NW 39th Street- Design CDBG Grant Total Loan

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

50,000

0

65,000

65,000

65,000

65,000

65,000

325,000

Master Parking Lot Refurbishing

0

0

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

250,000

New Pedestrian & Bike Path Construction

0

0

105,750

472,500

68,850

95,400

300,000

1,042,500

Resurface & Restripe Parking Lots

0

0

200,000

115,000

120,000

125,000

200,000

760,000

Road Resurfacing Program

0

0

900,000

800,000

800,000

800,000

800,000

4,100,000

University Drive North Resurfacing

0

0

250,000

350,000

0

0

0

600,000

Bus Shelters Repairs & Replacement

0

0

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

125,000

Roadway Evaluation and Management software

0

0

125,000

0

0

0

140,000

265,000

Westchester Elem & Royal Palm Blvd crosswalk

0

0

20,000

100,000

0

0

0

120,000

Wiles Road and 441 Entry Improvements

0

0

200,000

0

0

0

0

200,000

Computerized Survey of Roadway Conditions Guardrail Maintenance and Repair

Coral Hills Drive Sidewalk and Drainage Loan Total

0

0

800,000

0

0

0

0

800,000

50,000

0

2,950,050

3,529,154

1,428,850

1,477,368

1,683,891

11,069,313

0

0

115,000

450,000

450,000

250,000

250,000

1,515,000

0

0

115,000

450,000

450,000

250,000

250,000

1,515,000

Operating General Fund Meadows and Dells Drainage Improvement Operating General Fund Total Equity Financing General Fund Bridge Repairs

0

10,000

0

10,000

0

10,000

0

30,000

Keep Coral Springs Beautiful- Re-engage for good

0

11,827

0

0

0

0

0

11,827

30,000

0

0

0

0

0

30,000

0

51,827

0

10,000

0

10,000

0

71,827

0

22,077

0

0

0

0

0

22,077

0

22,077

0

0

0

0

0

22,077

0

115,000

0

0

0

0

115,000

0

115,000

0

0

0

0

115,000

Meadows and Dells Drainage Improvement- Desgin Equity Financing General Fund Total CFB Grant Keep Coral Springs Beautiful- Re-engage for good CFB Grant Total Dept of Environ Protection Grant Meadows and Dells Drainage Improvement Dept of Environ Protection Grant Total TAP Grant Existing Walkways Renovation TAP Grant Total Transportation Total

0

0

0

0

270,000

0

0

270,000

0

0

0

0

270,000

0

0

270,000

$229,154

$3,661,550

$4,338,354

$2,148,850

$1,861,118

$2,186,791

$14,425,817

City of Coral Springs, Florida

215


Water and Sewer CIP by funding source

Funding Source Project Name

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Total Cost

Budget

Budget

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

Plan

FY 2015-2020

Renewal and Replacement $1,300,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$6,000,000

Spare Pumps and Replacement Pumps

85,000

90,000

94,000

99,000

104,000

109,000

100,000

596,000

Water Meter Replacement Program

53,000

56,000

58,000

61,000

65,000

68,000

65,000

373,000

Lift Station Rehab Program

126,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

8,400,000

Security Improvements

300,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

160,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

1,660,000

Emerg. Generator Storage & Maintenance Bldg.

75,000

0

300,000

0

0

0

0

300,000

Emerg. Water Service Interconnect with C. Creek

50,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

261,000

0

261,000

Infiltration/Inflow Correction Program

Rehab of Well 11R and Replacement of 18,19 & 20

New Transfer Pump Station at WTP

69,000

0

600,000

630,000

660,000

694,000

0

2,584,000

Rehabilitation of East Water Booster Station

289,000

1,928,000

0

0

0

0

0

1,928,000

Water Storage Tanks and Clearwell Cleaning

100,000

0

0

0

0

292,000

0

292,000

0

0

350,000

0

0

0

0

350,000

Force Main Integrity Evaluation

104,000

109,000

115,000

120,000

126,000

133,000

100,000

703,000

Cast Iron Water System Model

100,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,500,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4,151,000

4,583,000

3,917,000

3,470,000

3,855,000

4,457,000

3,165,000

23,447,000

Galvanized Water Service Replacement Program

0

850,000

0

850,000

0

402,000

450,000

2,552,000

Force Main System Improvements

0

0

670,000

704,000

739,000

776,000

750,000

3,639,000

New Lift Station Near Coral Springs Hospital

0

400,000

0

0

0

0

0

400,000

Cast Iron Water Main Replacement

0

500,000

420,000

966,000

1,014,000

1,065,000

1,000,000

4,965,000

Lift Station Scada Installation

0

585,000

0

0

0

0

0

585,000

West Booster Station

0

1,300,000

0

0

0

0

0

1,300,000

0

3,635,000

1,090,000

2,520,000

1,753,000

2,243,000

2,200,000

13,441,000

100,000

104,000

110,000

115,000

121,000

127,000

100,000

677,000

27,000

29,000

29,000

29,000

29,000

29,000

29,000

174,000 75,000

Wireless Metering Reading System

Upgrade Force Main for Lift Station 21-C

Rehabilitation of Mullins Booster Station Renewal and Replacement Total Revenue Bond

Revenue Bond Total Operating-W&S Fund Fire Hydrant Replacement Program Broward County Water Conservation Prog

0

75,000

0

0

0

0

0

340,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Force Main Valve Repair/Repl. Program

79,000

83,000

87,000

91,000

96,000

101,000

100,000

558,000

Water Main Valve Repair/Repl. Program

79,000

83,000

87,000

91,000

96,000

101,000

100,000

558,000

0

118,000

0

0

0

0

0

118,000

100,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

100,000

0

0

100,000

FF&E for WTP GIS/Asset Management Tool

Site Select./eval.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;3 new Raw Water Supply Wells Isolation Valves in Raw Water Mains Overall WTP Site Master Plan & Stormwater Mgmt Plan

0

0

0

0

586,500

0

0

586,500

Replace Filter Beds

75,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Generator Fuel Transfer Piping

69,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dead End Water Main Automatic Flushers

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

450,000 100,000

Painting WTP

0

100,000

0

0

0

0

0

CMMS

50,000

53,000

0

0

0

0

0

53,000

Portable Emergency Generators for Lift Stations

80,000

80,000

80,000

80,000

80,000

80,000

80,000

480,000

Triennial Eng Report Water & Wastewater Systems

40,000

0

0

46,000

0

0

50,000

96,000

CRA Storm Water Study

40,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cab & Chassis, 3/4 Ton with Utility Body

46,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

312,000

0

0

0

0

0

312,000

Water Distribution System Model

Wiles Road Utilities Relocation Dump Truck WTP Operating-W&S Fund Total Total

216

0

127,000

0

0

0

0

0

127,000

1,200,000

1,239,000

468,000

527,000

1,183,500

513,000

534,000

4,464,500

$5,351,000

$9,457,000

$5,475,000

$6,517,000

$6,791,500

$7,213,000

$5,899,000

$41,352,500

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Summary of Fleet Purchases 2015 Department/Fund Financial Services

Div #

Vehicle/Equipment Type

Year

Item ID

Central Stores

1702

Van, Cargo

2000

5510

32,000

155001

Youth Liason

4303

Patrol Vehicle, Explorer PPV

2008

8312

33,000

155004

4201

Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Patrol Vehicle, Full Size Truck, Pickup, 3/4 Ton Admin Vehicle—Hybrid Admin Vehicle—full size Admin Vehicle—full size Admin Vehicle—full size Admin Vehicle—full size Admin Vehicle—full size Admin Vehicle—full size SUV, Expedition, 4 door Motorcycle Motorcycle Motorcycle Motorcycle Motorcycle Rescue Transport Vehicle Rescue Transport Vehicle Aerial Ladder Fire Truck- 75 ft Extrication Tool Generator, 45 kw (Station 95) SUV-Tahoe * Generator, 600 Kw (Academy) SUV-Tahoe EMS cart Ford Escape

2004 2007 2005 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2005 2004 2004 2005 2005 2005 2008 2008 2005 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2008 2008 2005 2010 1994 2008 2009 2008 2008 2008

8309 9131 9197 9200 9203 9205 9214 9217 9218 9225 9226 9227 9231 9232 9233 9234 9235 9236 9239 9240 9241 9242 9243 9244 9245 9246 9247 9248 9249 9250 9251 9252 9253 9254 9255 9256 9257 9258 9259 9909 8040 8038 8048 8050 8054 8064 8066 9978 8437 8439 8440 8441 8434 7750 7751 7730 1592 Gen-01 7715 Gen-74 7703 7747 7718

35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 35,500 38,000 30,000 29,500 29,500 29,500 29,500 29,500 29,500 36,500 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 210,000 210,000 950,000 21,700 20,000 44,500 2,500 44,500 46,000 26,000

Truck, Pickup 1/2 Ton EC * Admin Vehicle, Hybrid * Truck, Pickup (Prop) 1/2 Ton Truck, Pickup 1/2 Ton EC Mini

2005 2007 2008 2001

6620 6103 6646 6019

24,000 3,500 2,000 24,000

Patrol

Police

Humane Unit

4205

General Investigations

4301

Crime Scene Investigations

4305

Traffic Unit

4202

Emergency Medical Service

4702

Suppression

4801

Fire/EMS

Development Services

Budget FY 2015

Division/Program Name

Training

4805

Administration

4601

Inspection

4901

Planning and Zoning

3001

Code Compliance Building

5403 5302

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Project #

155003

155006

155005

155002

155007

155008

155009 155010 155017 155013 155011 155014 155012 155016

155015 155019 155018 155020 155021

217


Department/Fund

Division/Program Name

Cypress Park

Mullins Park

Div #

8101

8102

North Community Park

8103

Neighborhood Parks

8116

Parks & Recreation

Sportsplex

Beautification/Landscape

Irrigation

Public Works

Equipment Services

8409

8118

8119

Streets

5601

Facilities

5801

Equipment Maintenance

5701

Year

Item ID

Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton-EC * Skid Loader 5 Gang Rotary Mower * Mower, Zero Turn * Toyota Prius, Hybrid Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton Workman W/Sprayer Spreader Lely Truck Pickup, F150 Crew Cab * Mower, Zero Turn Truck, Pickup, 3/4 Ton EC LELY Spreader * Truck, Pickup 3/4 Ton Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton EC * Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton Pickup Truck, 1/2 Ton EC * Pickup Truck, 1/2 Ton Paint Machine Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton-EC Pickup Truck, 1/2 Ton Pickup Truck, 1/2 Ton Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton-EC Workman w/ Sprayer Attachment Truck, 1/2 Ton mini Workman W/Dump Bed

2005 2008 2008 2009 2007 2004 2006 2007 2005 2009 2005 2008 2008 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2007 2004 2004 2004 2007 2006 2008

2239 2198 1349 1351 2200 2005 1284 1292 2203 1952 2010 1960 2012 2013 2202 2208 2273 1989 2258 2003 2009 2007 1793 2011 1165

35,000 2,500 55,000 500 3,500 27,000 20,000 5,700 23,000 500 31,000 5,700 1,000 35,000 1,000 23,000 3,000 4,500 31,000 23,000 23,000 31,000 41,000 24,000 25,300

Pickup Truck, 1/2 Ton *Truck with Water Tank and Pump Truck, Izuzu NPR HD Directional Arrows * Pressure Clearner & Trailer * Pressure Clearner & Trailer Truck, Chipper Truck, Cab-Chassis 1 Ton Truck, Cab-Chassis, 1 Ton

2007 2004 2008 2001 2005 2005 2002 2006 2005

2241 2270 2206 1186 1810 1809 5717 2211 2002

23,000 15,000 59,000 6,600 2,000 2,000 65,000 45,500 45,500

155045 155046 155047 155050

* Truck, Pickup 3/4 Ton Directional Arrow Board Cab-Chassis w/Dump body-Diesel Cab-Chassis 1 Ton * Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton Truck, 1/2 Ton Crew Cab Chassis International 4300 Dura Star Cab & Chassis, 1 Ton Dump body** Gator w Trailer Truck /Pickup 1/2 Ton EC

2008 2008 2005 2003 2008 2003 2005

4419 4471 4439 4406 4427 4437 4431

2008 2005

1494 4411

2,000 6,000 49,500 46,000 2,000 30,000 110,000 49,500 11,000 23,500

155058 155055 155054 155061 155057 155062 155059 155056 155060 155063

* 'Truck, Pickup Truck, Pickup, 1/2 Ton * 'Van, Freestar, 7 Passenger * Van, Mini Passenger * Van, Mini Passenger * Light Tower * Light Tower * Light Tower * Light Tower * Generator, Fleet, 150 KW * Generator, Fleet Pool, 150 KW Contingency

2006 2004 2006 2008 2008 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 n/a

SPW9 5701 5706 5707 5708 5726 5727 5728 5729 Gen-07 Gen-08 n/a

3,800 23,000 1,200 1,200 1,200 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 4,000 4,000 32,000

155064 155065 155066

2003 2004 2006

3333 3309 3310

$65,500 $31,000 $2,000

155072 155073 155075

2008 2006

3329 3331

$1,000 $2,000 $4,711,900

155071 155074

Wastewater Collection

6005

Truck w/utility body & crane-diesel Pickup Truck, 3/4 Ton-lift gate * Truck, Pickup, 3500

Water Distribution

6002

* Directional Arrows, DOT * Truck, Silverado/2500 EC

Utilities

Total Fleet Budget窶認Y 2015 *Equipment to be refurbished in FY 2015 ** Vehicle not part of replacement plan-funded with repurposed funds.

218

Budget FY 2015

Vehicle/Equipment Type

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

Project # 155023

155022 155027

155024 155025 155026

155028 155029 155030

155031 155036 155035 155032 155033 155034 155037 155038 155039 155043 155040 155041 155042 155044 155053

155048 155049 155051 155052

155067

155068

155069 155070


Appendix Contents Millage Rate Resolution........................................................................................................................................................220 Budget Ordinance...................................................................................................................................................................222 Financial Policies......................................................................................................................................................................227 Fund Balance Overview........................................................................................................................................................235 Fund Balance Summaries............................................................................................................................................236 General Fund Balance...................................................................................................................................................236 Fire Fund Balance...........................................................................................................................................................238 Water and Sewer Fund Balance................................................................................................................................239 Health Fund Balance.....................................................................................................................................................240 General Insurance Fund Balance..............................................................................................................................241 Equipment Services Fund Balance...........................................................................................................................242 Debt Service Fund Balance.........................................................................................................................................243 Debt Service Schedules...............................................................................................................................................244 Staffing........................................................................................................................................................................................245 Summary table of Position Counts..........................................................................................................................245 Number of budgeted positions By Department—Fiscal Year 2015............................................................245 Position Counts for all Departments and Divisions...........................................................................................246 City Commission...................................................................................................................................................248 City Manager’s Office...........................................................................................................................................248 Human Resources.................................................................................................................................................249 City Attorney...........................................................................................................................................................249 Financial Services..................................................................................................................................................250 Information Technology.....................................................................................................................................251 Development Services—Administration.....................................................................................................251 Development Services—Code Compliance................................................................................................251 Development Services—Community Development...............................................................................252 Development Services—Building..................................................................................................................252 Police.........................................................................................................................................................................253 Fire/EMS....................................................................................................................................................................256 Public Works............................................................................................................................................................258 Equipment Services.............................................................................................................................................258 Utilities......................................................................................................................................................................259 Parks and Recreation...........................................................................................................................................260 Abbreviations and Acronyms..............................................................................................................................................262 Glossary of Terms.....................................................................................................................................................................263 Index............................................................................................................................................................................................269

City of Coral Springs, Florida

219


Millage Rate Resolution

220

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Millage Rate Resolution (continued)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

221


Budget Ordinance

222

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Budget Ordinance (continued)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

223


Budget Ordinance (continued)

224

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Budget Ordinance (continued)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

225


Budget Ordinance (continued) EXHIBIT “A” Annual Operating Budget

EXHIBIT “B” Capital Improvement Program

226

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Policies Operating Budget Policies

• The City Commission will be provided with interim budget reports comparing actual versus budgeted revenue and expense activity.

Accounting Basis The General, Fire, Coral Springs Charter School, and Debt Service fund budgets are prepared on a modified accrual basis of accounting except that encumbrances are treated as the equivalent of expenditures, as opposed to a reservation of fund balance. Under the modified accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recognized in the accounting period in which they become both measurable and available to finance expenditures of the fiscal period. Expenditures are recorded when a liability is incurred, as under accrual accounting. Debt service expenditures, as well as expenditures related to compensated absences and claims and judgments, are recorded only when payment is due, using the current financial resources measurement focus of accounting. At year-end, open encumbrance balances lapse. The budgets for the proprietary funds and internal service funds are prepared on the full accrual basis of accounting. These funds include Water and Sewer, Health and General Insurance, and Equipment Services. Under the full accrual basis, revenues are recorded when earned (for example, water user fees are recognized as revenue when the bills are prepared) and expenses are reported when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows, using the economic resources measurement focus of accounting. The differences between the budget basis and the full accrual basis of accounting include: (1) budgeting the full amount of capital expenditures as expense rather than depreciating them, (2) not budgeting interest earnings on restricted funds and impact fees, and (3) presenting debt service expense net of restricted investment proceeds. Guidelines The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) presents the status of the City’s finances on a basis consistent with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) (that is, the governmental funds use the modified accrual basis of accounting while the proprietary funds use the full accrual basis). In order to provide a meaningful comparison of actual results with the budget, the CAFR presents the City’s operations on a GAAP basis and also shows fund expenditures and revenues on a budget basis for the General, Debt Service and proprietary funds. • The City is required to prepare a balanced budget in which current revenues will be sufficient to support current expenditures. • The budget process and format shall be performance-based and focused on goals, objectives, and performance indicators. • The budget will provide adequate funding for maintenance and replacement of capital plant and equipment.

• The City shall establish and maintain a standard of accounting practices. Planning The City will annually prepare a Five-Year Forecast. The forecast will include estimated operating costs and revenues of future capital improvements, such as new parks and public works facilities, included in the capital budget.

Reserve Policies On an annual basis, after the year-end audit has been completed, staff shall produce a schedule of all fund surpluses and deficits, with projections of reserve requirements and a plan for the use of an excess surplus for the current year in accordance with “Use of Stabilization Reserve Policy” and “Use of Surplus Policy.” This document will be used not only to ensure compliance with stated policies, but also to analyze the total reserve and surplus picture to ensure that the policies as provided do not inadvertently create adverse effects. The Director of Financial Services may make changes to any policies in “Use of Stabilization Reserve Policy” and “Use of Surplus Policy” based on needs identified in the analysis. Stabilization Funds Maintaining a Financial Stabilization Account is a necessity for sound financial management and fiscal accountability. In accordance with the Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement 54, the City Commission has the authority to establish a Financial Stabilization Account that will be designated as Committed Fund Balance. The stabilization account provides the City with a “rainy day” fund for use in unforeseen, unbudgeted emergency situations, such as sustained declines in real estate values of more than 10% and/or property tax collections that decline by more than 5%; 1.5% decline in revenues or 1.5% increase in spending requirements imposed by the state or federal government or vital to maintaining day to day operations of the City (e.g. gas, electricity); unreimbursable natural disaster expenditures or emergency infrastructure failures costing greater than $1,500,000; or unforeseen litigation in excess of $1,000,000. The target level for the Financial Stabilization Account is 17% of General Fund budgeted expenditures. The recognition of the need to utilize the stabilization account must be established by the City Commission or the City Manager. If established by the City Manager, the specific need must be reported to the City Commission at its next meeting. A budget amendment must be approved by the City Commission. When such a need is recognized as part of the budget process, the need and amount

City of Coral Springs, Florida

227


Financial Policies (continued) will be documented as part of that process and adopted as part of the budget. When it becomes necessary for the City to draw funds from the stabilization account, wherein the balance drops below the target level of 17% of General Fund budgeted expenditures, the City will develop a plan to replenish the account to the minimum level from net revenue surpluses in subsequent fiscal year(s) until the balance is restored to the minimum level. Working Capital The City shall include in the General Fund operating budget annually, a contingency account equal to 0.5% of the General Fund budgeted expenditures, less chargebacks, debt service, interfund transfers and capital expenditures. This contingency will expire at the end of each fiscal year and balances will not be brought forward. The City shall maintain a working capital reserve in the Fire Fund to ensure the continued operations in the event of a natural disaster or other emergency. The reserve will be greater than or equal to 17% of the Fire Fund operating budgeted expenditures less Training Division, non-departmental, chargebacks, debt service, interfund transfers, and capital. In addition, a contingency of at least $25,000 in the nondepartmental operating budget will be budgeted annually and will expire at the end of each fiscal year. In order to provide the resources necessary to ensure continued operations of the City’s water and sewer programs should a natural disaster or other emergency occur, the City shall maintain a working capital reserve. The reserve will be equal to a minimum of two months of the Water and Sewer operating budgeted expenditures less chargebacks, debt service, interfund transfers, and capital costs. The City shall maintain a reserve for the Property, Casualty, and Workers’ Compensation Insurance Fund of a minimum of 125% of the current year’s projected claims or the amount as determined by the biannual actuarial report. Risk Management and the City Attorney’s Office shall review and adjust on a quarterly basis the funding of the reserve. Adjustments to the reserves shall be reflected in the budget as current expense with an offsetting liability account. An independent actuarial report will be performed biennially on reserves to verify their adequacy. In addition, up to 20% of General Fund revenue in excess of expenditures, calculated annually, may be dedicated to support the insurance reserves as needed. The City shall maintain an unreserved retained earnings balance in the Health Fund of an amount equal to or greater than 25% of total budgeted health claims. The City shall designate an amount equal to two pay periods of salaries and benefits for Charter School employees as a reserve in the Charter School Fund.

228

All defined-benefit retirement plans (General, Police, and Firefighters) will be financed in a manner that systematically funds liabilities at a minimum of 85% of the pension obligation per fund as determined by an annual independent actuarial report. Capital Reserves The City shall maintain a capital reserve balance in the Water and Sewer Fund of the lesser of 15% of the budgeted annual operation and maintenance expense or the prior year’s depreciation expense. The City shall establish a capital reserve balance in the Capital Projects Fund for unanticipated expenses for the maintenance of buildings and replacement of related equipment of 0.5% of the total annual General Fund expenditures, less debt service, interfund transfers, chargebacks, non-departmental expenditures, and capital expenditures. The purpose of this fund is to pay for new Business Plan initiatives of a capital nature that are adopted midterm, high-profile projects that go over budget, or emergency repairs not included in the annual operating budget or Capital Improvement Program. This fund is maintained at this level from year to year for this purpose. The City may transfer up to 20% of the General Fund revenue in excess of expenditures, determined annually, into the Computer Replacement Program or any other program for the purpose of creating a perpetual funding method for replacing the City’s equipment. Prior to any funds being transferred, a ten-year funding projection shall be made to determine appropriate balance requirements. The City shall designate 50% of the Charter School’s operating surplus to fund major facilities repair and maintenance in the Charter School Fund. An additional 10% of Charter School Fund operating surplus shall be designated for technology replacement. The City shall maintain a Library Reserve for the maintenance and improvement of the Northwest Regional Library grounds and other library-related projects. The City shall maintain a Tree Trust Fund for the purpose of replacing or maintaining the City’s tree canopy.

Use of Surplus Policies Use of Surpluses It is the intent of the City to use all surpluses generated to accomplish three goals: meeting reserve policies, avoidance of future debt, and reduction of outstanding debt. Any surpluses realized in the General Fund at year-end may be used first to meet reserve policies as set forth in the

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Policies (continued) Stabilization Reserve Policies. Excess surplus will then be used for the following purposes: • Gainsharing. This program provides for two uses of “yearend net favorable variances” (i.e., surplus) as a reward to employees. The first portion is a pro-rata distribution of 10% of the surplus as calculated by policy. This distribution is dependent on economic conditions and is at the discretion of the City Manager. The City may set aside an additional 10% of the surplus to be used for capital purchases or new programs. • Capital Replacement Programs. After General Fund and Insurance Fund reserves have been met, excess reserves may be set aside to provide the cash necessary to implement capital replacement programs (the vehicle replacement, computer replacement, and facility maintenance programs). Prior to any funds being transferred, a ten-year funding projection shall be made to determine appropriate balance requirements. • Retirement or Refinancing of Existing Debt. Any excess surplus remaining after reserve policies have been met and replacement programs are fully funded over a ten-year period may be used to pay principal on existing revenue bonds or any other existing debt. • Cash Payments for Capital Improvement Program Projects. Using cash to purchase capital items will reduce the future debt burden of the City. This strategy may be combined with debt retirement to reduce future debt service. • Pension Funds. From time to time the City may use excess surplus funds to contribute to any of its pension funds to increase its funding level to policy standards. • OPEB Trust. The City may transfer up to 20% of excess surplus funds to its Other Post-Employment Benefit Trust to bring that trust to the level determined by the actuary. • Trust Funds. After all other needs have been satisfied, excess surpluses may be transferred to trust funds that have been established to care for the environment or City facilities, such as the Environmentally Sensitive Land and Tree Trust funds. • Community Redevelopment Agency. After all other needs have been satisfied, excess surpluses may be transferred to the Community Redevelopment Agency that has been established to provide for infrastructure and public facility needs. Water and Sewer Fund surpluses shall be first used to fund minimum reserve requirements as identified in “Financial Reserve Policies,” with excess surpluses used to fund capital projects and economic development projects as follows: • Renewal and Replacement Fund Projects. Funds may be used to contribute to the Renewal and Replacement Fund balance for future capital expenditures.

• Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Projects. Excess surpluses may be used to pay cash for CIP items to avoid future debt service, or may be used to pay down existing debt. • Business Development Reserve. A reserve for economic development incentives, projects, and programs may be established to provide funding for future community redevelopment and business development. Equipment Services, Debt Service, and Insurance fund surpluses will be held in the fund generating the surplus to first contribute to meeting the reserve policies in “Financial Reserve Policies.” Excess surpluses may be used to pay down debt, pay cash for CIP items, provide General Fund operating support, or to reduce interfund transfers from the General Fund.

Performance Measurement Policies Establishing Performance Requirements Every two years, the City shall create a Strategic Plan that identifies the strategic priorities for the following two years, with three to five corresponding Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) that measure appropriate results for each priority. Annually, each department, in concert with the City Manager’s Office, shall develop departmental performance measures that directly support the successful achievement of KIOs. Goals should be related to core processes of the department and should reflect customer needs. The measures should be a mix of different types, including effectiveness, efficiency, demand and workload. Measures should have sufficiently aggressive “stretch” goals to ensure continuous improvement. Workload—Measures the quantity of activity for a department (such as number of calls responded to). Demand—Measures the amount of service opportunities (such as total number of calls). Efficiency—Measures the relationship between output and service cost (such as average cost of response to service call). Effectiveness—Measures the impact of an activity (such as percent of people who feel safe). Department directors shall establish performance measures for each division or program within their department to monitor and project program performance. These measures must be linked to the objectives they support. Supervisors shall negotiate fair and aggressive performance measures for each employee that directly support program objectives, departmental measures, and KIOs as part of the Incentive Pay System annual review.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

229


Financial Policies (continued) Reporting Performance Quarterly summaries of progress on KIOs and departmental performance measures will be published and distributed. A “State of the City” report shall be promulgated that summarizes the operational and financial performance of the City each fiscal year. Decision Making and Analysis The City’s strategic/business planning and budgeting decisions are based on a number of advanced statistical, economic, and financial models. The specific tools used include: • Citizen Surveys—Based on sound statistical sampling methods, a survey of residents and business owners will be conducted to gather widespread customer satisfaction, quality perceptions, and other attitudinal information. • Citizen Focus Groups and Advisory Boards—Focus groups (such as Vision 20/20) and advisory boards (such as Financial Advisory Committee) are teams made up of citizens and City staff to address specific concerns and strategic priorities. More than two dozen such committees currently exist. • Master Planning—Specific functions and processes are included in written plans, such as the Utilities Master Plan or the Comprehensive Land Use Plan. • Ad Valorem Impact Model—This econometric model quantifies the impact of tax relief legislation and changes in the economy on ad valorem revenue. • SWOT Analysis - Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats are gathered from staff, Advisory Committee members, and other members of the community. • Process Improvements—The Service Improvement Process, a ten-step model established by the City to guide crossfunctional teams through improvement cycles. Other tools include Pareto charts, “fishbone” diagrams, and statistical analysis. • Fiscal Impact Model—Allocation methodology which quantifies average and marginal revenues and the costs of new development by land use type. • Revenue Forecasting Model—Statistical time series analysis and tracking model of major revenue sources. • Performance Measurement System—Quarterly performance evaluations. • Capital Budgeting Tools—Present value payback, net present value analysis, and own/lease analysis. • Five-Year Financial Plan—Multiyear forecasting of revenues and expenditures.

230

• Ten-Year Fleet Replacement Plan—Equipment replacement model covering useful life of all vehicle classes. • Sustainability Index - Sets targets and measurable goals for a broad spectrum of green and environmental benchmarks. • Project Management—Several techniques are employed to manage processes citywide. For example, critical path methods and program evaluation review techniques are used in the budgeting process.

Capital Improvement Program Policies Alignment The City shall coordinate the development of the Capital Improvement Program with the development of the Strategic Plan, Business Plan, and Operating Budget, as well as ensuring compliance with the Comprehensive Plan’s Capital Improvement element. Future operating expenditures and revenues associated with new capital improvement will be projected and included in operating budget Five-Year Forecasts. Project Selection All capital projects submitted for approval must be justified in terms of how the project supports the achievement of the City’s strategic priorities and Key Intended Outcomes. Projects are prioritized and approved based on the relevance of the project to the City’s Strategic Plan and the impact on the end customer. Approval for inclusion in the adopted budget is granted through two separate mechanisms. For items under $100,000, approval will be granted or withheld at the departmental budget meeting with the City Manager’s Office. Items in excess of $100,000 will be discussed in a budget workshop held annually for the senior management team. Capital Budget The City shall adopt an annual capital budget based on the Capital Improvement Program. Future capital expenditures necessitated by changes in population, real estate development, or economic base will be calculated and included in capital budget projections. Staff will identify the estimated costs and funding sources for each capital project proposal before it is submitted to the City Commission for approval. The City shall make all capital improvements in accordance with an adopted Capital Improvement Program and capital budget. The City will determine and use the most prudent financial methods for acquisitions of new capital equipment and projects, based on its financial resources and market conditions at the time of acquisition.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Policies (continued) Capital Replacement Programs—The City shall establish equipment replacement and maintenance needs for at least a ten-year period and will update this projection each year. From this projection a maintenance and replacement schedule shall be developed and implemented. Funding for these programs will be made through funded chargebacks to user departments and held in sinking funds created for the purpose of paying for future replacements. Additional funding may be obtained through year-end surpluses as identified in “Use of Surplus Policies.”

Physical Inventory

The following replacement programs have been established:

Debt Management Policies

• Ten-Year Fleet Replacement Program

An annual inventory (see “Fixed-Asset Accounting Policies”) will be conducted to ensure that the replacement, maintenance, and Capital Improvement Program projections are accurate, and that sufficient internal control over capital items is exercised. See “Fixed-Assets Accounting Policies” in this section for further information on capital purchases.

• Ten-Year Computer Replacement Program

Market Review

• Twenty-Year Facilities Maintenance Program

The City shall review its outstanding debt annually for the purpose of determining if the financial marketplace will afford the City the opportunity to refund an issue and lessen its debt service costs. To consider the possibility of refunding of an issue, a present value savings of three percent over the life of the respective issue, at a minimum, must be attainable.

Project Management All projects will be considered active once the fiscal year has begun with an appropriately adopted Capital Improvement Program budget in place. Projects will be initiated by the responsible department, which shall follow appropriate procurement policies and procedures. Projects funded with bonds, loans, or short-term notes will continue until the project is finished and closed on the general ledger. Projects funded by cash will expire at year-end, with no funding rolled forward unless approved by the Director of Financial Services. Projects finished under budget will be closed and excess funds will be placed in fund balance for unrestricted use. Unrestricted, excess funds shall be used to fund future capital projects, new Business Plan initiatives adopted midterm, overbudget projects, or to refund financial instruments. Projects that will exceed budget must have a revised budget and request for additional funding submitted to the Budget Office at the earliest possible time. Additional funding may be identified through savings in other capital projects at the discretion of the Budget Director, or through Commission action, as appropriate to the procurement code. Maintenance The City shall maintain all capital assets at a level adequate to protect the City’s investment and to minimize future maintenance and replacement costs.

Debt Issuance When the City finances capital projects by issuing bonds, it shall amortize the debt over a term not to exceed the average useful life of the project(s) financed. The City’s goal is to keep the average maturity of general obligation bonds at or below 12 years. Capital improvements, equipment, and facility projects shall be classified into “pay-as-you-go” and “debt financing” classifications. Pay-as-you-go capital items will be $5,000 or less with short lives (less than four years) or replacement of existing equipment where depreciation has been paid to a sinking fund. Debt financing will be used for major, non-recurring items with a minimum of four years of useful life. The City may confine long-term borrowing to capital improvements and projects that have useful lives of four to 50 years. When appropriate, the City may use special assessment or selfsupporting bonds instead of general obligation bonds, so those benefiting from the improvements will bear all or part of the cost of the project financed. Debt Service Levels Annual General Fund debt service expense will be limited to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget. The City will limit its total outstanding General Obligation (GO) debt to 5% of the total assessed valuation of taxable property.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

231


Financial Policies (continued) Bond Ratings The City shall periodically review possible actions to maintain or improve its bond ratings by various rating agencies. The City shall maintain good communications with bond rating agencies about its financial condition. The City shall follow a policy of “full disclosure” in its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and bond prospectuses.

Revenue Policies Revenue Projections The City shall estimate its annual revenues by objective and analytical processes. The City shall maintain a diversified and stable revenue system to the extent provided by law to insulate it from short-run fluctuations in any one revenue source. User Fees The City shall recalculate the full cost of selected activities currently supported by user fees and charges to identify the impact of inflation and other cost increases periodically. The City shall set fees and user charges for each enterprise fund, such as Water and Sewer, at a level that fully supports the total direct and indirect costs of operation, including the cost of depreciation. The City shall review the costs of services it provides for the potential implementation of user fees and charges on an annual basis. Reporting and Analysis To ensure compliance with revenue, reserve, and budget policies, the City shall prepare reports and analyses annually to monitor, project, and estimate revenues and expenditures, specifically: • Five-Year Forecast of Revenues and Expenditures. A planning tool used by the Management and Budget Office (MBO) to forecast and project various funds (General, Fire, and Water and Sewer). • Environmental Scan. A review of the local economy, land development trends, population trends, and customer expectations by the MBO as part of the Business Plan.

232

• Situational Analysis. Every two years, as part of the strategic planning process, an analysis of the demographic, legislative, and customer requirements is made. Part of the process includes a SWOT (Strengths—Weaknesses—Opportunities— Threats) analysis. • Composite Index. A set of ten indicators used to determine annual improvements published by the MBO in the Business Plan. • Impact Model. An economic decision-making model used to estimate the impact of tax reform and the changing economy on ad valorem revenue compiled by the MBO. • Community Composition. Currently known as the “Growth Build-Out Model,” an as-needed review of all properties, absorption rates, and population will be compiled by MBO to estimate ad valorem tax revenues and building permit revenues. • Revenue Manual. A guide to the major revenue sources that indicates the source, calculation, legal requirements, and accounting guidelines. Updated biennially by MBO. • Reserve Analysis. The Controller will annually review the reserve levels and produce a report that indicates up-to-date reserve levels as compared to policy goals. • Investment Portfolio Reports. A quarterly report designed to track and analyze the performance of our investment portfolio.

Investment Policies Investment Management The City shall perform a cash flow analysis of all funds on a regular basis. Disbursement, collection, and deposit of all funds will be scheduled to ensure optimum cash availability. Where permitted by law, the City may pool cash from each respective fund for investment purposes. Investments shall be managed to optimize cash utilization to generate and enhance interest income opportunities. Investment Analysis The City shall review its investment policies established for investing surplus and pension funds to account for changes in legislation and market conditions on an annual basis. The City shall prepare quarterly investment portfolio reports containing the overall performance of the fund.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Financial Policies (continued) Fixed-Assets Accounting Policies and Procedures Definition of a Fixed Asset A fixed asset is any tangible property owned by the City that is worth more than $1,000 and has an expected useful life of two years or more. Fixed assets include equipment, computers, furniture and vehicles. All vehicles are attributed to the Equipment Services Fund where depreciation is calculated. Once purchased, all capital items are maintained in the physical inventory and Capital Replacement Program until disposed. Purchasing Fixed Assets Capital items (fixed assets) shall be identified for purchase through three methods: 1.

New. Through a new initiative in the Business Plan that justifies the feasibility of a project or program requiring the purchase.

2.

Replacement. Through the Capital Replacement Programs for items already in inventory that require replacement. Justification of the continued necessity for the item and an analysis of the functionality of the existing property are required through this program.

3.

Emergency. Ad hoc needs are addressed through special amendments to the budget, gainsharing funds, or through maintenance reserves.

The procedures for purchasing fixed assets are: • Capital items must be approved for inclusion in the adopted budget as outlined in Capital Improvement Program policies. • Once the identified items are approved in the budget resolution and ordinance, departments must contact the Department of Financial Services to ensure that the funding for their project is available before initiating the purchasing sequence (such as bond proceeds secured, or account and project numbers established). • Through the purchasing inventory module, departments initiate the purchase requisition and electronically record 7the receipt of an asset from a 6X-XX account. The Purchasing Division creates the purchase order for the item, ensuring that the first line of the item description contains a specific, identifiable description of the asset being acquired. For capital items only, multiple accounts for payment are not appropriate. Whenever possible, budget transfers should be made prior to initiating the requisition. • Once the item has been ordered and received, departments enter the receiving report electronically and forward any invoices to Accounts Payable. The capitalization and subsequent addition to inventory is made on the payment date.

• The Accounts Payable Division processes payment for these purchases once received. Because of the program interface capability, purchase information such as the purchase order number, asset description, acquisition date, cost center, purchase price and expense code migrate from the purchasing inventory module to the fixed asset pending item file in the fixed asset module when the item is paid in the accounts payable module. Year-End Procedures At year-end, the Accounting Division reconciles expenditures per activity listings of capital accounts to the fixed-asset maintenance file, adjusting any differences identified. Capital purchases using multiple account numbers other than 6X-XX that should have been recorded as a capital purchase should be verified via the purchase order on the purchasing inventory side, printed and adjusted to balance the fixed assets records. Disposition Forms/Transfers All interdepartmental transfers of inventory with a value of $750 or greater must be reported on a property disposition form. The transfer form identifies fixed assets transferred to their new assigned locations. The information on the disposition form is recorded and verified in the fixed asset records. The completed inventory transfer form must be signed by the transferring department director and fixed asset coordinator before an asset can be physically moved from one location to the next. The white copy goes to Central Stores, yellow copy to the originating department and pink copy to Accounting. The department/division disposing of an asset likewise completes a property disposition form, signed by the department head. The form is routed to Finance and upon approval of the fixed asset coordinator transferred to Central Stores to be held for auction, used as a trade-in at time of purchasing replacement, or disposed of, depending on the condition of the asset. Disposition forms require the following information by the time of the auction: • City of Coral Springs asset tag number • Quantity • Asset description • Serial number • Condition and disposition • Dollar amount On an as-needed basis, the City auctions assets that have salvage or resale value by using an online offsite auction service Central Stores Division completes the disposition forms for assets sold and sends the information to Accounting where the fixed asset coordinator updates the asset register.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

233


Financial Policies (continued) Monthly Depreciation

Accounting Division Responsibilities

For capital assets purchased, Accounting uses the fixed asset module depreciation program to compute the depreciation annually.

• Review of pending fixed asset file. • Coordinate tagging and inventory controls. • Maintain additions, deletions and transfers.

Inventory Tagging Using the fixed asset pending item file, Central Stores tags new assets and completes paperwork needed to update the fixed asset records. Information includes asset tag number, serial number, asset type, location code, and department/division number. Metal tags are used on outdoor equipment (such as hand-held communication devices) and paper tags for indoor equipment (such as computers, chairs and office equipment). Tags that become damaged or illegible should be identified by department staff and reported to Central Stores for a new asset tag.

• Update fixed asset system and record depreciation annually. • Work in conjunction with Central Stores and City departments to conduct annual physical inventory of fixed assets. • Make any adjustments of asset records. • Prepare Comprehensive Annual Financial Report fixed asset schedules and reconcile schedule balance to fixed asset records. Purchasing/Central Stores Responsibilities • Identify the item locations, tag the asset, and submit necessary paperwork to Accounting Division.

Physical Inventory Annually, as part of the Capital Replacement Program budget process, a complete inventory of fixed assets will be distributed to every department and division. At that time, all items on the inventory must be physically verified by a representative and corrections or changes made on the inventory sheets, which will then be signed and returned with the capital purchase requests. Throughout the year, departments may be audited on a random basis on the accuracy of their physical inventory. In cases of gross inaccuracies (10% of the item counts/dollar value or more) future capital purchases may be deferred until the inaccuracies have been rectified. Fixed Assets Losses Lost or stolen assets should be reported on a property disposition form. Replacement of the asset is accomplished through a budget transfer from the appropriate risk fund to a capital purchase account in the fund where the asset is maintained. Voiding Fixed Assets Accounts Payable is responsible for notifying Accounting of any capital purchases voided and/or voided and reissued through the accounts payable system. The Accounts Payable staff must notify the fixed asset coordinator to correct the pending fixed asset record. Duplication of records in the pending fixed asset file will create an overstatement.

• Inform accounting of any unusual observations in the field. • Check all purchase orders for capital items. • Ensure that the item description accurately and concisely describes the item. Risk Management Responsibilities • Annually assess insurance coverage.

Department Responsibilities • Justify need for capital purchases through the budgeting process. • Obtain the correct account number and ascertain that funding is available. • Project managers are responsible for coding and using the correct project numbers and account numbers on every requisition for all capital purchases (using 6X-XX accounts). • Conduct an annual physical inventory of fixed assets (subject to audit). • Prepare property disposition forms when assets are moved, removed from inventory, lost, or stolen.

Project Accounting A project is a specific grouping of activities aimed at achieving a defined goal. Projects are set up in the accounting software application with an assigned account number for all expenditures associated with the project and are identified with a five digit project number assigned by Accounting.

234

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Fund Balance Overview What is Fund Balance? Fund balance is the difference between assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund at the end of the fiscal year. Fund balance tables for all major funds are presented on the following pages.

How are Fund Balances Used? City staff reviews fund balances yearly to identify available surpluses. The surpluses become part of the City’s financial strategy to equity fund capital projects, supplement the funding of depreciation, and to pay down outstanding debt. Coral Springs is proud to be among an elite group of cities that are currently rated ‘AAA’ by Standard and Poor’s and Fitch and Aa1 by Moddy’s Investors Service. The City’s strong financial performance is due, in part, to the City’s long-term perspective and aggressive debt management. Prior to build-out, the City—through its growth management, strategic planning, and cost containment measures—had been able to generate reserves that were reinvested back into the community. The goal of the City has been to use surplus reserves in ways that positively affect the financial Five-Year Forecast by reducing long-term obligations, while avoiding property tax increases.

We have used surpluses to retire expensive debt, provide adequate funding for pension funds, enhance the education resources of the City, and provide “pay-as-you-go” financing structures for its equipment and technology upgrades. (See the Capital Improvement Program in the Budget Overview section for detailed information on replacement programs.) Prior to tax reform, it was evident surpluses would be decreasing at an increasing rate because the City had reached residential build-out and building/developmental-related revenues were expected to decline. To capitalize on these declining resources, surpluses were earmarked to provide a funding source for future capital expenditures. Although the City budgeted the use of $1.75 million from reserves in FY 2013, those reserves were not used. The allocation of reserves is intended to support operating expenditures required to maintain the quality of service our residents have come to expect. FY 2015 is the second year since FY 2010 that reserves have not being budgeted to close the gap between revenues and expenditures in the General Fund operating budget.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

235


General Fund Balance FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

Amended FY 2014 Budget

Adopted FY 2015 Budget

BEGINNING BALANCE $28,223,262 $28,586,406 $27,136,945 $22,478,338 $22,187,147 $21,827,147 3,696,419 Adjustment (Conference Center and Library) Use of Reserves (360,000) (400,000) REVISED BEGINNING BALANCE $28,223,262 $32,282,825 $27,136,945 $22,478,338 $21,827,147 $21,427,147 REVENUE/SOURCES Ad Valorem Taxes Franchise Fees Utility Taxes Intergovernmental Revenues License and Permits Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Interest/Other SUB TOTAL REVENUES Appropriations from fund balance TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES EXPENDITURES/USES General Government Public Safety Parks and Recreation Public Works Development Services Educational Programs Capital Outlay TOTAL EXPENDITURES/USES EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Special Item Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR Total Assets Liabiliities Deferred Inflows of resources Subtotal Fund balance Nonspendable Inventory Long-term note receivable Prepaid Items Advances to other funds Restricted Landfill Parks Committed Stabilization Fund Assigned Computer Replacement Program Facilities Replacement Subsequent years' expenditures Unassigned ENDING BALANCE

236

31,378,077 9,722,320 9,544,390 24,097,694 3,534,351 10,534,100 1,436,705 3,987,514 94,235,150

31,512,835 9,628,384 9,551,411 20,739,745 3,513,777 11,043,505 1,347,025 3,492,630 90,829,312

31,133,669 9,988,006 9,726,733 20,650,091 3,291,395 12,465,697 1,244,202 3,240,123 91,739,916

32,726,176 10,229,175 10,170,739 22,667,879 3,031,511 12,948,144 1,368,085 4,572,491 97,714,200 97,714,200

35,754,609 10,332,934 10,831,725 19,260,436 3,643,420 13,380,889 2,050,691 4,802,889 100,057,593 360,000 100,417,593

37,423,734 10,134,499 11,070,986 19,483,503 3,735,836 14,400,669 2,219,854 4,357,112 102,826,193 400,000 103,226,193

94,235,150

90,829,312

91,739,916

12,787,291 53,498,220 12,015,759 4,436,305 5,598,476 553,810 0 88,889,861

13,266,871 55,172,389 12,433,758 4,443,501 5,659,393 499,419 0 91,475,331

13,829,067 54,709,919 12,907,757 4,695,473 5,712,416 914,722 0 92,769,354

13,331,804 53,544,362 13,547,342 5,066,860 5,687,335 931,783 0 92,109,486

20,478,270 53,719,245 14,135,475 4,414,581 6,499,433 578,281 592,308 100,417,593

22,575,860 54,238,470 14,314,766 4,608,241 6,710,575 578,281 200,000 103,226,193

5,345,289

(646,019)

(1,029,438)

5,604,714

0

0

0 (4,982,145) 0 (4,982,145)

98,667 (4,598,528) 0 (4,499,861)

0 (3,401,546) (227,623) (3,629,169)

0 (4,830,905) (1,065,000) (5,895,905)

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

363,144

(5,145,880)

(4,658,607)

(291,191)

0

0

$28,586,406 $27,136,945 $22,478,338 $22,187,147 $21,827,147 $21,427,147 $37,882,209 $34,393,512 $28,438,904 $33,444,994 9,295,803 7,256,567 5,960,566 9,934,492 0 0 0 1,323,355 $28,586,406 $27,136,945 $22,478,338 $22,187,147 645,935 2,575,000 0 189,073

708,929 2,600,000 23,415 222,988

1,139,347 2,500,000 0 0

1,033,162 1,435,000 0 0

22,000 81,945

23,000 81,945

23,000 81,945

23,000 81,945

16,149,143

16,655,463

16,798,428

17,053,991

2,200,773 3,086,349 2,550,000 1,086,188

1,316,793 2,641,235 2,863,177 0

538,512 1,397,106 0 0

1,355,098 1,204,951 0 0

$28,586,406 $27,136,945 $22,478,338 $22,187,147 $21,827,147 $21,427,147

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


General Fund Balance (continued) Discussion of changes in Fund Balance:

At the end of FY 2011, fund balance for the General Fund was $27,136,945 or 30% of General Fund expenditures. Of this balance, $105,000 was restricted by specific legal requirements, $16,655,463 was committed to the City’s stabilization fund, $1,316,793 assigned to the Computer Replacement Program, $2,641,235 to the Facilities Replacement Plan, $2.9M to subsequent year’s expenditures, and $3.5M was classified as nonspendable. General Fund revenue was less than budgeted by $1.3M or 1.5%. This decrease in revenue was due to a reduction in interest income of $500K, reduction in Communications Service Tax revenue of $400K, and the reduction in franchise fees received from Florida Power and Light of approx. $400K. The assets of the City exceeded its liabilities at the close of fiscal year 2011 by approximately $240,013 (net assets). of this amount, approximately $76,413,000 may be used to meet the City’s ongoing obligations to citizens and creditors.

In FY 2014, the budget included a $260,000 appropriation from fund balance to finance capital projects for the General Fund and $100,000 to hire a Construction Project Manager. Fund balance as of end of September 2014 will be reported after audit is complete and CAFR is finalized. In FY 2015, $400,000 has been allocated from fund balance to help finance technology enhancements and other capital projects for General Fund departments. This estimated change assumes revenues and expenditures will be at 100% of budget at the end of FY 2015.

In FY 2012, fund balance decreased mainly due to a decline in net assets. The City’s governmental activities net assets decreased from $198,420,000 in 2011 to $195,035,000 in 2012. The $3.4M decrease is a result of the following: the Center for the Arts was no longer accounted for as a business-type activity. The fund was unable to generate sufficient revenues to cover the cost of its operation; therefore, as of October 1, 2011, its operations were accounted for in the General Fund. Charges for services increased by $1.1M (mainly due to an increase in ambulance transport fees and increase in lien search fees). Operational expenses exceeded revenues by $1M. At the end of FY 2013, fund balance for the General Fund was $22,187,147 or 24% of total general Fund expenditures. Of this balance, $17,053,991 has been committed to the City’s stabilization fund, $1,355,098 has been assigned to the Computers Replacement Program, $1,204,951 to the Facilities Plan, and $2,468,000 is classified as nonspendable. Changes are mainly due to a $1.6M increase in property tax revenue, $2M increase in intergovernmentral revenue, and $1.3M increase in other income (primarily to the receipt of excess funds from the volunteer firefighter’s pension fund of $1.2M). Expenditures decreased $660K or 0.7% over the prior fiscal year.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

237


Fire Fund Balance

BEGINNING BALANCE Use of Reserves REVISED BEGINNING BALANCE REVENUE/SOURCES Intergovernmental Non-Ad Valorem Special Assessment Charges for Services Interest and Other Income SUB TOTAL REVENUES Appropriations from fund balance TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$2,229,826

$1,744,308

$2,232,676

$2,489,670

$2,229,826

$1,744,308

$2,232,676

$2,489,670

84,487 7,651,545 6,039,918 83,873 13,859,823

46,600 7,812,339 6,814,333 44,470 14,717,742

50,510 8,278,476 7,054,735 47,019 15,430,740

53,170 8,792,351 7,256,998 15,146 16,117,665

13,859,823

14,717,742

15,430,740

EXPENDITURES/USES Public Safety

14,387,810

14,866,901

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/USES

14,387,810

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES

Adopted FY 2014 Budget

Adopted FY 2015 Budget

$2,675,464 (400,000) $2,275,464

$2,275,464 $2,275,464 55,020 10,572,408 7,809,289 55,000 18,491,718

16,117,665

54,000 10,383,325 7,430,583 77,000 17,944,908 400,000 18,344,908

15,995,356

16,768,601

18,344,908

18,491,718

14,866,901

15,995,356

16,768,601

18,344,908

18,491,718

(527,987)

(149,159)

(564,616)

(650,936)

0

0

Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Total Other Financing Sources (Uses)

975,329 (932,860) 42,469

1,000,469 (362,942) 637,527

1,054,470 (232,860) 821,610

1,119,590 (282,860) 836,730

0

0

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE

(485,518)

488,368

256,994

185,794

0

0

FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR Nonspendable/Restricted Unassigned ENDING BALANCE

18,491,718

$1,744,308

$2,232,676

$2,489,670

$2,675,464

$2,275,464

$2,275,464

1,744,308 0

2,232,676 0

2,489,670 0

2,675,464 0

2,275,464 0

2,275,464 0

$1,744,308

$2,232,676

$2,489,670

$2,675,464

$2,275,464

$2,275,464

For FY 2010-FY 2013, 100% of the Fire Fund's fund balance is restricted for Fire safety. For FY 2014 and FY 2015, the restricted amount shown is an estimate until year-end numbers are audited and CAFR is finalized.

Discussion of changes in Fund Balance: For FY 2010-FY 2013, the entire fund balance in the Fire fund is restricted for fire safety per the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Financial Policies. This capital reserve will ensure continued operations in the event of a natural disaster or other emergency. The reserve equals to 17% of operating expenditures less Training Division, non-departmental expenses, chargebacks, debt service, capital, and inter-fund transfers. For FY 2014 and FY 2015, the restricted amount is an estimate until year-end figures are audited and the CAFR is finalized. In FY 2011, the fund balance for the Fire Fund increased by $488K. This was primarily due to a $160K additional income from non-ad valorem special assessment and a net increase in other financing sources; off set by a reduction in interest earnings from fund balance. The net change in fund balance of $256,994 in FY 2012 was mainly due to an increase in non-ad valorem special assessment revenue as well as additional 3.5% of income for charges for services. In addition, interfund transfers increased by 28.9% or $184K. In FY 2013, the increase of $185,794 was due primarily to a 6.2% increase in non-ad valorem special assessment revenue and savings in operational expenses. For FY 2014, we expect fund balance to decline by year end due to a $400,000 appropriation from capital reserves to pay for the design phase of two new Fire Stations. These funds were transferred to the Capital Fund and will be reflected in the FY 2014 audited figures. In FY 2015, it was not necessary to allocate any portion of fund balance to cover expenses.

238

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Water and Sewer Fund Balance FY 2010 Actual BEGINNING BALANCE Use of Reserves REVISED BEGINNING BALANCE

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$31,414,332 $32,284,552 $35,174,454 $37,464,653 $39,856,654 $38,256,654 ($1,600,000) ($1,928,000) $31,414,332 $32,284,552 $35,174,454 $37,464,653 $38,256,654 $36,328,654

REVENUE/SOURCES Charges for Services Appropriations from fund balance TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES

16,796,570 0 16,796,570

18,513,415 0 18,513,415

18,708,432 0 18,708,432

19,457,821 0 19,457,821

20,024,783 1,600,000 21,624,783

20,720,735 1,928,000 22,648,735

EXPENSES/USES Operating Expenses: Operating and Program Costs Administration Non-Departmental Depreciation TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES/USES

9,786,216 2,407,662 874,092 2,985,206 16,053,176

9,433,433 2,516,153 839,221 2,718,312 15,507,119

9,840,866 2,793,520 506,517 3,025,765 16,166,668

9,572,847 2,909,962 729,870 3,223,832 16,436,511

11,684,516 680,029 9,260,238 0 21,624,783

10,731,972 881,622 11,035,141 0 22,648,735

138,108 (341,039) (48,495) (1,452) (252,878)

79,251 (260,931) (45,160) (500) (227,340)

94,709 (304,046) (41,643) (585) (251,565)

52,015 (583,489) (61,554) (897) (593,925)

0

0

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENSES

490,516

2,778,956

2,290,199

2,427,385

0

0

Other Financing Sources (Uses) Contributions from private source Capital Contributions Transfers Out Total Other Financing Sources (Uses)

379,704 0 0 379,704

110,946 0 0 110,946

0 170,269 0 170,269

14,616 125,145 (50,000) 89,761

0

0

CHANGE IN NET POSITION

870,220

2,889,902

2,460,468

2,517,146

0

0

Non Operating Revenues (Expenses) Investment Income Interest Expense Bond and Loan Issuance Costs Other (Trustee fees/disposal of capital assets) TOTAL NON OPERATING REV (EXP)

FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR

$32,284,552 $35,174,454 $37,464,653 $39,856,654 $38,256,654 $36,328,654

NET ASSETS/POSITION Net investment in capital assets 22,985,243 26,317,573 27,470,054 29,435,866 28,133,943 26,716,092 Restricted (Renewal & Replacement) 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Restricted (Impact Fees) 1,467,856 1,506,276 1,522,750 1,526,065 1,457,579 1,384,122 Unrestricted 7,331,453 6,850,605 7,971,849 8,394,723 8,165,132 7,728,440 NET POSITION END OF YEAR $32,284,552 $35,174,454 $37,464,653 $39,856,654 $38,256,654 $36,328,654 Discussion of changes in Fund Balance or Net Position: In FY 2011, the increase in fund balance was mainly due to an increase in operating income as a result of a 3% water and sewer rate adjsutment and a modification on the sewer fee charges (began to charge consumption at 100% versus 85% in the previous year). In addition, lower amounts of water sent to Broward County wastewater facility for treatment resulted in 3.6% operational cost savings. In FY 2012, the increase in fund balance was due primarily to a 3% increase in water and sewer rates implemented in October 2011, offset by a decrease in consumption of 1.9% and a $685K increase in operating, program, and administrative costs, including a 4% increase in wastewater treatment charges paid to Broward County. In FY 2013, increases in fund balance were due to reduced operating and program costs. For example, the actual charges for wastewater treatment were 79.8% from the estimated budget, resulting in a $1.3M cost savings. In addition, a 3% rate increase was implemented at the beginning of this fiscal year for water and sewer customers. In FY 2014, a $1.6M fund balance surplus was allocated to finance capital projects. We anticipate not using any portion of this fund balance in FY 2014. This will be reflected in the audited/actual numbers for FY 2014 year-end. In FY 2015, $1,928,000 was budgeted from fund balance to equity finance capital projects; thereby avoiding additional debt.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

239


Health Fund Balance FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

BEGINNING BALANCE/NET POSITION $3,158,344

$2,285,338

$1,750,288

$3,118,183

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$3,175,813

$3,175,813

REVENUE/SOURCES Operating Revenue Charges for Services General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Fund Property/Casualty Insurance Fund Fire Fund Other Revenue Total Operating Revenue

7,015,342 395,764 178,640 17,864 1,226,508 24,793 8,858,911

7,807,034 439,283 185,613 18,561 1,284,937 20,783 9,756,211

9,109,253 510,225 216,961 21,696 1,492,446 144,288 11,494,869

7,723,579 519,646 219,597 23,364 1,615,953 243,528 10,345,667

9,308,330 555,212 214,921 21,493 1,545,141 0 11,645,097

9,560,948 586,270 218,486 23,626 1,601,938 120,000 12,111,268

Non Operating Revenue Premium/Retirees Terminated/Cobra Employee W/Dependent Interest Income Total Non Operating Revenue

500,890 28,296 485,907 48,717 1,063,810

522,377 11,540 481,740 22,189 1,037,846

565,281 38,159 497,021 30,032 1,130,493

632,420 23,172 518,810 12,249 1,186,651

600,000 20,000 538,000 45,000 1,203,000

660,000 20,000 590,000 35,000 1,305,000

TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES

9,922,721

10,794,057

12,625,362

11,532,318

12,848,097

13,416,268

EXPENSES/USES Health Plan Life Ins/ Long Term Disability TOTAL EXPENSES/USES

10,808,885 373,933 11,182,818

11,053,209 275,896 11,329,105

10,991,337 266,130 11,257,467

11,192,892 281,796 11,474,688

12,577,537 270,560 12,848,097

13,124,718 291,550 13,416,268

387,092

0

0

0

0

0

(873,004)

(535,048)

1,367,895

57,630

0

0

FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR

$2,285,338

$1,750,288

$3,118,183

$3,175,813

$3,175,813

$3,175,813

NET ASSETS/POSITION Designated/Reserved Undesignated/Unreserved NET POSITION END OF YEAR

0 2,285,338 $2,285,338

0 1,750,291 $1,750,291

0 3,118,186 $3,118,186

0 3,175,813 $3,175,813

0 3,175,813 $3,175,813

0 3,175,813 $3,175,813

TRANSFERS - OTHERS CHANGE IN NET POSITION

Discussion of changes in Fund Balance or Net Position: The fund balance/net position shown for each year complies with the City’s financial policy of maintaining unreserved retained earnings balance in the Health Fund of an amount equal to or greater than 25% of total budgeted health claims. In FY 2011, the fund balance in the Health Fund decreased by $535K. This was mainly due to higher medical claims than originally anticipated. In FY 2012, contributions from all funds were increased to cover expected increases in health costs, based on prior year’s actuals. This resulted in additional $1.7M income into the Health Fund via inter-fund transfers. However, medical claims and life insurance costs declined by 0.64%, also contributing to the increase in fund balance. In FY 2013, a small change in fund balance of $58K was due to a combined $217K cost increase in health, long-term disability and life insurance and a reduction in inter-fund transfers for services to other funds totaling $1.1M. This decrease is offset by additional revenue receipts for pharmacy rebates. In FY 2014 and FY 2015, we expect to cover expenses with revenue receipts; therefore no reserves have been budgeted from fund balance.

240

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


General Insurance Fund Balance

BEGINNING BALANCE

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$182,865

$778,679

$1,293,006

$1,063,533

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

$914,499

$914,499

REVENUE/ SOURCES Operating Revenue Charges for Services General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Fund Health Fund Fire Fund

1,726,250 530,866 20,804 1,950 290,566

1,824,940 544,956 20,210 1,631 308,836

1,746,255 501,790 20,381 1,698 294,430

1,847,892 529,995 21,282 1,806 317,122

2,177,938 601,162 26,138 1,888 369,253

2,270,468 636,326 26,575 2,680 386,848

Total Operating Revenue

2,570,436

2,700,573

2,564,554

2,718,097

3,176,379

3,322,897

Non Operating Revenue Motor Vehicle Workers' Compensation Other Interest Income Total Non Operating revenue

36,969 486,346 29,369 55,902 608,586

43,570 232,495 24,730 32,794 333,589

81,672 39,445 29,953 37,980 189,050

65,427 50,029 22,601 14,810 152,867

50,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 135,000

50,000 10,000 25,000 25,000 110,000

TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES

3,179,022

3,034,162

2,753,604

2,870,964

3,311,379

3,432,897

EXPENSES/USES Workers' Compensation Property Casualty TOTAL EXPENSES/USES

1,945,497 1,323,995 (686,284) 2,583,208

859,672 1,585,318 74,845 2,519,835

1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004 2,983,077

1,460,707 1,506,702 52,588 3,019,997

1,449,400 1,730,979 131,000 3,311,379

1,481,400 1,820,097 131,400 3,432,897

595,814

514,327

(229,473)

(149,034)

0

0

$778,679

$1,293,006

$1,063,533

$914,499

$914,499

$914,499

0

0

0

0

0

0

778,679

1,293,006

1,063,533

914,499

914,499

914,499

CHANGE IN NET POSITION FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR NET ASSETS/POSITION Designated/Reserved Undesignated/Unrestricted NET POSITION END OF YEAR

$778,679

$1,293,006

$1,063,533

$914,499

$914,499

$914,499

Discussion of changes in Fund Balance or Net Position: The unrestricted fund balance listed above for the General Insurance Fund is undesignated after setting aside reserves for the minimum of 125% of each year’s projected claims (for Property, Casualty, and Worker’s Compensation) or the amount as determined by the biannual actuarial report. In FY 2011, the fund balance increased by $514K due to less worker’s compensation claims than originally estimated. This resulted in $239K cost savings to the General Insurance Fund. Another key factor was receiving a large recovery for worker’s compensation claims. These savings were offset by an increase in property insurance premiums. In FY 2012, worker’s compensation expenses increased by 68% compared to the previous year. This resulted in a reduction in fund balance of $585K, offset by a 7.4% decline in excess liability and property insurance costs. In FY 2013, overall expenses increased by only $35K primarily due to higher property insurance costs. Revenues declined by $114K due to a reduction in recoveries for worker’s compensation.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

241


Equipment Services Fund Balance FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

FY 2014 Budget

FY 2015 Budget

BEGINNING BALANCE/NET POSITION $19,408,728 $20,156,474 $18,242,963 $15,531,809 $16,010,253 $16,010,253 OPERATING REVENUE/SOURCES Charges for Services Other (Auction) SUB TOTAL REVENUES

5,314,837 29,131 5,343,968

5,105,042 130,293 5,235,335

5,314,668 90,422 5,405,090

5,451,840 177,099 5,628,939

5,819,387 103,000 5,922,387

5,939,324 103,000 6,042,324

215,448

116,106

109,079

30,451

83,188 298,636

28,084 144,190

123,008 232,087

127,606 158,057

80,000 3,447,585 0 3,527,585

50,000 4,970,409 0 5,020,409

TOTAL REVENUE/SOURCES

5,642,604

5,379,525

5,637,177

5,786,996

9,449,972

11,062,733

EXPENDITURES/USES Operating/Administration Depreciation Expense TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES/USES

2,596,824 2,407,087 5,003,911

2,969,527 2,373,512 5,343,039

3,210,729 2,305,811 5,516,540

3,352,023 2,360,822 5,712,845

6,881,187 2,568,785 9,449,972

8,365,509 2,697,224 11,062,733

638,693

36,486

120,637

74,151

0

0

1,277,386

72,972

241,274

148,302

0

0

Other Financing Sources/Uses Capital Contributions Transfers Out Total Other Financing Sources/Uses

109,053 0 109,053

50,003 (2,000,000) -1,949,997

382,198 (3,213,989) -2,831,791

504,460 (100,167) 404,293

0

0

CHANGE IN NET POSITION

747,746

(1,913,511)

(2,711,154)

478,444

0

0

Non Operating Revenues Investment Income Appropriation from fund balance Gain on disposal of capital assets Total Non Operating Revenues

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE CONTRIBUTIONS AND TRANSFERS EXCESS/DEFICIENCY OF REVENUES OVER EXPENSES

FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR

$20,156,474 $18,242,963 $15,531,809 $16,010,253 $16,010,253 $16,010,253

NET ASSETS/POSITION Net investment in capital assets Unrestricted NET POSITION END OF YEAR

7,922,189 7,410,171 7,337,535 7,427,178 12,234,285 10,832,792 8,194,274 8,583,075 $20,156,474 $18,242,963 $15,531,809 $16,010,253 $16,010,253 $16,010,253

Discussion of changes in Fund Balance or Net Position: In FY 2011, the reduction in fund balance was due to utilizing excess reserves in the amount of $2M to equity finance capital needs; thereby avoiding the issuance of debt. In FY 2012, the net change in position was primarily due to a $3.2M transfer to the Capital Fund to support the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial strategy. This borrowing was processed internally with the goal of replenish the funds back to the Equipment Services Fund as soon as possible, ensuring this fund has sufficient resources to replace City own vehicles and fleet equipment as scheduled. In FY 2013, the fund balance increased due to capital contributions.

242

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Debt Service Fund Balance BEGINNING BALANCE Budgeted Reserves Use of Reserves REVISED BEGINNING BALANCE REVENUE/SOURCES Ad Valorem Taxes Interest and Other SUB TOTAL REVENUES Other Financing Sources Inter-fund transfers for Debt Service From General Fund From Fire Fund From Water and Sewer Fund Subtotal Other Financing Sources

Adopted FY 2014 Budget

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Actual

$4,371,008

$3,847,153

$3,079,590

$1,895,891

$4,371,008

$3,847,153

$3,079,590

$1,895,891

1,429,219 83,106 1,512,325

1,277,185 82,811 1,359,996

2,065,981 172,086 2,238,067

Adopted FY 2015 Budget

$184,636 ($800,000) 800,000 $184,636

$184,636 $184,636

2,081,501 214,252 2,295,753

1,497,097 9,517 1,506,614

1,574,394 3,150 1,577,544

4,684,631 472,860 50,000 5,207,491

0

0

0

0

4,495,694 382,860 50,000 4,928,554

TOTAL REVENUE SOURCES

1,512,325

1,359,996

2,238,067

2,295,753

6,435,168

6,785,035

EXPENDITURES/USES General Government Principal Interest TOTAL EXPENDITURES/USES

2,650 3,480,000 1,993,675 5,476,325

2,650 3,590,000 1,970,828 5,563,478

2,650 3,934,983 2,064,069 6,001,702

2,650 4,354,871 1,986,474 6,343,995

3,249 4,891,439 1,540,480 6,435,168

3,150 5,297,538 1,484,347 6,785,035

(3,964,000)

(4,203,482)

(3,763,635)

(4,048,242)

0

0

0

0

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES

Other Financing Sources (Uses) Refunding Bonds Issued Payment to Refunded Bond Escrow Agent Transfers In 3,440,144 Transfers Out Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 3,440,144

3,435,919

2,579,936

3,435,919

2,579,936

14,302,475 (14,295,212) 4,029,724 (1,700,000) 2,336,987

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE

(523,856)

(767,563)

(1,183,699)

(1,711,255)

0

0

$3,847,153

$3,079,590

$1,895,891

$184,636

$184,636

$184,636

1,762,463 0 2,084,690

1,762,463 1,317,127 0

0 1,895,891 0

0 184,636 0

0 184,636 0

0 184,636 0

$3,847,153

$3,079,590

$1,895,891

$184,636

$184,636

$184,636

FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR Restricted for Bond Reserves Assigned to Debt Service Undesignated ENDING BALANCE

Discussion of changes in Fund Balance: In FY 2011, expenditures exceeded appropriations due to interest expense paid on a $5.9M Build America Bond. This Capital Revenue Note was issued in December of 2010 to support the redevelopment of Downtown Coral Springs and for the replacement of aging buildings at Mullins Park. In FY 2012, the City’s total debt increased by approximately $2.3M or 3.8%. A key factor of this increase was the principal and interest payments of the Build America Bond. Furthermore, interest rates declined significantly resulting in less interest earnings for the City. In FY 2013, the fund balance for the Debt Service Fund decreased by $1.7M mainly due to transferring cash reserves ($1,450,000 to the Capital Fund and $250,000 to the Tree Preservation Trust Fund) for use on capital improvement projects. During this year, the series 2004 Franchise Revenue bond was refunded. Payment to refunded bond escrow agent as well as proceeds from refunding bonds issued are both accounted for in FY 2013. A lease purchase financing was obtained during this fiscal year to upgrade the City’s phone system.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

243


GO

GO

Franchise Revenue

Capital

Taxable Capital

Lease/Pur.

Capital

1997

1997 CD

2006

Refunding

Revenue

Revenue

Capital

(Phone System)

Revenue

Refunding

Refunding

Refunding

(94;96;98;&99,04)

Refunding

(RZED)

Revenue

Agreement

Note

Series 2014

Series 2008

2013

Series 2014

Year Series 2005 A Series 2005 B Series 2013 Par Value $4,705,000 $5,855,000 $14,302,475 Source/Lender Issue Date July 6, 2005 July 6, 2005 April 25,2013 10/1/2018 2026 Due Date/Last Maturity 10/1/2014 Term (Yrs) T.I.C. 3.2984% 3.5803% 2.1800%

2014

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

P I DS EB

2015

P I DS EB

2016

P I DS EB

2017

P I DS EB

2018

P I DS EB

2019

P I DS EB

2020

P I DS EB

GO TOTAL

$24,862,475 $32,607,475

$9,441,272

Series 2010 Series 2013

SRF

SRF

SRF

SRF

SRF

SRF

SRF

Water/Sewer

WW822020

WW061610

DW0603010

DW0603020

DW0603030

DW061620

DW0616130

Bank Loan

Lift Station

Sewer

WTP

Wells,

Trans,

Source,

Forest

Series 2012

Rehab

Rehab II

Imprvmnts

Wellhds

Dist, Int

Treatment

Hills Wllfld

SRF TOTAL

Water & Sewer TOTAL

$16,830,000 $5,913,000 $4,679,582 $2,511,998 $10,043,000 $49,418,852 $ 8,745,000 $ 536,159 $ 1,046,756 $ 5,431,530 $ 1,846,683 $ 3,052,141 $ 1,119,826 $ 2,378,188 $ 15,411,283 $ 24,156,283 BB&T BBVA Key Bank Raymond James SunTrust FL DEP FL DEP FL DEP FL DEP FL DEP FL DEP FL DEP

Sabadell June 3, 2014 Sep 21, 2021 Dec 14, 2010 July 05, 2013 Jun 20, 2013 Sep 1, 2023 1.7002%

OTHER DEBT TOTAL

3.8856%

2.4474%

Sep 10, 2014

Dec 20, 2012

2.7995%

1.9502%

2.2900%

2.72%

2.56%

2.79%

2.79%

2.79%

3.06%

2.50%

575,000.00 32,375.00 607,375.00 595,000.00

430,000.00 96,478.76 526,478.76 2,430,000.00

55,176.00 290,406.27 345,582.27 14,247,299.00

                        ‐              39,233.73 1,479,436.03              39,233.73 $17,272,299 $9,441,272

           1,225,000           444,662.50       1,669,662.50           10,055,000

            253,608        151,909.72        405,517.72          5,172,708

           428,348         91,251.84       519,599.84         4,251,234

              449,307             2,356,263            24,449.64           751,507.43          473,756.38 $3,107,770.17            1,784,521              10,043,000           40,747,735

2.4700%

               385,000            194,192.00            579,192.00              8,095,000

          22,822            12,104            34,926          427,827

               20,822                 26,797                 47,619           1,025,934

             214,859               147,084               361,943           5,089,753

               74,133                 47,091               121,224           1,632,125

             119,275                 84,043               203,318           2,922,627

               42,952                 32,951                 75,902           1,044,531

               92,953                 58,877               151,830           2,285,235

               587,816                 408,947                 996,763            14,428,033

                972,816                  603,139              1,575,955            22,523,033

595,000.00 11,156.25 606,156.25 0.00

450,000.00 80,516.26 530,516.26 1,980,000.00

128,531.00 309,190.13 437,721.13 14,118,768.00

1,173,531.00       1,506,328.00             1,275,000 400,862.64            160,501.62           401,787.50 1,574,393.64 1,666,829.62       1,676,787.50 $16,098,768 $7,934,944             8,780,000

            260,707        144,809.96        405,516.96          4,912,001

           436,701         82,899.06       519,600.06         3,814,533

              430,083            43,673.82          473,756.39            1,354,439

                           ‐             3,908,819              241,860.55       1,075,532.51              241,860.55       4,984,351.08              10,043,000 $36,838,917

               395,000 23,447 42,534 220,919 76,216 122,626 44,276 95,291            185,375.50 11,479 25,993 141,024 45,008 80,692 31,627 56,539            580,375.50 34,926 68,527 361,943 121,224 203,318 75,902 151,830              7,700,000 $       404,380 $           983,400 $       4,868,834 $       1,555,909 $       2,800,001 $       1,000,255 $       2,189,944

625,309 392,362 1,017,671 13,802,724

1,020,309 577,738 1,598,046 21,502,724

470,000.00 63,736.26 533,736.26 1,510,000.00

701,333.00 300,144.61 1,001,477.61 13,417,435.00

1,171,333.00       1,532,236.00             1,325,000 363,880.87            134,894.04           357,162.50 1,535,213.87        1,667,130.04       1,682,162.50 $14,927,435 $6,402,708             7,455,000

            268,006        137,511.48        405,517.48          4,643,995

           445,216         74,383.40       519,599.40         3,369,317

              440,608            33,148.11          473,756.39                913,830

                           ‐              248,062.10              248,062.10              10,043,000

           4,011,066           985,161.63       4,996,227.91           32,827,850

               405,000            176,330.00            581,330.00              7,295,000

          24,089            10,836            34,926          380,291

               43,629                 24,898                 68,527               939,771

             227,150               134,793               361,943           4,641,684

               78,357                 42,867               121,224           1,477,552

             126,071                 77,247               203,318           2,673,930

               45,641                 30,261                 75,902               954,614

               97,688                 54,142               151,830           2,092,255

               642,626                 375,044              1,017,671            13,160,097

            1,047,626                  551,374              1,599,001            20,455,097

485,000.00 46,603.13 531,603.13 1,025,000.00

713,822.00 284,719.42 998,541.42 12,703,613.00

1,198,822.00       1,561,834.00             1,375,000 331,322.55            108,846.04           304,162.50 1,530,144.55        1,670,680.04       1,679,162.50 $13,728,613 $4,840,874             6,080,000

            275,509        130,008.64        405,517.64          4,368,486

           453,898         65,701.68       519,599.68         2,915,419

              451,392            22,364.80          473,756.38                462,439

                           ‐              248,062.10              248,062.10              10,043,000

           4,117,633           879,145.76       4,996,778.34           28,710,218

               415,000            167,055.50            582,055.50              6,880,000

          24,749            10,177            34,926          355,542

               44,753                 23,774                 68,527               895,017

             233,557               128,386               361,943           4,408,128

               80,559                 40,666               121,224           1,396,993

             129,613                 73,705               203,318           2,544,317

               47,048                 28,854                 75,902               907,566

             100,146                 51,684               151,830           1,992,110

               660,425                 357,246              1,017,671            12,499,672

            1,075,425                  524,301              1,599,726            19,379,672

500,000.00 28,750.00 528,750.00 525,000.00

730,783.00 268,973.23 999,756.23 11,972,830.00

1,230,783.00       1,585,010.00             1,430,000 297,723.23              82,294.86           249,162.50 1,528,506.23        1,667,304.86       1,679,162.50 $12,497,830 $3,255,864             4,650,000

            283,222        122,295.76        405,517.76          4,085,264

           462,749         56,850.68       519,599.68         2,452,670

              462,439            11,317.58          473,756.39                         ‐

                           ‐              248,062.10              248,062.10              10,043,000

           4,223,420           769,983.48       4,993,403.29           24,486,798

               425,000            157,552.00            582,552.00              6,455,000

          25,427               9,499            34,926          330,115

               45,907                 22,621                 68,527               849,111

             240,144               121,799               361,943           4,167,983

               82,822                 38,402               121,224           1,314,171

             133,254                 70,063               203,318           2,411,063

               48,499                 27,403                 75,902               859,067

             102,665                 49,165               151,830           1,889,444

               678,718                 338,953              1,017,671            11,820,954

            1,103,718                  496,505              1,600,223            18,275,954

525,000.00 9,843.75 534,843.75 0.00

742,114.00 252,918.65 995,032.65 11,230,716.00

1,267,114.00       1,614,862.00             1,490,000 262,762.40              55,349.68           191,962.50 1,529,876.40        1,670,211.68       1,681,962.50 $11,230,716 $1,641,002             3,160,000

            291,150        114,366.96        405,516.96          3,794,114

           471,773         47,827.06       519,600.06         1,980,897

                           ‐              248,062.10              248,062.10              10,043,000

           3,867,785           657,568.30       4,525,353.30           20,619,013

               430,000            147,819.50            577,819.50              6,025,000

          26,123               8,803            34,926          303,992

               47,089                 21,438                 68,527               802,021

             246,918               115,026               361,943           3,921,066

               85,149                 36,076               121,224           1,229,022

             136,998                 66,320               203,318           2,274,065

               49,995                 25,908                 75,902               809,072

             105,248                 46,582               151,830           1,784,197

               697,519                 320,152              1,017,671            11,123,435

            1,127,519                  467,971              1,595,490            17,148,435

1,302,892.00 230,628.08 1,533,520.08 9,927,824.00

1,302,892.00       1,641,002.00             1,550,000 230,628.08              27,897.04           132,362.50 1,533,520.08        1,668,899.04       1,682,362.50 $9,927,824 $0             1,610,000

            299,301        106,216.22        405,517.22          3,494,813

           480,972         38,627.50       519,599.50         1,499,925

                           ‐              248,062.10              248,062.10              10,043,000

           3,971,275           553,165.36       4,524,440.36           16,647,738

               440,000            137,972.50            577,972.50              5,585,000

          26,838               8,087            34,926          277,154

               48,302                 20,225                 68,527               753,719

             253,882               108,061               361,943           3,667,184

               87,541                 33,683               121,224           1,141,481

             140,847                 62,471               203,318           2,133,218

               51,536                 24,366                 75,902               757,536

             107,895                 43,935               151,830           1,676,301

               716,842                 300,828              1,017,671            10,406,593

            1,156,842                  438,801              1,595,643            15,991,593

Debt Service Schedules

244 Fiscal

GO


Staffing Staffing Summary by Department and FundCounts Summary table of Position FY 2012 Authorized Position FTE's 0 0.00

Department Name City Commission City Manager's Office

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTE's 0 0.00

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTE's 1 1.00

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTE's 1 1.00

Position Change # % 0.00 0.00%

FTE Change # % 0.00 0.00%

20.5

20.50

20.5

20.50

23.5

23.50

26.5

26.50

3.00

12.77%

3.00

12.77%

Human Resources

11.25

11.25

11.25

11.25

12.25

12.25

13

13.00

0.75

6.12%

0.75

6.12%

Financial Services

26

26.00

25

25.00

25

25.00

24.25

24.25

(0.75)

-3.00%

(0.75)

-3.00%

Information Technology

19

19.00

19.5

19.50

19.25

19.25

21.25

21.25

2.00

10.39%

2.00

10.39%

6

6.00

6

6.00

6

6.00

5.75

5.75

(0.25)

-4.17%

(0.25)

-4.17%

60

60.00

63

63.00

65

65.00

66

66.00

1.00

1.54%

1.00

1.54%

295

294.63

298

297.63

299

298.63

301

301.00

2.00

0.67%

2.37

0.79%

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

68.02

68.02

2.86

4.39%

2.86

4.39%

City Attorney Development Services Police Emergency Medical Services Public Works Parks and Recreation* Total General Fund *Includes Sportsplex & Aquatics Fire Fund

28

27.70

27

27.00

28.5

28.50

28

28.00

(0.50)

-1.75%

(0.50)

-1.75%

101

101.00

105

105.00

105

105.00

105

105.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

631.91

631.24

640.41

640.04

649.66

649.29

659.77

659.77

10.11

1.56% 10.48

1.61%

103.84

103.84

107.84

107.84

107.84

107.84

109.98

109.98

2.14

1.98%

2.14

1.98%

Water and Sewer Fund

35.5

35.50

35

35.00

38.75

38.75

40.25

40.25

1.50

3.87%

1.50

3.87%

Health Fund

1.25

1.25

1.25

1.25

1.25

1.25

1.50

1.50

0.25

20.00%

0.25

20.00%

General Insurance Fund (WC, Property and Casualty)

1.5

1.50

1.5

1.50

1.5

1.50

1.50

1.50

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Equipment Services Fund Total Staff All Funds Including Parkland, FL

15

15.00

15

15.00

15

15.00

15.00

15.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

813.63

828.00

828.00

1.72% 14.37

1.77%

789

788.33

801

800.63

814

14.00

(Budgeted Positions)

Changes in Staffing Levels For Fiscal Year 2015, the number of full-time equivalent increased by 14. This increase is offset by the conversion of three part-time positions to full-time status. Funding for the additinal positions is budgeted as follows: 10 are budgeted in the General Fund, two are funded in the Fire Fund, and two positions are split between the Fire Fund and the General Fund. These staff are necessary to continue providing high quality services to our customers. In addition, they are linked to the implementation of new Business Plan initiatives that will augment public safety and wellness, while enhancing the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to attract economic development. Details of the new authorized positions are included in the Budget in Brief section and details of the new initiatives associated with these staff are described in the Business Plan section of this document.

Positions By Department - Fiscal Year 2015 Number of budgeted Total positions By Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Fiscal Year 2015 City Commission

1.00

City Manager's Office

26.50

Human Resources/Health

14.50

Financial Services

24.25

Information Technology

21.25

City Attorney

5.75

Development Services

66.00

Police

301.00

Fire/EMS*

178.00

Public Works/Water and Sewer/Equipment

83.25

Parks and Recreation

105.00

0

25 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 225 250 275 300 325 350

City of Coral Springs, Florida

245


Position Counts for all Departments and Divisions FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Department Name City Commission* Office Assistant

F/T TOTAL *5 City Commissioners not included in total

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change # %

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

5.5 5 5 1 4 0 20.50

5.5 5 5 1 4 0 20.50

5.5 5 5 1 4 0 20.50

5.5 5 5 1 4 0 20.50

6.5 6 5 1 5 0 23.50

6.5 6 5 1 5 0 23.50

6.5 6 6 1 5 2 26.50

6.5 6 6 1 5 2 26.50

0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 2.00 3.00

0.00% 0.00% 20.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 12.77%

0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 2.00 3.00

0.00% 0.00% 20.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 12.77%

F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

7.25 4 0 11.25

7.25 4 0 11.25

7.25 4 0 11.25

7.25 4 0 11.25

7.25 5 0 12.25

7.25 5 0 12.25

7 5 1 13.00

7 5 1 13.00

(0.25) 0.00 1.00 0.75

-3.45% 0.00% n/a 6.12%

(0.25) 0.00 1.00 0.75

-3.45% 0.00% n/a 6.12%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

3 1 7 6 5 4 26.00

3 1 7 6 5 4 26.00

3 0 7 6 5 4 25.00

3 0 7 6 5 4 25.00

3 0 7 6 5 4 25.00

3 0 7 6 5 4 25.00

2.25 0 7 6 5 4 24.25

2.25 0 7 6 5 4 24.25

(0.75) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (0.75)

-25.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -3.00%

(0.75) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (0.75)

-25.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -3.00%

Information Technology

F/T TOTAL

19 19.00

19 19.00

19.5 19.50

19.5 19.50

19.25 19.25

19.25 19.25

21.25 21.25

21.25 21.25

2.00 2.00

10.39% 10.39%

2.00 2.00

10.39% 10.39%

City Attorney

F/T TOTAL

6 6.00

6 6.00

6 6.00

6 6.00

6 6.00

6 6.00

5.75 5.75

5.75 5.75

(0.25) (0.25)

-4.17% -4.17%

(0.25) (0.25)

-4.17% -4.17%

Development Services

F/T TOTAL

2 2.00

2 2.00

3 3.00

3 3.00

4 4.00

4 4.00

4 4.00

4 4.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

F/T F/T TOTAL

6 6 12.00

6 6 12.00

6 7 13.00

6 7 13.00

4 8 12.00

4 8 12.00

4 8 12.00

4 8 12.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

12 7 4 1 2 26.00

12 7 4 1 2 26.00

11 8 4 1 2 26.00

11 8 4 1 2 26.00

12 8 4 1 2 27.00

12 8 4 1 2 27.00

12 8 4 1 2 27.00

12 8 4 1 2 27.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Code Compliance

F/T TOTAL

20 20.00

20 20.00

21 21.00

21 21.00

22 22.00

22 22.00

23 23.00

23 23.00

1.00 1.00

4.55% 4.55%

1.00 1.00

4.55% 4.55%

Grand Total Development Services

F/T TOTAL

60 60.00

60 60.00

63 63.00

63 63.00

65 65.00

65 65.00

66 66.00

66 66.00

1.00 1.00

1.54% 1.54%

1.00 1.00

1.54% 1.54%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

2 2 14 5 5 116 10 5 3 2 6 5 4 1 0 19 16 19 1 10 9 7 29 4 295.00

2 2 14 5 5 116 10 5 3 2 6 5 4 1 0 19 16 19 1 10 9 7 29 4 294.63

2 2 14 5 5 113 10 5 3 2 6 5 3 1 7 18 16 19 1 10 10 7 29 4 298.00

2 2 14 5 5 113 10 5 3 2 6 5 3 1 7 18 16 19 1 10 10 7 29 4 297.63

2 2 14 5 5 110 10 6 3 2 6 5 4 1 7 19 16 19 1 11 10 7 29 4 299.00

2 2 14 5 5 110 10 6 3 2 6 5 4 1 7 19 16 19 1 11 10 7 29 4 298.63

2 2 14 5 5 113 10 6 3 2 6 5 4 1 7 19 16 19 0 11 10 7 29 5 301.00

2 2 14 5 5 113 10 6 3 2 6 5 4 1 7 19 16 19 0 11 10 7 29 5 301.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 2.00

City Manager's Office City Manager's Office Management & Budget Office Communications and Marketing CRA City Clerk Economic Development

Human Resources Human Resources Comm. Relations/City Hall in Mall Volunteer Services

Financial Services Administration Museum Accounting Revenue and Collection Purchasing Central Stores

Community Development Planning Neighborhood/Env.Services

Building Building-Administration Building-Structural Building-Electrical Building-Plumbing Building-Mechanical

Police Office of the Chief Office of Professional Standards Vice and Intelligence Human Resources Fiscal Management Patrol Unit Traffic Unit K-9 Unit Humane Unit Community Involvement Bicycle Unit Training Unit Substation Unit Emergency Management BEAR Unit General Investigations Special Investigations Youth Liaison Volunteer Services Crime Scene Investigations Strategic Enforcement Team Central Records Communications Center Building/Fleet Maintenance

246

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 2.73% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 25.00% 0.67%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 2.37

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 2.73% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 25.00% 0.79%


Position Counts for all Departments and Divisions (continued) FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Department Name EMS Emergency Medical Services Communication Services Training

Public Works Administrative Services Streets Facilities Management Parks and Recreation Parks Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park (31/35) Neighborhood Parks Beautification Environmentally Sensitive Land Landscape Irrigation

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

58 6.16 1 65.16

58 6.16 1 65.16

58 6.16 1 65.16

58 6.16 1 65.16

58 6.16 1 65.16

58 6.16 1 65.16

60.9 6.16 1 68.02

60.9 6.16 1 68.02

2.90 0.00 0.00 2.86

5.00% 0.00% 0.00% 4.39%

2.90 0.00 0.00 2.86

5.00% 0.00% 0.00% 4.39%

F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

1.5 20.5 5 28.00

1.5 20.5 5 27.70

1.5 20.5 5 27.00

1.5 20.5 5 27.00

3 21 4.5 28.50

3 21 4.5 28.50

2.5 21 4.5 28.00

2.5 21 4.5 28.00

(0.50) 0.00 0.00 (0.50)

-16.67% 0.00% 0.00% -1.75%

(0.50) 0.00 0.00 (0.50)

-16.67% 0.00% 0.00% -1.75%

10 11 8 14 1 1 15 8

10 11 8 14 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

11 11 9 16 1 1 15 8

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

68.00

68.00

72.00

72.00

72.00

72.00

72.00

72.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T

Sub-Total Parks Recreation Activity Center Recreation Services Summer Recreation Transportation Sub-Total Recreation

F/T F/T F/T F/T

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

1 5 1 1 8.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex Athletic Complex Cypress Tennis Tennis Center Sub-Total Sportsplex/Tennis

F/T F/T F/T F/T

1 5 1 2 9.00

1 5.0 1 2 9.00

1 5 1 2 9.00

1 5.0 1 2 9.00

1 5 1 2 9.00

1 5.0 1 2 9.00

1 5 1 2 9.00

1 5 1 2 9.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

3 2 11 16.00 101.00

3 2 11 16.00 101.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

3 2 11 16.00 105.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

F/T TOTAL

629.91 631.91

629.91 631.240

639.41 640.41

639.41 640.040

648.66 649.66

648.66 649.290

659.77 659.77

659.77 659.77

11.11 10.11

1.71% 1.56%

11.11 10.48

1.71% 1.61%

F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

2.5 1.84 89.5 9 1 0 0 0 0 103.84

2.5 1.84 89.5 9 1 0 0 0 0 103.84

2.5 1.84 92.5 9 2 0 0 0 0 107.84

2.5 1.84 92.5 9 2 0 0 0 0 107.84

3.5 1.84 92 9 1.5 0 0 0 0 107.84

3.5 1.84 92 9 1.5 0 0 0 0 107.84

3.5 1.84 91.52 10.62 2.5 0 0 0 0 109.98

3.5 1.84 91.52 10.62 2.5 0 0 0 0 109.98

0.00 0.00 (0.48) 1.62 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.14

0.00% 0.00% -0.52% 18.00% 66.67% n/a n/a n/a n/a 1.98%

0.00 0.00 (0.48) 1.62 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.14

0.00% 0.00% -0.52% 18.00% 66.67% n/a n/a n/a n/a 1.98%

F/T F/T F/T F/T TOTAL

4.5 8 15 8 35.50

4.5 8 15 8 35.50

5 8 15 7 35.00

5 8 15 7 35.00

4.75 10 15 9 38.75

4.75 10 15 9 38.75

6.25 10 15 9 40.25

6.25 10 15 9 40.25

1.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.50

31.58% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 3.87%

1.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.50

31.58% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 3.87%

Health Fund

F/T TOTAL

1.25 1.25

1.25 1.25

1.25 1.25

1.25 1.25

1.25 1.25

1.25 1.25

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

0.25 0.25

20.00% 20.00%

0.25 0.25

20.00% 20.00%

General Insurance Fund Workers' Compensation, Property and Casualty

F/T TOTAL

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

1.5 1.50

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

Equipment Services Equipment Maintenance

F/T TOTAL

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

15 15.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

787 2 789

787.00 1.33 788.33

800 1 801

800.00 0.63 800.63

813 1 814

813.00 0.63 813.63

828 0 828

828.00 0 828.00

15.00 (1.00) 14.00

1.85% -100.00% 1.72%

15.00 (0.63) 14.37

1.85% -100.00% 1.77%

Aquatics Cypress Pool Mullins Pool Aquatic Complex Sub-Total Aquatics Grand Total Parks & Recreation General Fund Fire Administration Communication Services Suppression Inspection Training Volunteer Emergency Medical Services Communication Services Contract Services Water and Sewerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Utilities Administration Water Distribution Water Treatment Wastewater Collection

Total Staff All Funds F/T P/T 5 City Commissioners not included in total

City of Coral Springs, Florida

247


Detail of Positions by Department and Division City Commission Detail of Positions City Commission-0100 Full Time Senior Office Assistant Grand Total City Commission Note: Mayor and Commissioners not included in total

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

0 0

0.00 0.00

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

0 0

0.00 0.00

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

Position Change # %

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

FTE Change #

%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

City Manager’s Office Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

CMO Administration—0501 Full Time City Manager 1 Deputy City Manager* 1.5 Executive Assistant to City Manager 1 Construction Project Manager 0 Executive Assistant 1 Senior Office Assistant** 1 Total Administration 5.5 *Position split 50/50 with Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001 **Reclassified to Executive Assistant Economic Development—0502 Full Time Economic Development Manager* Principal Office Assistant* Total Economic Development *Add to staff FY 2015 Management & Budget Office—1901 Full Time Director of Budget, Strategy & Communications Senior Financial Analyst Total Management & Budget Office Communications and Marketing—0604 Full Time Director of Communications and Marketing Communications and Marketing Manager Editor and Producer Broadcast Communications Coordinator Creative Services Coordinator* Writer/Media Relations Coordinator Total Communications and Marketing *Add to staff FY 2015 Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)—3200 Full Time CRA Coordinator Total Community Redevelopment Agency City Clerk—3501 Full Time City Clerk Assistant City Clerk Records Management Coordinator Principal Office Assistant Senior Office Assistant Total City Clerk Grand Total City Manager's Office

248

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

1.00 1.50 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 5.50

1 1.5 1 0 1 1 5.5

1.00 1.50 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 5.50

1 1.5 1 1 1 1 6.5

1.00 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.50

1 1.5 1 1 2 0 6.5

1.00 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.50

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 4 5

1.00 4.00 5.00

1 4 5

1.00 4.00 5.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

0 1 1 1 1 1 5

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0 1 1 1 1 1 5

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0 1 1 1 1 1 5

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0 1 1 1 2 1 6

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1 1 0 1 4 20.5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 4.00 20.50

1 1 1 0 1 4 20.5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 4.00 20.50

1 1 1 1 1 5 23.5

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 23.5

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% -100.00% 0.00%

FTE Change #

%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

n/a n/a n/a

1.00 1.00 2.00

n/a n/a n/a

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00

n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% 20.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00

n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% 20.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

1 1 1 1 1 5 26.5

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 26.5

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 12.77%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 12.77%


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Human Resources Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Human Resources—1000 Full Time Director of Human Resources* 0.75 Human Resources Partner** 1.5 Senior Human Resources Coordinator 1 Pension Administrator 1 Human Resources Analyst 1 Senior Office Assistant 1 Human Resources Support Specialist 1 Total Human Resources 7.25 *Position split 50/50 with Health Fund-8501 **Position split 50/50 with General Liability Insurance Fund-8801 Community Relations—1001 and 1007 Full Time Community Relations Manager Senior Community Relations Coordinator Community Relations Coordinator Office Assistant Senior Office Assistant Total Community Relations (Includes City Hall in the Mall) Volunteer Services—1008 Full Time Volunteer Services Coordinator Total Volunteer Services Health Fund—8501 Full Time Director of Human Resources* Senior Human Resources Coordinator Total Health Fund *Position split 50/50 with Human Resources-1000 Grand Total HR and Health Fund

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

0.75 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.25

0.75 1.5 1 1 1 1 1 7.25

0.75 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.25

0.75 1.5 1 1 1 1 1 7.25

0.75 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.25

0.5 1.5 1 1 1 1 1 7

0.50 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00

(0.25) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (0.25)

-33.33% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -3.45%

(0.25) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (0.25)

-33.33% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -3.45%

1 1 0 1 1 4

1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 4.00

1 1 1 1 0 4

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 4.00

1 1 1 1 1 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

1 1 1 1 1 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1.00 1.00

n/a n/a

1.00 1.00

n/a n/a

0.25 1 1.25

0.25 1.00 1.25

0.25 1 1.25

0.25 1.00 1.25

0.25 1 1.25

0.25 1.00 1.25

0.5 1 1.5

0.50 1.00 1.50

0.25 0.00 0.25

100.00% 0.00% 20.00%

0.25 0.00 0.25

100.00% 0.00% 20.00%

12.5

12.50

12.5

12.50

13.5

13.50

14.5

14.50

1.00

7.41%

1.00

0.07

City Attorney Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

City Attorney—2502 Full Time City Attorney 1 1.00 Deputy City Attorney 1 1.00 Assistant City Attorney* 2 2.00 Municipal Prosecutor 0 0.00 Executive Assistant 1 1.00 Grand Total City Attorney 6 6.00 *Position split .75 City Attorney; .25 Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

1 1 1 1 1 6

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

1 1 1 1 2 6

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 6.00

1 1 0.75 1 2 5.75

1.00 1.00 0.75 1.00 2.00 5.75

0.00 0.00 (0.25) 0.00 0.00 (0.25)

0.00% 0.00% -25.00% 0.00% 0.00% -4.17%

0.00 0.00 (0.25) 0.00 0.00 (0.25)

0.00% 0.00% -25.00% 0.00% 0.00% -4.17%

General Insurance Fund—Property—8801* Full Time Human Resources Partner** 0.5 Risk Management Coordinator 1.0 Sub-Total General Insurance Fund 1.50 *General Insurance Fund transferred from Financial Services **Position split 50/50 with Human Resources

0.50 1.00 1.50

0.5 1.0 1.50

0.50 1.00 1.50

0.5 1.0 1.50

0.50 1.00 1.50

0.5 1 1.5

0.50 1.00 1.50

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Grand Total City Attorney and General Insurance

7.50

7.50

7.50

7.50

7.50

7.25

7.25

(0.25)

-3.33%

(0.25)

-3.33%

7.50

City of Coral Springs, Florida

249


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Financial Services Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Administration—1501 Full Time Director of Financial Services* 1 1.00 City Controller** 1 1.00 Senior Office Assistant 1 1.00 Total Administration 3.0 3.00 *Position split .75 Financial Services; .25 Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001 **Position split 50/50 with Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001 Museum—1502 Museum Director Total Museum

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

1 1 1 3.0

1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00

1 1 1 3.0

1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00

0.75 0.5 1 2.25

0.75 0.50 1.00 2.25

(0.25) (0.50) 0.00 (0.75)

-25.00% -50.00% 0.00% -25.00%

#

%

(0.25) (0.50) 0.00 (0.75)

-25.00% -50.00% 0.00% -25.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

3 0 1 1 1 1 7

3.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00

3 0 1 1 1 1 7

3.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00

3 0 1 1 1 1 7

3.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00

3 1 0 1 1 1 7

3.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% n/a -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% n/a -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

4 1 1 6

4.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

4 1 1 6

4.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

4 1 1 6

4.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

4 1 1 6

4.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Total Accounting Services

13

13.00

13

13.00

13

13.00

13

13.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Purchasing Administration—1701 Full Time Purchasing Administrator Purchasing Agent II Senior Office Assistant Sub-Total Administration

1 3 1 5

1.00 3.00 1.00 5.00

1 3 1 5

1.00 3.00 1.00 5.00

1 3 1 5

1.00 3.00 1.00 5.00

1 3 1 5

1.00 3.00 1.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Central Stores—1702 Full Time Central Stores Coordinator Purchasing Assistant Sub-Total Central Stores

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Total Purchasing

9

9.00

9

9.00

9

9.00

9

9.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

26.0

26.00

25.0

25.00

25.0

25.00

24.25

24.25

(0.75)

-3.00%

(0.75)

-3.00%

Accounting Services Accounting—1601 Full Time Accountant Fin. Reporting & Compliance Admin. Accounting Analyst* Payroll Coordinator Payroll Technician Senior Accounting Assistant Total Accounting *Reclassified to Fin. Reporting & Comp. Admin. Revenue and Collection—1602 Full Time Water Billing Representative* Accounting Assistant Billing Operations Technician Total Revenue and Collection *Reclassified from Senior Office Assistant

Grand Total Financial Services

250

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

n/a n/a

FTE Change

0.00 0.00

n/a n/a


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Information Technology Detail of Positions Information Technology- 2001 Full Time Director of Information Technology Applications Administrator Network Administrator Senior Network Specialist Network Specialist Database Analyst* GIS Administrator Project Manager* Senior Programmer Analyst* Programmer Analyst Production Support Specialist Senior CADD/GIS Technician** Applications Analyst*** Project Suppport Specialist Senior Office Assistant**** Principal Office Assistant Grand Total Information Technology

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

1 2 1 2 3 0 1 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 19

1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 19.00

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

1 2 1 2 3 0 1 0 3 3 1 1 0.5 0 0 1 19.5

1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 19.50

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

1 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 4 2 1 0.75 0.5 0 1 0 19.25

1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 0.75 0.50 0.00 1.00 0.00 19.25

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 4 2 1 0.75 0.5 1 0 0 21.25

1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 0.75 0.50 1.00 0.00 0.00 21.25

Position Change # %

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00 2.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 10.39%

FTE Change #

%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00 2.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 10.39%

*Add to staff FY 2015 **Position split .75 Information Technology; .25 Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001 ***Position split 50/50 with Public Works Utilities-Admin-6001 ****Position reclassified to Project Support Specialist

Development Services—Administration Detail of Positions Administration—-3100 Full Time Director of Development Services Assistant Dir. Of Community Development Executive Assistant Development Services Coordinator Total Administration

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

1 0 0 1 2

1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 2.00

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

1 0 0 1 3

1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 3.00

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 1 1 4

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 1 1 4

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00

Position Change # %

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

FTE Change #

%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Development Services—Code Compliance Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Code Compliance—5403 Full Time Code Compliance Manager 0 Code Compliance Administrator* 0 Code Compliance Supervisor 0 Code Compliance Officer 0 Senior Office Assistant 1 Principal Office Assistant** 1 Tax Collection Specialist 1 Inspector I 1.00 Inspector II 1.00 Office Assistant 2 Total Code Compliance 20.00 *Reclassified from Code Compliance Support Supervisor **Add to Staff FY 2015

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 20.00

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

0 0 2 0 2 1 1 1.00 0.00 1 21.00

0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 21.00

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 2 10 2 2 2 1.00 0.00 1 22.00

1.00 1.00 2.00 10.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 22.00

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 2 10 2 3 2 1 0 1 23

1.00 1.00 2.00 10.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 23.00

Position Change # %

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 50.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 4.55%

FTE Change #

%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 50.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 4.55%

251


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Development Services—Community Development Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Planning and Zoning—3001 Full Time Planning and Zoning Manager Landscape Inspector* Assistant Planner Associate Planner Sub-Total Planning *Reclassified to Associate Planner Neighborhood/Environmental Services—3004 Full Time Community Development & Housing Administrator Chief Planner Transportation Planner Environmental Coordinator/City Forester Senior Planner Museum Director Assistant Planner Neighborhood Coordinator Assistant Sub-Total Neighborhood/Environmental Svcs

Total Community Development

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

1 1 1 1 6

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

1 1 1 1 6

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00

1 1 1 1 4

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00

1 0 1 2 4

1.00 0.00 1.00 2.00 4.00

0.00 (1.00) 0.00 1.00 0.00

0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00%

0.00 (1.00) 0.00 1.00 0.00

0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00%

0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 6

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 6.00

0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 7

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 7.00

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

12

12.00

13

13.00

12

12.00

12

12.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Development Services—Building Detail of Positions Building—Administrative Services— 5101 Full Time Chief Building Official Development Services Administrator Senior Office Assistant Senior Permit Services Representative Permit Services Representative* Total Administrative Services *3 of these positions are contractual Building—Inspection Structural—5301 Full Time Deputy Building Official Inspector II Inspector I Total Structural Electrical—5302 Full Time Chief Inspector Inspector II Total Electrical Plumbing—5303 Full Time Chief Inspector Total Plumbing Mechanical—5304 Full Time Chief Inspector Inspector II Total Mechanical Total Inspection

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

1 1 1 4 5 12

1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 12.00

1 0 1 4 5 11

1.00 0.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 11.00

1 1 1 4 5 12

1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 12.00

1 1 1 4 5 12

1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 12.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 3.0 3.0 7.0

1.00 3.00 3.00 7.00

1 4.0 3.0 8.0

1.00 4.00 3.00 8.00

1 4.0 3.0 8.0

1.00 4.00 3.00 8.00

1 5 2 8

1.00 5.00 2.00 8.00

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% 25.00% -33.33% 0.00%

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% 25.00% -33.33% 0.00%

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

1 3 4

1.00 3.00 4.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

14.0

14.00

15.0

15.00

15.0

15.00

15

15.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Total Building Administration and Inspection

26.00

26.00

26.00

26.00

27.00

27.00

27

27.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Grand Total Development Services

60.00

60.00

63.00

63.00

65.00

65.00

66

66.00

1.00

1.54%

1.00

1.54%

252

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Police Detail of Positions Police-Administration Office of the Chief—4101 Full Time Chief of Police Executive Assistant Total Office of the Chief

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1 1 0 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 0 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 0 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 1 1 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a -50.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a -50.00% 0.00%

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Vice and Intelligence—4103 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Investigator Intelligence Analyst Total Vice and Intelligence

1 12 1 14

1.00 12.00 1.00 14.00

1 12 1 14

1.00 12.00 1.00 14.00

1 12 1 14

1.00 12.00 1.00 14.00

1 12 1 14

1.00 12.00 1.00 14.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Communications Center—4502 Full Time Communications Administrator Telecommunicator Communications Technical Coordinator Communications Shift Supervisor Emergency Call Taker Total Communications Center

1 19 1 6 2 29

1.00 19.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 29.00

1 19 1 6 2 29

1.00 19.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 29.00

1 19 1 6 2 29

1.00 19.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 29.00

1 19 1 6 2 29

1.00 19.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 29.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Sub-Total Administration

Human Resources—4104 Full Time Human Resources Administrator Background Investigator Human Resources Support Specialist Traffic Technician Principal Office Assistant* Total Human Resources *One position reclassified to Traffic Technician Fiscal Management—4110 Full Time Deputy Police Chief Fiscal Accreditation Administrator Senior Office Assistant Principal Office Assistant Total Fiscal Management

55

55.00

55

55.00

55

55.00

55

55.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Administration-Community Services Building/Fleet Maintenance—4503 Full Time Senior Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Custodian* Facilities Technician Sub-Total Building/Fleet maintenance

1 1 2 0 4

1.00 1.00 2.00 0.00 4.00

1 1 2 0 4

1.00 1.00 2.00 0.00 4.00

1 1 0 2 4

1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 4.00

1 1 0 2 4

1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 4.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00%

Part Time Building Custodian Total Building/Fleet Maintenance

1 5

0.63 4.63

1 5

0.63 4.63

1 5

0.63 4.63

1 5

0.63 4.63

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

1 2 1 1 5

1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

1 2 1 1 5

1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

1 2 1 1 5

1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

1 2 1 1 5

1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

Training Unit—4210 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer Range Master Crime Lab Technician* Total Training Unit *Reclassified from Principal Office Assistant Volunteer Services—4308 (Moved to HR-1008) Full Time Volunteer Services Coordinator Total Volunteer Services

City of Coral Springs, Florida

(1.00) -100.00% (1.00) -100.00%

(1.00) -100.00% (1.00) -100.00%

253


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Police (continued) Detail of Positions Administration-Community Services (continued) Central Records—4501 Full Time Records Supervisor Principal Office Assistant Office Assistant Total Central Records

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

1 4 2 7

1.00 4.00 2.00 7.00

1 4 2 7

1.00 4.00 2.00 7.00

1 4 2 7

1.00 4.00 2.00 7.00

1 4 2 7

1.00 4.00 2.00 7.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 2 15 1 19

1.00 2.00 15.00 1.00 19.00

1 2 15 1 19

1.00 2.00 15.00 1.00 19.00

1 2 15 1 19

1.00 2.00 15.00 1.00 19.00

1 2 15 1 19

1.00 2.00 15.00 1.00 19.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Community Involvement Unit—4207 Full Time Law Enforcement Officer Community Involvement Coordinator Total Community Involvement

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Emergency Management—4115 Full Time Emergency Management Coordinator Total Emergency Management

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

Sub-Total Adm-Community Services

40

39.63

40

39.63

40

39.63

39

38.63

(1.00)

-2.50%

(1.00)

-2.52%

Total Administration

95

94.625

95

94.625

95

94.625

94

93.625

(1.00)

-1.05%

(1.00)

-1.06%

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

1 1 2

1.00 1.00 2.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 2 4 12 86 9 1 1 116

1.00 2.00 4.00 12.00 86.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 116.00

1 1 4 12 84 9 1 1 113

1.00 1.00 4.00 12.00 84.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 113.00

1 1 4 12 80 9 1 1 109

1.00 1.00 4.00 12.00 80.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 109.00

1 1 4 12 84 9 1 1 113

1.00 1.00 4.00 12.00 84.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 113.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 5.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 3.67%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 5.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 3.67%

1 9 10

1.00 9.00 10.00

1 9 10

1.00 9.00 10.00

1 9 10

1.00 9.00 10.00

1 9 10

1.00 9.00 10.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

126

126.00

123

123.00

119

119.00

123

123.00

4.00

3.36%

4.00

3.36%

Youth Liaison—4303 Full Time Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant Youth Liaison Officer Principal Office Assistant Total Youth Liaison

Office of Professional Standards—4102 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant (NB)* Senior Office Assistant Total Office of Professional Standards *Non-Bargaining. Operations Support Patrol Unit—4201 Full Time Deputy Police Chief Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Lieutenant Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer* Traffic Accident Investigator Executive Assistant Senior Office Assistant Total Patrol Unit *Add to staff FY 2015 Traffic Unit—4202 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Motorcycle Officer Total Traffic Unit Sub-Total Operations-Support

254

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Police (continued) Detail of Positions Special Operations K-9 Unit—4203 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer Total K-9 Unit

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

0 5 5

0.00 5.00 5.00

0 5 5

0.00 5.00 5.00

1 6 7

1.00 6.00 7.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

0.00 (1.00) (1.00)

0.00% -16.67% -14.29%

0.00 (1.00) (1.00)

0.00% -16.67% -14.29%

0 1 8 9

0.00 1.00 8.00 9.00

1 1 8 10

1.00 1.00 8.00 10.00

1 1 8 10

1.00 1.00 8.00 10.00

1 1 8 10

1.00 1.00 8.00 10.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Humane Unit—4205 Full Time Humane Officer Total Humane Unit

3 3

3.00 3.00

3 3

3.00 3.00

3 3

3.00 3.00

3 3

3.00 3.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

Bicycle Unit—4209 Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer Total Bicycle Unit

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

1 5 6

1.00 5.00 6.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

4 4

4.00 4.00

3 3

3.00 3.00

4 4

4.00 4.00

4 4

4.00 4.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

1 6 7

1.00 6.00 7.00

1 6 7

1.00 6.00 7.00

1 6 7

1.00 6.00 7.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Sub Total Special Operations

27

27.00

34

34.00

37

37.00

36

36.00

(1.00)

-2.70%

(1.00)

-2.70%

Operations- Criminal Investigations General Investigations- 4301 Full Time Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant Investigator Criminal Investigations Specialist Crime Analyst Senior Office Assistant Principal Office Assistant Total General Investigations

1 1 11 2 1 1 2 19

1.00 1.00 11.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 19.00

1 1 10 2 1 1 2 18

1.00 1.00 10.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 18.00

1 1 11 2 1 1 2 19

1.00 1.00 11.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 19.00

1 1 11 2 1 1 2 19

1.00 1.00 11.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 19.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Special Investigations—4302 Law Enforcement Sergeant Investigator Victim/Family Advocate Principal Office Assistant Total Special Investigations

2 10 2 2 16

2.00 10.00 2.00 2.00 16.00

2 10 2 2 16

2.00 10.00 2.00 2.00 16.00

2 10 2 2 16

2.00 10.00 2.00 2.00 16.00

2 10 2 2 16

2.00 10.00 2.00 2.00 16.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Crime Scene Investigations - 4305 Unit Supervisor Latent Fingerprints Examiner Crime Lab Technician (reclassified to property room Crime Scene Technician Evidence Specialist Property Room Technician* Principal Office Assistant Total Crime Scene Investigations *Reclassified to Evidence Specialist

0 1 0 5 0 2 1 10

0.00 1.00 0.00 5.00 0.00 2.00 1.00 10.00

1 1 1 5 0 2 0 10

1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 10.00

1 1 0 6 0 3 0 11

1.00 1.00 0.00 6.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 11.00

1 1 0 6 3 0 0 11

1.00 1.00 0.00 6.00 3.00 0.00 0.00 11.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 (3.00) 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 (3.00) 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 0.00%

Sub-Total Operations-Investigations

45

45.00

44

44.00

46

46.00

46

46.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Total Operations

198

198.00

201

201.00

202

202.00

205

205.00

3.00

1.49%

3.00

1.49%

Grand Total Police

295 294.625

2.00

0.67%

2.00

0.67%

Strategic Enforcement Team—4204* Full Time Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer Total Strategic Enforcement Team *Division name changed from Tactical/Gang Unit

Substation Unit—4211 Full Time Law Enforcement Officer* Total Substation Unit * Transfer position from Patrol 4201 Burglary Enforcement and Reduction (BEAR) Unit- 4212 (New Division in Fiscal Year 2013) Full Time Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer Total BEAR Unit

298 297.625

299 298.625

City of Coral Springs, Florida

301

301

255


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Fire/EMS Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Administration—4601 Full Time Fire Chief* Deputy Fire Chief* Emergency Management & Planning Chief* Fire Equipment Technician* Senior Office Assistant* Data Analyst*/** Total Administration *Positions split 50/50 with Fire-4601 and EMS-4702 **Add to staff FY 2015 Communication Services—4602 Full Time Telecommunicator* Emergency Call Taker** Total Communication Services *Positions split 23/77 with Fire-4602 and EMS-4703 **Positions split 23/77 with Fire-4602 and EMS-4703 Suppression—4801 Full Time Assistant Fire Chief*/** Battalion Chief** Captain (Fire)** Rescue Lieutenant** Driver Engineer/Paramedic** Driver Engineer/EMT Firefighter/Paramedic Division Chief Fire Training Center***/**** Firefighter/EMT Total Suppression *Positions split 50/50 Fire-4801 and EMS-4702 **Positions split 62/38 with Fire-4801 and EMS-4702 ***Position split 50/50 Fire-4801 and Training-4805

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 0 3.5

0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 0.00 3.50

0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 0 3.5

0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 0.00 3.50

0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 0 3.5

0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 0.00 3.50

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 3.5

0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 3.50

0.00 0.00 (0.50) 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00

0.00% 0.00% -50.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 0.00 (0.50) 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00

0.00% 0.00% -50.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.69 1.15 1.84

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1.5 1.5 13.5 16 19 5 31 0 1 88.50

1.50 1.50 13.50 16.00 19.00 5.00 31.00 0.00 1.00 88.50

1.5 1.5 13.5 16 19 5 34 0 1 91.50

1.50 1.50 13.50 16.00 19.00 5.00 34.00 0.00 1.00 91.50

1.5 1.5 13.5 16 19 5 34 0.5 1 92.00

1.50 1.50 13.50 16.00 19.00 5.00 34.00 0.50 1.00 92.00

1.74 1.86 18.6 18.6 15.5 3.1 31 0.5 0.62 91.52

1.74 1.86 18.60 18.60 15.50 3.10 31.00 0.50 0.62 91.52

0.24 0.36 5.10 2.60 (3.50) (1.90) (3.00) 0.00 (0.38) (0.48)

16.00% 24.00% 37.78% 16.25% -18.42% -38.00% -8.82% 0.00% -38.00% -0.52%

0.24 0.36 5.10 2.60 (3.50) (1.90) (3.00) 0.00 (0.38) (0.48)

16.00% 24.00% 37.78% 16.25% -18.42% -38.00% -8.82% 0.00% -38.00% -0.52%

1 0 0 1.00

1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00

1 0 1 2.00

1.00 0.00 1.00 2.00

0.5 0 1 1.50

0.50 0.00 1.00 1.50

0.5 1 1 2.50

0.50 1.00 1.00 2.50

0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00

0.00% n/a 0.00% 66.67%

0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00

0.00% n/a 0.00% 66.67%

1.00 1.00 4.00 0.00 1.00 9.00

1 1 5 0 1 9

1.00 1.00 5.00 0.00 1.00 9.00

1 1 6 0 1 9

1.00 1.00 6.00 0.00 1.00 9.00

1 1 7 0.62 1 10.62

1.00 1.00 7.00 0.62 1.00 10.62

0.00 0.00 1.00 0.62 0.00 1.62

0.00% 0.00% 16.67% n/a 0.00% 18.00%

0.00 0.00 1.00 0.62 0.00 1.62

0.00% 0.00% 16.67% n/a 0.00% 18.00%

109.98

2.14

1.98%

2.14

1.98%

****Reclassified from Chief Training Officer Training- 4805 Full Time Division Chief Training Center*/** Training Officer*** Senior Office Assistant Total Fire Training *Position split 50/50 Fire-4801 and Training-4805 **Reclassified from Chief Training Officer ***Add to staff FY 2015

Inspection-4901 Full Time Fire Marshal Fire Inspection Captain Fire Inspector II* Public Education Officer*/** Senior Office Assistant Total Inspection *Add to staff FY 2015 **Position split 62/38 with Inspection-4901 and EMS-4702 Total Fire

256

1 1 4 0 1 9

103.84

103.84

107.84

107.84

107.84

107.84

109.98

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Fire/EMS (continued) Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Emergency Medical Service—4702 Full Time Fire Chief* 0.5 Deputy Fire Chief* 0.5 Assistant Fire Chief** 1.5 Battalion Chief** 1.5 Emergency Management & Planning Chief* 0 Captain (Fire)** 16.5 Rescue Lieutenant** 14 Firefighter/EMT 0 Firefighter/Paramedic** 16 Driver Engineer/EMT** 0 Driver Engineer/Paramedic** 6 Fire Equipment Technician* 0.5 Public Education Officer***/**** 0 Data Analyst*/*** 0 Senior Office Assistant* 1 Principal Office Assistant*** 0 Total Emergency Medical Service 58.00 *Position split 50/50 with EMS-4702 and Fire-4601 **Position split 38/62 with EMS-4702 and Fire-4801 ***Add to staff FY 2015 ****Position split 38/62 with EMS-4702 and Inspection-4901 EMS Communication Services—4703 Full Time Telecommunicator* Emergency Call Taker* Total Communication Services *Positions split 23/77 with Fire-4602 and EMS-4703

EMS Training—4705 Full Time Assistant Chief Training Officer Total EMS Training Total EMS Grand Total Fire and EMS

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

0.50 0.50 1.50 1.50 0.00 16.50 14.00 0.00 16.00 0.00 6.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 58.00

0.5 0.5 1.5 1.5 0 16.5 14 0 16 0 6 0.5 0 0 1 0 58.00

0.50 0.50 1.50 1.50 0.00 16.50 14.00 0.00 16.00 0.00 6.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 58.00

0.5 0.5 1.5 1.5 0 16.5 14 0 16 0 6 0.5 0 0 1 0 58.00

0.50 0.50 1.50 1.50 0.00 16.50 14.00 0.00 16.00 0.00 6.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 58.00

0.5 0.5 1.26 1.14 0.5 11.4 11.4 0.38 19 1.9 9.5 0.5 0.38 0.5 1 1 60.86

0.50 0.50 1.26 1.14 0.50 11.40 11.40 0.38 19.00 1.90 9.50 0.50 0.38 0.50 1.00 1.00 60.86

0.00 0.00 (0.24) (0.36) 0.50 (5.10) (2.60) 0.38 3.00 1.90 3.50 0.00 0.38 0.50 0.00 1.00 2.86

0.00% 0.00% -16.00% -24.00% n/a -30.91% -18.57% n/a 18.75% n/a 58.33% 0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% n/a 4.93%

0.00 0.00 (0.24) (0.36) 0.50 (5.10) (2.60) 0.38 3.00 1.90 3.50 0.00 0.38 0.50 0.00 1.00 2.86

0.00% 0.00% -16.00% -24.00% n/a -30.91% -18.57% n/a 18.75% n/a 58.33% 0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% n/a 4.93%

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

2.31 3.85 6.16

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

1 1.00

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

65.16

68.02

68.02

2.86

4.39%

2.86

4.39%

169.00

169.00

173.00

173.00

173.00

173.00

178.00

178.00

5.00

2.89%

5.00

2.89%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

257


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Public Works FY 2012 Detail of Positions Authorized Administrative Services—5501 Full Time Director of Public Works* 1 1.00 Civil Engineer* 0 0.00 PW Project Technician** 0.5 0.50 PW Analyst*** 0 0.00 Senior Office Assistant 0 0.00 Total Administrative Services 1.5 1.50 *Position Split 50/50 with Admin-5501 and Utilities-6001 **Reclassified to Public Works Analyst ***Position split 50/50 with Admin-5501 and Facilities-5801 Streets-5601 Full Time PW Project Technician Streets Superintendent Lead Worker Senior Office Assistant Equipment Operator II Streets Technician Office Assistant Neighborhood Service Worker Total Streets

0 1 2 1 4 8.5 0 4 20.5

Facilities Management—5801 Full Time Facilities Superintendent 0 Facilities Technician 1 Electrician 1 Public Works Lead Worker* 1 Carpenter 1 PW Project Technician** 0.5 PW Analyst*** 0 Sub-Total Facilities Management 5 *Reclassified to Facilities Superintendent **Reclassified to Public Works Analyst ***Position split 50/50 with Facilities-5801 and Admin-5501 Total Facilities Management Total Public Works

FY 2013 Authorized

FY 2014 Authorized

FY 2015 Authorized

Position Change

FTE Change

1 0 0.5 0 0 1.5

1.00 0.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.50

1 0.5 0.5 0 1 3

1.00 0.50 0.50 0.00 1.00 3.00

0.5 0.5 0 0.5 1 2.5

0.50 0.50 0.00 0.50 1.00 2.50

(0.50) 0.00 (0.50) 0.50 0.00 (0.50)

-50.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00% -16.67%

(0.50) 0.00 (0.50) 0.50 0.00 (0.50)

-50.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00% -16.67%

0.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 8.50 0.00 4.00 20.50

0 1 2 1 3 8.5 0 5 20.5

0.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 8.50 0.00 5.00 20.50

1 1 2 1 3 7 1 5 21

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 7.00 1.00 5.00 21.00

1 1 2 1 3 7 1 5 21

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 7.00 1.00 5.00 21.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.00 5.00

0 1 1 1 1 0.5 0 5

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.00 5.00

0 1 1 1 1 0.5 0 4.5

0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.00 4.50

1 1 1 0 1 0 0.5 4.5

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.50 4.50

1.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00 (0.50) 0.50 0.00

n/a 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

1.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00 (0.50) 0.50 0.00

n/a 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

6

5.700

5

5.000

4.5

4.500

4.5

4.500

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

28

27.700

27

27.000

28.5

28.500

28

28.00

(0.50)

-1.75%

(0.50)

-1.75%

Equipment Services Detail of Positions Equipment Maintenance—5701 Full Time Fleet Superintendent Lead Mechanic Generator Technician Mechanic/Fire-EVT Mechanic Senior Office Assistant Fleet Service Worker Total Equipment Services

258

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 1 0 10 1 1 15

1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 10.00 1.00 1.00 15.00

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 1 1 10 1 0 15

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

1 1 1 1 10 1 0 15

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget

1 1 1 1 10 1 0 15

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

Position Change # %

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

FTE Change #

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

%

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Utilities Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Administration—6001 Full Time Deputy City Manager* 0.5 Director of Financial Services** 0 Director of Public Works*** 0 0.5 Civil Engineer*** Utilities Operations Manager 0 Applications Analyst**** 0 Senior Office Assistant 1 SR. CADD Tech/GIS Technician***** 0 Assistant City Attorney****** 0 City Controller******* 0 Office Assistant 1 Sub-Total Administration 4.5 *Position split 50/50 with City Manager's Office-0501 **Position split .25 Utilities-Admin-6001; .75 Financial Svc.-1501 ***Position split 50/50 with Public Works-Admin-5501 ****Position split 50/50 with IT-2001 *****Position split .25 Utilities-Admin-6001; .75 IT-2001 ******Position split .25 Utilities-Admin-6001; .75 City Attorney-2502 *******Position split 50/50 with Financial Services-1501

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

0.50 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 4.50

0.5 0 0 0.5 0 0.5 1 0 0 0 1 5

0.50 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00 0.50 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 5.00

0.5 0 0 0.5 1 0.5 1 0.25 0 0 1 4.75

0.50 0.00 0.00 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 0.25 0.00 0.00 1.00 4.75

0.5 0.25 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 0.25 0.25 0.5 1 6.25

0.50 0.25 0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 0.25 0.25 0.50 1.00 6.25

0.00 0.25 0.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.00 1.50

0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% 31.58%

0.00 0.25 0.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.00 1.50

0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a n/a 0.00% 31.58%

Water Distribution—6002 Full Time Utilities Coordinator Water Conservation Technician* Water Conservation Coordinator Utilities Lead Worker** Field Operations Supervisor Equipment Operator II Utilities Service Technician Utilities Backflow Technician Utilities Locator Technician Utilities Service Worker Total Water Distribution *Reclassify to Water Conservation Coordinator **Reclassify to Field Operations Supervisor

1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 8

1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 3.00 8.00

0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 3 8

0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 3.00 8.00

0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 5 10

0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 5.00 10.00

0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 4 10

0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 0.00 1.00 4.00 10.00

0.00 (1.00) 1.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00

n/a -100.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 0.00% 100.00% n/a 0.00% -20.00% 0.00%

0.00 (1.00) 1.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 0.00

n/a -100.00% n/a -100.00% n/a 0.00% 100.00% n/a 0.00% -20.00% 0.00%

Water Treatment—6003 Full Time Chief Water Plant Operator Water Plant Maintenance Coordinator* Utilities Maintenance Supervisor Utilities Mechanic Senior Water Plant Operator Water Plant Operator Utilities Service Worker** Utilities Service Technician Total Water Treatment *Reclassfied to Utilities Maintenance Supervisor **Reclassified to Utilities Service Technician

1 1 0 2 5 5 1 0 15

1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

1 1 0 2 5 5 1 0 15

1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

1 1 0 2 6 4 1 0 15

1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 6.00 4.00 1.00 0.00 15.00

1 0 1 2 6 4 0 1 15

1.00 0.00 1.00 2.00 6.00 4.00 0.00 1.00 15.00

0.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00

0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00

0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

1 1 2 1 0 0 3 0 8

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 8.00

1 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 7

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 7.00

1 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 9

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 0.00 9.00

1 1 2 1 1 1 0 2 9

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 2.00 9.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (2.00) 2.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (2.00) 2.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

Wastewater Collection— 6005 Full Time Utilities Coordinator Utilities Instrumentation Equipment Operator II Video Inspection Technician Asset Management System Technician Lift Station Mechanic Utilities Service Worker* Utilities Service Technician Total Wastewater Collection *Reclassified to Utilities Service Technician Total Utilities

35.5

35.50

35

35.00

38.75

38.75

40.25

40.25

1.50

3.87%

1.50

3.87%

Grand Total Public Works, Equipment and Utilities

78.5

78.20

77

77.00

82.25

82.25

83.25

83.25

1.00

1.22%

1.00

1.22%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

259


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Parks and Recreation Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

Parks— 8100 Cypress Park—8101 Full Time Parks Superintendent Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Technician Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker Sub-Total Cypress Park

1 1 1 1 6 10

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 10.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Mullins Park—8102 Full Time Director of Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Technician Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker Sub-Total Mullins Park

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

1 1 2 1 6 11

1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 11.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1 1 5 8

1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 8.00

1 2 1 5 9

1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 9.00

1 2 1 5 9

1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 9.00

1 2 1 5 9

1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 9.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 2 1 1 9 14

1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 9.00 14.00

1 3 1 1 10 16

1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 16.00

1 3 1 1 10 16

1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 16.00

1 3 1 1 10 16

1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 16.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0 1

0.00 1.00

0 1

0.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0 1 1 2 1 10 15

0.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 10.00 15.00

0 1 1 2 1 10 15

0.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 10.00 15.00

0 1 1 2 1 10 15

0.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 10.00 15.00

2 0 0 1 3 9 15

2.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 3.00 9.00 15.00

2.00 (1.00) (1.00) (1.00) 2.00 (1.00) 0.00

n/a -100.00% -100.00% -50.00% 200.00% -10.00% 0.00%

2.00 (1.00) (1.00) (1.00) 2.00 (1.00) 0.00

n/a -100.00% -100.00% -50.00% 200.00% -10.00% 0.00%

1 0 2 5 8

1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00 8.00

1 0 2 5 8

1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00 8.00

1 0 2 5 8

1.00 0.00 2.00 5.00 8.00

0 1 2 5 8

0.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 8.00

(1.00) 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

-100.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

(1.00) 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

-100.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

68

68.00

72

72.00

72

72.00

72

72.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

North Community Park—8103 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Technician Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker Sub-Total North Community Park Neighborhood Parks—8116 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Technician Parks Lead Worker Senior Office Assistant Maintenance Worker Sub-Total Neighborhood Parks Beautification—8117 Full Time Parks Adminstrator Sub-Total Beautification Landscape—8118 Full Time Parks Services Coordinator Parks and Recreation Coordinator* Arborist* Parks Technician** Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker** Sub-Total Landscape *Reclassified to Parks Services Coordinator **1 position reclassified to Parks Lead Worker Irrigation—8119 Full Time Parks and Rec. Coordinator* Parks Services Coordinator Parks Technician Maintenance Worker Sub-Total Irrigation *Reclassified to Parks Services Coordinator Environmentally Sensitive Land—8121 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Sub-Total ESL Total Parks Recreation—8200 Activity Center—8204 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Sub-Total Activity Center

260

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Detail of Positions by Department and Division (continued) Parks and Recreation (continued) Detail of Positions

FY 2012 Authorized Position FTEs

Recreation Services—8205 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Principle Office Assistant Office Assistant* Sub-Total Recreation Services *Reclassified to Principle Office Assistnat Summer Recreation—8208 Full Time Recreation Superintendent Sub-Total Summer Recreation Transportation—8209 Bus Driver Sub-Total Transportation Total Recreation Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex—7810 Full Time Assistant Director of Parks and Recreation Sub-Total Sportsplex *Reclassify Position from Executive Director of Sportsplex Athletics—7812 Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Lead Worker Parks Technician* Maintenance Worker Sub-Total Athletics *Reclassify to Parks Lead Worker Total Sportsplex/Athletics

FY 2013 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2014 Authorized Position FTEs

FY 2015 Authorized Position FTEs

Position Change # %

FTE Change #

%

4 0 1 5

4.00 0.00 1.00 5.00

4 0 1 5

4.00 0.00 1.00 5.00

4 0 1 5

4.00 0.00 1.00 5.00

4 1 0 5

4.00 1.00 0.00 5.00

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% n/a -100.00% 0.00%

0.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.00

0.00% n/a -100.00% 0.00%

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

1 1 8

1.00 1.00 8.00

1 1 8

1.00 1.00 8.00

1 1 8

1.00 1.00 8.00

1 1 8

1.00 1.00 8.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0 1

0.00 1.00

0 1

0.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

1 0 2 2 5

1.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 5.00

1 0 2 2 5

1.00 0.00 2.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

1 1 1 2 5

1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

6

6.00

6

6.00

6

6.00

6

6.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Tennis—8400 Cypress Tennis—8401 Executive Assistant Sub-Total Cypress Tennis

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

1 1

1.00 1.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

Tennis Center—8409 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks Lead Worker Sub-Total Tennis Center Total Tennis Services

1 1 2 3

1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00

1 1 2 3

1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00

1 1 2 3

1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00

1 1 2 3

1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

Total Sportsplex and Tennis

9

9.00

9

9.00

9

9.00

9

9.00

0.00

0.00%

0.00

0.00%

Aquatics—8300 Cypress Pool—8301 Full Time Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks and Recreation Associate Principal Office Assistant Total Cypress Pool

1 1 1 3

1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00

1 2 0 3

1.00 2.00 0.00 3.00

1 2 0 3

1.00 2.00 0.00 3.00

1 2 0 3

1.00 2.00 0.00 3.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

Mullins Pool—8302 Full Time Parks and Recreation Associate Total Mullins Pool

2 2

2.00 2.00

2 2

2.00 2.00

2 2

2.00 2.00

2 2

2.00 2.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0 1 1 7 0 1 0 11

0.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 11.00

0 1 1 6 1 1 0 11

0.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 11.00

1 1 1 6 1 1 0 11

1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 11.00

1 1 1 5 2 0 1 11

1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 0.00 1.00 11.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 1.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -16.67% 100.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

0.00 0.00 0.00 (1.00) 1.00 (1.00) 1.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -16.67% 100.00% -100.00% n/a 0.00%

Aquatic Complex—8303 Full Time Aquatics Manager Parks and Recreation Coordinator Parks and Recreation Technician Parks and Recreation Associate Principal Office Assistant Senior Office Assistant** Maintenance Worker Total Aquatic Complex *Reclassify Position from Director of Aquatics **Reclassified to Maintenance Worker Total Aquatics Grand Total Parks and Recreation Sub-Total Full-Time Staff Sub-Total Part-Time Staff Total Staff (Including Parkland, FL)

16 101 787 2 789

16.00 101.00 787.00 1.33 788.33

16 105 800 1 801

16.00 105.00 800.00 0.63 800.63

16 105 813 1 814

16.00 105.00 813.00 0.63 813.63

City of Coral Springs, Florida

16 105 827 1 828

16.00 105.00 827 0.63 828

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

14.00 0.00 14.00

1.72% 0.00% 1.72%

14.00 0.01 14.00

1.72% 0.80% 1.72%

261


Abbreviations and Acronyms ACS A/P ARC ARRA AS/400

American Community Survey Accounts payable Architectural Review Committee American Recovery and Reinvestment Act The City’s mainframe/server*

ICMA IRD ISF ISP IT

International City/County Management Association Industrial Research Development Internal Service Fund* Internet service provider Information Technology

CADD CAFR CALEA

JAG KIO LAN

Justice Assistance Grant Key Intended Outcome* Local area network

CDBG CERT CIP C&M CMO CO CPI CRA CSHS CSMART CSUSA

Computer assisted design and drafting Comprehensive Annual Financial Report* Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Community Development Block Grant* Community Emergency Response Team Capital Improvement Program* Communications and Marketing City Manager’s Office Certificate of Occupancy Consumer Price Index Community Redevelopment Agency Coral Springs High School Coral Springs Museum of Art Charter Schools USA

MBO MGD MLK M-STARS

Management and Budget Office Million gallons per day Martin Luther King Municipal Short-term Auction Rate Securities*

NEC OPEB

Neighborhood Stabilization Comittee Other Post Employment Benefits

DEP DOE DOR DOT

Florida Department of Environmental Protection* U.S. Department of Energy Florida Department of Revenue U.S. Department of Transportation

EDF EMS ESF ESL

Economic Development Foundation Emergency Medical Services Equipment Services Fund* Environmentally Sensitive Land

FCAT Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test FDOT Florida Department of Transportation FEMA Federal Emergency Management Administration* FF&E Furniture, fixtures, and equipment FICA Federal Insurance Contributions Act FIFC Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission* FPL Florida Power and Light F/T Full-time FTMS Financial Trend Monitoring System FTE Full-time equivalent* FY Fiscal Year* GAAP GASB GFOA GIS GMBA GO

Generally Accepted Accounting Principles Governmental Accounting Standards Board Government Finance Officers Association Geographic Information Systems Government Management Budgetary Association General Obligation

HR HTE HUD

Human Resources The City’s main data application vendor* U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

262

PD Police Department PFM Professional Facilities Management P/I Purchasing/Inventory PM Performance measure* SFWMD South Florida Water Management District SRF State Revolving Fund* (loan program) SRT Special Response Team SWOT Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats SYEP Summer Youth Employment Program TIF TQM TRIM

Tax Increment Financing* Total Quality Management Truth in Millage*

UASI WAN

Urban Area Security Initiative* Wide Area Network

*defined in the Glossary of Terms

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Glossary of Terms Accrual Basis of Accounting A method of accounting where revenues are recorded when service is given and expenses are recognized when the benefit is received.

Bonds A certificate of debt issued by an entity, guaranteeing payment of the original investment, plus interest, by a specified future date.

Actuarial A person or methodology that makes determinations of required contributions to achieve future funding levels that addresses risk and time.

Build-out That time in the life cycle of the city when no incorporated property remains undeveloped. All construction from this point forward is renovation, retrofitting or land cleared through the demolition of existing structures.

Ad ValoremTax A tax levied on the assessed value of real estate and personal property. This tax is also known as property tax. Adopted Budget The proposed budget as initially formally approved by the City Commission. Amended Budget The adopted budget as formally adjusted by the City Commission. Amortization The reduction of debt through regular payments of principal and interest sufficient to retire the debt instrument at a predetermined date known as maturity. Appropriation A specific amount of money authorized by the City Commission for the purchase of goods or services. AS400 Midrange server built by IBM and designed for small businesses and departments in large enterprises and now redesigned so that it will work well in distributed networks with Web applications. Assessed Property Value The value set upon real estate or other property by the County Property Appraiser and the State as a basis for levying ad valorem taxes. Balanced Budget A budget in which planned funds or revenues available are equal to planned expenditures. Basis Point Equal to 1/100 of one percent. If interest rates rise from 7.50 percent to 7.75 percent, the difference is referred to as an increase of 25 basis points. Benchmarking Determining the quality of products, services and practices by measuring critical factors (e.g., how fast, how reliable a product or service is) and comparing the results to those of highly regarded competitors. Bond Covenants A legally enforceable promise made to the bondholders from the issuer, generally in relation to the source of repayment funding. Bond Rating A measure of an organization’s credit-worthiness. The primary bond rating services—Moody’s, Fitch, and Standard & Poor’s—perform credit analyses to determine the probability of an issuer of debt defaulting partially or fully.

Business Plan A written document outlining how City resources will be applied to achieve the objectives determined by the Strategic Plan. Business SWAT Team A special team put together to deal with a specific issue using particular analysis tools over a short period of time. Capital Equipment Physical plant and equipment with an expected life of five years or more. Capital Expenditure The approved budget for improvements to or acquisition of infrastructure, park development, building, construction or expansion, utility systems, streets or other physical structure with an estimated cost of $5,000 or more. Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) A plan for capital expenditures to be incurred each year over a five-year period. Essentially, the plan allows for a systematic evaluation of all potential projects, specifies funding sources for all approved projects, and serves as an economic development tool. The CIP is linked to the City’s Business and Strategic Plans. Capital Lease An agreement conveying the right to use property, plant or equipment usually for a stated period of time where the lessee assumes all the risks and rewards of ownership. Capitalized Interest When interest cost is added to the cost of an asset and expensed over the useful life of the asset. Chargeback Term used to describe the method to reimburse the Equipment Services Fund for the usage of an asset over its expected useful life (also known as funded depreciation). Communications Services Tax Simplification Law A law created by Florida Legislature to combine communication services revenues with a two-tiered tax composed of State and local-option tax. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) One of the longest-running programs of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that funds local community development activities such as affordable housing, antipoverty programs, and infrastructure development.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

263


Glossary of Terms (continued) Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) This official annual report presents the status of the City’s finances in a standardized format. The CAFR is organized by fund and contains two basic types of information: a balance sheet that compares assets with liabilities and fund balance; and an operating statement that compares revenues and expenditures.

Distinguished Budget Presentation Program A voluntary program administered by the Government Finance Officers Association to encourage governments to publish efficiently organized and easily readable budget documents and to provide peer recognition and technical assistance to the fiscal officers preparing them.

Contingency An appropriation of funds available to cover unforeseen events that occur during the fiscal year. These funds, if not used, lapse at year end. This is not the same as fund balance.

Encumbrances Obligations incurred in the form of orders, contracts and similar items that will become payable when goods are delivered or services rendered.

Coral Springs Charter School Fund This fund accounts for the revenues and expenses incurred in the operation of the Coral Springs Charter School. Funds are received from the state and through grants to teach approximately 1,600 students in grades six through twelve. Core Service A principal service or product delivered by a program or department that is necessary to the successful operation of the city. Often, core services are part of the mission of the program or department.

Enterprise Fund A self supporting fund designed to account for activities supported by user charges: an example is the Water and Sewer Fund. Equipment Services Fund (ESF) An Internal Service Fund that accounts for the operating and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and major equipment. Fuel, maintenance and depreciation expenses are determined on a full recovery basis for each fleet asset type. Departments reimburse this fund for these costs through interfund transfers.

Cross-Functional Team A team of employees from more than one department convened to analyze problems and create strategies for process improvement that have Citywide impact.

Equity Financing A source of revenue that comes from surpluses that are generated in previous years. When the City Equity Finances some of its CIP it reduces the amount of debt that would have to be issued.

Debt Service The payment of principal and interest on borrowed funds such as bonds and loans.

Escrow Money or property held in the custody of a third party that is returned only after the fulfillment of specific conditions.

Debt Service Fund The debt service fund is used to account for the accumulation of resources for, and the payment of, general long-term debt principal, interest, and related costs.

Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) Agency of the US government responsible for disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning.

Defeasance A provision that voids a bond when the borrower puts cash in escrow via a refunding bond issuance sufficient to service the borrower’s debt. When a bond issue is defeased the borrower sets aside cash to pay off the bonds, therefore the outstanding debt and cash offset each other on the balance sheet and are removed from the financial statements.

Fiduciary Funds Funds used to report assets held in a trustee or agency capacity for others and which therefore cannot be used to support the government’s own programs. The fiduciary fund category includes pension trsut funds, investment trust funds, private-purpose trust funds, and agency funds.

Deficit The excess of liabilities over assets—or expenditures over revenues—in a fund over an accounting period. Depreciation The decrease in value of physical assets due to use and the passage of time. Designated Funds that have been identified for a specific purpose. This differs from reserved funds, in that there is no legal requirement for funds that have been designated.

264

FIFC Debt service activity related to a bond series of the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission. Financial Trend Monitoring System A management tool that pulls together information from a government’s budgetary and financial reports, combines it with economic and demographic data, and creates a series of 22 financial indicators that, when plotted over time, can be used to monitor changes in financial condition and alert the government to future problems. Fines And Forfeitures Consists of a variety of fees, fines and forfeitures collected by the State Court System, including bail forfeitures, garnishments, legal defenders recoupment and juror/witness fees.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Glossary of Terms (continued) Fire Fund A special revenue fund that provides for the Fire Department, consisting of administration, prevention, suppression, inspection and communications. Fiscal Year (FY) Any period of 12 consecutive months designated as the budget year. The City’s budget year begins October 1st and ends September 30th. Fixed Asset Items owned by the City that cost a considerable amount and has a useful life exceeding two years—e.g., computers, furniture, equipment and vehicles. Fleet The vehicles owned and operated by the City. (See Rolling Stock) Forfeiture The automatic loss of property, including cash, as a penalty for breaking the law, or as compensation for losses resulting from illegal activities. Once property has been forfeited, the City may claim it, resulting in confiscation of the property. Franchise Bonds Bonds for the payment of which the City’s franchise revenues are pledged.

Health and General Insurance Funds Internal service funds set up to account for the City’s insured general liability, property, workers’ compensation, life and employee medical benefits. Homestead Exemption Pursuant to the Florida State Constitution, the first $25,000 of assessed value of a home which the owner occupies as principal residence is exempt from the property tax. HTE The City’s main data application vendor. Also known as Sungard. Inflation A rise in price levels caused by an increase in available funds beyond the proportion of available goods. Infrastructure Public domain fixed assets including roads, bridges, curbs, gutters, sidewalks, drainage systems, lighting systems and other items that have value only to the city. Interest Income Revenue associated with the City cash management activities of investing fund balances.

Franchise Fee Charges to utilities for exclusive/non-exclusive rights to operate within municipal boundaries. Examples are electricity, telephone, cable television, and solid waste.

Interfund Reimbursement (Transfers) Administrative fees charged to other City funds (e.g. Water & Sewer Fund) for the provision of administrative and other City services.

Full-Time Equivalent Position A part-time position converted to the decimal equivalent of a full-time position based on 2,080 hours per year.

Intergovernmental Revenue Revenue received from or through the Federal, State, or County government. These include Cigarette Tax, State Revenue Sharing, Alcoholic Beverage Tax, Sales Tax (5th cent), Rebate - Municipal Vehicles.

Fund A set of interrelated accounts to record revenues and expenditures associated with a specific purpose. Fund Balance The difference between assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund at the end of the fiscal year. Gainsharing A city program, similar to corporate profitsharing, where departments and employees who contribute to cost savings or revenue enhancements may share in the resulting gain. This Fiscal Year, up to 10% of retained earnings and unappropriated fund balances in specific funds may be shared with employees. General Fund A governmental fund established to account for resources and uses of general operating functions of City departments. Resources are, in the majority, provided by taxes. General Obligation Bonds Debt issued by municipalities that are backed by the full faith and credit of the issuer. Governmental Funds Funds generally used to account for tax-supported activities. There are five different types of governmental funds: the general fund, special revenue funds, debt service funds, capital projects funds, and permanent funds.

Internal Service Fund (ISF) A fund established to account for an entity which provides goods and services to other City entities and charges those entities for the goods and services provided. Key Intended Outcome (KIO) The principal outcome desired from a program or activity that forms a basis for the rationale for funding the activity. They are always expressed quantitatively to ensure that discreet measurements can be made to assess the effectiveness of the activity. Linkage A system of interconnected parts or the act of linking. In our case, this refers to the relationships between the various performance measures, objectives, goals, and Key Intended Outcomes to ensure the entire organization is working together to achieve the City’s Mission. Mandate A requirement from a higher level of government that a lower level of government perform a task in a particular way or to a particular standard. Market Rate Value The appraised value assigned to property by the County Property Appraiser. Typically, this value represents “Fair Market Value” less estimated selling expenses.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

265


Glossary of Terms (continued) Mill A taxation unit equal to one dollar of tax obligation for every $1,000 of assessed valuation of property. Millage The total tax obligation per $1,000 of assessed valuation of property. Modified Accrual Basis The basis of accounting under which revenues are recognized when measurable and available to pay liabilities and expenditures are recognized when the liability is incurred except for interest on long-term debt which is recognized when due, and the noncurrent portion of accrued vacation and sick leave which is recorded in general long-term debt. The General Fund, Fire/EMS Fund, and Debt Service Fund budgets are prepared on the modified accrual basis of accounting except that encumbrances are treated like expenditures. M-STAR The rate of interest to be borne by M-STARS (either or both of the Series 2002B and Series 2002C Bonds while they bear interest at the M-STARS Rate) during each auction period. In no event may the M-STARS Rate exceed the maximum M-STARS Rate. Municipal Code A collection of laws, rules and regulations that apply to the City and its citizens. Neighborhood Services Team A program comprised of various City department team members developed to promote and strengthen the stability, development, revitalization and preservation of Coral Springs’ neighborhoods through community-based problem solving, neighborhood services and public/private cooperation. Non-Departmental Referring to activities, revenues and expenditures that are not assigned to a department. Operating Budget A budget for general revenues and expenditures such as salaries, utilities, and supplies. Operating Lease A lease that is paid out of current operating income rather than capitalized. Ordinance A formal legislative enactment by the City that carries the full force and effect of the law within corporate boundaries of the City unless in conflict with any higher form of law, such as state or federal. Outcomes Quality performance measures of effectiveness and of achieving goals. (e.g., customer satisfaction, awareness level, etc.) Outputs Process performance measures of efficiency and productivity. (e.g., per capita expenditures, transactions per day, etc.)

266

Pay-as-You-Go Financing A method of paying for capital projects that relies on current tax and grant revenues rather than on debt. Pension Fund The Pension Fund accounts for the accumulation of resources to be used for retirement benefit payments to the City’s employees. Per Capita A measurement of the proportion of some statistic to an individual resident determined by dividing the statistic by the current population. Performance Budget A budget wherein expenditures are based primarily upon measurable performance of activities and work programs. Performance Measure (PM) Data collected to determine how effective and/or efficient a program is in achieving its objectives. Performance Measurement System The City’s methodology for monitoring performance measures and Key Intended Outcomes. See Quarterly Performance Report. Permit Revenue Fees imposed on construction-related activities and for the acquisition of other nonbusiness permits (e.g. dog, bicycle). Potable Water Water that is fit to drink. Present Value The discounted value of a future amount of cash, assuming a given rate of interest, to take into account the time value of money. To put it another way, a dollar is worth a dollar today, but is worth less than today’s dollar tomorrow. Property Tax A tax levied on the assessed value of real and personal property. This tax is also known as ad valorem tax. Proprietary Fund Enterprise and internal service funds that are similar to corporate funds, in that they are related to assets, liabilities, equities, revenues, expenses and transfers determined by business or quasi-business activities. Public Art Fund This is a special revenue fund where Public Art fees are collected during the permitting process for new construction and renovations of existing structures. Revenues are collected only from those developers who choose not to purchase and maintain public art on their own property. Public/Private Partnership A joint project conducted with resources of the city and a private organization, generally nonprofit. Examples in Coral Springs includes the efforts of the Economic Development Foundation and Civic, Cultural and Educational Foundation.

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Glossary of Terms (continued) Quarterly Performance Report A document that collects quarterly performance achievement in each of the Key Intended Outcomes and departmental performance measures. Refunding Paying off an outstanding bond issue by using money from the sale of a new bond offering. In other words, issuing more bonds to pay off existing bonds. Reserves A portion of the fund balance or retained earnings legally segregated for specific purposes. Resolution A legislative act by the City with less legal formality than an ordinance. Retained Earnings An account in the equity section of the balance sheet reflecting the accumulated earnings of the Water & Sewer Fund, the Self-Insurance Funds, the Equipment Services Fund, or the City Centre Fund. Revenue Bonds Bonds whose principal and interest are payable exclusively from earnings of an enterprise fund. In addition to a pledge of revenues, such bonds sometimes contain a mortgage on the enterprise fund’s property.

Sterling Award The Governor of the State of Florida created a program in 1993 to recognize Florida corporations for quality and organizational excellence. It is based on the criteria established for the national Malcolm Baldrige Award. Structurally Balanced Budget: A budget that supports financial sustainability for multiple years in the future. Strategic Plan A document outlining long-term goals, critical issues and action plans which will increase the organization’s effectiveness in attaining its mission, priorities, goals and objectives. Strategic planning starts with examining the present, envisioning the future, choosing how to get there, and making it happen. Tax Increment Financing (TIF) A funding source used in blighted areas designated by the City for redevelopment. The public improvements required for the project is financed with the incremental taxes generated by the increase in the assessed valuation of the new development. Taxable Value The assessed value less homestead and other exemptions, if applicable.

Rolled-Back Rate The operating millage rate required to raise the same ad valorem tax revenues as were levied in the prior year, exclusive of new construction, additions to structures, deletions and property added, i.e. annexations.

Total Quality Management (TQM) A management philosophy that emphasizes customer satisfaction, continual incremental improvement, teams and employee training as critical elements to an organization’s long-run success.

Rolling Stock Wheeled vehicles in the City’s fleet.

Transport Fees The cost to provide ambulance transportation to patients from home to hospital.

Sales Tax Tax imposed on the taxable sales of all final goods Self Insurance Fund This internal service fund is used to centrally manage the employee health and life insurance benefit packages, the workers’ compensation program, and the City’s insurance coverage of real and personal property. Special Assessment A compulsory levy made against certain properties to defray part or all of the cost of a specific improvement or service deemed to primarily benefit those properties. Special Revenue Fund A fund used to account for revenues legally restricted to expenditures for a particular purpose. An example is the Fire Rescue Fund. State Revolving Fund (SRF) A low interest loan program from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for planning, designing, and constructing drinking water and wastewater projects.

Trust and Agency Funds These funds are used to account for assets held by the City in a trustee capacity or as an agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments and/or other funds. Truth in Millage (TRIM) The Florida Truth in Millage Act (TRIM) requires a specific method of tax rate calculation, form of notice, public hearing requirements and advertisement specifications prior to the adoption of a budget tax rate. The effect of TRIM is to inform taxpayers that their property taxes are changing (up or down), the cause (a change in the assessed value of their property and/or an increase in the proposed spending level) and how the proposed new tax rate compares to the rate that would generate the same property tax dollars as the current year (the “rolled-back” rate). Unappropriated Not obligated for specific purposes. (See Undesignated)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

267


Glossary of Terms (continued) Undesignated Without a specific purpose. (See Unappropriated) Unencumbered The portion of an allotment not yet expended or encumbered. Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) A federal grant program that provides funding support for target-hardening activities to nonprofit organizations. The program seeks to promote coordination and collaboration in emergency preparedness activities among public and private community representatives, state and local government agencies, and Citizen Corps Councils. Useful Life The period of time that a fixed asset is able to be used. This can refer to a budgeted period of time for an equipment class or the actual amount of time for a particular item. User Fees Charges for expenses incurred when services are provided to an individual or groups and not the community at large. The key to effective utilization of user fees is being able to identify specific beneficiaries of services and then determine the full cost of the service they are consuming (e.g. building inspections). Fees are traditionally charged under the following circumstances: • Service is supplied to an individual or group • Benefits accrue to an individual or group • Service can be withheld from individuals who refuse to pay

• Cost can be passed on to the ultimate beneficiary • Degree of utilization can be measured • Use of service is voluntary Utility Service Tax Taxes levied on consumer consumption of utility services provided in the City. The tax is levied as a percentage of gross receipts. Variable Rate A rate of interest subject to adjustment (e.g., the rate of interest specified may be a percentage of the prime rate on certain set dates.) Water & Sewer Fund (W&S) An enterprise fund established to account for the resources and uses of the Utilities function of the City and is prepared on the full accrual basis of accounting. The Utilities function consists of the provision of a clean water source and the proper disposal of wastewater. The Water & Sewer Fund is an enterprise fund and as such receives its revenues from charges levied for the provision of services to users. Wetlands Mitigation Any action required to reduce the impact of development on a wetland. Mitigation actions may include creation of new wetlands or improvement of existing wetlands. Mitigation may occur on the site of the development or at some other site. Working Capital A financial metric which represents operating liquidity available to a business. It is calculated as current assets minus current liabilities.

Sources: Bailey, Larry P.; Governmental GAAP Guide; Harcourt Brace; 1994. Bland, R; Budgeting-A Guide for Local Governments, ICMA, 1997. Government Finance Officers Association; Governmental Accounting, Auditing and Financial Reporting; GFOA, 1994. Webster’s II: New Riverside University Dictionary; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994.

268

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Index

Note: Departments and funds are bold to help the reader locate them easier.

A

C

Abbreviations and Acronyms 262 Ad Valorem Taxes 38 Millage rates 38 Operating Millage Rate Comparison 25 Tax Rate 25 Voter Approved Debt Service Millage Rate 25 Awards and Special Recognitions 2, 156

Calendar See “Budget Calendar” 24 Capital Improvement Program 68 Capital Improvement Summaries All Funds by Funding Source 75 General Fund by Funding Source 76 Summary by Fund 74 CIP Funding Sources 70 CIP Policies 230 Impact on Operating Budget 71 Major Capital Projects by Department 78 Major Capital Projects by Location 77 Capital Improvement Summaries Summary by Fund 74 Center for the Arts Service Statistics 15 Charts and Graphs 2015-2016 Short-Range Transportation Improvement Plan 102 Accidents at Major Intersections 133 Allocation of Debt Service for Revenue Bonds and Other Debt FY2015 63 Appropriated Funds Budget 29 Are Businesses Interested in Conducting Business with the City On-Line? 148 Athletic League Participants 132 Best Ways for the City to Communicate with Businesses 147 Budget Process Map 160 Capital expenditure 68 CIP funding sources 70 CIP impact on the operating budget 71 City of Coral Springs’ Business Mode 95 Combined Budget Summary 29 Communications services tax revenue 119 Commute time to work 94 Comparison of top helpdesk topics 152 Computer Replacement Prog.contributions and expenses 69 Computer Rep. Program contributions and expenses 69 Coral Springs Properties in Some Stage of Foreclosure 88 CPI Bears Watching 86 Crime Rate 131 Customer Satisfaction 132 Debt Service Fund total expenditures 63 Debt Service Fund total revenues 62 Debt service millage rate 25 Electric Franchise Fee revenue 119 Electric Franchise Fee Revenues 80 Electric Utility Service Tax Revenues 79 Employee Productivity 133 Employee Satisfaction 132 Fire Assessment rate comparison 45 Fire Fund total expenditures 45

B Benchmarking 153 Bond ratings 14 Budget Award 2 Calendar 24 Highlights 25 Major Policy Considerations 28 Process Amending 23 Approving 23 Creation 20 Environment 20 Format 22 Methodology 21 Monitoring 23 Review Process 21 Staff 18 Where the Money Comes from by Source 34 Where the Money Goes by Line Item Category 34 Where the Money Goes by Type of Program 34 Budget and Strategic Planning Performance Measures 170 Budget Highlights 25 Budget in Brief 25 Budget Ordinance 222 Budget Process Map 160 Budget Process Overview 20 Budget Resolution 220 Budget Summary Tables Coral Springs Charter School Fund 54 Debt Service Fund 61 Equipment Services Fund 56 Fire Fund 43 General Fund 35 General Insurance Fund 52 Health Fund 50 Pension Fund 59 Public Art Fund 55 Solid Waste Fund 60 Water and Sewer Fund 47 Building. See Development Services Business Plan Initiatives. See Initiatives Business Survey Summary 145

City of Coral Springs, Florida

269


Index (continued) Fire Fund total revenues 44 Five-Year Forecast: General Fund 81, 120 Fleet replacement cost 69 Franchise fees 39 Full-time additions 26 Fund Structure Overview 30 FY 2014 Capital projects financed via grants 73 General Fund total expenditures 41 General Fund total revenues 38 Growing Hispanic Population 91 Half-cent sales tax 80 Housing 93 ICMA comparison cities 153 Importance-Satisfaction Assessment Matrix 143 Income 94 Key Intended Outcomes 96, 100, 105, 108, 112 Language spoken at home 93 Likelihood of recommending City as a business location to friends, family and co-workers 147 Long-Range Transportation Improvement Plan 103 Major Capital Projects by Department 78 Major Capital Projects by Location 77 Majority of housing units were built between 1970-1999 93 Median Single-Family Home Sales Prices in Broward County 87 Millage rates 38 Net budgeted expenditures 33 Net budgeted revenues 32 Net full-time position changes 26 Non-departmental operating expenses 42 Non-Residential Property Values 131 NW 40th Street Bike Path Map 105 Operating millage rate 25 Operating millage rate comparison 25 Organization Chart 13 Overall Business Atmosphere Rating 147 Overall Composite Customer Satisfaction Index 2009 vs. 2011 vs. 2013 141 Overall Quality of Services Provided by the City 145 Overall Ratings of Customer Service 145 Percent Change in GDP Urges Caution 86 Place of birth 92 Population age 91 Population below poverty level 94 Population trends 91 Property tax revenue trend 119 Ratings of City Property Taxes 148 Ratings of City Property Taxes Compared to Other Communities 148 Reasons Businesses Decide to Locate Here 146 Residential Property Values 131

270

Residential Solid Waste Assessment 121 Residential Survey Trends 142 School enrollment (age 3 and older) 93 School Overcrowding 133 SRF Loan 66 State Shared Revenues 80 Tax rate 25 Ten-year fleet replacement cost 57 Top 10 Ethnic Groups by First Ancestry Reported 92 Top 10 Ethnic Groups for Foreign Born Population 92 Total Millage Less than Fiscal Year 2013 117 Total Positions By Department 245 Total Taxable Assessed Value 118 Unemployment Rates Recovering 86 Utility service taxes 39 Volunteers in Government 132 Water and Sewer Fund forecasted debt service 122 Water and Sewer Fund total expenses 49 Water and Sewer Fund total revenues 48 Water/Sewer Loans Outstanding Balance 66 Where the Money Comes from by Source 34 Where the Money Goes by Line Item-GF 34 Where the Money Goes by Type of Program 34 Yield Curve May Indicate Future Economic Growth 85 CIP funding sources 70 City Organization Chart 13 City Attorney Core Processes and Outputs 164 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 164 New Initiatives 164 Performance Measures 165 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 165 Staff 249 City Clerk Core Processes and Outputs 168 Mission; Org Chart 167 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 169 Staff 248 City Commission Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 166 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 166 CityHelpDesk Responses 152 City Manager’s Letter 8 City Manager’s Office CIP by funding source 171 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 167, 168 New Initiatives 168 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 169 Staff 248 Code Enforcement. See Development Services

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Index (continued) Combined Budget Summary 29 Communications and Marketing Core Processes and Outputs 168 Mission; Org Chart 167 Community Development. See Development Services Composite Indicators 131 Computer Repl Prog Contributions and Expenses 69 Coral Springs Awards and Special Recognitions 156 Bond Ratings 14 Budget Ordinance 222 Budget Resolution 220 City Manager’s Letter 8 Core Values 12 Demographics 14 Education 14 Fire Assessment Fee 14 History 16 Land Use 14 Net Budgeted Expenditures 33 Net Budgeted Revenues 32 Service Statistics 15 Solid Waste Fee 14 Staff Detail of Positions by Department and Division 248 Total City Staff 15 Total Positions By Department 245 Strategic Priorities 11 Tax Rate 14, 25 Coral Springs at a Glance 14 Core Processes and Outputs City Attorney 164 City Commission 166 City Manager’s Office 167 Development Services 172 EMS/Fire 182 Financial Services 179 General Insurance Fund 164 Human Resources 188 Information Technology 192 Parks and Recreation 195 Police 204 Public Works 209 Core Values 12 Cross-Functional Teams 154 Customer Requirements Analysis 140

D Debt Management 64 Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes/Loans 66 Franchise Revenue Bonds 66 General Obligation Debt 65 Revenue Bonds 66 Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds/Loans 66 Debt Management Policies 231 Debt Service Fund Allocation of Debt Service for Revenue Bonds and Other Debt 63 Budget Summary 61 Description 62 Expenditures 62 Fund Balance Table 243 Revenues 62 Debt Service Maturity Schedules 244 Debt Service Millage Rate 25 Debt Service Schedule 64 Debt Service Schedule - Water and Sewer Loans 67 Demographic Trends 91 Departmental Performance Budgets 162 Department Performance Measurements 127 Development Services CIP by funding source 178 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 172 New Initiatives 174 Performance Measures 176 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 175 Staff 251 Downtown Coral Springs 89

E Economic Development 88 Emerging Issues 90 Equipment Services Fund Budget Summary 56 Capital 214 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 209 Description 57 Expenses 58 Performance Measures 213 Revenue and Expense Summary Table 58 Revenues 57 Staff 258

City of Coral Springs, Florida

271


Index (continued) F

G

Financial Condition 27 Financial Policies 227 Financial Services CIP by funding source 181 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 179 Performance Measures 181 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 180 Staff 250 Financial Strategy 117 Fire Assessment Rate Comparison 45 Fire Assessment rate schedule 44 Fire Assessment (single-family residence) 14 Fire/EMS Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 182 EMS CIP by funding source 186 Fire CIP by funding source 187 New Initiatives 183 Performance Measures 185 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 184 Service Statistics 15 Staff 256 Fire Fund Budget Summary 43 CIP by Funding Source 187 Description 44 Expenditures 45 Fire Assessment Rate Comparison 45 Fire Fund revenue and exp summary 46 Fund Balance Table 238 Rate Schedule 44 Revenues 44 Fire Fund Balance Table 238 Fiscal Year 2014 Initiative Summary 134 Fiscal Year 2014 KIO Summary 126 Fiscal Year 2015 Capital Improvement Program 121 Five-Year Forecast 120 Five-Year Forecast-GF 81 Fixed-Assets Accounting Policies and Procedures 233 Fleet Purchases Summary 217 Fleet Replacement Program Contributions and Expenses 69 Franchise fees 38 Full-time positions added in Fiscal Year 2015 26 Fund Balance Overview 235 Fund Balance Tables Debt Service Fund 243 Equipment Services 242 Fire Fund 238 General Fund 236 General Insurance Fund 241 Health Fund 240 Water and Sewer Fund 239 Fund Structure Overview 30, 31

General Fund Capital Summary 76 Description 38 Expenditures 40 Five-Year Forecast 81 Five-Year Forecast Summary Schedule 82 Franchise fees 39 Fund Balance Table 236 Millage rates 38 Revenue and exp summary table 40 Revenues 38 Utility service taxes 39 General Insurance Fund Budget Summary 52 Description 53 Expenses 53 Fund Balance Table 241 Revenue and Expense Summary Table 53 Revenues 53 Glossary of Terms 263

272

H Health Fund Budget Summary 50 Description 51 Expenses 51 Fund Balance Table 240 Revenue and Expense Summary Table 51 Revenues 51 History of Coral Springs 16 How To Use This Book 3 Human Resources CIP by funding source 191 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 188 New Initiatives 189 Performance Measures 191 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 190 Staff 249

I Information Technology CIP by funding source 194 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 192 Performance Measures 193 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 194 Staff 251 Initiative Analysis 125 Initiatives 40-Year-Old Building Inspections 100 Additional Patrol Officers 97 Aquatic Complex 50 Meter Pool Design 106 Aquatic Complex Entrance 110

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Index (continued) ArtWalk at NW 31st Court 108 Atlantic Boulevard Entryway 111 Business Tax Amnesty 101 CDBG Action Plan 110 Center for the Arts Improvements 100 Code Lien Amnesty Program 109 Communications Survey 112 Community Beautification Award 109 Community Paramedicine 96 Compensation Study 113 CSI Building Renovation 97 Downtown Pathway 107 Downtown Redevelopment 104 Drowning Prevention 98 Economic Development Office 100 Electronic Data Back-up and Storage 114 Electronic Permitting Feasibility Study 104 Enhance Fire Inspection Services 101 Enterprise Software 114 Fire Stations 43 and 95 97 Half-marathon and 5K Run/Walk 107 Humane Unit Building Design 108 Misdemeanor Diversion 112 Mullins Gym Roof Replacement 105 Multi-cultural Events 99 Municipal Complex 102 Neighborhood Partnership Program 109 Network Support 113 New Resident Outreach 106 NW 40th Street Bike Path Renovation 105 Playground Equipment Replacement 107 Public Safety Dispatch Equipment Upgrade 98 Public Safety Technology Upgrade 99 Realign Volunteer Services 113 Realtors’ Summit 101 Re-Engage for Good 110 Safety Town 98 Statistical Analysis for Fire/EMS 113 Stormwater Utility Fee Study 114 Summary 115, 116 Teen Political Forum 99 Tennis Center Lighting Improvements 106 Traffic Management 103 University Drive LED Street Light Pilot 98 Waste Transfer Station Improvements 111 Investment Policies 232

K Key Intended Outcomes 96, 100, 105, 108, 112 Key Tools 3

L Legislative Issues 89

M Major Capital Projects by Department 78 Major Capital Projects by Location 77 Major Funds 30 Management and Budget Office 18 Managing Debt and Equity 120 Map, Strategic Plan and Perf Measurement Process 160 Market Environment 85 Measuring Results 125 Millage Rate Resolution 220 Millage rates 25, 38 Mission City Commission 166 City Manager’s Office 167 Development Services 172 Financial Services 179 Fire/EMS 182 General Insurance Fund 164 Health Fund 188 Human Resources 188 Information Technology 192 Parks and Recreation 195 Police 204 Public Works 209 Equipment Services 209 Utilities 209 Museum of Art Service Statistics 15

N Neighborhood Meetings 151 Net Budget See “Fund Structure Overview” 30, 31 Summary of net budgeted expenditures 33 Summary of net budgeted revenues 32 New Initiatives. See Initiatives

O Ongoing Initiatives 98. See Initiatives Operating millage rate 25 Ordinance 222 Organization Chart City Attorney 164 General Insurance Fund 164 City Commission 166 City Manager’s Office 167 Management and Budget Office 167 Citywide 13 Development Services 172 Financial Services 179 Fire/EMS 182 Human Resources 188 Health Fund 188

City of Coral Springs, Florida

273


Index (continued) Information Technology 192 Parks and Recreation 195 Police 204 Public Works 209 Equipment Services 209 Utilities 209 Organization of This Book 3 Outstanding Debt 244

P Parks and Recreation CIP by funding source- Aquatics 202 CIP by funding source- Parks and Recreation 201 CIP by funding source- Sportsplex 203 CIP by funding source- Tree Trust Fund 203 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 195 New Initiatives 196 Performance Measures 199 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 197 Service Statistics 15 Staff 260 Pension Allocation Budget Summary 59 Expenses 59 Revenues 59 Performance Budget Overview 162 Performance Measurement Policies 229 Performance Measures City Attorney 165 City Manager’s Office 170 Department Performance Measures 127 Development Services 176 Financial Services 181 Fire/EMS 185 Human Resources 191 Information Technology 193 Key Intended Outcomes 96, 100, 105, 108, 112 Parks and Recreation 199 Police 207 Public Works 213 Police CIP by funding source 208 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 204 Performance Measures 207 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 206 Service Statistics 15 Staff 253 Policies Capital Improvement Program Policies 230 Debt Management Policies 231 Financial Reserve Policies 227 Fixed-Assets Accounting Policies and Procedures 233

274

Investment Policies 232 Operating Budget Policies 227 Performance Measurement Policies 229 Revenue Policies 232 Use of Surplus Policies 228 Policy Considerations 28 Process Improvement Teams 154 Property Tax Millage Rate 14 Public Art Fund Budget Summary 55 Description 55 Expenditures 55 Revenues 55 Public Works CIP by funding source- Equipment Services 214 CIP by funding source- Public Works 214 CIP by funding source- Transportation 215 Core Processes and Outputs; Mission; Org Chart 209 New Initiatives 210 Performance Measures 213 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category 211 Service Statistics 15 Staff 258

Q Quarterly Performance Review 125

R Real Estate Trends 87 Recognitions See “Awards and Special Recognitions” 156 Replacement programs Computer Repl. Prog. contributions and expenses 69 Fleet Repl. Prog. contributions and expenses 69 Residential Satisfaction Survey Results 140 Resolution See “Budget Resolution” 220 Revenue Outlook 119 Revenue Policies 232 Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category City Attorney 165 City Commission 166 City Manager’s Office 169 Development Services 175 Financial Services 180 Fire/EMS 184 Health Fund 190 Human Resource 190 Information Technology 194 Parks and Recreation 197 Police 206 Public Works 211 Revenue Trends 79

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget


Index (continued) S

V

Sample Performance Budget Page 163 Service and Operations Strategy 95 Service Statistics 15 Solid Waste 121 Solid Waste Assessment 14 Solid Waste Fund Budget Summary 60 Description 60 Expenses 60 Revenues 60 Special Department Teams 155 Special Recognitions See “Awards and Special Recognitions” 156 Staffing 245 Detail of Positions By Department 248 Summary of Position Counts 245 Total City Staff 15 Total Positions By Department 245 Strategic Priorities 11 A Family-Friendly Community 96 An Active, Healthy Community 105 An Attractive Community 108 An Innovative, High-Performing Organization 112 A Thriving Business Community 100 Summary Tables. See Budget Summary Tables Supplier and Partner Performance Data 125 Surplus Policies 228 Survey respondents by general location 140 Survey Results Business 145 Employee 149 Neighborhood Meetings 151 Residential 140 SWOT 150 SWOT 150

Voter-approved debt service millage rate 25

W Water and Sewer 122 Water and Sewer Fund Budget Summary 47 CIP by funding source 216 Description 48 Expenses 48 Fund Balance Table 239 Revenue and Expense Summary Table 49 Revenues 48 Water/wastewater bill 48 Workforce Analysis 149

T Table of Contents Main 4 Tables and Illustrations 6 Total City Staff 15 Tree Trust Fund CIP by funding source 203

U Utilities Service Statistics 15 Staff 259 Utility Service Taxes 39

City of Coral Springs, Florida

275


276

Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Budget