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WEDNESDAY MARCH 5, 2014

TRI-CITIES

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ANOTHER CLOSURE Cracks lead to the shutdown of the Bailey bridge, as Coquitlam and New West stake out their positions

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RIVERVIEW CONCERNS

Hundreds share views on site’s future NEWS 4

Heritage home on the move again NEWS 12

It’s official: Farnworth wants to lead NDP NEWS 12

CHUNG CHOW/NOW

Ioco Townsite, which includes the Ioco School, is up for sale by Imperial Oil, the company that owns the land.

Townsite tourist plan Imagine gala

Get ready for food and fun

NOW FILE PHOTO

HERITAGE BUFFS WANT TO REBUILD IOCO TOWNSITE

Jeremy DEUTSCH

LIFE 20

jdeutsch@thenownews.com It used to be the hub of what eventually grew to be the bustling community of Port Moody. Now, the old Ioco Townsite sits largely empty. While the landowner, Imperial Oil Company, is looking to sell a giant chunk of land in the area, including the town, a city committee tasked with looking after the heritage of the community is proposing a vision for the property. Port Moody’s heritage commission is proposing the old townsite be turned into a tourist attrac-

tion, similar to the Burnaby Village Museum. Commission member Greg Millard explained the concept could include a historical re-creation of the town using the houses and structures to create an attraction based on the old site. He suggested there could be actors playing the role of people living on the site with various activities held in the common area of the town. “That site, as it stands, is an enormously powerful place to be, full of ghosts, full of atmosphere and it’s an utterly unique experience to go to the Ioco Townsite as it is right now,” Millard told the CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

That site, as it stands, is an enormously powerful place to be. –Greg Millard

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

InTHE NOW

NEWS IN BRIEF Police warn of scams Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com

CHUNG CHOW/NOW

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Tamara Bordeville tickles the ivories at the Leigh Square Community Arts Village in PoCo. She’s accompanied by Jayne Boyer, an employment specialist with the New View Society. The piano is available to anyone who wants to sit down and play a few tunes.

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Evening & Weekend Appointments Available!

Last year, a number of Tri-Cities residents became victims of fraud or a scam. With March being Fraud Prevention Month, Coquitlam RCMP are highlighting a few of the most common scams. The grandparent scam involves a person claiming to be the victim’s grandchild calling and asking the victim for money. The “grandchild” needs the money for bail, medical bills or other types of emergency situations. The caller pleads emotionally and tries rushing the victim to send money. The phishing scam involves unsolicited fake e-mails or SMS (text) messages that appear to be from financial institutions, businesses, organizations or credit card companies asking for money or personal information. Some phishing messages received locally offer a large sum of cash or very high return on investment while others ask for account numbers and passwords. The debit/credit card skimming scam has crooks working in groups of two or three, following a victim around a grocery store and discretely recording the victim’s PIN when groceries are paid for by credit or debit. They then follow the victim home, pretend to have car problems and ask the victim for water to cool the engine. When the victim returns, the crooks are gone, along with the victim’s purse.

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Visit us online at www. thenownews. com to view photo galleries of local people and events. CONTACT US editorial@thenownews.com sports@thenownews.com advertising@thenownews.com distribution@thenownews.com (for delivery concerns)


NEWSNOW

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

Riverview open house packed

HUNDREDS TURN OUT TO SHARE THEIR VIEWS ON THE FUTURE OF THE HOSPITAL SITE

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com After years of speculation, the process to decide the future of the Riverview lands in Coquitlam has begun in earnest with a pair of public open houses. The first of two open houses, held at the Burquest Jewish Community Centre Thursday evening, drew a crowd before the doors even opened. We need a Several hundred people facility to deal eventually with the mental showed up to health problems provide feedback and get in the province. information –Al Welygan from the open Coquitlam Resident house, organized by BC Housing, the government agency taking the lead in the process. Residents like Tania Dean expressed concern that BC Housing is involved in the process, suggesting the agency’s presence indicates a plan for market housing is already in the works. Instead, she would like to see the former hospital turned into a centre of excellence for mental health, while preserving the heritage of the site. “It’s our backyard. I’m feeling protective,” Dean told the Tri-Cities NOW, adding there are a number of people in need of a hospital

NOW FILE PHOTO

BC Housing is overseeing the process to decide the future of the Riverview grounds. CEO Shayne Ramsay says a vision document will take about a year to complete. focused on mental health. It was a suggestion echoed by many others at the open house, including Coquitlam resident Al Welygan. “We need a facility to deal with the mental health problems in the province,” he said, adding that while public park space could also be a nice addition, he’s opposed to market housing.

Welygan argued the money generated from market housing would be a short term gain, but disastrous in the long run. Fred Soofi, a former city council candidate and businessman, also questioned why BC Housing is involved in the process, expressing his opposition to market housing. He too would support Riverview reverting back to a hospital, but also contends the gov-

ernment can get creative to generate revenue through other means than market housing. “There is so much you can do here,” he said, suggesting money could be made off the heritage aspect of the lands. A second open house was held on Saturday, with officials noting 553 people attended the two events. BC Housing CEO Shayne Ramsay acknowledged the fears by some at the meeting that there is a preconceived idea in place for the lands, but said he has assured residents there is none. He did note, however, there are some guiding principals set by the government that BC Housing is following. The guidelines include maintaining as much open space on the site as there is now, keeping an open transparent process, and that any development must break even. Ramsay explained that any community amenities have to be paid for by revenue generated from the site. “Government didn’t put a for sale sign on it to get the highest and best use. They said ‘We don’t expect a return,’” he said. The BC Housing CEO also noted feedback from the open houses will help guide the process as the agency builds a vision document. “We really want to hear from stakeholders and the community about what some of their aspirations are for the site,” Ramsay said. As for a timeline for the vision document, BC Housing said it will probably take a year to complete. It will then be shared with the City of Coquitlam, which has its own neighbourhood and land use and planning processes.

Coquitlam lays out Kinder Morgan fears CONCERNS INCLUDE DELAYS FOR BUSINESSES NEAR ROUTE, PLUS ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

John KURUCZ

to both salmon and trout species. jkurucz@thenownews.com Access to four city parks — includEnvironmental protection, ing the boat launch at Maquabeak another prolonged hit to southwest Park — will also be limited during businesses, and delayed emergency the pipeline’s construction, according to the report, response times — while businesses in Coquitlam staff have the southwest corricompiled a lengthy dor of the city could list of concerns over They’ve had be left reeling finanKinder Morgan’s cially. proposed Trans their lives Those same busiMountain pipeline turned upside nesses are just startexpansion. down by all the ing to recover from City council the three-plus-year received an update transportation construction of the from staff Monday, issues. Port Mann Bridge/ outlining the state Highway 1 proof the city’s stake in –Michael Hind ject, and could face the pipeline discusTri-Cities Chamber another few years of sion, and that report of Commerce traffic and business cites five major areas interruptions. of concern. The city’s “Because of the length of time submission to the National Energy Board (NEB) flags watercourse con- and complexity of the Port Mann/ cerns across four local bodies of Highway 1 project, the community’s water, including the Fraser River tolerance for another disruptive and Dawes Hill, Como and Nelson project is very limited,” the report creeks. Those waterways are home notes.

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce executive director Michael Hind suggested southwest Coquitlam businesses have lost 30 to 40 per cent of their business in the past three years due to construction. “They’ve had their lives turned upside down by all the transportation issues,” said Hind, who is scheduled to meet with Kinder Morgan officials next week. “People couldn’t get into the area and now, finally, it’s starting to come back. It’s certainly going to take some time. It’s been a really tough three years for them.” Kinder Morgan’s proposal would see its 1,550-kilometre oil pipeline twinned from Edmonton to Burnaby. The proposed route in Coquitlam would run east of the Port Mann Bridge through the Fraser River, hitting land near United Boulevard. The line would follow the road west past the Eaglequest Golf complex before meeting up with the Lougheed Highway corridor to Burnaby. In terms of emergency response during construction, the city staff report suggests a temporary fire station will likely need to be built in the area to ensure proper emergency response times. As for liability and financial con-

CHUNG CHOW/NOW

Coquitlam’s Maquabeak Park, along with three others, could be impacted by Kinder Morgan pipeline construction. cerns, the city wants Kinder Morgan to provide disaster preparedness information and training to the city at no cost. Another clause in the report notes the city has asked Kinder Morgan to cover any city expenses that “are not reimbursed through provincial emergency programs” in the event of a major disaster.

“We’ve got to manage our way through identifying the concerns that would affect Coquitlam so that we can properly present them in this process,” Mayor Richard Stewart said in an interview Tuesday. The city is now awaiting the NEB’s decision on whether it will be granted intervener status at the upcoming hearings.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

GOT NEWS?

Contact the editorial team

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 604-444-3460 Email: editorial@thenownews.com

Site a ‘spectacular’ heritage location

Moody and highlight our history and stimulate our economy is a good idea and worth exploring,” he said. Glumac is also pushing to have the commisTri-Cities NOW. “We don’t really have enough of these kinds of opportunities to step back in sion’s recommendations added to the OCP, arguing if there is going to be talk of a new time in the Lower Mainland.” He noted the commission wants to tackle vision for the land, it should be in the OCP so the idea since the lands, including the site, the public can provide comment. “If there’s any interest at all, it’s worth startare up for sale. As for who would run such an attraction or ing the dialogue as part of the OCP process,” pay for it, Millard noted those details have not he said. Last spring, officials from Imperial Oil been explored, but he did suggest it could be confirmed the company had done through a mix of governreceived letters of interest from ment funding, contributions property developers for the from the eventual developer entire site. and even a fee from visitors. If there’s any The property is made up of He cautioned the commis232 acres of undeveloped land, sion’s idea is just a vision at this interest at including 150 acres in the point, with hopes of creating all, it’s worth Village of Anmore and another a greater discussion amongst starting the 82 acres in Port Moody. residents and the larger comMichael Geller, a planning munity. dialogue as and development consultant to Millard argued developing part of the OCP Devon Estates, the real estate the site as just another zone process. arm of Imperial Oil, said the would be a great loss to the city. –Coun. Rick Glumac oil company is still in discussion with a number of potential “Ioco Townsite is one of the purchasers regarding the sale. most spectacular heritage locaHe noted the company hasn’t been presenttions in Port Moody and the entire Lower ed with the specific idea being floated by the Mainland,” he said. The heritage commission recommended heritage commission, but a key consideration the vision be included in the city’s draft offi- that has been discussed with possible buyers cial community plan (OCP), but that decision is how best to respect the heritage aspects of was deferred last week by council to give staff the townsite. The [Ioco] townsite is very much top of time to prepare a more detailed report. For at least one Port Moody politician, the mind for Imperial Oil,” Geller said, adding the company has had discussions with heritage idea is worth exploring. Coun. Rick Glumac, one of the council advocates in the past. As for the sale of the lands, Geller said members on the commission, suggested that that part of Port Moody has a unique history Imperial Oil was hoping to have a deal in place by the end of 2013, but that timeline people might want to learn about. “Anything we can do to bring visitors to Port has passed.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

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March 10th, 6:30pm Poirier Public Library (575 Poirier St) with special guest Selina Robinson, MLA Coquitlam - Maillardville

March 12th, 6:00pm Kyle Centre (125 Kyle St) with special guest Rick Glumac City Councilor

March 13th, 6:30pm Sapperton Pensioners Hall (318 Keary St) with special guest Judy Darcy, MLA New Westminster

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Local Mounties and the BC Coroners Service were called out Monday afternoon to Dacre Park in Coquitlam to deal with the discovery of human remains. Investigators sealed off an area of the park near Lougheed Highway just south of the railway tracks near the Coquitlam Centre bus loop. Officers could be seen investigating an area under an overpass near a creek. Coquitlam RCMP confirmed human remains were discovered, but said there is no indication of foul play. At 3 p.m., coroners were seen loading what appeared to be a body in a white bag from below the overpass into a van. RCMP noted the identity of the deceased is being withheld pending nextof-kin notification. Police also noted the two agencies continue to investigate. One lane of traffic was partially blocked for a time while police did their work.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

Meet the people ICBC doesn’t want you to meet.

NEWSN0W

Introducing Joe McStravick If you have been injured in a car accident, you may think ICBC will take care of you. But insurance companies have a vested interest in saving money and reducing costs, not paying you for your pain, loss or inconvenience. ICBC does not work for you. But Joe McStravick will. Joe does not work for insurance companies. Instead, he has chosen to focus his entire 25-year career on protecting the legal rights of personal injury victims. If you are injured and are wondering what happens next, just call DBM to meet Joe in person for a free initial consultation about your case.

News Updates...“NOW” www.thenownews.com

CHUNG CHOW/NOW

Coquitlam fire crews were called out Tuesday morning to douse flames at a building belonging to a former car dealership in the Burquitlam neighbourhood of Smith Avenue and Clarke Road. There was no word on the cause of the blaze or how much damage was done to the building.

Spring Break in Port Moody

Keep EVERYone busy BETWEEN March 17-28

Preschool Spring Break Camp

is for ages 3-5 years. It’s a halfday camp filled with crafts, active games and more!

Glee Club – Spring Break Edition

is for the performer in all of us! Singing, theatre and improv for ages 5-11 years.

Spring Skating Lessons start April 1 on the Curling Rink!

Mountain Biking – Spring Break Edition is for children 8-12

years. Be safe and have fun riding on the trails in Port Moody!

EPIC Youth Spring Break Camp is for youth in grades 6-12. Each day is spent on the road – snow tubing, swimming, bowling, paintballing and more.

Spring Recreation Programs start April 1! Space is filling up fast, so don’t forget to register in one of our great programs. Find our Happening Guide online at www.portmoody.ca/recreation and try something new today!

Register today!

Visit www.portmoody.ca/signmeup or call 604.469.4556 before space runs out! 604.469.4500 www.portmoody.ca

• Tap Dance for Children

• Battlefit Training

• Sporty Girls

• Ball Hockey

• Little Green Thumbs

• Inline Skating

• Tap Dance for Preschoolers

• Lacrosse programs


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

NEWSN0W

No jail time for man in attempted arson Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com A Tri-Cities man won’t be going to jail for nearly burning down a restaurant and bakery in Port Coquitlam back in 2012. Brian William James Moffat pleaded guilty to one charge of intentionally or recklessly causing damage by fire or explosive, and on Tuesday in Port Coquitlam provincial court, received an 18-month conditional sentence for his actions. According to the facts of the case heard at his sentencing hearing, the incident happened on March 21, 2012 at the Kandoo Restaurant-Bakery in PoCo’s Shaughnessy Square, which has since closed. Earlier that day, Moffat’s vehicle was parked near the business when he noticed someone had hit his vehicle. He surmised someone in the restaurant saw the incident, but when he went to speak to someone in the business, he didn’t get help, believing the business was closed. It was noted in court he

saw people in the restaurant, leading him to become more frustrated. Court heard Moffat went home, started drinking and got more “pissed off” about the situation. He decided to make two Molotov cocktails, and returned to the business after dark. Moffat threw the two homemade explosives at the window of the business, but they didn’t shatter the glass and instead fell to the sidewalk, causing little damage. Two people who were working in the area at the time noticed the incident and chased Moffat down until police arrived. He was originally charged with several arson-related offences. Crown was seeking a jail sentence of nine months to three years, while the defense was asking for a conditional sentence. In her decision, Judge Patricia Janzen noted the “good luck” that the devices didn’t cause more damage, adding Moffat’s actions were a “gross overreaction” to what happened to him. She noted

his troubles with alcohol, but also pointed out that he hasn’t had any trouble with the law since the late 1990s. The judge also agreed with a psychiatric report that Moffat was a low risk to reoffend, pointing out he has a job and a wife to provide support. However, the sentence did include a number of conditions, including a nighttime curfew, a weapons ban, and that he must take counselling programs, including anger management. Moffat was also ordered not to attend any businesses in Shaughnessy Square.

NoGce of Public Hearing

Proposed Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 3867 General Purpose of Bylaw

PUBLIC HEARING 7 pm on Monday, March 10, 2014 Council Chambers Port Coquitlam City Hall

editorial@thenownews.com 604-444-3451

LAST CHANCE! Nominate a volunteer by March 11th!

To rezone a 14-acre site to facilitate its subdivision and future development. The north part of the site would be rezoned to M3 Light Industrial and the south part of the site would be rezoned to M3 Light Industrial on the east and P2 Ins�tu�onal on the west. The P2 zone would be further amended to allow a oor area ra�o of 1.5 at this site in order to accommodate a proposed complex care facility.

LocaGon

Street address: 770 Dominion Avenue

GIVE YOUR INPUT All members of the public will have a reasonable opportunity to be heard or to present wriOen submissions about the bylaw at the hearing. Council cannot receive new or addiGonal informaGon on this applicaGon aFer the public hearing.

GOT A

NEWS TIP?

Legal address: Lot 28, Block 6 North, Section 8, Range 1 East, NWD, PL 4318

InspecGon of Documents

Prior to the public hearing, the public is welcome to inspect the proposed bylaw, as well as Zoning Bylaw 2008, No. 3630 (which would be amended by the proposed bylaw) and related reports at: Corporate Office, Port Coquitlam City Hall 8:30 am-4:30 pm (except weekends/stat. holidays)

CITY HALL

2580 Shaughnessy Street Port Coquitlam BC

Susan Rauh, CMC, Corporate Officer 604.927.5421 • corporateoffice@portcoquitlam.ca

Visit the website below for more details or a larger map, or contact Development Services, 604.927.5442 for more information.

www.portcoquitlam.ca/getinvolved

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Info and step-by-step instructions: portcoquitlam.ca/online


OPINION

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

Tri-Cities NOW is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at 216-3190 St. Johns Street, Port Moody BC V3H 2C7 Phone: 604-444-3451

Our focus is too narrow

T

he work by diplomats and world leaders to head off open war between Ukraine and Russia is admirable. But the relentless media focus on Ukraine highlights one of the ways in which the major media do not always give us a complete picture of the world. Dozens of people have been killed in Ukraine during the revolution and fighting between protestors and riot police in the main square of Kyiv. Compare that to the 5.4 million victims claimed over a decade by the Second Congo War between 1998 and 2008. Western media devoted a tiny fraction of TV coverage or newspaper space to that conflict, one which caused more deaths than any conflict since the Second World War. We’re used to thinking of wars in Africa, Central America or Southeast Asia as being unimportant, unless a European or North American power is involved. This is a dangerous way to see the world. The complexities of the Russian and Ukrainian political situation are many — the shared history of both regions involves multiple revolutions, invasions, ethnic cleansings and one of the largest famines of the 20th century. Yet many of these issues will be teased out by the media over the next few days and weeks. Both the media and the general public are perfectly capable of absorbing information. However, we will not see many stories about the continuing conflicts in countries affected by the Congo Wars or the aftermath of the Rwandan Genocide, or of the attacks of the Lord’s Resistance Army from Uganda. The current major war in Africa, which has actually received more coverage than usual in Canadian media, is that in the Central African Republic. Like the situation in Ukraine, it is complicated, involving religious and regional tensions. It is already leading to the displacement of thousands of people. As Canada offers aid to Ukraine, we should think of other nations where Canada’s soft powers of diplomacy, peacekeeping and development can also help.

SILVER ALERT SYSTEM COULD HELP SAVE LIVES Re: Friday, Feb. 28, “Missing man’s family backs Silver Alert.” I think the idea of creating a Silver Alert program here in B.C. makes good sense. We have an aging population where Alzheimer’s and other cognitive impairment diseases are becoming more prevalent. My wife’s father suffered from Alzheimer’s and as time wore on he became less able to function in a logical/rational manner. If he were to have ventured out on his own, the possibility of him returning back to his home would have been slim. Many families endure the loss of cognitive ability in a loved one to this incurable disease and to physically lose them would be incomprehensible. As one of the many people who volunteered to help last September to try to find Shin Noh, I believe that if a system such as the one proposed by MLA Selina Robinson’s private member’s bill had been in place, the Noh family would presently be in the company of their father. Let’s hope that this bill passes in the legislature, so that other families will have the ability to quickly find a lost loved one. Michael Bell Coquitlam Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. The publisher shall not be liable for minor changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions with respect to any advertisement is limited to publication of the advertisement in a subsequent issue or the refund of monies paid for the advertisement.

This battle goes on and on

T

he B.C. version of The NeverEnding Story has resumed playing, and it’s not clear that it will ever actually stop. I’m referring, of course, to the pseudo-comic soap opera that stars the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and the B.C. Liberal government. I hammered the government in this space a few weeks back for its heavyhanded and inept attempts to arbitrarily strip language from the BCTF collective agreement. It has lost twice in court on that issue, but it’s still fighting, likely all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. The government needs to quit scheming to outfox the BCTF, and get down to real negotiations that will inevitably involve a significant increase in funding for the K-12 education system to address important issues such as class composition (often involving children designated with special needs). But just when things were looking up for the BCTF, leave it to the union to again engage in some puzzling behaviour. After the government made an opening offer in its round of negotiations for a new contract with the BCTF, the union opted to abruptly announce it will hold a strike vote without presenting its own detailed counter offer. Now, strike votes are a perfectly legitimate and well-used part of labour relations strategy. But holding one before any actual detailed negotiations occur seems odd, to say the least. The BCTF leadership has taken pains to say that even armed with a strong strike vote mandate, the union will not take job action that has any negative impact on the classroom and students. This leaves one to wonder how, then, a strike vote puts any kind of pressure

VIEW FROM THE LEDGE Keith Baldrey

on the government at the negotiating table. The sudden emphasis on holding a strike vote may be designed to deflect attention from an issue that the BCTF is vulnerable on. That would be its pitch for a wage increase, which in past contract talks seem to have come from a different planet. For example, there was the 34-percent hike the BCTF asked for back in 2001, within days of the 9/11 attacks. There was a $2-billion package presented a few years ago, which included lengthy paid leave provisions for the death of a friend (but not a Facebook friend, as the joke went at the time). The government’s chief negotiator, Peter Cameron, says the union has dropped hints in negotiations that an “extreme” wage demand lurks in the future. BCTF president Jim Iker says his team has presented a salary “provision” without any actual numbers contained in it (huh?). The BCTF says the government’s opening offer of 6.5 per cent over five years is “unreasonable, unfair and provocative” even though other public sector unions seem fine with those kinds of numbers, having settled their own contracts recently. Given the BCTF’s oft-quoted demand that its members be paid at a level equal to the top-paid teachers in other

provinces, I’m betting the union’s wage demand will be in the double digits, and if it is it will be seen as coming from lala land. But wage increases and bizarre strike votes aside, the BCTF does hold the higher ground on the more serious issues of class size and class composition. The courts have ruled repeatedly in its favour, although the courts have also noted these issues are the subject of negotiations with the government. The B.C. Liberals have presented counterarguments that even with current class size and composition averages, the graduation rates for all kinds of categories of students — including aboriginal and special needs — have increased considerably in the last decade. The government keeps referring to “average” class size and special needs numbers that seem relatively low, but they mask the fact that there can be many, many instances where the numbers are well above the average. It is the teachers in those situations that I hear from the most, who describe such things as trying to teach chaotic Grade 4 classes with 30 nine-year-olds, many of them with serious but undiagnosed behaviour problems. Or an apprenticeship Math 10 class where half of the 29 students have an “individual education plan” because of behaviour or psychological issues. Or shop classes, where too many kids are working on dangerous or ancient equipment. Unfortunately, The NeverEnding Story does little to help them. The soap opera will just play on and on, with the two key players fumbling their way along, with no resolution in sight. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC.


OPINION LNG NEEDS OVERSIGHT

One glaring problem with the provincial government’s strategy to turn British Columbia into a liquefied natural gas exporting juggernaut is that it scuttles any chance B.C. has to be a climate change leader. But equally problematic is how our government’s economically dubious fixation with gas exports jeopardizes our irreplaceable water resources. In Alberta as well as numerous U.S. states where natural gas companies operate, there is a growing public backlash against industry operations. Gas-drilling and hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” — a process where immense quantities of water, chemicals and sand are pressure-pumped down gas wells to break up rock and unleash trapped gas — has contaminated local water supplies. Between them, multinationals Shell, Chevron, Exxon and British Gas and Malaysian state-owned Petronas each have plans for LNG plants in Kitimat or Prince Rupert and have been granted export approvals by the National Energy Board. With combined investments of $70-billion, this

group will need years to recoup investments and generate profits. So let’s assume they build the plants by 2020 and operate them through 2040. How many new gas wells would need to be drilled between now and then? And how much water would have to be sucked out of our rivers, lakes and streams or from wells and rendered toxic? One underappreciated aspect of fracked gas wells is that gas production can be spectacular initially but declines rapidly. To maintain gas flows, then, it’s drill baby drill. The largest five of seven LNG projects currently approved would export 14.2 billion cubic feet of gas per day (bcf/d) — not including gas used to power the liquefaction process itself. B.C. currently produces 3.5 bcf/d, all of which is committed to current customers. So B.C. would have to ramp up production roughly five-fold to meet these export requirements. Let’s assume that only 70 per cent of this capacity gets built. Based on known gas production rates and declines in fields like the Horn River and Montney, where most of this new gas would originate, roughly 39,000 new wells would be required by 2040. Assuming that nine of

10 wells were fracked, a very conservatively estimated 582 billion litres of water would then be polluted and removed from the hydrological cycle. But the likely number is far higher. Minor increases in the percentage of wells drilled in the Horn River — a major gas source for proposed LNG projects — would push water use sky high. In 2012 it took on average 77 million litres of water to frack just one gas well in the Horn, compared to 17 million litres of water elsewhere in B.C. Currently, the industry pays nothing or virtually nothing for that water, while taxpayers foot all downstream environmental and human health costs. With Premier Christy Clark vowing to make B.C. the “lowest cost jurisdiction” for LNG, don’t count on government heaping higher water management responsibilities on the industry — just the opposite. In April, the government granted the energy industry regulator — the OGC — authority to issue long-term water licences to natural gas companies, making the fossil fuel industry the only entity in B.C. with its own dedicated water regulator, a regulator established by the province to speed approvals of industry

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

development applications. Meanwhile, natural gas industry operations in B.C. have already resulted in isolated incidents of contamination and misuse of water. Gas companies have also jeopardized water flows by overdrawing during low-water periods and been forced to halt water takings after drawing down lake levels too far. In the midst of this, the government promises a new Water Sustainability Act. Perhaps, then, it’s time government explained how it intends to square its LNG agenda with sustaining our most precious of natural resources. Where, exactly, will all the water come from to meet an unprecedented drilling program? How will environmentally safe water flows be maintained? Will water use fees be high enough to ensure that public servants can adequately monitor and enforce environmental regulations and protect the public interest — hopefully at arms length from the OGC? It’s time for answers — before another 39,000 gas wells are drilled. Ben Parfitt and David Hughes Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

9

CONTACT US

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

General 604-444-3451 Sports 604-444-3094 Advertising 604-492-4492 Delivery 604-942-3081 REGIONAL PUBLISHER Brad Alden EDITOR Leneen Robb SPORTS EDITOR Dan Olson REPORTERS Jeremy Deutsch, John Kurucz PHOTOGRAPHER Lisa King ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Catherine Ackerman ADVERTISING SALES REPS James Corea, Kerri Gilmour, Pat Jacques, Sanjay Sharma, Bentley Yamaura SALES SUPPORT Daaniele Sinclaire AD CONTROL Elayne Aarbo CLASSIFIED SUPERVISOR Dawn James CLASSIFIED REPS Darla Burns, John Taylor ACCOUNTING Judy Sharp


10

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

NEWSN0W

TAX RETURNS

Cracks close Bailey bridge, again

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CERTIFIED GENERAL ACCOUNTANT

John KURUCZ jkurucz@thenownews.com Almost one year to the day since its last major closure, the Bailey bridge linking New Westminster and Coquitlam is again closed due to structural defects. Jim Lowrie, New Westminster’s director of engineering, told the TriCities NOW Tuesday cracks were found on the underside of the bridge over the

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weekend. The City of New Westminster is now examining repair options, and Lowrie said the closure will likely last “at least a couple weeks.” The closure comes as no surprise to Coquitlam Mayor Richard Stewart, who characterized the situation as “entirely predictable,” particularly given the bridge’s closure last February for largely the same reasons. “This is urgent,” he said. “This [repair] has to get

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done.” Coquitlam has long lobbied for a four-lane crossing to replace the single-lane bridge, which was built in the mid 1990s. New West, on the other hand, contends that none of the replacement plans meet its needs. “We’ve never tried to stop this from going ahead,” New West Mayor Wayne Wright told the Tri-Cities NOW Tuesday. “But all of our numbers, all of our safety facCHUNG CHOW/NOW tors … have not been in the The single-lane span linking New Westminster with positive, from our position, Coquitlam was also shut down last year. for a double bridge. Having said that, we’re looking at it Highway 1 construction, and get to other communities.” Built in 1994, the Bailey and we’re going to be mak- that his city has done its part ing a decision that [won’t] be for the betterment of the bridge sits within New region. done for any Westminster’s municipal “We have boundaries and was temother reason a c c e p t e d porarily closed in 2003 by but to make it H i g h w a y that city. But after Coquitlam right for the 1 expan- took New West to court, a future.” This is urgent. sion, and the judge ordered the bridge reStewart –Coquitlam Mayor L o u g h e e d opened. acknowledges Richard Stewart H i g h w ay a region-wide Part of the fallout from e x p a n s i o n , that decision was a change approach is both of which to the Community Charter needed to are not to move that calls for an arbitrator to alleviate trafC o q u i t l a m intervene in cases of regional fic and safety r e s i d e n t s , significance that cross jurisconcerns in the Braid Street/United but to move people through dictions. Boulevard corridor. However, Coquitlam,” Stewart said. According to Stewart, an he also points out that “Every community in the arbitrator has been chosen Coquitlam has undergone region has to do that. We for the dispute, though he traffic disruptions for the last have to allow people to move couldn’t give timelines five years due to Port Mann/ through our communities to around a possible resolution.

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| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

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NEWSN0W

Heritage house moved, this time to its final home Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com It’s not often a house gets lifted off its foundation and trucked down the road. For the Centennial/ Appleyard house in Port Moody, Friday was the second time in less than two years it got that treatment. Crews began moving the house Friday morning to a site beside the Arts Centre on St. Johns Street. It will be the final resting place for the 100-year-old building. Suzanne Charest and her young family live a couple of blocks away from the site in Moody Centre and wanted to see the move. “It’s an exciting thing to see,” she said, adding it’s especially so for her young son Corbin, who’s fascinated by all things construction. “We’re lucky to live in a relatively young region that

has heritage and character.” Charest said she’s pleased a building like the Appleyard home is being saved, suggesting people move to the Moody Centre neighbourhood for its character. The house was supposed to be in place by Saturday, but a weather delay postponed the move to Sunday. The move shut down some streets for most of the weekend. The end goal of the Port Moody Arts Centre Expansion Project is to see an atrium built linking the two properties that will also serve as functional art space. Preliminary architectural drawings point to the atrium being made of glass, while the basement underneath the atrium will also be expanded to allow for more use. The arts centre has been raising funds for the project, with a goal of $200,000. The house, which once

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$500,000 grant from the federal government in the spring of 2013. Centennial House is an Edwardian-style building dating back to 1910 and was formerly known as the Appleyard Residence. The house is also valued for its association with Frederick Appleyard, who later acquired it. Appleyard worked in the lumber industry and served on Port Moody city council in 1917.

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served as a pizza joint on Clarke Street, was saved from the wrecking ball after the city bought it from the province in the spring of 2012. It had to be moved from the Clarke location to make way for the Evergreen Line. The city then moved the house from Clarke to Kyle in July 2012, with the intention to have it join the arts centre. The decision to find the building a permanent home was made easier after the society received a near

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It’s been the job no one has appeared to want, until now. Over the weekend, long-time PoCo MLA Mike Farnworth did the expected, by announcing his intention to run for the NDP leadership. He is the first leadership candidate to declare. Farnworth sent this tweet Sunday morning after news broke that he was jumping into the race: “I’m in! BC needs a progressive alternative that can win — and that’s what I’ll do!” Coquitlam-Maillardville MLA Selina Robinson said she wasn’t surprised by Farnworth’s decision, calling him “more than capable.” However, the NDP MLA said she wanted to see who

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

13

NEWSN0W

Port Moody to host OCP townhall March 19

jdeutsch@thenownews.com A date has been set for another town hall meeting about Port Moody’s official community plan. The city has set the OCP town hall meeting for Wednesday, March 19, at 7 p.m. at the Inlet Theatre at City Hall. The last OCP town hall in the same venue back in December drew some 300 residents, while more than 1,000 people have weighed in on the plan in various forms over the last year. For the better part of a year, city council has been working on the OCP in anticipation of the Evergreen Line’s arrival. The document, which guides land use, servicing and the form and character of any new development, identifies seven distinct Evergreen sub areas, mostly within the city centre area. Last week council approved several changes to the document, including adding a new institutional/research designation to the possibilities of use for the oceanfront district, along with comments from the Burke Mountain Naturalists regard-

School talks trades Sam SMITH

editorial@thenownews.com Thousands of students had the opportunity to network and ask questions about careers in the trades on Feb. 26 at School District 43���s annual Trades Fair. Dr. Charles Best Secondary held this year’s event, hosting more than 100 businesses and schools associated with the trades. “It’s good to have an outsider tell those kids what they need to get into the industry,” said Phyllis Devlin, career resource facilitator for Best. “It’s also a great opportunity for young students to learn about the realities of the trade sector, to see if it’s something they would be interested in going into.” Every student from Grade 10 to 12 within the district was invited to attend to get first-hand exposure to businesses and post-secondary institutes such as Douglas, Kwantlen and BCIT, which all have programs relating to the trades. “They get exposure and ideas about networking,” Devlin said. “They get to ask questions about different things in the business and they can ask about different programs and scholarships.”

ing environmental changes to the OCP. The OCP also has a

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

Kids on the Go... Next Kids on the Go March 12

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

kidz biz

15

Great smiles that last a lifetime

Program aims to help kids John KURUCZ

jkurucz@thenownews.com Never mind new programs, endless data or spreadsheets — Lucie Honey-Ray simply wants to know what it will take to get neighbours talking to one another. That aspect of social inclusion is only one part of a pilot program that’s launching in the Coquitlam River neighbourhood, called My Neighbourhood, My Future. Funded by the United Way, the five-year pilot program aims to give kids the best start in life, while supplying neighbourhoods with the tools to do so. According to program coordinator HoneyRay, those tools can come in virtually any form. “My role is to engage the neighbourhood and find out what’s working, what needs to be changed and what the challenges are for parents,” she said. “We’re looking for champions within the neighbourhood who are willing to have conversations with their neighbours.” Outside of the United Way, the program also includes partners from the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) at UBC and the Social Planning and Research Council (SPARC). The initiative will be introduced to the community it’s being staged in — between the Coquitlam River and Coast Meridian Avenue, from Lougheed to David avenues — at a community lunch in PoCo on Saturday, March 8. “Our goal at that meeting is to look at the potential that exists in the neighbourhood and build more of it,” HoneyRay said. The Coquitlam River neighbourhood was chosen because of the high number of kids — more than 900 — under the age of six, many of whom have been deemed vulnerable based on a measuring tool called the Early Development Instrument. That test looks at five

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A Tri-City Pre K-12 Christian Education Alternative Since 1992 • 90% Post Secondary entrance rate • Early introduction into French & Music • Special needs program • Bus service is available • Safe environment • Christ centered education • Extensive extracurricular programs grade 4 to 12

KINDERGARTEN KINDER OPEN HOUSES OPEN HOUSES Join us the 3rd Thursday of each month from September Join us March 10th @ 9am to February for our “Kinder for our “Kindergarten Open Houses” and find out what BCCA Kindergarten Open House” and findhas out towhat offer!BCCA Each open house runs Kindergarten from 12:30pm - 1:30pm.

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16

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

Registering NOW for

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014 SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL

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Doctor developed decompression belt has been called the solution for back pain. Dr. Michael Ho announced the first 100 customers save 50% and get a free Heat Pad with their Back Relief Belt. Each household is limited to only 2 belts. By Marc Charron

Health and Lifestyle

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Nominate a deserving volunteer in PoCo

Port Coquitlam has hundreds of dedicated volunteers, but only a handful have been nominated for the city’s Volunteer Recognition Awards as the deadline approaches. Nominations close on Tuesday, March 11 for the city’s annual “thank you” to local volunteers. Although volunteers don’t dedicate their time because

they expect a reward, they do appreciate being recognized for their efforts. “Receiving a Volunteer Recognition Award showed me that the volunteer work I was doing truly was making a difference in my community, and it was cool to see how many other people I was — and still am — connected with as a volunteer,” Katrina Besler, who received the U21

& Enhancement; Sports & Recreation; Youth Programs; U21 (youth under age 21); and Lifetime Volunteer. Nominations can be made online at www.portcoquitlam.ca/volunteer or by using a printed form available at city facilities (see below). For the best chance of success, nominators are encouraged to fill out the forms as completely as possible. The nom-

award (for youth under age 21) in 2013, said in a press release. “That kind of encouragement is so valuable.” This year’s awards theme is Volunteers are our Good Fortune. Nominations are once again being accepted in seven categories: Arts, Heritage & Cultural Awareness; Caring & Safety; Environmental Protection

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ination forms include ideas about what information to include. Eurilda Larsen, who received the Environmental Protection & Enhancement award in 2013, said those who take the time to make a nomination are actually volunteers in their own right. “All volunteers, no matter how little they do, should be acknowledged. Like lit-

tle drops of water, they can make a rushing river,” Larsen noted. “TheVolunteerRecognition Awards are important, as they acknowledge all the hard work being donated by ordinary people, all because they want to contribute to or support their favourite community activity. “Being a volunteer is usually done out of love and a deep desire to make a difference, to add value.” Fortis BC has again stepped forward to sponsor this year’s awards and the Volunteer Recognition Awards and Tribute evening, held during National Volunteer Week in April at the Giggle Dam Theatre and featuring entertainment, refreshments and the awards presentation. Nominees can be any age and do not have to live in Port Coquitlam. They cannot have previously received a Volunteer Recognition Award from the city, and must meet at least one of these criteria: • their unpaid volunteer contributions provide extraordinary help or care to families or groups in Port Coquitlam, • they continually commit their time, talent and energy, without pay, to improve the quality of life in Port Coquitlam, or • they have been voluntarily involved in a program or project that has had a lasting benefit for Port Coquitlam and its residents. All nominees will receive a commemorative pin and certificate, along with an invitation to the tribute event on April 8. Award recipients will receive a personalized etched glass trophy and will have their names added to the volunteer Honour Roll displayed at City Hall since the awards were created in 1997. Nomination forms and tips for nominators are available at www.portcoquitlam.ca/volunteer and in printed form at City Hall (2580 Shaughnessy St.), the Port Coquitlam Recreation Complex (2150 Wilson Ave.), the Hyde Creek Recreation Centre (1379 Laurier Ave.) and the Terry Fox Library (2470 Mary Hill Rd.). For more information, visit www.portcoquitlam.ca/volunteer, call 604-927-5410 or e-mail info@portcoquitlam. ca.

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19

What you need to know about the Trans Mountain Expansion Project After nearly two years of conversations, studies and planning, Trans Mountain filed a Facilities Application with the National Energy Board (NEB) in December 2013 for its proposed $5.4 billion expansion project. Respectful and authentic dialogue begins with transparency and a common understanding of the facts. As we move forward in the regulatory process, we are committed to making sure that people have access to the facts about our proposal and the process. The following is aimed at correcting misinformation being spread by individuals and groups in your community. CLAIM

CLAIM

Land will be expropriated; people will lose their homes.

The route for the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Project has already been determined.

REALITY Trans Mountain does not have the right to expropriate land. We have established and maintained relationships for the last 60 years with 2,200 landowners, as well as with neighbours and communities along the pipeline corridor. Our goal is to treat all landowners fairly and equitably. In the unlikely event that we cannot reach an agreement with a landowner, the NEB can grant right of entry to allow us to build and maintain the pipeline, but not to expropriate or take away any land or homes from owners.

CLAIM The opportunity for public input into the project is limited.

REALITY In our Facilities Application, we’ve identified a proposed pipeline corridor, and in some cases an alternative. These corridors are wider than what the permanent right-of-way will be. They provide the flexibility to respond to stakeholder input or to place the pipe so as to minimize local community or environmental impacts. A final right-of-way will be determined only after regulatory approval and during the detailed design phase. It is important to note that 73 per cent of the proposed expanded pipeline will follow the existing right-of-way where the Trans Mountain pipeline has been operating safely for 60 years. An additional 17 per cent of the proposed expansion will follow existing utility corridors and only the remaining 10 per cent would require greenfield right-of-way.

REALITY To date, we’ve engaged with thousands of individuals through 63 open houses and workshops along the pipeline and marine corridors and hundreds of meetings between project team members and stakeholder groups. Our work continues, with opportunities for continued dialogue throughout the process. The NEB will hold a public hearing on the Application before it makes a decision, allowing people or groups who have been granted permission to participate by the NEB a chance to raise issues, present evidence, test evidence and provide their input.

We want to ensure that no voice goes unheard and no concern goes unaddressed. If you hear more claims that you’d like us to address, please send them to us. Please visit our website or contact us if you have questions or would like to learn more about the proposed project.

CLAIM Property values near the pipeline have already declined and will continue to drop. REALITY Along our existing pipeline route, which has been in place for 60 years, there is no measurable difference between properties with or without an easement. However, we appreciate that land devaluation is a concern. Looking ahead to the new pipeline, companies are required by the NEB act to compensate landowners for any new easement and pay for any impacts or inconvenience associated with the new pipeline. Included within the determination of compensation is any change in the value of the property before and after the pipeline is built.

For more information about the regulatory process and how to get involved, go to the NEB website at www.neb-one.gc.ca > Major Applications and Projects > Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - Trans Mountain Expansion.

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20

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Imagine gala promises food and fun TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE FOR THIS SATURDAY’S EVENTS IN COQUITLAM

John KURUCZ jkurucz@thenownews.com If you’re looking for a fun event that helps raise money for worthwhile causes like SHARE’s food bank, the Imagine gala is your best bet. Set for Saturday, March 8 at the Hard Rock Casino Vancouver on United Boulevard, this event is the SHARE Family & Community Services Society’s biggest annual fundraiser. As has been the case at past events, this year’s show aims to tantalize taste buds. Ten restaurants will vie for culinary bragging rights in both sweet and savoury taste tests across three different categories: people’s choice, judge’s choice and mayors’ choice. The five restaurants competing in the savoury category are Christine Catering Company, Mr. Mikes, Sammy J’s Grill & Bar, Unlisted, and Wilbur & Sabastian’s Smokehouse & Bistro. Competing for supremacy in sweets are Brown’s Socialhouse Town Centre, JOEY Coquitlam, Luscious Creations, Micky’s Public House/Townhall Coquitlam, and White Spot. A wide range of prizes is also up for grabs between a raffle draw and live and silent auctions: golf trips, vacation packages, a private

wine tasting, an Ikea room makeover and tickets to local sporting events, among other things. “There’s a lot of networking, chatting, meeting new people, milling about and testing out the food,” said Valerie Hutton, SHARE’s director of development. “It’s a little bit more social and less formal than other events.” All money raised will go towards SHARE programming that doesn’t receive funding from other agencies. “Our fundraised dollars go towards our unfunded programs,” Hutton said. “The most obvious one would be our food bank because there’s no federal or provincial funding for the food bank. And on top of that, a lot of our community development work is unfunded.” While the gala is slated to run from 7 to 9:30 p.m., an after-party from 10 until midnight is also being offered for those who want to continue the festivities later into the night. Tickets for Imagine cost $75 and can be purchased online only, at www.sharesociety. ca — they will not be sold at the door. Another way to get involved is by volunteering, an option available to those over 19.

NOW FILE PHOTO

Food is a big part of SHARE’s Imagine gala, as chefs from local restaurants vie for culinary supremacy in both sweet and savoury categories. “Greeting people attending the event, being a theatre ambassador, helping with the silent auction and live auction — we have a wide variety of roles available for anyone who

wants to get involved,” said Michelle Murray, an executive assistant with SHARE. Those interested in volunteering can contact Murray at 604-529-5135.

KidSport equipment sale this Saturday DROP OFF DONATIONS THROUGH FRIDAY

John KURUCZ jkurucz@thenownews.com The premier selling point is in the sale prices — a bike for $2 (with higher-end ones selling for up to $100), a baseball glove for $5 and a full set of hockey gear for $100. KidSport Tri-Cities is staging its bi-annual spring equipment sale on Saturday, March 8 at Riverside Secondary in PoCo. Running from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m., the sale features virtually anything sports related: hockey gear, soccer cleats, fit-

ness equipment, skis, lacrosse gear and more. “It’s for just about anybody and we get all sizes donated to us,” said KidSport TriCities chair Chris Wilson. “The most popular age people are buying for would be young kids, but we get quite a few guys who are starting to play beer league hockey and they can get fully outfitted for $100.” Last year’s spring sale netted the local non-profit about $18,000, money that helps subsidize athletic registra-

tion fees for kids from lowerincome families. A week-long communitywide equipment dropoff is also taking place to coincide with next week’s sale. Residents are encouraged to donate their sporting gear until Friday, March 7 at one of five locations in the Tri-Cities: Port Coquitlam Recreation Complex, Port Moody Recreation Complex, Poirier Sport & Leisure Complex, Riverside Secondary and the Thriftopolis outlet at 2579 Lougheed Hwy. in Port Coquitlam. According to Wilson, used lacrosse gear is right up near the top of the wish list for items to be donated.

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“That’s the one thing that we’re really hoping people will have a look for in their basements and their garages,” he said. “There’s always a huge demand for lacrosse gear, and anything that we have, we usually sell out.” Wilson also noted older, straight downhill skis won’t be accepted as part of the sale, as sporting goods stores typically don’t carry the necessary parts for those skis anymore. He also encouraged anyone dropping off large, heavy items to do so at Riverside on Friday, March 7. Admission to the sale is by donation, or via a donated item for the SHARE food bank. For details, call Wilson at 604-341-0241 or log on to www.kidsporttricities.com.

LISA KING/NOW

Chris Wilson and Gesele Lajoie gear up for the KidSport Tri-Cities spring equipment sale, set for Saturday, March 8 at Riverside Secondary in PoCo. KidSport volunteers will be accepting donations of equipment through Friday at locations throughout the Tri-Cities. One of the most in-demand items is used lacrosse gear, which Wilson says always sells out.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

SHARE a night of fun, food and entertainment. Two ticket options:

Presenting Sponsor:

$75

Enjoy amazing entertainment, live and silent auctions, sweet and savoury treats, cash bar– all while supporting a worthy cause.

$100 VIP

Get on THE List! Including all of the above plus, avoid the crowds with VIP registration, private theatre entrance, front and centre table seating and cocktail service.

Saturday, March 8, 2014 Hard Rock Casino Vancouver, 2080 United Blvd, Coquitlam Doors open: 6:30 pm Dress: Cocktail Party Casual Entertainment: Big Topp Show

Benefitting:

For tickets, call 604.540.9161 or at imagine.sharesociety.ca Purchase 9 General Admission tickets, receive the 10 th free. Tickets NOT available at door.

Experience the best from our IMAGINE restaurants competing for Best Sweet and Best Savoury in three categories! (all tastings included in your ticket price!)

SWEET AND SAVOURY CREATIONS Browns Socialhouse Coquitlam Town Centre Joey Coquitlam Micky’s Public House/Townhall Coquitlam Mr. Mike’s Steakhouse & Bar Sammy J’s Grill & Bar Coquitlam Christine’s Catering Company Inc Wilbur & Sabastian’s Smokehouse and Bistro Luscious Creations White Spot Restaurants

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21


22

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Local events highlight World Prayer Day Sam SMITH

Port Moody and Our Lady of the Assumption Parish in Port Coquitlam hosting local events. Organizer Betty Moore said the event is not about Christians banding together, but a chance for people of all religions to meet and learn from one another. “I think the more we can get people together, no mat-

editorial@thenownews.com On Friday, March 7, people in more than 170 countries around the world and in 2,000 communities across Canada will gather together in solidarity for World Day of Prayer. The Tri-Cities are no different, with St. John the Apostle Anglican Church in

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ter what their religion, the age to the rest of the world. The service at St. John more we can learn how to the Apostle respect one Anglican another,” she Church, at told the Tri2208 St. Cities NOW. There’s also a lot John’s St. in “There’s also Port Moody, a lot to be said to be said for place for community community here takes from 1 to 2 here because because it just p.m. it just brings The serpeople togethbrings people vice at Our er.” together. Lady of the This year’s Assumption prayer has –Betty Moore Parish, at 3141 been written Shaughnessy by women from Egypt to showcase their St. in Port Coquitlam, starts country’s culture and herit- at 2 p.m. DEVELOPMENT OF A PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN # 701-002-14/19 Metro Vancouver has prepared a draft Pest Management Plan (PMP) for the purpose of controlling the larval stage of nuisance mosquito species that significantly impact quality of life in limited parts of the region. Proposed treatment areas are: Metro Vancouver owned and/or managed lands and facilities; non-private lands within the City of Coquitlam, the District of Maple Ridge, the City of Pitt Meadows, the City of Surrey, and non-private and some private lands in the Township of Langley. Application of larvicide will occur annually between April and September in artificial waterbodies, standing water and areas prone to flooding. The PMP would be in effect for a five year period. Products that may be used include: Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) – VectoBac – PCP# 18158 Bacillus sphaericus (Bsph) – VectoLex – PCP# 28008 These products are registered for use in Canada, are target specific, non-residual and non-toxic. Chemical control of adult mosquitoes is expressly excluded. Manner of application will be by hand, backpack blower, truck-mounted sprayer or all terrain vehicle- mounted blower and helicopter. Applicant contact information: Rhea Leroux, Park Operations Technician, Planning, Policy and Environment Department, Metro Vancouver 4330 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC V5H 4G8 Tel: 604-432-6294 Email: rhea.leroux@metrovancouver.org A copy of the draft PMP can be obtained from the Metro Vancouver website: www.metrovancouver.org - search: Mosquito Control Program A person wishing to contribute information about a proposed treatment site, relevant to the development of the Pest Management Plan, may send copies of the information to the applicant at the address above within 30 days of the publication of this notice.

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LISA KING/NOW

Members of St. John the Apostle Anglican Church will gather Friday to mark World Prayer Day.

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Sat., March 8 10AM - 1PM

USED EQUIPMENT SALE

Riverside Secondary. 2215 Reeve Street. Port Coquitlam Admission by donation or item to the food bank KidSport needs your sports equipment

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

COMMUNITY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 Think Green Supper Club hosts a free vegan cooking demo,

with a meal to follow, at 7 p.m. at the Cornerstone Church, 1415 Noons Creek Dr. in Coquitlam. Info will be provided around the health and planet benefits of a plant based diet. Info: 604-9421860 SHARE Society hosts a 13-week education series around alcohol and drug use for those who have an alcohol or drug problem, and for those concerned about their use or the use of others. This week’s discussion is on “Marijuana: A second class addiction?” The session includes a video, brief presentation and open discussion, 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 2615 Clarke St. in Port Moody. Registration is not required. Info: 604-936-3900.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6 Coquitlam Foundation hosts a pub night fundraiser at 6 p.m.

at Woody’s Pub, 935 Brunette Ave. in Coquitlam. The cost is $20, which includes a burger and beer/wine. Info: dclarke@coquitlamfoundation.com. Coquitlam Gogos host Chocolate & Wine Tasting Parties from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on both March 6 and 7 at the Gallery Bistro, 2411 Clarke St., Port Moody. Select wines, gourmet paired chocolate, tea, coffee and more. Funds go to the Stephen Lewis Foundation’s Grandmother to Grandmother campaign helping grandmothers in sub-Saharan Africa raising their grandchildren orphaned by AIDS. Tickets for either evening are $35. Call Linda at 604-931-2843.

FRIDAY, MARCH 7

World Day of Prayer events take place at two different churches in the Tri-Cities. The first event goes at 1 p.m. at St. John’s Church, 2208 St. Johns St. in Port Moody. Info: 604464-0582. The other prayer event happens at Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Church , 3141 Shaughnessy St. in Port Coquitlam at 2 p.m. Info: 604-464-4185.

SATURDAY, MARCH 8

low prices. Donation is by admission or through a donation to the SHARE food bank. Info: www.kidsporttricities.ca. Port Moody Ecological Society, Metro Vancouver and the City of Port Moody team up to host an invasive species workshop from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Brovold Room at Port Moody City Hall, 300 Ioco Rd. Learn more about local invasive species and the strategies used to remove them. Registration is required by going to http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/port-moodyweeds-in-mind-management-workshop-tickets-10787775527. Info: laughlovetalk@gmail.com. City of Coquitlam hosts a free “Try-it” event for would-be curlers aged 10 and up from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Poirier Sport & Leisure Complex at 633 Poirier St. Experienced coaches will be on hand to help attendees learn the basics and participate in a full game. Info: coquitlam.ca/pslc or call 604-927-4386. Anytime Fitness Coquitlam holds an open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 2662 Austin Ave. in Coquitlam. Tours, free boot camp sessions, prizes and more will be offered. Info: www. anytimefitness.com. Friends of the Coquitlam Public Library Society meet in the boardroom of the Poirier Library branch, 575 Poirier St., at 10:30 a.m. New members welcome. Info: 604-937-4130.

MONDAY, MARCH 10 Port Coquitlam Heritage and Cultural Society hosts a

“Rhymes of Times” session from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 2100– 2253 Leigh Sq. in PoCo. Attendees will celebrate Nutrition Month by remembering kitchens and foods from the past. Registration is required. Info: julies@pocoheritage.org or call 604-941-5430.

ONGOING Terry Fox Library and SHARE Family & Community

KidSport Tri-Cities holds a used sporting goods sale from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Riverside Secondary School, 2215 Reeve St. in PoCo. Hockey gear, bikes, baseball equipment and more sold for

Services offer a free English conversation group, from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Thursdays at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. The group gives people a chance to practise English in a fun atmosphere. All are welcome. Info: 604-927-7999. Tri-City Singles Social Club gathers for activities and friendship at 7 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion, 2513 Clarke St. in Port Moody. This 50-plus group is not a dating club. New members are welcome — membership is $20 per year. Info: 604-466-

LIST YOUR EVENT:

Contact the Tri-Cities NOW

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: events@thenownews.com

0017, 604-941-8897 or tricityclub@gmail.com. Tri-Cities Better at Home, presented by SHARE Family & Community Services, helps seniors maintain their independence and connection with the community. The program offers light housekeeping, transportation to doctor appointments, and grocery shopping for those 65 and older. To register, contact Paola at 604937-6991, 604-936-3900 or betterathome@sharesociety.ca. Recovery International is a self-help peer-to-peer support group for people who struggle with stress, fear, anger, depression, anxiety, panic and nervous symptoms. Cognitive behavioural techniques are discussed at the Port Coquitlam meeting. Info: Phyllis at 604-931-5945 or www.RecoveryCanada.ca. MOSAIC Kindness Club needs host volunteers to help newcomers adjust to Canadian life. Commitment is for two hours a week for 13 weeks. Info: 604-254-9626. Tri-Cities Early Childhood Development Committee hosts a free Family Play and Learn event on the ground floor of Coquitlam Centre, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on the last Wednesday of the month. Join librarians for stories, songs, crafts and more. No registration is required. Tri-Cities Women’s Choir is a new women’s choir in the Tri-Cities area, and is looking for experienced choral singers. Rehearsals are on Thursdays, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the Coquitlam Centre area and singers are taken on an ongoing basis. For more info, call 604-817-3976. Tri-City Family Place offers a drop-in program for parents and caregivers of children under six, and is open Tuesdays to Fridays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 2062 Manning Ave., Port Coquitlam. Info: 604-945-0048 Tricity Speakers Toastmasters meet every Monday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Room B 2050, at Douglas College, 1250 Pinetree Way. Info: http://tricityspeakers.toastmastersclubs.org. Tri City Potters meet at 7 p.m. at Port Moody Secondary, 300 Albert St., on the third Wednesday of each month. Activities include gatherings, shows, presentations and more to inspire those with an interest in clay. Info: www.tricitypotters.ca. Tri-City Women’s Resource Society offers an Empowering Mothers parenting group at various times throughout the year. Participation in the educational group is free, and child care and transportation subsidies are available. Info: 604-941-7111, Ext. 106.

Treat Yourself!

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

SPORTSNOW

GOT SPORTS? Contact Dan

Phone: 604-444-3094 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: sports@thenownews.com

OT loss sets table for Talons Blues pair GLENEAGLE LEARNS VITAL LESSON PRIOR TO PROVINCIALS

Stories by Dan OLSON sports@thenownews.com There was only one real negative that the Gleneagle Talons could take from Saturday’s senior boys Fraser Valley final — and that would be the score. Despite suffering an 86-79 overtime defeat at the hands of the Tamanawis Wildcats in the championship game, the Coquitlam crew will have much to take with them into next week’s AAAA boys provincial tournament. Going toe-to-toe with the No. 1-ranked team in B.C., and actually leading most of that run, will be ample ammunition to carry them into the 16-team B.C. test at the Langley Events Centre. If disappointment was to be served, they’d gladly accept it prior to the province’s version of March madness. “That was the positive thing in all this, but it’s disappointing, too,” remarked Gleneagle coach Tony Scott. “We’ve learned a lesson, and it’s a good time to learn it.” The No-4-ranked Talons led by 15 points in the third after staking out a seven-point edge at halftime before Tamanawis turned it on, led by Sukhjot Bains. Bains cashed in 17 points in the fourth quarter and overtime alone, en route to 43 points on the night. Gleneagle maintained a well-balanced offensive approach, getting 15 from Brenden Bailey, 14 from Cordell Parker and 13 from Grant Galbraith. But Tamanawis put the Talons through a gruelling grind, wearing down the slight underdogs with a fierce, physical gameplan. “We had the game in our hands,” noted Parker, 16. “But late in the third and in the fourth we let it get away from us.” “We just ran out of gas in the fourth,” said Scott. “Tamanawis is a big team that plays it extremely physical. My guys were getting frustrated, it was building up because we weren’t able to stop them.” With a three-point lead and 10 seconds left, Scott scripted a plan to stop the Tamanawis tide — but Parm Bains forced overtime with a buzzer-beating trey. The Wildcats outscored Gleneagle 11-4 in the extra frame to win its 24th straight game. Earning first team all-star honours were Brenden Bailey and Cordell Parker. Now onto the B.C.s. The Valley loss will supply ample fuel to the four-day marathon, which starts next Wednesday (March 12) against Prince

exact gold redemption

For both Ciara McCrae and Jessica Nowicki, a silver lining was the thread that led to gold at Saturday’s B.C. High School Wrestling championships. The two Port Moody Blues wrestlers won their respective weight divisions at the Prince George-hosted event with powerful performances — partly motivated by last year’s silver results. McCrae collected her second provincial title in three years with her pin of St. Thomas More’s Ciara Corbett in the 51-kilogram class. It came with just 50 seconds left in the first round, capping a gritty comeback for the longtime grappler. Nowicki took down teammate and rival Beth Potts for the 69kg division’s top prize. A Grade 11, McCrae equated the victory as validation on the heels of a tough loss in last year’s final. “It definitely feels like redemption,” the 16 year old said. “I worked so hard for this, and after last year’s loss I had a lot of motivation to push harder.” Port Moody coach Selwyn Tam said McCrae’s medal run began with her first win of the two-day event. “She pretty much had her way right up to the final, it was quite a thorough run,” said Tam. “But then she was down 4-1 [in the final] right off the bat — it was like, ‘This is new.’” McCrae closed the gap and pinned Corbett. Nowicki, meanwhile, faced a familiar foe in her final. “This is definitely one of the top things for me — it’s No. 1,” said Nowicki of the win. The Grade 12 grappler scored two points in the second round for the 10-0 sweep. Both Nowicki and Potts, in Grade 11, earned their way into the final with upset decisions, said Tam. “[Potts] gutted out a tough match to win her semifinal,” noted Tam. The district’s other gold medallist was Gleneagle’s Malique Giordano, who won the boys 63kg division, knocking off Sentinel’s Parsa Habibi in the final. For more on the B.C. wrestling championships, go to www.thenownews.com. KIM STALLKNECHT/PNG

Gleneagle Talons’ Brenden Bailey, right, battles a Holy Cross opponent for the ball earlier this year. The Talons put it all on the floor in the Fraser Valley final on Saturday, getting squeezed 86-79 in overtime by Tamanawis. George at the Langley Events Centre. “We learned you’ve got to just really fight to the end,” said Bailey. “We were up and had a lot going for us at the half... It was heartbreaking.” Bailey knows that there’ll be little room for reflection and no taking it easy during at the B.C.s. “I think everyone’s going to come in hungry. We just have to come out with the same intensity we showed much of the season,”

SPORTS SHORTS RAPIDS TARGET JEWELS

Gravity may have prevailed at Sunday’s Oscars, but the Riverside Rapids are aiming to bring a whole bunch of rivals down to earth starting today at the B.C. Senior Girls AAA basketball championships in Langley. The Rapids, who three weeks ago were ranked No. 3 in B.C., open the tournament today, 7 p.m. against the Salmon Arm Jewels. Riverside saw its stock drop after a pair of tough results at the Fraser Valley championships. They placed fourth following a 83-43 loss to W.J. Mouat. A win puts them into Thursday’s quarterfinals, tipping off at 6:15 p.m. at the Langley Events Centre.

he said. Gleneagle is the lone District 43 team to advance to the provincials, after the Heritage Woods Kodiaks were nudged 7267 by North League rival Pitt Meadows in a battle for the sixth and final qualifying spot. The Kodiaks had charged into that contest after bouncing the Terry Fox Ravens from the potential qualifiers, eking out a 75-68 victory last Thursday.

BCHL PLAYOFFS BEGIN

It’s the promise of the playoffs, when all teams start anew. The Coquitlam Express aim to take advantage of this ‘refresh’ opportunity, squaring off against the Prince George Spruce Kings in a best-of-seven B.C. Hockey League opening round series. Despite a face-slapping 1-6-1-1 record against the Kings, Coquitlam coach Barry Wolff says there’s lots to look forward to. “The whole season has been essentially practice for the playoffs,” said Wolff. The two teams launched the playoffs last night, past Tri-Cities NOW deadline. They continue tonight in Prince George, and resume in Coquitlam Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.. For up-to-date results, go to www.thenownews.com.

CHUNG CHOW/NOW

Showing off their high school provincial wrestling prizes are, from left, Beth Potts, Jessica Nowicki, Ciara McCrae and Rashid Anwar.

RAPIDS WIN JR CROWN CLAN JR NETS HONOUR Judging from their start in Saturday’s B.C. Junior Girls Basketball championship final, the Riverside Rapids were not going to settle for second. The squad bolted out to a 28-0 lead and fended off a desperate and determined rally from South Kamloops to capture the 2013-14 title with a 46-32 win. That amazing start in the final was the team playing at its peak, said coach Kelli Langford. “We had the press right on and South Kamloops could barely get the ball to half court,” she said. Marty Chambers was named tournament MVP, while Alex Antignani and Ozioma Nwabukowerefirstteamall-starsandStephanie West was named to the second team. For more, go to www.thenownews.com.

Simon Fraser University’s Erin Chambers was named to the 2013-14 Great Northwest Athletic Conference’s first all-star team. The SFU Clan co-captain and leading scorer was a unanimous selection, and one of just three to receive such an honour. Chambers set the pace in the GNAC scoring race and ranks eighth in the NCAA, averaging 22.7 points per game. “I think one of the most impressive parts of Erin’s game is her consistency,” said SFU coach Bruce Langford. “She is the leading scorer in almost all our games and is able to score in multiple ways, either with the three, the jumper or posting up in the lane.” The junior forward from Mission helped lead her squad to a fourth-place finish in the GNAC this season.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2014

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