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Seven years for North Rd. murder

Patient launches surgery lawsuit

NEWS 7

NEWS 4

JEREMY DEUTSCH/NOW

RCMP Cpl. Jamie Chung, left, joins the parents of 16-year-old Annie Leung for an emotional press conference.

Parents issue appeal STEP FORWARD AND TELL US WHAT HAPPENED: MOM Jeremy DEUTSCH

PHOTO BY LISA KING

Arthritis warrior Woman fights back

LIVING 18

MAKE A ‘HALLOGREEN’ COSTUME LIVING 24

jdeutsch@thenownews.com Annie Leung was a budding artist with a generous heart. Now the parents of the 16-year-old PoCo teen killed in a hit-and-run last month are hoping the driver will come forward and turn him or herself in. Leung’s parents Maggie and Ricky made the tearful plea at the Coquitlam RCMP detachment Thursday in front of media. “We urge you to step forward and tell us what

happened,” Maggie said, at times wiping away tears. “It’s still not too late to do the right thing. We know you are struggling with your conscience — and only by stepping forward, you could live peacefully with yourself.” Emergency crews were called to the intersection of Pitt River Road and Mary Hill Road at 3:30 p.m. on Sept. 10 to a report of a pedestrian being struck. Investigators said Leung was crossing Mary Hill with a friend when a dark-coloured truck hit CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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Watch a plea from the parents of hit-and-run victim Annie Leung

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LISA KING/NOW

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Chase Vader, front, and Bailey Parr-Forest take advantage of a streak of warm and sunny weather to fish in the section of the Coquitlam River that runs alongside Gates Park in Port Coquitlam.

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NEWSNOW THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

Lawsuit alleges botched surgery PATIENT SUES AFTER UNDERGOING OPERATION TO DEAL WITH LONGTERM BACK PAIN

Editor’s note: due to the sensitive nature of the medical claims detailed in this lawsuit, the TriCities NOW has decided to protect the plaintiff’s privacy by identifying him by his initials, rather than his full name.

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com An alleged botched surgery has landed the lone Tri-Cities hospital and one of its surgeons in court. According to a notice of civil claim filed in Supreme Court, G.M. is suing the Fraser Health Authority on behalf of Eagle Ridge Hospital, Dr. Mark Matishak and four nurses, for injuries related to a back procedure done in 2011. Court documents state that, in the spring of 2011, G.M., who is listed as a maintenance worker, sought treatment for longstanding back pain and was diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis at L3-4 and L4-5. On Nov. 7, 2011, court documents state G.M. was operated on by Dr. Matishak at Eagle Ridge Hospital. The doctor performed a decompressive laminectomy at the L3 to L5 levels. The purpose of the operation was to relieve pressure on the spinal cord caused by the stenosis. Documents state the nurses, listed in the suit as H. Snyder, M. Calderon, D. Magel and N. Spassous, also participated in the

LISA KING/NOW

A doctor and four nurses are named in a lawsuit launched by a former patient at Port Moody’s Eagle Ridge Hospital. The allegations have not been proven in court. procedure. The lawsuit alleges that when Dr. Matishak was drilling a small amount of bone at L3, he “breached the dura causing an approximate eight millimeter tear.” The claim said the doctor attempted to

repair the dura (the outer layer of the spinal cord) tear using sutures and fibrin glue. The claim also stated G.M. remained on bed rest for several days after the procedure. The plaintiff displayed anemia and needed

medication for meningitis. His post-operative diagnosis was lumbar spinal stenosis, post-operative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and neurogenic bowel and bladder. The suit claims since the tear incurred during the procedure, G.M. has suffered a serious nerve root injury and developed urinary and fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction. The suit claims his prognosis is “guarded.” The suit alleges Dr. Matishak breached his duty of care owed to G.M. by failing to use reasonable operative skill during the procedure and failing to provide the plaintiff with a reasonable quality of care. Similarly, the suit alleges the four nurses breached their duty of care by failing to provide care of reasonable and prudent nurses in the circumstances during the operative procedure. None of the allegations have been proven in court and none of the other parties have filed a response. A spokesperson for Fraser Health said the health authority couldn’t comment because the case is before the courts. The claim states the damage continues to cause G.M. pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life. He is also no longer able to work. G.M. is seeking compensation for general damages, loss of earnings capacity, special damages and costs.

Unpaid tolls could mean School district trouble for vehicle owners confirms virus diagnosis

20,000 VEHICLE OWNERS ISSUED LETTERS AFTER FAILING TO PAY TOLLS

Jeremy DEUTSCH

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com If you’ve been avoiding paying the tolls to cross the new Port Mann Bridge, you won’t be able to for long. The company that administers the toll, Transportation Investment (TI) Corp., is cracking down on drivers with unpaid tolls. On Wednesday, the comThe vast majority pany issued a press release noting that as of Oct. 16, of Port Mann drivers with unpaid tolls will users have been not be able to renew their paying their tolls vehicle insurance and driver’s licence. automatically TI Corp. said it has issued through their letters to 20,000 vehicle TReO accounts or owners with accounts that are 90 days overdue and promptly upon have toll balances owing of the receipt of an $25 or more. invoice. If a balance remains by Oct. 16, the company said –TI Corp. it will request that ICBC refuse to issue the registered owner’s vehicle insurance and driver’s licence until payment is made in full. “With more than 600,000 registered accounts and more

LISA KING/NOW

TI Corp. says drivers can pay overdue toll fees at its Coquitlam headquarters, by phone or online.

than 1.7 million different vehicles using the Port Mann Bridge since opening, the vast majority of Port Mann users have been paying their tolls automatically through their TReO accounts or promptly upon the receipt of an invoice,” a TI Corp. statement said. The statement went on to read, “customers sent Refuse to Issue warnings account for a very small percentage of Port Mann users, but this process is in place to ensure that everyone that uses the Port Mann Bridge, and takes advantage of the time savings benefits that it offers, pay their tolls.” The company also noted tolls are used solely to pay for the costs and operation of the Port Mann/Highway 1 Improvement Project. TI Corp. said payments can be made online anytime at www.treo.ca, in person at the Coquitlam and Surrey customer service centres located on either side of the bridge, and by phone at 604-516-8736.

jdeutsch@thenownews.com It’s not even the start of the cold and flu season, but already one school in Coquitlam is dealing with a common virus. On Wednesday, a letter was sent home to students and parents at Hillcrest Middle alerting them to a confirmed case of hand-foot-and-mouth disease at the school. According to school district officials, one student was diagnosed with the virus and has not been back to school since. A spokesperson for the district said it is standard procedure to send a letter home informing the entire parent community when a case has been reported. The district said the illness is quite common, but did not have an exact number of cases reported each year. According to the school’s letter and the BC Health Guide, hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a common childhood illness that starts with a fever and then causes sores in the mouth and on the hands and feet. It usually goes away on its own after a week. The virus spreads easily through coughing and sneezing. The disease can occur at any time of the year, but is most common in the summer and fall. To prevent the spread of the illness, the health guide recommends washing hands after changing the diaper of an infected child. The district decided to inform parents in part because of the implications the disease has for pregnant women and people with lowered immune systems. Anyone seeking more information can contact Fraser Health at 604-778-8700. twitter.com/jertricitiesnow


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

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Parents say they can forgive driver CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 her while she was in the crosswalk. The driver allegedly stopped for a moment, looked back, then took off. Leung, a Riverside Secondary student, was killed. The family offered more words to the alleged driver, and forgiveness. “We understand it’s an accident and nobody wanted it to happen,” Maggie said. “We can forgive you and we believe our daughter would forgive you as well. Annie was such a kind and loving child.” The family also talked about their daughter, noting she liked to draw and wanted to be an artist, designer or author when she got older. “She loved to contribute anything she could to help her school,” her parents said, adding Annie would help draw posters to promote school activities. The family thanked a young man they said tried to save their daughter’s life by holding her and calling 911 after the crash. The family also thanked Annie’s classmates at Riverside, neighbours and strangers for placing flowers and cards at the scene of the crash. Maggie also said she never had concern

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for Annie’s safety walking along Pitt River Road, pointing out she walked the same route without problems for more than a year before the crash. As for the investigation, RCMP Cpl. Jamie Chung said police have followed up on several leads, but no suspect or vehicle has been identified. “In a case like this it’s not uncommon for us to interview several people or examine several vehicles to try and find the right one,” he said. A few days after the incident, RCMP released a video, taken from a nearby home on Mary Hill Road, which shows a possible suspect in a black truck driving away near the scene of the crash. Chung noted the video has led to tips from the public, but did not offer specific details. He also suggested the purpose of the family making a plea is to give the driver a chance to come forward. “There are two sides to the story and we really want to hear from him,” Chung said. Mounties are asking anyone with information related to the collision or the identity of the driver to contact Coquitlam RCMP traffic services at 604-945-1550 and quote file number 2013-27102. twitter.com/jertricitiesnow

Stolen smartphones on ‘blacklist’ turned off Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com It’s called the blacklist, but it’s a roll you want to be on — or at least have your phone on. Local Mounties are urging smartphone owners to join a stolen cellphone blacklist set up by the Canadian WirelessTelecommunications Association (CWTA). Smartphones on the blacklist are essentially useless to criminals who steal them because the device is blocked and cannot be reactivated by any service provider that is participating in the program. “The blacklist program is a great tool for smartphone owners and bad news for smartphone thieves,” RCMP Cpl. Jamie Chung said in a statement. “But we’ve found that many people don’t really understand how the program works and what they have to do to make the program a success. That message needs to get out so smartphone owners can protect themselves.” The program works when a lost or stolen smartphone is added to the blacklist by a cellphone service provider after the device’s owner reports the device lost or stolen and provides the

LISA KING/NOW

RCMP Cpl. Jamie Chung shows how to find a phone’s International Mobile Equipment Identity number. phone’s IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity). The IMEI number is a code that identifies a device to a service network. The blacklist program was launched Oct. 1, and will only cover phones reported stolen from Sept. 30 onwards. Participating carriers include Bell, Telus, Rogers and Wind. Chung noted Coquitlam RCMP have been dealing with a rash of phone thefts in the community. He pointed out in some cases the victims are being physically robbed of their phone.

To link directly to instructions on how to add your phone to the blacklist, scan this page with Layar

So far, there haven’t been any injuries reported from the thefts, but police are warning people to be aware of their surroundings when using their phone. For more information about the blacklist and tips from police, go to a link at Coquitlam RCMP’s webpage at http://bit.ly/18TalSB.

Smile Cookies are gone, but the smiles they’ve left in our community will last forever. Thanks to your support, Tim Hortons will be donating the entire proceeds to BC Children's Hospital Foundation.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

NEWSN0W

Did businesses ‘hijack’ tax meeting? NEW EXHIBIT NOW OPEN

COQUITLAM MAYOR AND SOME COUNCILLORS EXPRESS CONCERNS

Sam SMITH editorial@thenownews.com Coquitlam council is looking at new ways to get public input following a budget

meeting on Oct. 3 that council members say was “hijacked” by business owners. Mayor Richard Stewart said the business owners were given too much time to speak and intimidated other residents from getting up to talk about other issues. “It really got hijacked,” he said. “I felt it was unfortunate that a group of business owners almost designed the meeting so that residents couldn’t get up and speak.” Coun. Mae Reid told the Tri-Cities NOW it was the time and place for concerned business owners to speak their minds, but it became too much of a focus.

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“I do think, to be fair, it wouldn’t have been very nice to the business people if everybody only talked about sports and fields,” she said. Stewart and Reid say there were residents at the meeting who felt too intimidated to speak and ended up leaving before the meeting was over. “They felt like it wasn’t for them,” Reid said. Reid thinks the solution should involve either separating business issues into their own meeting, or having a similar setup to the Union of B.C. Municipalities system with a pro-microphone and a con-microphone. If no one is on the con side,

then only one pro-speaker may go. “In this case, you couldn’t do a pro and con mic, but you could do a business and residents [mic], or something so that everyone feels they’re included in the meeting,” she said. At the Oct. 3 meeting, small business owners and Mike Klassen, director of provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), argued for tax relief and equality for local businesses. “Right now what we’re seeing is that businesses are paying a premium to be in the City of Coquitlam,” Klassen

Five Ways to Get the Most Out of Your Home Warranty Insurance Buyers of new homes in B.C. are protected by Canada’s strongest construction defect insurance. Those who learn as much as they can about their home warranty insurance will get the most out of their coverage. 1. Make note of each coverage expiry date. The home warranty insurance provided on new singlefamily and multi-family homes built for sale in B.C. protects ;H;D8GE 5D*#!#8E 5#"#7EG "&! G$#7D'7 $#!D&5G &" ED:#0 including 2 years on labour and materials (some limits apply), 5 years on the building envelope (including water $#8#E!;ED&84 ;85 +, (#;!G &8 EF# GE!C7EC!#. B#AD#> (&C! policy for details. 2. Know what’s covered and what isn’t. Make sure you understand the extent and limitations of your coverage by reading through your insurance documents. You can also search the HPO’s free online Residential Construction Performance Guide. 3. Make a claim. If you need to make a claim for defects not otherwise taken care of by your builder, be sure to send details in writing to your warranty provider prior to the expiry of coverage. 4. Maintain your home. Maintain your home to protect your coverage, and if you receive a maintenance manual for your home, read it and follow it. 5. Learn more. Check out the Homeowner Protection Office’s Guide to Home Warranty Insurance in British Columbia, a free download from www.hpo.bc.ca.

told the Tri-Cities NOW the day of the meeting. “They could go to a neighbouring municipality and run their business for cheaper. That’s not right.” A 2011 study by the CFIB suggested that Coquitlam businesses pay 4.69 times more in property taxes than residential owners. Those numbers rank Coquitlam’s disparity as the highest among B.C.’s larger cities. Last year, one business owner saw her bill spike by 70 per cent in a one-year period. In 2011, a City Centre business owner saw nearly a 50-percent increase in his tax bill. Klassen spoke before council on Oct. 3, stating the amount paid to city staff is too high, directly contributing to a “property tax tsunami.” Following its presentation, the CFIB got a commitment from mayor and council to meet with small business owners. “Obviously we were delighted,” Klassen said. However, Klassen heard of council’s reaction on Monday and was disappointed. “To me, it’s just an appalling arrogance that a mayor and council will be so dismissive of their small business community,” Klassen said. “Actually hearing from your small business operators from your own city in a respectful way hardly amounts to hijacking.” Coun. Terry O’Neill said the small business owners were operating within the city’s rules and thinks the word “hijacked” is too strong. “I do agree, however, that they dominated the meeting too much,” he said. Coun. Neal Nicholson proposed adopting a practice of hearing from all residents once on one topic, then after everyone has had a turn residents could return to an earlier topic. Stewart said at the least there should be an opportunity for concerned residents to speak on other subjects before one issue takes over. However, Coun. Lou Sekora said the small business owners had a point, especially when it came to city staff payroll. Sekora pointed to the city’s $260-million budget and the seven per cent going into reserves, totalling roughly $18.2 million. “Is the city that poor we have to put that much money in on a yearly basis?” he said, adding some of that money could go to relieve taxation. Stewart said the money put into reserves is needed for capital projects, as well as other items as they come up throughout the year. Despite the comments made Monday, Klassen is still expecting council to hold to its commitment to speak with small business owners.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

7

NEWSN0W

Man sentenced to 7 years in killing Jennifer SALTMAN

editorial@thenownews.com A man involved in a fatal shooting outside a Coquitlam sushi restaurant 10 years ago has been sentenced to seven years in prison. Jason Hyun Kim, 29, was charged with second-degree murder, but pleaded guilty in September to manslaughter. He was sentenced Thursday in B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster. The incident took place at Boss Sushi Cafe on North Road, where 19-year-old Kim and three friends — two men and a woman — met for an evening out on May 31, 2003. Heung “Charlie” Lee, 27, and a group of about 14 people were also at the restaurant celebrating a birthday. There was some kind of interaction between the two groups outside the restaurant and words were exchanged. Everyone had been drinking. The situation became fur-

ther inflamed when Lee said, in Korean, something along the lines of “So, do you want to die?” or “You’re going to be dead.” The argument continued after both groups went inside and a member of Kim’s group threw a glass or beer bottle at Lee and his friends. A melee ensued, which spilled outside the restaurant. Punches and kicks were exchanged. At one point, one of the three men from Kim’s group went to Kim’s car, retrieved a handgun and shot three times at Lee’s group. Everyone ran back toward the restaurant, but one of the bullets struck Lee in the back. Kim and his friends fled. Police were called and when they arrived at the scene around 1:30 a.m. on June 1, Lee was on the ground at the entrance to the restaurant. Lee was rushed to hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 2:40 a.m. “This was a completely pointless and unnecessary

attack on Mr. Lee,” Justice Kathleen Ker said in her decision. Kim was arrested and charged with murder on June 26, 2003, and released on bail five weeks later. In February 2004, a warrant was issued for Kim’s arrest after he failed to make a court appearance. Kim remained missing for more than seven years. He was arrested on July 25, 2011 for possession of heroin for the purpose of trafficking.

However, Kim gave police his younger brother’s name and his true identity did not come to light until Kim was fingerprinted. Kim pleaded guilty to the drug charge and was sentenced to one day in jail. He also admitted to obstruction and was sentenced to two months in jail. Crown prosecutor Wendy Stephen said in her submissions that the plea to the lesser charge of manslaughter was accepted because there

was no substantial chance of a conviction for murder. “We simply don’t know who fired the gun,” Stephen said. Lee’s father said he hopes Kim is able to put the incident behind him and lead a productive life after he is released from prison. Kim’s sentence was reduced by four years, three months after he was given credit for time served. Two years, nine months remain in his sentence.

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OPINION

8

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

Tri-Cities NOW is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at 216-3190 St. Johns Street, Port Moody BC V3H 2C7 Phone: 604-444-3451

All business, all the time?

I

n the movie Killing Them Softly, the lead character, played by Brad Pitt, offers the insight that “America is not a country, it’s business.” The same could certainly be said of Canada, even before the revelations of industrial espionage carried out on behalf of Canadian mining interests in Brazil by our national spy agency, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC). After all, the divide between the corporate boardroom and a democratically elected government like Canada’s gets pretty grey at some levels. Corporate executives hold their jobs at the behest of those shareholders who bother to vote, just as a democracy is supposedly controlled by its putative shareholders: the country’s citizens … those who bother to vote, that is. Of course, in an ideal democracy, everyone, rich or poor, is an equal partner at the ballot box, while in the corporate structure, those who have more money — or control more shares — have a greater say when a vote is taken. More importantly — and this is where the line between business and the business of government tends to get cloudy — a country’s prime assets are its people, and their well-being is the reason for the government’s existence, while in a corporation, people are just assets — and money is the ultimate goal. That distinction appears to have been lost almost entirely in Canada’s governance of late. Only science that bears financial fruit is allowed relevance. Research that dares to question the validity of the corporate view of economics is stamped out. Human rights are those that do not stand in the way of monetary gain. And now, as apparently clarified by goings-on in Brazil, even our spies have identified the national interest of Canada to be congruent with the financial interests of our corporations. When it’s only money that does the talking, it’s strictly business.

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I don’t know, but it’s scary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.00% Drivers are more distracted than ever . . . . . . . . 23.00% Drinking and driving is a major problem . . . . . . . 5.00% Drivers lack empathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.00% Drivers don’t want to face the consequences 59.00%

Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. The publisher shall not be liable for minor changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions with respect to any advertisement is limited to publication of the advertisement in a subsequent issue or the refund of monies paid for the advertisement.

Where does this zone end? “My question is not directly on school bus matters, but about “school zone” road signs. I moved from Calgary, where school zones are clearly defined at the start and at the end with signs. Driving around New West, Burnaby and the Tri-Cities, I’ve noticed that there are only signs that tell you when school zones begins, but not when they end. Not long ago, I was driving through a school zone and the car behind me started to honk at me to speed up. I was still driving the reduced speed as I hadn’t seen the school zone end sign. After this incident, I asked a friend, how are you supposed to know when the school zone ends? He told me to look for where the school property ends. It doesn’t seem to make sense that I should be worrying about where the school property ends and not focusing all my attention to what is happening on the road. So, my question to you is: how do you know when a school zone ends and it is safe to increase your speed?” Yasuo Tano Port Coquitlam Yasuo, having lived in Alberta myself, I know exactly what you mean. Indeed, when I first moved here, the absence of the “School Zone End” sign was quite noticeable to me too. Since each province has its own set of regulations for traffic signage, road signs in Alberta are not exactly the same as those in B.C. In B.C., the “School Zone End” sign is not required. Naturally, drivers would wonder where a school zone ends. The answer is to look for the school zone sign facing the opposite direction of traffic. In some municipalities, such as in Port Coquitlam, the school zone sign pole is painted neon green so the sign is more visible to drivers in all directions. At some schools in other jurisdictions, staff members put traffic cones along

COP TALK

Cpl. Jamie Chung the entire stretch of the school zone as an extra reminder for drivers to slow down. I hope this answers your question. Did you know: • The posted speed limit in school zones is 30 km/h and it is applicable on school days between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., unless the sign says otherwise. • The posted speed limit in playground zones is 30 km/h from dawn to dusk, every day of the year, not just on school days. • Until children are about eight years of age, it is difficult for them to assess whether a vehicle is moving or not. So drivers must watch for children walking on medians, roadways and curbs, and be cautious when approaching intersections. • Children also assume cars stop instantly, and they do not have the ability to estimate whether there is enough time for them to cross the road. • When children see an approaching car, they first notice the colour of the vehicle — not how fast the vehicle is travelling. • It takes a vehicle 13 metres to come to a complete stop when driving 30 km/ h, but 27 metres — more than double that distance — when driving 50 km/h. • By law, drivers are required to have their lights on between a half hour after sunset and a half hour before sunrise, or whenever they cannot see clearly due

to weather conditions. That said, it is recommended to drive with your headlights on at all times. • The painted yellow curb lines that prohibit parking in front of a school are there for a reason: to ensure that drivers’ vision and their ability to spot children on the sidewalk or roadway is not impeded. If you have any more questions about school zones or traffic in general, we are more than happy to answer them. You can e-mail us at coquitlam_media@ rcmp-grc.gc.ca. “Cop Talk” is a monthly column produced as a partnership between the Coquitlam RCMP and the Tri-Cities NOW based on questions submitted by readers. Cpl. Jamie Chung is the media relations officer for the Coquitlam RCMP. Questions can be submitted to editorial@thenownews. com (put “Cop Talk” in the subject line). You can follow Cpl. Chung on Twitter (@rcmpjchung) and visit the Coquitlam RCMP’s website (www.coquitlam.rcmp. ca) for more information about policing and public safety in your community.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? Share your opinion on this column or anything else you read in The Tri-Cities NOW by sending a letter to the editor to editorial@thenownews.com, with “letter to the editor” in the subject line. We edit for taste, legality and length, and both letters to the editor and opinion columns may be reproduced on The Tri-Cities NOW website, www.thenownews.com.


LETTERS TIME TO ‘BACK AWAY FROM THE PIPELINE’

I recently read a somewhat puzzling article written by Dylan Jones, president and CEO of the Canada West Foundation (B.C. needs other provinces, Tri-Cities NOW, Aug. 30). He has taken a number of halftruths, blithely spun them to the right and created an emotional plea for the people of British Columbia to play nice with their Albertan neighbours with respect to Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline project. Untangling the innuendos and intricacies within this article could well be the substance of a master’s thesis. I will therefore limit the scope of my equally passionate response to two points which I find particularly troubling. 1. In his argument, Mr. Jones attempts to find common ground between the two provinces by noting, “It’s stunning how many values British Columbians share with many of their Prairie neighbours. A deep love of the land.” Really? I find this statement rather stunning. Alberta is currently home to the most environ-

rugged and remote mountain ranges and hundreds of sparkling, pristine salmon-bearing waterways. Non-native peoples are standing in solidarity with First Nations peoples to defend B.C.’s spectacular, world-renowned terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Anyone who has journeyed into the majestic Great Bear Rainforest in search of the elusive Spirit Bear or kayaked alongside fabled humpbacks, orcas and grey whales through the magic and mists of the wild West Coast waters can attest to the fact that we possess treasures far beyond anything that could ever be squeezed out of Alberta’s tarry bitumen. British Columbians are as passionate about their environment as the Albertan and Harper governments are about their tar sands. Perhaps British Columbians and Albertans have a deep love of their respective lands for vastly different reasons. 2. Mr. Jones goes on to say that British Columbians and Albertans also share a “willingness to take risks.” In my book, friends do not ask friends to accept risks which far outweigh benefits. When objective analyses based on fact and scientific evidence conclude that risks far outweigh benefits — it’s time to put down the shovel

mentally devastating process on the face of the Earth; scars so deep they are visible from outer space. Great swathes of Canada’s boreal forest, home to vast herds of woodland caribou and countless birds, are being mowed down as the first step in tar-sands extraction. The next step often involves excavating the fertile layers of soil, in order to reach the gluey bitumen. Toxic waste-water is dumped into leaky tailing ponds spanning 50 square km, thus threatening the world’s third-largest watershed. Rates of rare types of cancers are soaring in First Nations communities living in proximity to the tar-sands extraction sites. If Alberta has its way, 149,000 square km (an area the size of the State of Florida) will face “end to end degradation.” The Albertan government, goaded on by the Harper government, is hell-bent on completely dismantling and transforming an entire ecosystem into a grotesque and inhospitable Mordor-like wasteland. I’m just not feeling the love here … In contrast, increasing numbers of British Columbians are raising the alarm and rallying to stop pipelines carrying this toxic tarsands sludge from crossing two

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

CONTACT US

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General 604-444-3451 Sports 604-444-3094 Advertising 604-492-4492 Delivery 604-942-3081 REGIONAL PUBLISHER

Brad Alden EDITOR

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and back away from the pipeline. In the world according to Enbridge, there are no islands in the placid waters of Douglas Channel, bitumen floats and environmental safety is paramount — therefore the risk is minimal. In reality, supertankers laden with toxic sludge will be expected to navigate treacherous waters, take sharp turns through reef- and rock-strewn channels, and endure sudden, extreme weather conditions, dense fog and notorious rogue waves. Human error cannot be discounted either (remember the Exxon Valdez and the Queen of the North). By Enbridge’s own admission, between 1999 and 2010 they were responsible for at least 800 spills releasing close to seven million gallons of heavy crude into the environment. Oh, and by the way, independent studies confirm that bitumen sinks, thereby making effective cleanup impossible. Are we really willing to disregard the facts and put our environment, our regional economies, our heritage, our children’s future and our very identity at risk for the sake of shipping cheap bitumen to Asia? Nancy H. Furness Port Coquitlam

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

Saturday, October 26, 2013

Elect Again BARRIE

NEWSN0W

Bus driver threatened

22-YEAR-OLD PORT MOODY MAN ARRESTED Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com It was a tense few moments for the driver and passengers on a bus in Port Moody. Port Moody police said an incident began just after 5 p.m. Monday, when a passenger on a Coast Mountain bus called 911 about two men who had reportedly threatened to stab the bus driver. Police eventually stopped the bus in the 3000-block of St. Johns Street and dealt with the two men. Investigators said one man, a 22-year-old Port Moody resident, was in possession of a concealed knife. The suspect, who was not identified, was arrested for uttering threats, carrying a con-

cealed weapon and possession of a weapon dangerous to the public. He was eventually released on a promise to appear in court with various conditions. The second man, a 22-year-old Coquitlam resident, was released without charges as investigators determined the first man to be the lone aggressor in the situation. “Port Moody Police and Transit Police would like to thank the members of the public who reported this incident,” said Port Moody police spokesman Const. Luke Van Winkel in a statement. “Together we can ensure that public transit remains a safe mode of transportation for everyone.” Police note no one was hurt in the incident.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

11

CITY OF COQUITLAM By-Election 2013 Notice of Election by Voting Public Notice Is Hereby given that the 2013 By-Election has been set for Saturday, October 26, 2013 to elect two (2) individuals to the office of Councillor (2 vacancies).

Councillor - Two (2) to be elected Usual Name

Jurisdiction of Residence

Usual Name

Jurisdiction of Residence

Usual Name

Jurisdiction of Residence

Usual Name

Jurisdiction of Residence

Michael Bell

Coquitlam

Ben Craig

Coquitlam

Ben B.H. Kim

Port Moody

Barrie Lynch

Coquitlam

Doug Macdonell

Coquitlam

Kevin Startin

Coquitlam

Teri Towner

Coquitlam

Chris Wilson

Coquitlam

Vincent Wu

Coquitlam

Kurt Zaporozan

Coquitlam

Bonita Bonita Zarillo Zarrillo

Coquitlam

www.coquitlam.ca

General Voting Day Maillard Middle School 1300 Rochester Avenue Mountain View Elementary School 740 Smith Avenue Mundy Road Elementary School 2200 Austin Avenue Porter Elementary School 728 Porter Street Ranch Park Elementary School 2701 Spuraway Avenue

Bramblewood Elementary School 2875 Panorama Drive Eagle Ridge Elementary School 1215 Falcon Drive Glen Elementary School 3064 Glen Drive Hillcrest Middle School 2161 Regan Avenue Leigh Elementary School 1230 Soball Road Lord Baden-Powell Elementary School 450 Joyce Street

These locations are readily accessible for persons with physical disabilities.You may vote at any one of the above-noted locations.

Advanced Polls Advance Polls will be available to all qualified electors of the City of Coquitlam at the following locations, dates, and times: Date Location Times October 16, 2013 Poirier Sport and Leisure Complex, 633 Poirier Street 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. October 19, 2013 Pinetree Community Centre, 1260 Pinetree Way 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. October 23, 2013 Poirier Community Centre, 630 Poirier Street 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. October 25, 2013 Pinetree Community Centre, 1260 Pinetree Way 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Voter Registration The list of registered electors for the City of Coquitlam has been produced on the basis of the most recent Provincial Voters’ List. If you have recently moved, or are not on the Provincial Voters’ List you may register at the time of voting if qualified. Please note, if you are registering at the time of voting you will be required to produce two pieces of identification that together prove your residency and identity. At least one document must include a signature and a solemn declaration must be made prior to receiving a ballot. Acceptable pieces of identification that show proof of identity and residency are: B.C.D.L., B.C.I.D., I.C.B.C. registration, CareCard or Gold CareCard, Request for Continued Assistance Form SDES8, Social Insurance Card, Citizenship Card, property tax notice, credit card or debit card and utility bill (i.e. telephone, cable, hydro).

Elector Qualifications To qualify as a Resident Elector, you must meet all of the following requirements at the time of voting: • age 18 or older on or before Voting Day; and • a Canadian citizen; and • a resident of British Columbia for at least 6 months immediately before the day of registration; and • a resident of the City of Coquitlam for at least 30 days immediately before the day of registration; and • not disqualified by any enactment from voting in an election or otherwise disqualified by law. To qualify as a Non-Resident Property Elector, you must meet all of the following requirements at the time of voting: • age 18 or older on or before General Voting Day; and • a Canadian citizen; and • a resident of British Columbia for at least 6 months immediately before the day of registration; and

• a registered owner of real property in the City of Coquitlam for at least 30 days immediately before the day of registration; and • not entitled to register as a resident elector; and • not disqualified by any enactment from voting in an election or otherwise disqualified by law. The following special conditions determining eligibility apply to persons wishing to register as a Non-Resident Property Elector: • Only one person may vote per property. If several non-residents own a single piece of property, the owners must select one of the owners to vote. Written consent from the majority of those property owners not voting must be submitted to the Chief Election Officer. • A current title search is required as proof satisfactory that the applicant is entitled to register. • To be eligible to vote the non-resident property elector must first obtain a certificate from the Chief Election Officer at City Hall.

Special Voting Opportunities The following special voting opportunities have been arranged:

Location

Cartier House Care Facility Residences at Belvedere Belvedere Care Centre Foyer Maillard Parkwood Manor

Date

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Time

8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. 3:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Location

Dufferin Care Centre Lakeshore Care Centre Madison Care Centre L.J. Christmas Manor Burquitlam Lions Centre

Date

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 Wednesday, October 23, 2013 Wednesday, October 23, 2013 Friday, October 25, 2013 Friday, October 25, 2013

Time

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Please note only those qualified electors who are residents of the facility at the time of voting may vote at a special voting opportunity.

Election Results Preliminary election results will be available after 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 26, 2013. Please visit the City’s website at www.coquitlam.ca/elections. Official election results will be declared on Monday, October 28, 2013.

Election News Direct Email Service The City of Coquitlam Direct Email Service sends you election information direct to your home! Visit www.coquitlam.ca/elections today and sign up to receive important updates and news on the 2013 By-Election via email. Further information on the foregoing may be obtained by contacting the City of Coquitlam Election Office at 604-927-3025, by emailing electioninfo@coquitlam.ca or by visiting the City’s website at www.coquitlam.ca/elections. Kerri Lore Chief Election Officer


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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

13

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

arts@thenownews.com

Paula Ledenko’s paintings are on display at the Port Moody Public Library.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Paintings evoke ‘a sense of happiness’

Coquitlam actor Donna Thompson stars in the play Let’s Murder Marsha.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Local actor makes the move to comedy Sam SMITH

C

editorial@thenownews.com omedy is an elusive beast to some and like wearing a hat to others; it’s either non-existent or as natural as choosing to do it. For almost 30 years veteran actor and Coquitlamite Donna Thompson donned the cap of a dramatic actress. But currently, she’s one of two lead female roles in the Vagabond Players’ production of Let’s Murder Marsha, a comedy and thriller parodying a variety of mystery novels. “You know what’s funny? I’m usually cast in dramatic roles,” Thompson told the Tri-Cities NOW. “I’m usually the woman that gets murdered, or is being murdered, but lately I’ve been stepping into comedy.” Acting has been Thompson’s passion ever since she was little, and as she grew up in Coquitlam and later Burnaby, before moving back again, she fueled her natural curiosity with drama classes and school plays. Her desire, work ethic and intense role preparation kept her landing gigs over the years, working in theatre productions in and out of the Tri-Cities. It wasn’t until recently she decided to dip her acting pen into the comedic ink. “I really did not find it easy at first,” she said. “I didn’t understand comedic timing. And it’s quite different preparing for a comedic role.” Years of being used to underplaying her characters was flipped on its side, making

way for the opposite tendency in comedy to put it all on the line. “I personally believe in dramatic roles, that you don’t want to overplay them,” she said. “But with comedy, I tend to want to put myself out there. Just let it all out.” Arriving on a comedy set has a different feel altogether than walking into a dramatic production, she added. “You definitely have to walk into the theatre with a light-hearted attitude,” she said. “You can’t be afraid to push the envelope.” Her character in Let’s Murder Marsha is named Persis Devore, a glamorous interior designer who inadvertently causes chaos in the home of friends Marsha and Tobias Gilmore. Her friend Marsha, a mystery novel addict, overhears Persis speaking with her husband Tobias about Marsha’s birthday present, but due to bad timing and a little more than a bit of paranoia, she hears bits and pieces of the conversation and starts to believe they are planning to murder her. Then the chaos begins. After a long career in drama and a recent successful foray into comedy, Thompson couldn’t be happier with the outcome. Let’s Murder Marsha runs until Oct. 26 at The Bernie Legge Theatre in New Westminster. The play runs from Thursday to Saturday at 8 p.m. with a Sunday matinée at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, and $13 for seniors and students. For reservations or to book online, email reservations@vagabondplayers. ca.

The Port Moody Public Library is displaying works by Paula Ledenko throughout October. “Bright, bold and clean, the way a young child sees the world is the style that Ledenko has chosen to use in her painting,” a press release states. “Her pieces are meant to evoke a sense of peace and simple happiness that automatically draws the viewer in.” Ledenko’s inspiration comes from the many natural scenes around Coquitlam. Thanks to her young daughter, Ledenko has taken the time to slow down and appreciate the little things in life: the flowers, leaves and bugs — all the stuff we take for granted. The Port Moody Public Library is located at 100 Newport Dr.

New choir seeks members

It’s all about the chops. A new community choir has come to the Tri-Cities with seasoned music director Michael Grice taking the lead to help clear those throats and get that melody hidden deep inside to come out. The new choir, titled Choral Connections, is open to all singers from novice to experts, as long as they are interested in joining a nonauditioned choir that functions in a safe, supportive, collegial learning and performing environment. “I am excited about this opportunity to work with Choral Connections, a choir of dedicated adults, and to help them explore the world of choral music in all its varied repertoire genres from classical to jazz,” Grice said in a press release. Rehearsals have already begun, but potential mem-

Michael Grice is leading a new community choir. bers can call Peggy Koopman at 604-465-6599 or Terry Bates at 604-356-4970. More information can be found at choralconnections.ca.

Evergreen hosts The Fugitives

All great shows need to start somewhere. And for Vancouver-based indie-folk collective The Fugitives, that start is at the Evergreen Cultural Centre today (Friday, Oct. 11) to promote their new album, Everything Will Happen. The band, led by Brendan McLeod and Adrian Glynn and known for its “infectious” contemporary roots/folks songs, will be going all out on stage before touring the country. Tickets, which range in price from $15 to $30, can be purchased online at evergreenculturalcentre.ca or by calling 604-927-6555. McLeod and Glynn will also be leading a songwriting workshop before the concert, from 4 to 6 p.m. Call the number above for registration. Tickets are $52 for adults and $26 for students.

It’s Oktoberfest time

It’s that time of the year the Germans do best:

Oktoberfest. Douglas College’s Coquitlam campus will be celebrating at A Class Act on Friday, Oct. 18 from 7 to 10 p.m. Pitch in $45 for your ticket and be treated to Bavarian culture through tastings of beers, wines and foods. “A Class Act includes festive sounds of traditional Oktoberfest music which will encourage you to bid on our diverse live and silent auctions,” a press release states. “For example, we have a $1,000 shopping spree at Coquitlam Centre, a little red wagon full of beer and gift certificates for restaurants, hotels, ballroom dancing lessons, athletic events and so much more.” Hosted by the Douglas College Foundation and students from the hospitality management program, A Class Act is a fundraiser for student aid. To reserve a ticket call 604777-6176 or visit bettermail. ca/ct/ for more information.

Celebrate Elvis at the Red Robinson

Legends never die. And when it comes to the King, that statement is nothing short of truth. In what is being called the “ultimate tribute show” to Elvis Presley, three worldclass impersonators will be coming to the Tri-Cities to show off their idol’s mojo. The show is titled Elvis, Elvis, Elvis, and is happening on Saturday, Oct. 19. Doors open at 7 p.m., with the show starting at 8 p.m. Tickets range in price from $29.50 to $44.50. Tickets are available at all Ticketmaster outlets, online at ticketmaster.ca or by phone at 1-855-985-5000. — compiled by Sam Smith


14

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

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To view a trailer for this film, scan with Layar

CINEPHILIA

Joshua Cabrita

Jason James’ directorial debut, That Burning Feeling, intends to challenge the archetypes of the characters in these movies, attempting to push them to further emotional depths — the protagonist in That Burning Feeling, Adam Murphy, tries to turn his life around after he has been diagnosed with gonorrhea. His new-life resolution is to find all his recent one-

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H

e is a pretty boy (like Hugh Grant or Matthew McConaughey); she has a perky and bubbly personality (like Sandra Bullock or Julia Roberts). They meet. Of course, it is love at first sight, but quicker than a high school relationship, the couple have melodramatic quarrels and go their own ways. In the end the woman is swept off her feet once again and the lovers kiss in the beauty of the sunset (screen fades to black) as the entire theatre drowns in teary-eyed whimpering. Nearly every romantic comedy follows this formula rigidly. But Vancouverite

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

Convenient location #407 - 100 Schoolhouse Street, Coquitlam (next to ABC Country Restaurant) www.acdcoquitlam.com (604) 520-6640

15

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Dogwood Pavilion to host arthritis forum TRI-CITIES RESIDENT LIVING WITH ARTHRITIS URGES SUFFERERS TO GET INFORMED

Sam SMITH editorial@thenownews.com It was 16 years ago Lois Mackenzie found out she had arthritis. She was working as a welder, dealing with grinders and welding rods and using heavy equipment. It had never been a problem to her before. She was only in her ’20s. “When I was welding, it just seemed to amplify things,” she says. So she quit. It became too much strain on her body to even work, and to this day she’s still suffering from arthritis, mostly in the tendons in her hands, but also in various joints and, almost worst of all, with the fatigue she now feels. “I find working three days in a row is too much for me,” she says. Fifteen per cent of Canadians over the age of 15 suffer with some form of arthritis, according to the Arthritis Society. Other statistics include: • There are currently 600,000 people in B.C. living with arthritis. • There are more than 100 different kinds of arthritis, including lupus, gout and scleroderma. • Arthritis can affect anyone at any age. • One in four people between 25 and 44 are not in the labour force because of their disease. • It affects more women than men. • It can affect one’s ability to work, their quality of life and the potential to advance in their career. That last point Mackenzie knows all too well, having been forced to leave her career path at an early age to find something that fit

LISA KING/NOW

Lois Mackenzie, who has lived with arthritis for 16 years, says being proactive is the way to go.

her lifestyle. She tried working at Sears, but even that proved too much for her. But then, almost two years ago, she made the big score. She found a job at KMS Tools, working in sales, which doesn’t require a lot of physical exertion. The company works around her schedule, despite the opening being for a full-time position. “So now I’m three days a week,” she said. Over the course of 16 years Mackenzie has developed a very understanding relationship with her body. She knows her limits and when she can push them, and when to back off. Even so, she can’t stop the random flare of pain from acting up. “Going to dinner with me is interesting,” she said. “I’m always dropping my cutlery.” She describes her arthritis as a “throbbing” pain, mostly affecting the tendons in her hands and her joints. And there are times when that’s really kept her from doing the things she loves.

“I used to Boxfit. I really liked hitting the bag, the heavy bag, but I can’t do that now because it hurts,” she said. When she was 23 she loved riding a motorcycle. Those nostalgic memories recently pushed her to take a riding course, but it was also too much. “I’ve come to the conclusion it’s too hard to hold on, to turn the throttle and hold the clutch,” she said. “I could probably do it for 10 minutes, but I couldn’t do it for a long ride.” The disappointment still weighs her down, but she’s not letting it keep her there. Living with arthritis this long, Mackenzie knows the moment she lets her body rest, the easier it will be for her to give in. ���I am proactive,” she said. “I don’t push myself, but I don’t ignore my body either.”

She’s happy with how the summer went, as weather affects her body, but so far, so good. As for those who may be starting to suffer or just thinking they might be suffering from arthritis, Mackenzie is keen to offer advice. “Get a professional to check you out,” she said. “Be active. Don’t let the strain slow you down. There is also a lot to be said for alternative medicines, and acupuncture really helps.” A forum discussing arthritis-caused pain and fatigue will take place on Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Dogwood Pavilion, located at 624 Poirier St. in Coquitlam. The event is free, but registration is required. Call 604-714-5550 to register.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

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mall space gardeners who have now harvested most of their summer vegetables have several choices for occupying the bare earth in their containers as winter draws closer. Fall plantings of leafy crops may be successful if the weather co-operates, nurseries sell enticing leafy plants for winter containers or closer to Christmas you can get decorative berried branches which can be thrust into the soil. One beautiful alternative is planting a bulb pot in at least one container that won’t be needed for spring vegetables. Early tulips are especially suitable since their flowers are usually over by the end of May and their leaves are dying back. This is especially good timing for adding nutrients to the pots and then putting in transplants of summer crops. Tomatoes and peppers are especially suitable for containers. People who would like to re-plant the tulips next fall can lift them, let the leaves finish withering in a community pot then store them in absolutely dry conditions.

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The key to re-blooming is to keep them totally dry all through summer. This is how old-fashioned gardeners kept the same tulips going year after year. The species tulips, such as the Gregii and the Kaufmannia group, are mostly dwarf but they are the earliest and have pretty darkly spotted and speckled leaves. One of the few tall Gregii tulips is the red-flowered 20inch (50-cm) casa grande. The emperor series of tulips (Fosteriana) also blooms very early. Flower colours include orange, red, white and yellow in solids and bi-coloureds. The single and double early tulips also have many colours and large flowers. Double earlies are magnificent though they can end up face down in the mud CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

ARTHRITIS

COMMUNITY

Hyacinths are a great choice

FREE PUBLIC FORUM

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CONT. FROM PAGE 21

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if rain gets into their masses of petals. The major pest of container tulips is squirrels that love to dig the bulbs up and eat them. One way of foiling them is by covering the pot with wire mesh. Pea mesh can also work, though it’s best double-layered and securely fastened. The whole range of spring bulbs can be forced over winter, unearthed bit by bit as shoots appear in January or early February and brought inside. Development and blooming speeds up once they are exposed to house temperatures. Hyacinths are the most popular. Generally the shorter spring bulbs including crocuses, scilla and Iris reticulata make the best windowsill displays because they don’t lean. The taller tulips and daffodils tend to flop unless you stake them. Forcing bulbs means giving them a period of moist cold that works best if you can keep them outside by placing the planted pots in a shallow pit in the garden. The pots should be covered with

leaves, straw, bean vines, cut up corn stalks or something else light and airy that allows access in freezing cold. Grass clippings don’t work because they pack down too tightly. People with no outside garden can try forcing bulbs in pots in a garage or carport. This is quite doable but is more work than forcing bulbs out in a garden because the bulbs need to be covered so that they’re in the dark and watered regularly. All forced bulbs can be planted outside as soon as possible and those fed after blooming can flower the next spring. Hyacinths are especially successful planted outside.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

COMMUNITY&LIFE

City hosts ‘Hallogreen’ costume contest

The City of Coquitlam is challenging students to reduce their waste during the Halloween season by encouraging them to create their own Halloween costumes made from reusable and/or recycled materials. This competition is open to all Coquitlam students in kindergarten through Grade 12. Students will need to submit a photo of themselves in

their costume along with a brief report explaining the design of the costume and answering these questions: • What is your costume? • What reusable and/or recycled materials did you use? • How much reusable and/ or recycled materials did you use? • Why do you think it is important to reduce waste

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and recycle? City staff will judge each costume submission on originality, types of reusable and/or recycled materials used, and the amount of reusable and/or recycled materials used. Prizes include tickets to Evergreen Cultural Centre’s Fred Penner family matinee, Capilano Suspension Bridge and the Vancouver Aquarium. The submission deadline is Thursday, Oct. 31 before 4:30 p.m. “I’m always amazed at the creativity of our youth, particularly at Halloween,” Mayor Richard Stewart said

in a press release. “This is the perfect opportunity to get our students thinking about ways to reduce waste and to recycle.” Steffanie Warriner, the city’s manager of environmental services, added, “We really value the participation of the city’s youth in our recycling initiatives, and this is just another fun way to get students thinking about how they can help reduce waste and make a positive difference for the environment.” Visit coquitlam.ca/ hallogreen for all the contest information and complete submission details.

In Honour of International Newspaper Carrier Day on October 12, 2013 The Tri-Cities NOW would like to thank all of our newspaper carriers for making an important contribution to our community. We value the work you do!

Give. Volunteer. Act.

NOW FILE PHOTO

The City of Coquitlam is encouraging the use of recycled/reusable materials in Halloween costumes with a ‘Hallogreen’ costume contest for students.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

25

COMMUNITY&LIFE

Scholarships recognize two young leaders Sam SMITH

editorial@thenownews.com Being a teenager is tough. School takes up all the good hours during the day, and homework demands attention at night. Teachers fight for students’ attention, even if the subject isn’t to their liking. Finding any time for themselves can be a tricky thing. But for these two local youth, finding time for themselves wasn’t even an option. In fact, they felt obligated to make the community that helped raise them become even better, even if it meant losing precious hours of PHOTOS BY LISA KING, LEFT, AND SUBMITTED sleep. Terry Fox Secondary grad Shehan Wijeyagoonewardane, left, and Gleneagle “I was always notorious among friends Secondary grad Liam St. Louis both received scholarships from Envision Financial. and teachers that I never slept much,” said recent Terry Fox Secondary graduate Shehan would be an understatement, and for some don’t have to worry about food or going to Wijeyagoonewardane, laughing. “Sometimes reason his drive to better his community was school, or being harmed going to school, or having to walk two hours to get there.” I take on a bit more than I can handle. I think never really a choice. Wijeyagoonewardane graduated last year “Honestly, for me it’s just automatic,” he that’s my biggest issue, because when you take said. “I’ve always wanted to and is already looking ahead about how to pile on so much work you don’t better the community some- even more on top of his already full plate. want to let anyone down.” “I’ll be doing a dual-degree, a bachelor of how. I think it’s all of our obliIn his last year of high science and business,” he said. gation as citizens. school, Wijeyagoonewardane I’ve always He recently left for the University of Western “We are lucky in the sense we was the youth rep for the Trihave a secure society,” he said. Ontario, where this future community leader Cities Chamber of Commerce, wanted to “We can go to sleep at night plans to learn as much as he can before taking helped draft the Partington better the knowing we have jobs and can the next step into the working world. Creek Neighbourhood Plan community In fact, his community service garnered him put food on the table. That’s for Burke Mountain, raised not the case for many other a $2,000 scholarship from Envision Financial, $19,000 for Free the Children, somehow. I people around the world.” and started The Legacy Project think it’s all of Wijeyagoonewardane says for his school. our obligation people in Canada can act a “Essentially what this is is a bit spoiled, and that becomes way for the graduating class to as citizens. painfully apparent when he think about how to leave a leg–Shehan compares our quality of life to acy in their name every year,” Wijeyagoonewardane those of people in less fortunhe said. “For example, last year ate communities around the the grad class raised money for world. a baby suffering from a rare type of cancer.” “People complain about taking transit,” he They raised a few thousand dollars. To say Wijeyagoonewardane was a keener said. “At least you have a transit system. You

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a division of First West Credit Union. But he’s not alone. Local student Liam St. Louis also received the scholarship for much the same reason: an unprecedented commitment to community well-being. “Usually when I see an opportunity to do something, I don’t ask myself why, I ask why not,” St. Louis said. “If I see something that I think should be done or should be happening, whether that’s a new club or a way to improve something that’s already around, I make sure it happens.” Just exiting his teen years, St. Louis founded his school’s debate team (which sent a member on to place fourth in the national competition), is an ESL practice facilitator, a major participant in the model United Nations, and works in an English practice group. He’s attending Mount Allison University in New Brunswick to pursue a degree in international relations. “After that, who knows?” he said. “I trust myself to forge a good path.” He also offered a point of wisdom to those looking to better the world around them. “And a note to anyone else striving to do more for their world and their community,” he said. “There’s never a reason you can’t do something, only reasons you won’t try.”


26

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

CALENDAR

FRIDAY, OCT 11 Tri-Cities Caregiver Program hosts a meeting for caregivers at

Dogwood Pavilion, 624 Poirier St. in Coquitlam. Info: Karen Tyrell at 778-789-1496.

TUESDAY, OCT 15 Dogwood Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. in the Centennial

Room at Dogwood Pavilion, 624 Poirier St. in Coquitlam. Guest speaker and renowned rose expert Brad Jalbert will speak about growing and pruning roses. Coquitlam Public Library, City Centre branch, hosts an Internet beginner class from 2 to 3 p.m. at 1169 Pinetree Way. Participants must be able to click and scroll with a mouse. Registration is required. Info: 604-554-7330.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 16 Terry Fox Library hosts Storytime for young children and their

caregivers from 10:15 to 10:45 a.m. at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Interactive stories, songs, rhymes and reading tips offered. Info: 604-927-9999. Singles Travel Club meets at 6 p.m. at the ABC Restaurant, 300-100 Schoolhouse St. in Coquitlam. Take part in group tours for solo travellers, meet new friends, enjoy the security of group travel and avoid the costly single supplement. RSVP to Val at 604669-6607 ext. 304. University Women’s Club meets at 7 p.m. at Scott Creek Middle School, 1240 Lansdowne Dr. in Coquitlam. Darcie Gabruck, YWCA Community Development Coordinator at Como Lake Gardens, will be the guest speaker. Info: Allison at 604-9399146 or Ellen at 604-464-0246. Coquitlam Public Library, City Centre branch, hosts an introductory e-mail course from 2 to 3 p.m. at 1169 Pinetree Way in Coquitlam. Participants must already know how to scroll, click, and use the address bar to go to a website. Registration is required for this free program. Info: 604-554-7330.

THURSDAY, OCT 17 Terry Fox Library stages an “altered book workshop” for

teens of all ages from 4 to 5 p.m. at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo.

Turn an old library book into a work of art. The library will provide books and other art supplies. Info: 604-927-9999. Burquitlam Community Association holds an all-candidates meeting for those running in the Coquitlam byelection from 7 to 9 p.m at Banting Middle School, 820 Banting St. in Coquitlam. Info: Graham Hill at 604-937-7458 or e-mail at hill7458@gmail.com. Port Coquitlam Heritage & Cultural Society meets at 1 p.m. for a general meeting at Heritage at Leigh Square Museum and Archives, 2100-2253 Leigh Sq. in PoCo. Bring your treasures to share with other members. Info: 604-927-8403.

FRIDAY, OCT 18 Terry Fox Library hosts Babytime from 10:15 to 10:40 a.m.

at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. This program is for babies and caregivers and is meant to help develop speech and language skills through bouncing, singing and rhyming with stories. Info: 604-927-7999. Tri-City Singles Social Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion, 2513 Clarke St. in Port Moody. This 50-plus singles group meets to plan activities such as dancing, theatre, concerts, dining, movies, day trips and travel. Membership is $20 per year. Info: Darline at 604-466-0017 or Louise at 604-941-8897.

SATURDAY, OCT 19

Coquitlam Public Library, City Centre branch, hosts the vocal talents of Asha Lohia and the teachers and students of Guru Sangeet Martand Padma Vibhushan Pandit Jasraj ji at 1 p.m. at 1169 Pinetree Way. Space is limited for this free program. To register, call 604-937-4155 and leave a message on the library’s program registration line at 604-937-4155. Port Coquitlam Heritage & Cultural Society hosts appraisal experts William Shannon and Jasper van Voorst Vader from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2100-2253 Leigh Sq. in PoCo. A maximum of three items can be brought for appraisal and the cost is $15 for the first item, $10 for the second item and $5 for the third item. Free admission for those not bringing an item. Info: 604-927-8403.

MONDAY, OCT 21 Tri-Cities Parkinson’s Support Group meets from 10 a.m. to

noon at Eagle Ridge United Church 2813 Glen Dr. in Coquitlam, inside. Info: 604-941-3182

LIST YOUR EVENT:

Contact The NOW

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: events@thenownews.com

Terry Fox Library presents a screening of the film, Mongol, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Described as a historical epic, the film follows the life of Genghis Khan. Info: 604-927-7999.

TUESDAY, OCT 22 SHARE Society offers a free education and support group for

parents and caregivers who are concerned about their youth and substance use from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 2615 Clarke St. in Port Moody. Call 604-937-6969 to sign up. Terry Fox Library offers stuffed animal storytime from 6:45 to 7:30 p.m. at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Info: 604 927-7999.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 23 SHARE Society offers an education series around alcohol and

drug use for those who have an alcohol or drug problem, or for those concerned about their use. The topic will be “Use, misuse, abuse – how people become addicted.” The discussion runs from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 2615 Clarke St. in Port Moody. Info: 604-9363900. Tri-City Centennial Stamp Club meets at 7 p.m. in the McGee Room at the Poirier Community Centre, 630 Poirier St. in Coquitlam. A meeting and a small stamp presentation by members are on tap. Info: www.stampclub.ca or call 604-941-9306.

ONGOING North Fraser Alzheimer Resource Centre offers monthly

caregiver support groups in Coquitlam and PoCo. Info: 604-298-0780. Parent Support Services of BC offers free weekly parent and grandparent support circles led by trained facilitators across the Lower Mainland. Learn new ways to nurture your child through discussing parenting techniques, challenges and stresses, and receiving support. Info: www.parentsupportbc.ca or 604669-1616. Parents Without Partners is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization devoted to the interests of single parents and their children. Single parents who are separated, divorced, widowed or never married are eligible to join. Orientation meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Poirier Community Centre, 630 Poirier St., Coquitlam. Info: 604-945-2407.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

SPORTSNOW

27

GOT SPORTS? Contact Dan

Phone: 604-444-3094 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: sports@thenownews.com

Best is still best,Talons fit to be tied

DEFENDING B.C. CHAMPS REMAIN THE TEAM TO BEAT Stories by John KURUCZ sports@thenownews.com

W

ith 13 goals for and just one against, their statline alone would suggest that the season to date has literally been a walk in the park. But when you’ve won three of the last four provincial soccer crowns, those numbers tend to come with the territory. The Dr. Charles Best Blue Devils seemingly haven’t missed a beat this season and look to again be in championship form after having racked up a 4-0 start in North Zone play. “This is an extremely motivated group of boys,” said Best coach Dave Jones. “They’re playing with a bit of pressure in the sense that they are the defending provincial champions so they know that every team wants to beat them. I don’t have to give them too much motivation, because they just know that everyone is gunning for them.” Their most recent win came Tuesday when they downed Heritage Woods 3-0. That they did without five starters only underscores the fact that the Coquitlam school is something of a breeding ground for upper-echelon soccer talent. “We’ve got a real deep roster, which makes things really nice,” Jones said. “Our depth is fantastic. But for us, it’s not so much about how many goals you put in the other team’s net, it’s about how many you keep out.” The players looked at to shoulder the leadership load include keeper Nazz Russo, centre midfielder Trevor Hallam, and striker Michael Mobilio, who notched the winning goal in last year’s provincial final against Terry Fox. “The three of them have shown tremendous leadership and they kind of set the standard for the rest of the team when it comes to work ethic,” Jones said. Gleneagle, on the other hand, is looking to emerge from the middle of the pack and make a push for contention. The Talons currently sport a 1-1-2 record, good for a fifthplace tie in the eight team division. The club is coming off Tuesday’s 1-1 tie with Centennial

LISA KING/NOW

Gleneagle’s Diego Govantos looks to break away from a barrage of Centennial Centaurs during Tuesday’s 1-1 tie. Scan this page with the Layar app to see more photos from Tuesday’s game. “Our boys showed great team work ethic and never let their — the team they’re currently tied with — and had to play a bit of catch-up to earn the draw. foot off the gas,” said Talons coach Frank Abbinante. “In the Down 1-0 midway through the first half, team captain Arjan end it was a game that should have resulted in a [win] for us, Nikpay knotted the contest on a penalty kick strike to the low however we will take the point and move on.” corner. Logan Wong, Patrick Serrano and Kai De Torres also Other Week 4 action saw Fox upend Pinetree 3-1, while Port stood out for the Talons. Moody defeated Riverside by the same score.

Chiefs aim to shore up offensive weaponry

HELEN JUNG/CJGA

STICKIN’ IT: Coquitlam’s A.J. Ewart keeps on keeping on, as the 14-year-old golfer won yet another tournament last weekend. Ewart captured the boys 14 and under title at the Canadian Junior Golf Association (CJGA) stop at the Pitt Meadows Golf Club on the strength of a seven-over par score of 151 (78 and 73), four better than his nearest competitor. Ewart also claimed victory at a CJGA stop in Vancouver in September, as well as a Canadian Junior Golf Association Nike series title in June.

With just five returnees on the roster, defence Johansen remain as holdovers from last year’s has been the order of the day for the North East team. As such, each of them is expected to Chiefs through six games in the B.C. Major carry the leadership load and that’s reflected by the letters on their jerseys. Midget Hockey League. “With those leaders, there’s a lot that’s But, as it turned out, the offence decided to show up in spades during the club’s most recent expected of them,” Menard said. “They’ve done a really god job of being leaders, contest last week in Nanaimo. too. They work really hard to The 3-1-2 Chiefs bookended make sure that they’re towing a weekend split with the North the line with the rest of the Island Silvertips with a 6-0 With those group, and the rest of the group drubbing, a win that saw both seems to be following.” Jordan Henderson and Jeffery leaders, there’s Menard admits that his team Wong pot a pair. Team captain a lot that’s is still “a work in progress” at and club scoring leader Connor expected of this early juncture in the season, Burk notched a single, as did but notes that his defence corps San Chung. them. They’ve has done everything asked of The Chiefs opened up the done a really weekend with a 5-3 loss, with them in virtually all facets of good job. goals credited to Ziyan Karim, their play — first passes, corHenderson and Burk. rect reads and knowing when to –Doneau Menard, Prior to Sunday’s game, the jump into the play. Chiefs coach. highest offensive output for the Couple that with stellar goalChiefs this season was a 4-2 win tending via Adam Derochie and over the Kootenay Ice in late September. Severson, and the club could have something “Things were going fairly well for us in to build on — provided the goals start coming. that game,” said Chiefs coach Doneau Menard. “Our defence has been the strength of our “Their goaltender would probably admit that team, but we’ve got a very raw group that’s he didn’t play that great, and [Jakob] Severson starting to buy into the system. I think we’re made some big saves for us.” coming along pretty well,” Menard said. Outside of Henderson and Burk, only Austin TheChiefshosttheCaribooCougarsSaturday Campeau, Matthew Hermary and Lucas at 4:15 p.m. and on Sunday at 11:45 a.m.


28

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2013

SPORTSN0W

tNt doubles up on Cliff Avenue United Good things came in twos for the Coquitlam Metro-Ford tNt side in u-15 Gold play last week. The club won 2-0 over Cliff Avenue United thanks to goals from two sources, Sarah Jetha and Jade Ryshak, while Alivia Ungaro copped her second shutout. Also turning in standout performances were Natasha Calis, Julianna Bosa, Cristina Daniela, Kaisha Markiewicz and Jetha. • Talk about making things right. One week after suffering their first loss in close to a year, the u-18 Threat ravaged Richmond to the tune of 6-0. Natalia Kaczmarek found the back of the net four times

in the win, while Pam Scowby got the ball rolling three minutes in with a volley off of a Sam Kells corner. Paige Benning accounted for Metro Ford’s other tally. • In a battle of two undefeated teams, the u-12 Renegades ended up as the last club standing. The Metro-Ford side got it done over the Royal City Rebels 1-0 thanks to Ava Mongrain’s penalty kick winner, while netminder Diana Emelianova posted the clean sheet. Chanelle Prestia, Christa Tascona and Sierra Santorelli also helped lead the offensive attack. • Leo Lau’s two secondhalf strikes proved to be the

exclamation point for the u-10 Juventus side’s 4-1 win over the North Coquitlam Hawks. Juventus got on the score sheet early with Roman Bandiera’s strike from 18 yards out minutes into the game, while Adam Kirby helped pad Juventus’ first-half lead. Trenton Heinrich-Duddy and Max Kenward combined to turn in a stellar effort in the Metro-Ford nets. • Trevor Good made good on his attempt on net, but it wasn’t enough as the u-17 Div. 3 Crusaders dropped a 3-1 decision to the Aldergrove Mavericks. For more soccer results, view www.thenownews.com/sports.

Duncan, Sabry torch Titans

The ground game grounded White Rock to the point of no return, as the Coquitlam Tigers hammered the Titans 45-0 in atom division football. Tamani Duncan and Ziad Sabry led the way with a pair of touchdowns each, while Aiden Domino and Nathan

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Chalmers both registered their first majors of the season as well. Markus Rafnson and Duncan both picked up a convert each. The defensive corps was led by Malcolm Williams, Alex Gagnon, Giancarlo Garcea, Pedro Cabanas and Domino.

• The Coquitlam Wildcats claimed their third straight win in peewee football play thanks to a 12-7 win over the visiting North Surrey Hawks.

For more football results, log on to www. thenownews.com/ sports.

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