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WEDNESDAY JULY 31, 2013

TRI-CITIES

homeowners to keep up to two beehives in their yards

4

thenownews.com

THE NOW

URBAN BUZZ PoCo moves toward allowing

ADANACS ON A ROLL Junior Adanacs sweep Victoria, prepare for league final against New West

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Serving COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM, PORT MOODY, ANMORE and BELCARRA since 1984

BYELECTION FEVER

Coquitlam residents eager to snag a seat NEWS 4

Mystery solved, 24 years later NEWS 10

Schoenborn transfer request denied NEWS 11

The owners of this gas station on Lougheed Highway have won the right to build a car wash next to it.

LISA KING/NOW

Coquitlam upholds OCP PHOTO BY ROBERT SHAER

Children’s charity Event helps kids

PHOTOS 13

CITY COUNCIL STICKS WITH PLAN, DESPITE OPPOSITION

Sam SMITH editorial@thenownews.com After almost two hours of public input and another hour of council debate, a new car wash facility off Lougheed Highway is one step closer to being a reality, despite the majority of neighbours at a public hearing speaking against it. While the decision affects only those near the proposed business, which would be attached to an existing Husky gas station, it’s important for all Coquitlam homeowners — as several council members suggested — since it sends a

clear message that the city plans to uphold its Official Community Plan (OCP), even in cases where residential development is encroaching and homeowners are against the expansion of business and commercial interests. Council voted in a split decision to change the zoning of the lot at 801 Henderson Ave. off Lougheed Highway from residential to commercial-service, essentially approving the developer’s desire to build a car wash. A final development permit has yet to be approved, but the rezoning approved the car wash in principle, CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

InTHE NOW

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OPINION

When it comes to buying a home, your first stop should be City Hall. . . . . . . . . . 8 Canada’s health minister defends changes to medical marijuana rules. . . 9

COMMUNITY

Hosting a block party in PoCo? Invite your local firefighters. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

SPORTS

Timely goal scoring helps PoCo midget lacrosse team earn B.C. title. . . . . . . . 19

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NEWSNOW THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

Is this the future of beekeeping?

POCO LOOKS AT ALLOWING HOMEOWNERS TO KEEP UP TO TWO HIVES ON THEIR LAND

Sam SMITH editorial@thenownews.com There’s a buzz in the streets, or at least there could be soon. Urban beekeeping is one step closer to becoming a reality in Port Coquitlam as city council is directing staff to conduct a public consultation process and prepare bylaw amendments to allow certain home owners to own beehives. The bylaw changes would most likely come with a number of stipulations, and wouldn’t allow a hive to be placed anywhere around a property. Homeowners would have the option to own up to two hives if they follow the guidelines. Other municipalities share common regulations: limiting the number of hives per property, restricting their location to the backyard, having them set back nearly eight metres (26 feet) from property lines and raised two or more metres (6.5 feet) above grade or located behind a high fence or hedge, mandating an on-site water source, and having measures to prevent swarming. At a meeting on July 22, council sent back a draft to its smart growth committee for further amendments, potentially allowing beehives in the front yard. PoCo resident Ken Wills first proposed urban beekeeping to council back in September and advocates the positive impact certain bees can have on the environment. “[With bees] you can notice the difference all over the place,” he told the Tri-Cities NOW. Wills swears by the positive pollination effects of urban beekeeping, claiming his friends who live in municipalities that already allow urban beekeeping have had their gardens grow beautifully, thanks to their buzzing friends. Port Coquitlam Coun. Brad West agrees with Wills and is hopeful council will go on to support the changes.

LISA KING/NOW

PoCo beekeeper Enrico Bovero shows off one of his 17 hives of gentile bees. He believes hobbyists can do a lot to help struggling bee populations around the world. “There’s a number of benefits that go with it,” he said. “But the benefits in terms of pollination of plants and gardens people may have in their homes is something that’s very significant.” Bees are incredibly important to plant life as they help pollinate and spread plant growth. However, the city’s report to council noted common concerns residents may have with urban beekeeping. “The most common concern regarding beekeeping in urban areas tends to be the possibility of stings,” city staff state. Generally, bees are considered non-aggressive vegetarians that rarely sting, and are not to be confused with more aggressive wasps and hornets.

Beehives can be a possible attractant for bears, but the Ministry of Agriculture says beehives are generally not considered to be a primary bear attractant, the report states. The District of North Vancouver has permitted urban beekeeping for more than 10 years, and there have been no complaints of increased bear activity due to the hives, according to the report. Another concern listed is swarming, particularly in spring or summer when the hive reproduces with a new queen at a new location. But “experienced beekeepers are able to control swarms and employ management practices that can reduce their likelihood,” the report states.

Port Coquitlam resident Enrico Bovero owns farm land, on which beehives are allowed, and has worked his way up to 17 hives since 2009. “I think it’s good,” Bovero said of urban beekeeping. “I think the future of beekeeping is in small operations like hobbyists, rather than large commercial operations.” Beekeeping is not To see more an easy hobby and photos of bees, it requires care and download the attention for it to work, free Layar Bovero said. app to your “It requires a little smartphone and studying and obviously it is something that scan this page needs to be taken care of,” he said. But he believes anyone can do it if they have the time and patience to properly care for their hives. He encourages anyone who truly wishes to run their own beehives to do so, not just for the personal advantages, but to help combat the greater threat of dwindling bee numbers worldwide. “I think with this issue that bees in general are having worldwide, with the pesticides and diseases, it’s going to be solved through small hobbyists because that is where the people really have time to properly take care of the bees,” he said. PoCo council directed city staff into drafting bylaw changes to allow for urban beekeeping and to ensure residents are informed of the implications of beekeeping in residential areas. The consultation process is expected to take six to eight weeks, followed by drafting the bylaw amendments and, if supported, could come before council by September.

Byelection announcement draws interest Jeremy DEUTSCH

jdeutsch@thenownews.com The date has barely been set, and already a potential candidate has thrown her name into the ring for the Coquitlam byelection. On Monday, city council set the byelection date to replace former councillors-turnedMLAs Linda Reimer and Selina Robinson for Oct. 26. The next day, small businesswoman Bonita Zarrillo took to social media to announce her intentions to run for one of two spots up for grabs. She sent out this tweet: “I am running for #Coquitlam city councillor in October with a platform of “Living Local”. Look forward to hearing from residents.” Zarrillo, who sat on the city’s arts and culture committee, told the Tri-Cities NOW she’s looking for equitable

Barrie Lynch

Fred Soofi

Chris Wilson

Bonita Zarrillo

representation and believes another woman needs to be elected to council. She also wants to create more jobs and housing in the city so people don’t have to leave the community, adding she works and raises her family in Coquitlam. “I basically do everything in Coquitlam,” Zarrillo said. The nomination period for

candidates to get their paperwork in will run from Sept. 10 to 20. While Zarrillo might be the first to declare, there are some others considering a run for a spot on council. Former Coquitlam-Burke Mountain NDP candidate Chris Wilson said he’s thinking about running, but hasn’t decided. He said he still needs

to figure out if it’s right for him at this time. While Wilson suggested there is a lot of development in the city, he added it’s also an opportunity to make sure the growth is handled in a responsible way. “I think it’s an exciting time in our city,” he said. Wilson lost his bid to be MLA by more than 2,000

votes to Liberal incumbent Doug Horne. Former Coquitlam mayoral candidate and city councillor Barrie Lynch said he’s also considering putting his name forward. He said he wants to make sure he has the support he believes is there for a run, but hasn’t set a time line for when he might make a decision.

“I think I would be an asset on council once again,” Lynch said, adding he felt he was a positive influence on council and his approach to decisionmaking was well received. Lynch also sought the NDP nomination for CoquitlamBurke Mountain this year, but lost to Wilson. Another former city council candidate is also considering joining the race. Restaurant owner Fred Soofi said he hasn’t decided yet if he will run, but added the city needs a progressive voice. He also suggested he and many others aren’t happy with the way the city is run and he has concerns about how the city is going to handle the growth along the future Evergreen Line. Soofi finished 10th, two spots out of a council seat in the 2011 civic election, picking up 7,310 votes.


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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

NEWSN0W

City protests transit situation Sam SMITH

editorial@thenownews.com “I think we’re about to break the law.” That’s what Coquitlam Mayor Richard Stewart said before the majority of council voted not to send a regional context statement to Metro Vancouver — to take a stand on what council sees as inadequate public transportation in the city. But a few minutes later, after sober second thoughts, council backtracked and voted to do a second and third reading of the regional context statement — a document linking the municipality’s Official Community Plan to reflect the shared goals and objectives laid out in Metro Vancouver’s regional growth strategy (RGS). The RGS is a plan that looks ahead to

2040 on how to accommodate a projected one million more people and 600,000 new jobs over the next 30 years in Metro Vancouver. All member municipalities are expected to approve it. While Stewart said he doesn’t agree with many parts of the RGS, he said the wisest choice of action would be to agree to the second and third readings but hold off on the fourth and final one. “I hope council will stand by their guns because they will be under lots of pressure by Metro Van to give fourth and final if everyone else is,” Coun. Brent Asmundson said. “I’ll stay off on fourth forever if we don’t get what we need in our community.” Coun. Neal Nicholson quipped, “Here in Coquitlam, we don’t need a Senate to find sober second thought.” Council members pointed to the lack

of bus service in the developing Burke Mountain area and the recent loss of route No. 177 as signs of transit services not being good enough for Coquitlam. “We don’t have transit yet,” Mayor Richard Stewart said of the Burke Mountain neighbourhood. “We don’t have a bus that makes the neighbourhood work.” Glenn Bohn, a spokesperson for Metro Vancouver, told the Tri-Cities NOW the regional context statement had to be submitted by Monday night. “However, the legislation does not set out provisions if the regional context statement is not submitted by the deadline,” he said. Metro Vancouver has received six letters from municipalities stating they will not make the deadline, but offering time lines for completion, Bohn said.

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OPINION

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

Tri-Cities NOW is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at 216-3190 St. Johns Street, Port Moody BC V3H 2C7 Phone: 604-444-3451

Add this to your checklist

Y

ou’ve found a home you’re excited to live in and can afford — no easy task in the overheated Metro Vancouver housing market. What’s your next step? Put in an offer? Start taking measurements to see whether you’ll need new furniture? Draw up a guest list for your housewarming party? No. Your first step, while less exciting, is much more important. It involves a quick trip to City Hall to learn what the municipality’s plan is for the neighbourhood. After all, it’s a lot more important, when making what will probably be the biggest financial investment of your life, to make sure the city doesn’t have plans to build a garbage dump down the street, or another developer hasn’t been OK’d to put up a tall tower in front of the coveted view from that condo you’ve been admiring. Very few people make that trip to City Hall, what with all the other concerns that come into play when buying a home. You’ve got to think about financing, how close you are to public transportation and schools, whether the space will work for you, whether pets are allowed ... On Monday, some Coquitlam residents found out the hard way that what the city has planned for an area — even if that plan is decades old — could come to pass when you least expect it, raising fears of increased traffic and noise and decreased property values. We’re talking about city council’s decision to approve a car wash next to a Husky gas station on Lougheed Highway. While some residents don’t want the car wash in what they see as a residential neighbourhood, council voted — rightly, we believe — to allow the development to go ahead since the area is zoned service-commercial. Change can be scary, and it’s understandable residents have concerns, but like many new developments this one will likely blend into the neighbourhood and not cause the dire consequences some fear. Nevertheless, as a homeowner you don’t want these kinds of surprises. If you’re in the market to buy, stop by City Hall and take a look at the Official Community Plan and area plan for any neighbourhood you’re thinking of buying into. Then, if you like what you see, make an offer.

USE CAUTION IN OFF-LEASH DOG PARKS

With so few places to take our pups, one would assume the term off-leash would indicate human patrons understand there are loose dogs frolicking about. As a mother of three, I would not trust such a place to lay my small baby down for a nap on the sand. Would you? Well, picture this: four-month-old puppy running about saying hello to every human she is sure loves her until she unknowingly tramples across a blanket in the sand where, laying covered and invisible, is a sleeping baby. All the while I was supervising and was also unaware there was a sleeping baby there — who would consider that at an offleash dog park? The parent aggressively grabbed my puppy and threw her off the blanket and proceeded with a slew of profanities insulting my lack of control of my “puppy.” The baby was unharmed and merely startled and woken up. I feel bad, I really do — but I don’t blame myself or my dog. She’s a puppy in training; however dogs of all sizes run about in off-leash areas. It’s a good thing it wasn’t a much larger dog that said hello, but it could have been. Parents should use caution with small children in an off-leash dog park. Kelsey Mizener Coquitlam Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. The publisher shall not be liable for minor changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions with respect to any advertisement is limited to publication of the advertisement in a subsequent issue or the refund of monies paid for the advertisement.

Skills training plan needed

T

he cornerstone of the B.C. Liberal government’s longterm economic strategy is an expanded liquefied natural gas industry, but a new study underscores how shaky some of the assumptions embedded in that strategy are. The study, commissioned by the B.C. Natural Gas Workforce Strategy Committee, estimates that an eye-popping 75,000 skilled workers will be needed once five LNG plants are operational. As well, a further 60,000 workers will be needed in the construction phase. This represents an enormous number of skilled workers. Of course, the study is optimistic that all five LNG plants will come on line within a few years, which is by no means guaranteed. But if even two or three plants become reality, a large number of skilled workers will be needed. And this potential development underscores the urgency of the need for government action and funding to address the looming skills shortage that will soon confront British Columbia. I’ve written before how our changing demographics are working against us when it comes to skilled trade workers. Recent Statistics Canada data shows about two-thirds of those workers in B.C. are over the age of 45, which means many of them will soon be approaching retirement. Compounding the problem is that those retirees will take with them their years of experience. This means foremen and other managers will start leaving the trades at a disproportionately higher rate than those trained but inexperienced workers who enter the profession. The government, in its recent Throne Speech, promised a “comprehensive 10year skills training plan” that presumably will deal with this looming crisis.

VIEW FROM THE LEDGE Keith Baldrey

So far, however, we have yet to see any details of that plan. And the government doesn’t seem to have a lot of room to move on this front any time soon. It is desperately trying to balance its budget, and the three-year fiscal plan shows that funding for advanced education — which funds skills training — is actually set to decline by more than $40 million over the next two years. The fact that the government appears locked in a fiscal box for a few years suggests it may want more say in how universities, colleges and institutes spend the dollars it allocates to them. For example, given that there is a surplus of teachers in B.C., is it wise to continue to fund as many people to become teachers? Or should some of that money be redirected into training people for professions that will provide well-paying jobs for years to come? Post-secondary institutions jealously guard their independence, but I have to wonder whether the government that funds them will start providing that funding with some strings attached. If a strong liquefied natural gas industry is indeed the key to B.C.’s economic future (and many, such as Green Party MLA Andrew Weaver, are very sceptical about that claim) and if it does require thousands of newly trained workers, the B.C. Liberals better get moving fast on that file. Hopefully, we’ll have some idea

what that 10-year plan for improving skills training will look like in the fall. If I were a university president, I might be a bit nervous about some of the things that may be part of it. ••• The old debate over where BC Ferries should build its ships has resumed with news the company will need three more vessels. Some, such as the NDP and the B.C. Federation of Labour, are demanding they be built in B.C. shipyards. Others, like Transportation Minister Todd Stone, say it’s up to BC Ferries to decide. Understandably, BC Ferries wants competitive bidding on the projects, which means shipyards in Europe can bid (a German shipyard built the three “C Class” ferries a few years ago). The NDP’s argument about the economic spin-offs that would come from building them in B.C. mean nothing to BC Ferries, since those spin-offs have nothing to do with their bottom line. In fact, allowing only B.C. shipyards to bid on the vessels’ construction would dampen the competition, since the B.C. yards would have less motivation to submit lower bids, given that rivals in Germany were being shut out. It’s likely the B.C. shipyards will bid on the vessels, and I suspect they’ll have a better chance of landing the contracts this time around. The vessels are smaller than the C Class ones, and the shipyards’ own infrastructure has expanded and improved since landing those big federal government shipbuilding contracts a couple of years ago. In other words, they are probably more competitive now — which means they may not need the inside deal the NDP and labour are demanding. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global B.C.


12

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

COMMUNITY&LIFE

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Port Coquitlam residents who want to add some sizzle to their block parties — or simply get a chance to see a fire truck up close — are encouraged to take part in this year’s Hot Summer Nights program. Through this free outreach initiative, fire crews drop by Port Coquitlam neighbourhoods to provide safety information on a variety of topics. Introduced in 2005, the program not only improves community safety but gives local adults and children the opportunity to meet and talk to local firefighters and to check out the rescue vehicles and equipment. Based on availability, the visits can be scheduled during the days or evenings. The fire department works with the event organizer to plan the visit and tailor the theme; educational topics can include helmet safety, barbecue safety, use of fire extinguishers, and the placement, testing and maintenance of smoke alarms. Through the program, Port Coquitlam’s fire crews have attended hundreds of events in neighbourhoods, parks, schools and businesses. Their presence brings excitement to the events and also gives the fire department a chance to connect with the community in an informal setting. Visit www.portcoquitlam. ca/fire for information on the Hot Summer Nights program and other fire safety information. To request a visit, contact deputy fire chief Randy Minaker at minakerr@portcoquitlam.ca or 604-927-5340. As part of its year-long 100th birthday celebration, Port Coquitlam is encouraging residents to hold a block party this year by waiving application fees and providing free celebration kits with balloons, swag and more. Visit www.portcoquitlam.ca/blockparty for further information. Port Coquitlam Fire & Emergency Services has compiled the following tips to help local residents be fire smart while barbecuing this summer: • Never leave the barbecue unattended when in use. • Keep gas hoses away from hot surfaces and hot grease. • Keep children and pets away from the gas valve and the grill. • Keep loose clothing away from the hot barbecue. • Don’t put water on a grease fire — it will only cause flames to flare. Use an approved fire extinguisher or baking soda. • Don’t operate your barbecue near wooden fences or walls, beneath a combustible roof, under a tree, near vinyl siding or in an enclosed space (such as a garage). • When finished, first turn off the gas valve to allow gas in the hoses to burn off

WY


16

B.C. Day THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

LEARN ABOUT OUR PROVINCE ON B.C. DAY … Think B.C. Day and you

think summer: barbecues, trips to the beach or a favourite park, time to relax with family and friends, a day spent in the backyard with a good book.

But have you ever wondered about the history behind our province’s official day? Here’s a short introduction:

Culture and history Since the retreat of the great glaciers about 10,000 years ago, aboriginal populations have inhabited the B.C. landscape. B.C.’s first people may have journeyed to the region from Asia via a land bridge across the Bering Sea. As the ice receded, forests

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It is thought that B.C.’s coastal region became one of the most densely populated areas in North America. Prior to European contact, B.C.’s First Nations populations may have numbered some 300,000. The aboriginal way of life would continue undisturbed for thousands of years, until the arrival of the British in 1778.

European arrival When British naval explorer Capt. James Cook reached the West Coast of Vancouver Island in

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The Coquitlam RCMP officers, employees and volunteers wish you a safe and happy BC Day. Please celebrate responsibly. coquitlam.rcmp.ca twitter.com/cqrcmp

1778, he was eager to trade with the Nuu-chahnulth (Nootka) people. In his wake, waves of European settlers arrived, carrying smallpox and other diseases that decimated aboriginal populations in the late 1700s. Nearly a century later,

British agent James Douglas was searching the Pacific Coast for a new Hudson’s Bay Co. headquarters. He was welcomed by the Lekwammen, whose villages dotted the shores of what is now Greater Victoria. Douglas settled in and selected a site called Camosack. A year later, in 1843, Fort Victoria was built in the area now known as Old Town, the heart of Victoria’s downtown.

Gold rush in B.C. The discovery of gold in the Fraser River and the Cariboo brought a rapid influx of prospectors, merchants, pioneers and

other colourful figures to B.C. in the 1860s. They came from around the world, arriving from as far away as China. It was a time of rapid economic expansion; sleepy hamlets became bustling cities, and new roads, railways and steamships were constructed to carry the extra load. Boomtowns were born and legends made, but not all experienced good fortune. The aboriginal peoples lost most of their ancestral lands and, in 1876, First Nations populations were made subject to the federal Indian Act, which regulated every aspect of their lives.

Rapid expansion in B.C. Transportation and development marked another period of rapid economic expansion during the 1950s and 60s. Massive building projects changed the shape of the B.C. landscape. Expansive damming projects turned rivers into lakes; giant turbines powered dozens of new pulp mills and smelters; and the Trans Canada Highway was completed, while new bridges, railways and BC Ferries linked land, people and technological progress.

B.C.’s cultural diversity Today, B.C.’s population is diverse. More than 40 major aboriginal cultural groups are represented in the region. The province’s large Asian communities have made Chinese and Punjabi the most spoken languages after English. There are also sizeable German, Italian, Japanese and Russian communities — all creating a vibrant cultural mosaic in which distinct cuisine, architecture, language and arts thrive. In 1986 the City of Vancouver celebrated its centennial, hosting the Expo ‘86 World Exposition. That same year, the Sechelt Indian Band was the first aboriginal group in B.C. to


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

gain a municipal style of self-government. In 2000, the Nisga’a Treaty came into being. The Nisga’a Nation, which has lived in the Nass area since time immemorial, negotiated with the provincial and federal governments to achieve B.C.’s first modern-day,

constitutionally protected self-governance agreement. This marked a momentous achievement in the history of the relationship among British Columbia, Canada and First Nations. In February and March 2010, Vancouver was the host city for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic

Winter Games. And this year, 2013, marked the centennial of two of our Tri-Cities communities: Port Coquitlam and Port Moody. Coquitlam celebrated its centennial in 1991. Information adapted from Tourism BC website

Celebrate

ENTER TO WIN

B.C. Day

B.C. DAY 2013

4 TICKETS TO THEATRE UNDER THE STARS

Unscramble these B.C.Destinations, numbered from 1-6 to: Email answers in number order to:

vmcginnis@van.net

(indicate B.C. Day contest in subject field) or mail to:

1. Gsroamrtn

The Tri-Cities Now B.C. Day Contest c/o #201A-3430 Brighton Avenue, Burnaby , B.C. V5A 3H4 Attention: Virginia

HAPPY B.C. DAY

Deadline for all entries is Monday, August 12th, 2013 Winner’s name will be published in our Friday, August 16th issue.

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Wishing You and Your Family a Happy BC Day

City of Coquitlam

Coquitlam Coquitlam pproudly roudly celebrates celebrates the 154 anniversary the 155 anniversary of of this this great province. Mayor Richard Stewart & Council

Councillor Brent Asmundson Councillor Craig Hodge Councillor Neal Nicholson Councillor Terry O’Neill Councillor Mae Reid Councillor Lou Sekora

Happy BC Day “You can trust us to get you back on the road safely”. COQUITLAM #101 - 2714 Barnet Hwy. 604-461-4494

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PORT COQUITLAM 3090 Westwood Street 604-945-6717

11 Locations to serve you In support of BC Children’s Hospital

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Have a Safe & Happy BC Day

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Doug Horne MLA Coquitlam-Burke Mountain 203 - 130 Brew Street Port Moody BC V3H 0E3

604-949-1424

Douglas.Horne.MLA@leg.bc.ca


18

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

CALENDAR

WED, JULY 31 Terry Fox Library and the Tri-Cities Early

Childhood Development Committee team up to host a free family play and learn event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on the ground level of Coquitlam Centre Mall, 2929 Barnet Hwy. in Coquitlam. The session is based around the theme of “Books, Books and More Books,” and offers children and their families stories, songs and crafts. Pre-registration is not required.

SATURDAY, AUG 3 Terry Fox Library plays host to ventriloquist

Kellie Haines from 11 to 11:45 a.m., with activities ranging from theatre, dance, singing and clowning. Free tickets are now available at the library, located at 2470 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Tri-City Wordsmiths will hold their second meeting from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Poirier Branch of the Coquitlam Public Library, 575 Poirier St., Coquitlam. The area’s newest writing group will host guest speaker Daryl R. Stennett, a Sunshine Coast author who will speak about life as a self-published author, as well as reading from his book and signing copies. Info: 604-475-2875.

TUESDAY, AUG 6 Coquitlam Prostate Cancer Support and

Awareness Group (PCCN Coquitlam) holds its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at the Pinetree Community Centre, 1260 Pinetree Way in Coquitlam. All those involved with prostate problems are welcome to share their concerns and experiences in a strictly confidential atmosphere. There is no charge and donations are accepted. Info: Norm (604-936-8703) or Ken (604-936-2998). Art Focus Artists’ Association members Sherry Carroll and Eunice Hodge will have select-

ed artworks placed on display at Port Coquitlam City Hall, located at 2580 Shaughnessy St. The works will be on display until Sept. 3.

WEDNESDAY, AUG 7 Terry Fox Library offers an evening storytime

event from 6:45 to 7:15 p.m. for preschool-aged kids and their families. Books, songs, fingerplays and flannel stories are offered as part of this free event. Info: 604-927-7999. Hyde Creek Watershed Society holds its monthly general meeting at 7:15 p.m. at the Hyde Creek Education Centre and Hatchery, 3636 Coast Meridian Rd., PoCo. Member Isaac Nelson will share information about a recent UBC Fish Health Management workshop he attended. Everyone is welcome to this free event. E-mail hcws.info@gmail.com for info. Colony Farm Community Gardens Society invites children and parents to a potato dig from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Find out how potatoes grow, how they are harvested, and what critters — besides us — eat potatoes. Take a potato or two home, while the rest will be donated to the food bank. Meet at the pagoda visible from the south parking lot on Colony Farm Road. Event happens rain or shine. Info: 604-936-7423

THURSDAY, AUG 8 Port Coquitlam Heritage and Cultural

Society host a heritage garden walk starting at 10 a.m. Local historian Bryan Ness will lead participants through the city’s northside, and the group will be joined by members of the PoCo Garden Club as well. Meet at the Kinsmen Hall on Coquitlam Avenue at Aggie Park. For more info, call 604-927-8403 or e-mail pocoheritage1@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, AUG 9 Colony Farm Community Gardens Society

invites gardeners and naturalists to join ecologist Elizabeth Elles in looking for wild pollinators in the gardens from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Learn how you can help pollinators maintain their populations at this free event. Meet at the pagoda visible from the south parking lot on Colony Farm Road. Event will be cancelled in the event of rain. Info: www.cfcg.ca or 604-936-7423. Coquitlam RCMP host a Show ‘N’ Shine event from 9 a.m. to noon at the Poirier Recreation Complex, 633 Poirier St., Coquitlam. The RCMP’s Air One helicopter makes an appearance at 10 a.m. Demonstrations and displays offered by RCMP specialty sections and agencies such as Coquitlam Search and Rescue, B.C. Sheriff Service and Coquitlam Fire and Rescue Services.

SATURDAY, AUG 10 Hyde Creek Watershed Society members

host an invasive plant species removal event starting at 9:30 a.m. at the society’s education centre, located at 3636 Coast Meridian Rd. in PoCo. Bring work gloves and long pants. Info: 604-461-3474 or e-mail hcws.info@gmail.com.

SUNDAY, AUG 11

Riverview Horticultural Centre Society host a Catalpa and north end tree tour on the Riverview Hospital grounds at 1 p.m., leaving from the upper entrance of the Henry Esson Young Building. For a site map, visit www.rhcs.org. Info: 604-290-9910.

TUESDAY, AUG 13

Terry Fox Library welcomes guitarist and

LIST YOUR EVENT:

Contact The NOW

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: events@thenownews.com

renowned kids entertainer Tony Prophet from 2 to 2:45 at 270 Mary Hill Rd. in PoCo. Enjoy singalongs to songs like “Splish Splash,” “Good Love” and “Cat Came Back” at this free event. Info: 604-927-7999.

SATURDAY, AUG 17 Minnekhada Park Association hosts its fifth

annual Art in the Park event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This free event includes visual arts, live music, roving performers, arts and crafts workshops, a children’s area and great nature trails. For more info, see www.minnekhada.ca.

SUNDAY, AUG 18 Minnekhada Park Association hosts its

fifth annual Art in the Park even from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This free event includes visual arts, live music, roving performers, arts and crafts workshops, a children’s area and great nature trails. For more info, see www.minnekhada.ca.

ONGOING Tri-City Family Place offers a drop-in

program for parents and caregivers of children under six, and is open Tuesdays to Fridays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 2062 Manning Ave., Port Coquitlam. Info: 604-945-0048. Tricity Speakers Toastmasters meet every Monday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Room B 2050, at Douglas College, 1250 Pinetree Way. Info: Sean at 778-995-5230 or http://tricityspeakers.toastmastersclubs.org. Tri City Potters meet at 7 p.m. at Port Moody Secondary, 300 Albert St., on the third Wednesday of each month. Activities include gatherings, shows, presentations and more to inspire those with an interest in clay. Info: www.tricitypotters.ca.

newspaper

n ’s to ily nt e a E am m V r f ip $A ou qu y e s on ort sp

Carriers Needed! get great stuff. . .

Computer•ipod •iphone•video games•car etc.

presented by

Saturday, August 17th - 10am- 2pm Coquitlam Main Arena

whatever you imagine!

Poirier Sport & Leisure Complex - 633 Poirier Ave Admission by donation or food bank item

EARN YOUR OWN MONEY AND

Donated equipment Drop Off Dates: July 3-Aug 9 in front of the offices at: * Centennial Secondary, 570 Poirier St. * Gleneagle Secondary, 1195 Lansdowne August 7–16: * Port Coquitlam Rec Centre * Port Moody Rec Centre * Poirier Sport and Leisure Complex * Thriftopolis - D-2579 Lougheed Hwy, Port Coquitlam

THE NOW TRI-CITIES

FRIDAY

APRIL 19, 2013

www.thenownews.com

Contact us at:

604.942.3081

GETTING A CHARGE Port Moody unveils four electric vehicle charging stations

5

thenownews.com

You won’t have to beg Dad to buy it for you. Wish you had the latest and greatest gadgets and gear to make all your friends jealous? You soon can. Build up your savings, and before you know it you’ll be able to buy that stuff you’ve always wanted.

FANTASTIC FEAST

Tri-City Potters display juried works at centennial exhibit

11

Serving COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM, PORT MOODY, ANMORE and BELCARRA since 1984

HIGHWAY HAZARD

Mayor calls for median on Lougheed NEWS A6

Fewer geese at Como Lake Park NEWS A4

Is Bear Aware message sinking in? NEWS A4

distribution@thenownews.com

NOW FILE PHOTO

School trustees will provide more details on proposed cuts at a meeting Tuesday at the district’s offices.

District to cut 142 jobs PROJECTED OPERATING DEFICIT ESTIMATED AT $12M Jeremy DEUTSCH

InQuiring Minds Show tonight at Evergreen

ARTS A10

FINDING BALANCE IN A BUSY WORLD LIFE A15

A self employment opportunity

jdeutsch@thenownews.com School District 43 officials knew they would have to make cuts to deal with a ballooning deficit, and on Tuesday employees and the public learned just how deep the reductions will be once the budget is done. To make up for a $12.1-million projected operating deficit for the 2013/2014 school year, the district is looking at cutting six per cent of its staff across the board. More specifically, it’s proposing to cut 142 pos-

itions within the district. A further breakdown of the numbers has the district cutting 81 teachers, 19 teacher assistants/special education assistants/youth workers along with 32 clerical/custodial/IT and facilities positions and 10 from administration. The staffing cuts add up to $11.5 million in savings. Some of the positions being cut will be offset by attrition, with as many as 30 staff in various positions already putting in their retirement papers for the end of the year. CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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Tri-Cities Now - July 31, 2013