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FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 15, 2013

TRI-CITIES

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STABBING IN POCO

Man taken to hospital after incident near Shaughnessy and Lougheed

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THE NOW

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Serving COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM, PORT MOODY, ANMORE and BELCARRA since 1984

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SkyTrain planning image incorrect: official NEWS 4

Chamber hears pipeline details NEWS 6

Backyard bees OK’d in Port Moody NEWS 10

LISA KING/NOW

Former Minister David Spence, along with Rev. Shannon Tennant, will host a memorial service at Riverview.

A special ceremony

SERVICE WILL HONOUR THOSE WHO DIED AT RIVERVIEW John KURUCZ

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jkurucz@thenownews.com The world-renowned arboretum and its place as a centre for healing have long been documented. But Port Moody resident David Spence also wants to highlight the religious and spiritual contributions Riverview Hospital has made over the last century. To that end, Spence is organizing a memorial ceremony at the cemetery plot on the Riverview lands, beginning at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 17.

“Not many people know that there is a cemetery in the Riverview estate lands. I, as an individual, want to encourage awareness around the Riverview estate lands and its religious history,” he said. Spence recently retired from his post as minister at St. Andrew’s United Church in Port Moody, and formerly sat on a chaplaincy committee at the hospital. In that capacity, he helped Riverview’s resident chaplain deliver religious and spiritual guidance to patients at the hospital, as well as their families and other hospital staff. CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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InTHE NOW

View our stories and photos with Layar Using Layar: Download the Layar app to your smartphone. Look for the Layar symbol. Scan the photo or the page of the story as instructed. Ensure the photo or headline is entirely captured by your device. Check for advertisements that have layar content too. Watch as our pages become interactive.

Watch a trailer for the documentary Slaughter Nick for President, about a little-known Canadian actor’s fame in Serbia Page 24

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LISA KING/NOW

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Coquitlam RCMP officers and friends are growing mustaches for Movember. From left to right are Const. Jason Gernhart, Const. Justin Christofferson, Sgt. David Fee, Garry Low, Mark Petrik and Const. Ryan Ziebart. To learn more about Movember, visit http://ca.movember.com.

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NEWSNOW THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Anger at Evergreen Line plans KLAHANIE RESIDENTS SAY THEY WERE MISLED, WHILE EVERGREEN OFFICIAL APOLOGIZES

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com As expected, Evergreen Line officials got an earful Wednesday evening from Klahanie residents upset over plans to elevate a portion of the SkyTrain line through their neighbourhood. Dozens of residents from the Port Moody neighbourhood turned out to the meeting, intended to discuss mitigation options for the new line. Several people who spoke during the two-hour event grilled officials over their handling of information about the line. Klahanie resident Jen Dolsen said it was clear misleading information had been put out to the public, specifically noting incorrect information on the Evergreen website that shows the line being at grade. “I don’t want to brush over

NOW FILE PHOTO

Klahanie residents are upset a portion of the Evergreen Line near their homes will be elevated. the issue that we’ve been lied to, basically,” she said. “What are we as citizens supposed to look at?” Though Dolsen said she supports the project, she suggested mitigation proposals

put forward by Evergreen are not good enough. At the meeting, Evergreen Line officials admitted they became aware of an outdated map on the website in October and removed it.

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The map had apparently been on the website for several years. Officials also apologized for the mistake. The issue has been front and centre for Klahanie after a community meeting in October, when residents were informed the line would be raised. The plan is to elevate the line over the CPR tracks, starting west of Murray Street and lowering it back down at the Inlet station. The guideway will be 650 metres (2,130 feet) long and nine metres (30 feet) high, not including the height of a train on the tracks. The portion of the line that crossesPigeonandSuterbrook creeks will be raised to cross the CPR tracks. In response to concerns, Evergreen Line staff have proposed installing noise mitigation on the guideway in the

form of barriers that cover the wheels of the train. They’ve also put together three landscaping options to address privacy concerns. Amanda Farrell, the Evergreen Line’s project director, said crews would like to start planting trees in the spring to give them a couple of years to grow. Evergreen Line officials said they’re also committed to working with a smaller group of Klahanie residents on mitigation plans for the neighbourhood. However, it was made clear the line will be elevated. “We just can’t change at this point,” Farrell said, noting it became obvious the line needs to be elevated during initial engineering in 2010. Nadine Dean, another Klahanie resident, said she also feels lied to by Evergreen, suggesting she did her due diligence when she bought

her home three years ago. She said the line would be directly in her line of sight and cost her thousands in property value. Dean said she supported and still supports the overall project, but isn’t convinced the mitigation plans proposed will be enough. “I’m not going to be bitter about it, but I do want to see as much of a proactive move now — it’s really what half of us are here for,” she told the Tri-Cities NOW. Klahanie resident Nick Petropolis said he’s fully behind the line, but has lost faith in the process and trust in Evergreen Line staff. He appreciated the apology from officials, but isn’t sure the mitigation steps will be enough. He said he’d like to see more options than the ones being proposed so far. twitter.com/jertricitiesnow

Will this help get better community amenities in my neighbourhood? I want to be involved in planning for the future.

My child’s school is overcrowded. We need new schools.

You talk. We’ll listen.

The Coquitlam Board of Education is having a community workshop about the future of a portion of Victoria Park. We invite you to attend the dialogue on November 19th at 6:30 p.m. at Leigh Elementary School at 1230 Soball Road, Coquitlam. Your input will help shape decisions about the future of this property. Learn more at www.sd43.bc.ca/landmngmt Phone: 604-939-9201 @sd43bc #sd43lln

Learning, Land and Neighbourhoods


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

GOT NEWS?

Contact the editorial team

Phone: 604-444-3451 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: editorial@thenownews.com

PoCo stabbing not random, police say Jeremy DEUTSCH

jdeutsch@thenownews.com Coquitlam Mounties have concluded a stabbing involving a man near a Port Coquitlam bus stop was not random. According to police, investigators believe the incident was isolated and the public is not at risk. Police were called to the area of Shaughnessy Street and Lions Way just after 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. When they arrived, they found what one witness described as a teen suffering from stab wounds. The victim received severe but non-life-threatening injuries and was taken to hospital. Mounties note there is no indication the stabbing was gang or drug related. Police are still investigating what sparked the incident, but say they have a “person of interest” in mind. Police have spoken to several witnesses but are urging any others to contact Coquitlam RCMP at 604-9451550 and quote file number 2013-33574.

STEPHEN LISIK/NOW

Police are looking for information following a stabbing near 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in Port Coquitlam.

PoCo approves plan Don HAUKA

editorial@thenownews.com Port Coquitlam city council passed its 2013 Master Transportation Plan Tuesday, despite a red light from Mayor Greg Moore. Council voted 5-2 in favour

of the blueprint that will shape the city’s transportation priorities for the next 30 to 40 years. Moore voted against the plan, saying it didn’t go far enough to increase bicycle use or create a “walkable city.”

But only Coun. Mike Forrest sided with Moore when it came time to vote. The transportation plan envisions major road improvements, establishes rapid transit priorities and expanded sidewalks and pedestrian paths.

Riverview memorial ceremony on Sunday SERVICE WILL HONOUR THE 1,000-PLUS PEOPLE WHO DIED AT THE HOSPITAL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “One hundred years ago it started out as a Christian site,” he said. “But in the last 10 to 20 years, other religions have been included and are aware of perhaps some members of their religion that had their emotional needs served by Riverview.” Spence hopes that air of inclusion will be reflected at Sunday’s event, and he’s invited members of the Muslim, Jewish and Christian communities to attend. Attendees will convene around the roughly 1,000 grave sites for the ceremony, which will

feature prayers, songs, readings and a scattering of flower petals by a host of community leaders. “I’d like to have [attendees] walk away with a sense of reverence, a sense of respect and a sense of awareness of the cemetery in the Riverview estate lands and where it is located,” he said. “And I want to pass along an appreciation of the history of the Riverview Hospital, as it served the needs of the community.” For more details on the event, call Spence at 604-469-1164. twitter.com/johnkurucz

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Kinder Morgan CEO makes Tri-Cities visit Jeremy DEUTSCH

jdeutsch@thenownews.com As the debate rages on over oil pipelines in B.C., the head of a company behind one potential project was in the Tri-Cities to pitch its economic benefits to local business leaders. Speaking to the Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce Thursday, Kinder Morgan Canada president Ian Anderson provided an update on the Trans Mountain Pipeline project and the possible impacts it will have on the community. The CEO told the chamber the proposed project would provide jobs and economic opportunities and spin-offs along the pipeline, including in the Tri-Cities. He said at the peak of construction, the project would employ 4,500 workers and bring in about $23 million annually in taxes to the province once it’s operational. He said the company would be looking to hire locally for a myriad of jobs and wants to have a conversation with local businesses on how they can benefit. Locally, the company pays $200,000 annually in taxes to the City of Coquitlam, a figure that’s expected to double to $443,000 once the project is complete. Anderson also touched on routing and some of the concerns expressed around the twinning of the pipeline. The current line in Coquitlam, which stretches roughly seven kilometres, begins near Schooner Street near the Fraser River, run-

Ian Anderson ning through the centre of the city. Anderson said the company has no interest in expropriating houses or land, or digging up schoolyards to put in pipeline. “All of our principals are behind finding the most benign route,” he said. The route in Coquitlam would have the line run east of the Port Mann Bridge through the Fraser River hitting land near United Boulevard. The line would continue to follow the road west past the Eaglequest Golf complex before meeting up with the Lougheed Highway corridor to Burnaby. Anderson acknowledged construction will be disruptive and have an impact on communities, but added the company is looking to offset that with each community. He noted the company has a list of more than 6,000 “community investment opportunities” along the pipeline that could include building a playground or upgrading a library or bike path. As for spill containment, Anderson said the company

would lay out its emergency response plan in its National Energy Board application — including marine response — but predicts it will be in line with what the provincial and federal governments are expecting. “I’m confident we can continue to run a safe industry,” he said. He also noted the company is working to address concerns around noise and lights from the increased tanker traffic with port officials. Some local politicians were listening to the CEO’s presentation closely. Coquitlam-BurkeMountain MLA Doug Horne said it’s important for Kinder Morgan to talk about its plans in the community. He also said he’s confident the company can meet the five pipeline conditions set out by the premier, including the condition that B.C. get its “fair share” of the benefits. “There are huge benefits, but there are risks as well and you have to weigh those against each other,” he said. Newly elected Coquitlam city councillor and former NDP candidate Chris Wilson said he would have liked to hear more about environmental protection, but believes the project will have great economic benefits. He said he isn’t opposed to the project as long as it’s done in an environmentally friendly way and follows the five provincial conditions. “We need family supporting jobs,” Wilson said. “We need the kind of economic benefits it’s going to bring. twitter.com/jertricitiesnow

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OPINION

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Tri-Cities NOW is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. Our offices are located at 216-3190 St. Johns Street, Port Moody BC V3H 2C7 Phone: 604-444-3451

This debate’s not over yet

L

ast week, B.C. Premier Christy Clark and Alberta Premier Alison Redford got down to some serious business of smiling for the cameras. Previously, Clark had famously said that no pipelines would even be considered in B.C. until Alberta and the proponents had satisfied her government’s five extremely vague conditions. Though it did not contain a single detail, the press conference seemed to announce that “progress” had been made. We do know that one of the five conditions — the one demanding a share of royalties to compensate B.C. for taking on the environmental risk — is still a non-starter for Alberta. But apparently, staff for both premiers put on their beer goggles the night before and concluded that that impasse doesn’t stop B.C. from demanding money from the pipeline companies themselves. Presto, the deal was back on, along with one of Clark’s treasured photo ops. We don’t know if Clark and Redford really are besties now or if they ever were the frenemies they appeared to be. But all of this lends credence to the cynics who predicted the “five conditions” were all just talk — with plenty of wiggle room. Neither premier actually has a veto in whether the pipeline gets approved. It’s up to the federal cabinet — based on recommendations from the National Energy Board — to decide whether or not the Northern Gateway becomes a reality. The biggest X-factors in all of this are still the dozens of First Nations who will have their territories bisected by a pipeline — a pipeline that, so far, they have indicated they are dead set against. We’d bet the Clark and Redford love-in will not be the end of the pipeline debate. Not by a long shot.

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Copyright in letters and other materials submitted voluntarily to the Publisher and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. The publisher shall not be liable for minor changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions with respect to any advertisement is limited to publication of the advertisement in a subsequent issue or the refund of monies paid for the advertisement.

Flaw in forestry agreement

T

en years ago, the provincial government made the welcome decision to provide greater opportunities for First Nations to participate in and benefit from forestry operations in British Columbia. The result was a flurry of new resource and revenue sharing agreements between the government and numerous First Nations that underscored the government’s commitment to enter a “new relationship” with the province’s first peoples. There was a fundamental flaw with the agreements, however, one that is now painfully obvious as today’s government contemplates controversial new rules that could allow a handful of companies to further entrench their monopoly control of our forestlands. The flaw was that the agreements were of only short duration (five years) and failed to provide secure rights of access to defined areas of forestland for First Nations to manage as their own. Complicating matters, the short-term, non-replaceable licences typically covered tracts of trees killed by mountain pine beetles. What the government clearly intended was to marshal First Nations in a concerted “salvage” logging effort in response to the beetle-kill — something everyone knew could not be sustained. To underscore the vulnerable position that First Nations now find themselves in, let’s turn to the contentious proposal now emanating from the provincial government. The government wants to expand the current network of Tree Farm Licences (TFLs). These licences carry by far the greatest financial value in the marketplace because they grant TFL holders exclusive rights to manage defined areas of forest over many, many years. Of somewhat less financial value, but nonetheless still coveted, are replaceable forest licences.

These licences are different from TFLs in that they confer rights to log defined numbers of trees over very large land masses known as Timber Supply Areas (TSAs). In TSAs, numerous forest licensees may operate. Over time, this has resulted in gentlemen’s agreements of sorts where one forest licence holder sticks to a particular corner of a TSA while others operate elsewhere. What the government now proposes is that the holders of replaceable forest licences be allowed to roll them over into TFLs. The government contends this will result in improved forest management (proponents claim that areabased licences provide greater security, which allows for increased investments in forest management, although there is scant proof of this). But the great danger is that it will deepen existing inequalities. The privileged will reap the windfalls while the underprivileged do without once again. Here’s how. Currently, First Nations can log roughly 8.3 million cubic metres of trees per year. But the vast majority of that cut — 70 per cent — occurs under non-replaceable licences in forests that are running out of trees. Meaning, more than two thirds of what First Nations have is virtually worthless. It can’t be converted because the timber, quite frankly, isn’t there. Individual First Nations do hold a few TFLs, and many smaller forest tenures that might be called “mini TFLs” — small woodlots and community forest tenures — and they are grateful for them. But under the proposed government “rollover” policy, First Nations only have about 1.2 million cubic metres of licensed cut that could conceivably be rolled into TFLs. By comparison, what do the five largest forest companies operating in BC stand to gain under the government’s

proposed rollover legislation? Between them, Canadian Forest Products, West Fraser Timber, International Forest Products, Tolko Industries and Western Forest Products control the bulk of what is logged each year in B.C. This includes 80 per cent of all logging done under TFLs. And because of the vast number of replaceable forest licences that those same companies hold (they have 19 times more replaceable forest licence volume than do First Nations) they could effectively triple their TFL holdings in the province, while First Nations, rural communities, small value-added mill owners and others do without. Allowing a massive conversion of forestlands that further solidifies the hold that the shareholders of a privileged few companies have on Crown lands that are claimed by First Nations is a policy fraught with peril. It undercuts efforts to reach fair and just settlements with First Nations while unnecessarily saddling provincial taxpayers with potentially huge compensation payouts to those same companies down the road, in the event that lands turned over to them as TFLs are subsequently needed to resolve outstanding aboriginal rights and title cases. It’s time to roll the proposed rollover policy into the ditch and have a long overdue, wide-ranging discussion about how we chart a new, inclusive course in British Columbia, where the forests we share in common are truly shared. Anything less betrays the public trust and is a giant step back from an as yet unfulfilled new relationship. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip is president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. Ben Parfitt is a resource policy analyst with the CCPA-BC.


LETTERS COAL TRAINS A THREAT TO OUR REGION

As a resident of Port Coquitlam I feel I have not been adequately informed regarding the proposed transport of thermal coal from Wyoming via Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, through White Rock, Surrey, Delta and other areas of the Lower Mainland. A major handling and exporting facility, Westshore Terminals located at Roberts Bank in Delta, has plans to expand a second terminal which would connect to its existing one. There is another coal transfer facility terminal planned which would be located on the Fraser River (Fraser Surrey Docks). The expansion of the coal via trains will have negative effects on health and the environment. Trains that transport coal are longer and heavier than regular trains (2.5 km in length, 130 cars). There will be 174 noisy coal cars travelling through Surrey/Delta four times a day. Longer trains mean that there are more delays for emergency vehicle response times and the number of trains will dramatically increase noise and negatively affect air quality. The concerns regarding maintenance of the rail lines and safety procedures are current issues

thermal coal will have devastating effects on one of the largest salmon rivers in the world, the Fraser River, and sensitive ecological habitats such as Burns Bog. The prevailing winds tend to blow pollutants up the Fraser Valley and into our area. I am greatly concerned as we, the people, are not given a say in how our region is being developed. I am also deeply concerned as the environmental impact assessment will be conducted by SNC Lavalin, who has a major role in the coal expansion project. This appears to be a conflict of interest. It is our responsibility as citizens of this province to inform ourselves regarding these projects. Crystal Morgan Port Coquitlam

as increased heavy traffic could increase the chances for train derailment. The recent major derailments in Lac-Mégantic, Que. on July 6, and Gainford, Alta. on Oct. 19 have brought this issue into the attention and concern of the public. Thermal coal (for electricity) is different from metallurgical coal (for steel making). Coal dust is a known carcinogen which contains toxic heavy metals such as mercury and arsenic which can lead to “black lung disease” and is associated with chronic bronchitis and emphysema. There are 12,000 emergency room visits and a billion dollars in health care costs associated with coal. This will increase if the proposal goes through. The diesel that is expelled from the locomotives is associated with various health issues such as an increase of cancer, heart attacks and asthma attacks. It is estimated that each train car loses between 500 pounds to a ton of coal dust when it is en route from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The diesel and dust matter are extreme pollutants to our land, air, water, health, agriculture and fisheries. Coal dust can smother agriculture from absorbing nutrients from the sun. Mercury will travel up the food chain to our dinner plates. The increasing import of

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY,NOVEMBER 15, 2013

CONTACT US

Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General 604-444-3451 Sports 604-444-3094 Advertising 604-492-4492 Delivery 604-942-3081 REGIONAL PUBLISHER

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of Kinder Morgan’s proposed oil pipeline project can never be true pipeline safety, nor anything near it. One need only consider what a major tectonic-plate shift — which the Cascadia region is overdue to experience — of even just a metre, with the fault zone land shifting in opposing directions, would do to any strength or solidity of, as good examples, the proposed Alberta-to-B.C. oil pipelines. They’d breach, to put it mildly, leaving behind detrimental environmental consequences, very potentially throughout countless pristine and eco-sensitive regions of B.C. Frank G. Sterle, Jr. White Rock

PIPELINE SAFETY ASSURANCES RING HOLLOW

Following the significant quake last Jan. 5 epicentred in the waters off of southern Alaska, it must be noted, and noted again, that the hollow assurances of “pipeline safety” or similarly such repeatedly brought up by proponents

Dan Olson

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The Tri-Cities NOW welcomes letters to the editor. We do, however, edit for taste, legality and length. Priority is given to letters written by Tri-Cities residents and/ or issues concerning the Tri-Cities. Please include a phone number where you can be reached during the day. Send letters to editorial@thenownews.com with “letter to the editor” in the subject line. No attachments, please. Letters to the editor and opinion columns may be reproduced on The Tri-Cities NOW website, www.thenownews.com.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

NEWSN0W

Post office to undergo Port Moody moves to facelift in Port Moody allow backyard bees Jeremy DEUTSCH

Rural carriers will also be using corporate jdeutsch@thenownews.com vehicles and not their own personal vehicles. “There is serious investment in this buildA forty-year-old landmark in the centre of ing,” the spokesperson told council. Port Moody will soon be getting a facelift. However, Canada Post officials at the meetCity council gave the green light Tuesday to a development variance permit related to the ing did not specify the dollar amount being expansion and renovation of the Canada Post spent on the renovation and did not take questions from the media. facility on Mary Street. There was also no indication when conThe federal government is proposing to add struction would begin and be an additional 1,819 square feet completed. (532 square metres) of floor On the outside of the facility, area to the building, bringthe cedar siding and cement ing the total area up to 5,732 block walls are being restored, square feet. There is serious while red metal panelling is set The proposed addition will investment in to wrap around the upper porbe to the northeast corner of this building. tion of the building. the site along Clark Road and A staff report also noted Mary Street. –Spokesperson for landscaping around the facility According to Canada Post, Canada Post will be upgraded, with the plan the purpose of the renovation calling for six additional trees is to accommodate the use of across the site in addition to smaller vehicles to reduce fuel three existing trees. consumption and emissions. While Coun. Rosemary The postal service will use Small said she’s happy to see a Ford Transit vehicle, which is the size of a compact car and can park in the building get a facelift, one councillor thought the application missed the mark in regular stalls. Existing facilities are being retrofitted with terms of the outside of the building. Zoe Royer said she was disappointed by automated doors to help with the loading of the permit application and the lack of art such vehicles. Inside, the building is being used as part of incorporated in the design, suggesting it was operations changes at the postal service that an opportunity to showcase Canada Post’s will see mail sorted to route as opposed to in heritage. In response, Canada Post officials pointed the facility. A spokesperson for Canada Post told coun- out the building is built to LEED certification, cil carriers will spend less time in the building adding the service has never done such a major retrofit on a building before. and more time on their feet. Royal City Youth Ballet Company Society proudly presents, for the 25th season, the full length ballet, the Nutcracker.

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SOME HOMES WOULD BE ALLOWED 2 HIVES

Jeremy DEUTSCH jdeutsch@thenownews.com The City of the Arts is set to join a host of other municipalities in the Lower Mainland that allow for backyard or urban beekeeping. On Tuesday, city council unanimously approved the first three readings of a bylaw that would allow Port Moody residents to keep beehives on their property. The new bylaw follows provincial guidelines for residential bee management. Under the new bylaw, hobby beekeeping is limited to one-family residential zones or a site containing a community garden. Beekeepers will need to register with the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands and are permitted to have two hives per lot. The beehives must be positioned eight feet or more above ground level, while the hive entrance needs to be directed away from neighbouring property. The hive should also be positioned behind a solid fence or hedge six feet in height and located a minimum of 25 feet away from the neighbouring property line. A staff report noted since the mid-1990s, bees have been dying off in droves around the world and supporting backyard beekeeping could help in repopulation efforts. That appeared to be the sentiment from city council members. Coun. Zoe Royer suggested the bylaw is the beginning of a leap forward for the city in terms of food security and urban agriculture, while Coun. Gerry Nuttall argued the law would pave the way for future beekeeping in Port Moody. Several residents have already reportedly inquired about setting up a hive on their property. Mayor Mike Clay argued if beekeeping is done right under provincial regulations, the hives could help with the local food supply. “We’re one of the few municipalities left that had anti-beekeeping laws,” he said. The City of Port Coquitlam recently voted to allow backyard beekeeping, directing staff to conduct a public consultation process and prepare bylaw amendments to allow certain

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Port Moody residents may soon be able to keep beehives on their property, although not as many as Enrico Bovero, who has 17 on a farm in PoCo. The Port Moody regulation would allow for two hives per single-family property.

homeowners to own beehives. The cities of Vancouver, New Westminster and West Vancouver all have bylaws that allow for hobby beekeeping. But it’s not all honey keeping bees in a backyard. The staff report noted beehives could attract bears, but after consulting with other municipalities like North Vancouver, stated that has not been a problem. If, however, a beekeeper is reckless with hive maintenance, it would be up to conservation officers to step in. Final adoption of the bylaw is expected to take place later this fall.

D

arlene gave me a gift certificate for dance lessons on Christmas 2005 for Arthur Murray Dance Studio and we’ve never looked back. The owners, Barb and Brent Smith have always been welcoming and gracious, making us feel like part of their extended family.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

11

NEWSN0W

No action on report Salmon fest Sunday COHEN COMMISSION IGNORED, CRITICS SAY

John KURUCZ jkurucz@thenownews.com It’s being characterized as a $26-million, taxpayer-funded report that’s being left to languish. Oct. 31 represented the one-year anniversary of the release of findings from the Cohen Commission, a wideranging, nationwide exercise meant to key in on reasons behind the collapse of Fraser River sockeye stocks in 2009. Though no one factor was identified in the report, 75 recommendations were put forward by Justice Bruce Cohen to mitigate the damage already done, while laying out a framework to resuscitate the fishery. According to New Westminster-Coquitlam MP Fin Donnelly, however, none of those recommendations have been put into practice, or even acted upon. “It was a comprehensive report and it was received positively as a blueprint for salmon conservation,” said Donnelly, who serves as the NDP’s deputy critic for fisheries and oceans. “It had timelines and milestones. It had everything that was needed for the government to make some inroads into what was a disastrous summer run of Fraser sockeye. So far, we’ve heard nothing.” Further exacerbating the problem is the fact that a number of those recommendations had deadlines attached to them. More than a dozen have already passed. Among the key points in Cohen’s report was a call to reinvigorate plans for the Wild Salmon Policy, a management and conservation document crafted in 2005. “This is of great concern to us, but we’re not

totally surprised,” said Stan Proboszcz, a fish biologist with Coquitlam’s Watershed Watch Salmon Society. “We haven’t seen any meaningful words or actions from this government on fish and fish habitat, or in terms of protection.” The federal government, however, maintains that action is being taken. A Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) representative suggested at least three of Cohen’s recommendations are being addressed: $1 million collected annually from Salmon Conservation stamps is being redirected to the Pacific Salmon Foundation, while enforcement measures have been ramped up near the Fraser. “Between mid-August and mid-September of this year, DFO’s enforcement presence was doubled in the Fraser Area resulting in the seizure of 10 vessels, 66 nets and initiating 29 investigations,” said DFO spokesperson David Walters. Walters also echoed a recent pledge made by fisheries minister Gail Shea,

who said in late October the moratorium for aquaculture development — namely fish farms — in the Discovery Islands areas will not be lifted for “the foreseeable future.” While Cohen’s report didn’t key in on a single reason for the collapse, it did point to a series of contributing circumstances: changing water temperatures, competition for food out at sea, and the prevalence of pathogens in certain fish. The report also suggested farmed salmon had transferred diseases to wild fish throughout B.C.’s central coast. Getting to those conclusions entailed three years of fact finding, 138 days of hearings, more than 2,100 exhibits and close to 200 witness testimonies. Thisyear’ssockeyereturned in fewer numbers than was anticipated: the pre-season forecast was initially pegged at 3.7 million returning fish, but was later downgraded to around two million. The key summer runs represent about 80 per cent of sockeye returns to the Fraser River, and a number of closures ensued.

Don HAUKA

editorial@thenownews.com The Hyde Creek Salmon Festival is what “live-streaming” used to be about. The 14th-annual festival features lots of family fun, food, wildlife and best of all, a creek full of fish. “The return this year is magnificent — there are fish coming up the creek in great numbers,” said Jean Peachman, secretary-director of the Hyde Creek Watershed Society. Peachman said the recent rain has helped the returning chum and coho salmon, which are the real stars of the show during the Nov.

17 festivities at the Hyde Creek Recreation Centre and the Hyde Creek Education Centre and Hatchery. The festival usually sees about 5,000 people celebrate the salmon’s return. Programming this year includes tours of the salmon hatchery, in-stream salmon demonstrations, crafts and face painting for the kids. The salmon will have a supporting cast from other members of the animal kingdom. Also on display will be orphaned wildlife like owls, a vulture and a Western painted turtle. This free, family event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit www. hydecreek.org/festival.htm.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY,NOVEMBER 15, 2013

5-year mortgages as low as

Consumers need to watch for harmful counterfeit products

(NC) Do be aware that counterfeit electrical products can be dangerous to you and your household, say authoritative sources including the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI-Canada) and the Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network. Over the past 10 years the value of counterfeit goods seized by the RCMP has increased by 500 per cent and the number of harmful counterfeit products has more than doubled, with electrical products representing 12 per cent of those seized last year. Consumers should be aware that counterfeit electrical products can present shock and !re hazards that can kill. “The concern with counterfeit electrical products is that they bypass the quality controls that ensure relevant safety standards are met. Investigations have found that products made with substandard materials lack the required insulation to avoid !re hazards caused by overheating, and that improper assembly exposes wires and can present electrical shock hazards,” says

Wayne Edwards, a board member of the foundation and chair of the network.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

TRI-CITIES AUTOMOTIVE

GUIDE

Dear Tom and Ray: About once a week, my boyfriend and I drive to a nearby city, about 150 miles round trip. When we go together, he drives my Toyota Yaris. He insists on shutting off the engine at EVERY stoplight, which he says improves gas mileage. I say it’s dangerous; it’s going to require a new starter sooner rather than later; and it upsets the drivers behind him as they wait for him to start up the car when the light turns green. On the weeks he doesn’t drive the car, my mileage is about 41 to 42 miles per gallon, and on

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the weeks he does drive my car, the mileage is about 40 to 41 mpg. So, does shutting off the engine at stoplights improve gas mileage, and is it worth it? — Terry

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not. It certainly does save fuel when you turn off the engine at stoplights. That’s why hybrids and newer cars are coming equipped with automatic “stop/start” features. RAY: What does stop/start do? It turns off the engine when you stop at a light and turns it back on for you the moment you take your foot off the brake — to save fuel. TOM: So why isn’t your mileage better when your boyfriend drives, then? Probably because he’s got a lead foot the rest of the time. He likely accelerates harder than you do, and drives

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faster. And that’s costing you more in mileage than he’s saving by shutting down the engine at stoplights. RAY: But there’s no question that running the engine less uses less fuel. We used to hear people cite the myth that it takes more fuel to restart the car than it does to keep it running while you’re waiting at a light. That’s nonsense. TOM: Engineers say stop/start technology can add about five per cent to fuel economy, give or take, depending on how much stop-and-go driving is done. RAY: But the cars that

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MORREY NISSAN OF COQUITLAM 2710 Lougheed Hwy, Port Coquitlam, BC Tel: (604) 464-9291 www.morrey.coquitlam.nissan.ca

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14 | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Should you turn off the engine at stoplights?

MOTORING runs into a store, or when you get stuck while one of those six-mile-long freight trains full of bulgur wheat crosses the road in front of you. TOM: And suggest to your boyfriend that he go a little lighter on the pedal. Going 65 instead of 70 or 75 will save quite a bit of fuel, as will accelerating gently away from stoplights. RAY: Because if his real goal were to save fuel rather than annoy you and the people in cars behind him, the proof would be in the mileage numbers. And he’s not making his case.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

GUIDE

WATCH UFC 167 HERE!

MOTORING

TRI-CITIES AUTOMOTIVE

THIS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 at 7 PM!

ALL PITCHERS* $12.99 (*EXCEPT STELLA)

behind the wheel. More tips on safe winter

Corner of Pinetree Way 604-941-2359 Lincoln across from CIBC

driving can be found online at www.community.ups.com.

THE HOLIDAY SALES EVENT IS HERE.

Get your car winter-ready in the fall — Prepare for a rough winter ahead of time. Have your car serviced to ensure that fluids are changed and topped up and that brakes are in proper working condition. Purchase snow tires — Studies show that compared to regular tires, snow tires can dramatically improve your ability to effectively navigate your car through heavy snow and ice.

2014 ACCORD LX

Charge your cellphone — In case your vehicle gets stuck or your car battery dies, you want to have a cellphone to call for assistance. Make sure your cellphone is fully charged before getting

Lease for

146 0 down

2014 ODYSSEY LX

$

Lease for

183 0 down

$

!

3.99% APR€

*

4.49% APR#

$

bi-weekly for 60 months. MSRP** $25,685 includes freight & PDI.

$

2014 CR-V LX SPECIAL EDITION

bi-weekly for 60 months. MSRP** $31,685 includes freight & PDI.

Pack an emergency kit — If you end up stuck in a snow bank or otherwise run into trouble this winter, it’s important to have an emergency kit within arm’s reach. Pack a winterized blanket, flares, first aid kit, wind-up flashlight, whistle, water and non-perishable food such as granola bars or crackers. Give yourself extra travel time — Anticipate traffic and slower speeds during stormy weather. A trip that usually takes 20 minutes may take 40 in bad weather, so be patient and stay alert.

(60 oz.)

Pros offer driving tips

(NC) Canadian winters can be harsh, cold and unpredictable. This is why many new and experienced drivers become stressed or worried when it’s time to get behind the wheel during the snowy, slippery months. A recent survey conducted by the Canadian Automobile Association revealed that only 36 per cent of drivers carry a winter driving kit in their vehicle. This means that many of us aren’t adequately prepared to deal with Jack Frost. “The holidays are a busy time of year,” notes Dominic Porporino, the vice-president of operations at UPS Canada. “To ensure the season is also a safe one, it’s important that drivers keep road safety top of mind and prepare themselves for winter driving.” As part of UPS’s commitment to road safety, the company has created a special distinction for an elite group of drivers — each with over 25 years of accident-free driving — called the Circle of Honour. Globally this group has driven over 8.5 billion kilometres; enough to circle the globe 212,000 times. To keep drivers safe this winter, the Circle of Honour members offer these tips:

15

Lease for

153 0 down

$

¥

2.99% APR£

$

bi-weekly for 60 months. MSRP** $28,684 includes freight & PDI.

$

PLUS

500

HOLIDAY BONUS †

THE LIMITED EDITION CR-V SE GIVES YOU OVER $1,600 IN EXTRAS. Including roofrails, running boards, cargo tray, all season floor mats and SE badge.

This is our best offer of the season, but the selection won’t last long. Visit your BC Honda Dealer for details.

BCHonda.com DL# 31286

bchonda.com

QUALITY DEALER

2011

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16

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

5 DAY CLEAROUT SALE!

17

ENDS THIS SUNDAY – WHEN IT’S OVER, IT’S OVER!

2013

FIESTA SE HB

WINTER PACKAGE, #1309365

2013

FOCUS SE HB

2013

SYNC, #1302003

FUSION SE

HEATED SEATS, SUN, SIRIUS, SIDE AIR BAGS, #1309279

FOCUS TITANIUM HATCHBACK 5 DOOR

2013

LEATHER, POWER SEAT, MOON ROOF, NAV., SIRIUS, #1309226

14,800

$

15,500

20,000

$

$

22,500

$

ALL 2013 MODELS MUST GO OVER 400 NEW & USED TO CHOOSE FROM 2013 F150

XLT CREW CAB

BUCKET SEATS, SYNC, BRAKE CONTROL, SIRIUS, #1319212

2013 TAURUS

SEL AWD

LEATHER, MOON ROOF, BACK-UP SENSOR #1309267

2013 ESCAPE

4WD

SE

LEATHER, HEATED SEATS, NAV., ROOF RAILS, POWER GATE, #1319338

2013 MUSTANG

V6 CONVERTIBLE

2013 EDGE

AWD

SEL

PREMIUM PKG., LEATHER, SECURITY LEATHER, MOON ROOF, MYFORD, PKG., PONY PKG., #1309107 #1319851X

2013 FLEX

2013 C-MAX

7 PASSENGER, ROOF, POWER & HEATED DRIVER/PASS. SEATS, SYNC, #1319333

MYFORD, #1302141X

SEL

2013 F150

LARIAT CREWCAB

HYBRID SE

LEATHER, MOON ROOF NAVIGATION #1312114

25,000 $24,800 $26,000 $26,000 $27,900 $28,000 $25,200 $40,800

$

LOWEST PRICES OF THE YEAR!

15,600 MAKE NO PAYMENTS * ** OFF NEW 2013’s PAY NO INTEREST UP $ TO

UNTIL MAY 2014

PAY INVOICE PRICING!

Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. Price plus dealer doc charge of $499. *See dealer for details** On Approved Credit. Ad expires Nov. 17th, 2013.

STOCK NO YEAR CARLINE EQUIP 2699290 2539327 2292159 1139231 2294441 2612077 2692090 2616584 2416613 2839217 2992168 2559297 1112081

2006 Kia SPECTRA LX SEDAN .................................................. $6,800 2005 CHEVROLET BLAZER 4X4 WELL EQUIPPED ........................ $7,600 2002 TOYOTA CAMRY LE SEDAN ONLY 128,900 KMS................. $7,900 2011 Chevrolet AVEO5 HATCHBACK.......................................... $8,800 2002 TOYOTA CELICA GT 2DOOR HATCH 107,000KMS............... $8,800 2006 FORD ESCAPE 4WD XLT TRIM....................................... $10,800 2006 MINI COOPER HATCHBACK........................................... $11,800 2006 FORD F150 4WD SUPERCREW XLT TRIM....................... $13,500 2004 FORD F150 4WD LARIAT CREW CAB LOADED................ $13,500 2008 Chevrolet TRAILBLAZER 4WD LT MODEL WELL EQUIPED $13,500 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5L WELL EQUIPED ........................... $13,600 2005 Chrysler CROSSFIRE LIMITED LOADED .......................... $13,800 2011 FORD RANGER PICKUP 4CYL ONLY 34,800KMS ............ $14,800

DEALER #7485

DEALER #7485

3 0 1 S T E W A R D S O N W A Y, N E W W E S T M I N S T E R

2819129 2399083 2696600 2919159 2812161 2519986 2699323 106175X 2894458 1219340 1099288 1226598 1219190

WEB $

2008 FORD EDGE SUV.......................................................... $14,800 2003 Hummer H2 4WD Leather, OnStar............................... $14,800 2006 INFINITI G35 X LEATHER ROOF.................................... $15,800 2009 FORD ESCAPE 4WD LT TRIM......................................... $16,500 2008 FORD F350 SUPERDUTY PICKUP.................................. $16,500 2005 FORD F150 4WD SUPERCREW XLT................................ $16,800 2006 Infiniti M45 SPORT SEDAN Leather, Moon Roof, Nav..... $17,800 2010 FORD F150 4WD XLT SUPERCAB................................. $17,800 2008 BUICK ENCLAVE AWD POWER GROUP ALLOYS............... $18,500 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT TRIM .............................................. $19,600 2010 Mazda RX-8 GT CPE Leather, Moon Roof, Navigation.... $20,800 2012 KIA SORRENTO SUV..................................................... $20,800 2012 FORD E250 CARGO VAN V8 AIRCON ONLY 15,000KMS . $21,000

STOCK NO YEAR CARLINE EQUIP

WEB $

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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COMMUNITY&LIFE

Help victims of typhoon Are you looking for a way to help people in the Philippines who’ve been affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan? BC Liquor Store customers can support Red Cross Super Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts in the Philippines by making

a press release. This includes carrying out search and rescue operations, distributing food and mobilizing items like blankets, hygiene kits and sleeping mats. Through Monday, Dec.

a donation at any of the 195 BC Liquor Stores located in communities throughout the province. These donations will help the Red Cross provide urgently needed assistance in affected communities, according to

INTERIOR TO LOWER MAINLAND TRANSMISSION PROJECT CONSTRUCTION UPDATE BC Hydro’s contractor for the Interior to Lower Mainland Transmission Project will be burning slash piles this fall on BC Hydro’s dependent, and continue as needed through to the end of December. The contractor has obtained the necessary

COQUITLAM RIVER

provincial and municipal permits and will comply

LOWER MAINLAND

ILM PROJECT ROUTE BC HYDRO RIGHT-OF-WAY ROADS

with all regulations. A key requirement is that the contractor does not conduct burning unless the

QU AR RY RD

venting index is “good”. This ensures proper air movement exists to minimize smoke impacts to people in the vicinity of the burning.

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businesses and homes in the Lower Mainland and

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The 247 kilometre, 500 kilovolt transmission line currently under construction will expand the capacity of the system that brings power to

POCO & DISTRICT HUNTING & FISHING CLUB

9, customers will be able to make donations of $2 or $5 — or multiples thereof — at all checkouts in BC Liquor Stores. All donations received during this time will be matched by the federal government. The BC Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) has a longterm partnership with the Canadian Red Cross. Since 2010, BC Liquor Store customers and employees have supported Red Cross disaster relief by contributing more than $1.7 million for humanitarian crises at home and abroad.

Quick Facts:

right-of-way from Pipeline Road east to the Pitt River in Coquitlam (see map). This work is planned to start in November, weather

PIPELINE

20

• On Nov. 8, Super Typhoon Haiyan — one of the strongest storms ever recorded with wind speeds of up to 300 km/ h — destroyed thousands of homes and completely devastated parts of the Central Philippines. • According to the National Household Survey, there are 96,560 people of Filipino descent living in B.C. The majority of these people live in Metro Vancouver. • Earlier this year, BC Liquor Stores customers and employees supported Red Cross humanitarian relief efforts for Alberta Flood Relief. • In 2011, BC Liquor Store customers and employees supported Red Cross humanitarian relief efforts following the earthquake/tsunami in Japan and the Horn of Africa drought. • BC Liquor Stores are unable to issue tax receipts for donations. Customers who require tax receipts should donate directly to the Canadian Red Cross.

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Visit LougheedTownCentre.com for more details Like us on Facebook to receive a free gift and to enter for a chance to WIN weekly prizes. Offer ends December 18.


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 2013

21

Local man a winner in SPCA photo contest

COQUITLAM MAN NORMAN NG’S SHOT WINS FIRST PLACE IN WILD SETTINGS CATEGORY Honourable mentions (in no particular order) include: • Deanna Brett, Sooke • Kin Fun Li, Victoria • Penny Colton, Tappen • Stephen Joseph Richard, Kelowna • Victor Jacinto, Richmond • Maureen Hannay, New

Coquitlam Animal Services

ADOPT-A-PET TILLY

HUGO

• ANIMAL: CAT • BREED: DOMESTIC SHORT HAIR, ADULT • SEX: SPAYED FEMALE

Tilly is a sweet and shy girl who is looking for a quiet home. She is very affectionate and loves to snuggle and will even give kisses. Tilly would like to be the only cat in the home as she wants all the attention to herself.

5.

Backyard habitats 1st Laurie Schretlen, Kelowna 2nd Veronica Caron, Delta 3rd Carol Munro, 100 Mile House Wild Settings 1st Norman Ng, Coquitlam 2nd Alice Sun, West Vancouver 3rd Jesse Schpakowski, New Denver

• ANIMAL: CAT • BREED: NEUTERED MALE • SEX: DOMESTIC SHORT HAIR, ADULT

Hugo is a big handsome boy who arrived at the shelter with his pal Kira after their family got a divorce. It took him a while to adjust to his new environment but he’s doing really well. He can get a bit unsure around the other cats but was fine in the home with Kira. Hugo is a big love and will roll over for a belly rub, then suddenly start playing! He is around 3 years old and in good health.

KIRA

• ANIMAL: CAT • BREED: SPAYED FEMALE • SEX: DOMESTIC SHORT HAIR, ADULT

Kira is a beautiful cat who found herself being returned to the shelter with her pal Hugo after a divorce. She’s adjusted well and has quickly become a volunteer favorite. Kira has an amazing soft coat and loves to have snuggles. She’s doing well with the other cats but seems to prefer her own space right now.

The annual contest runs from June through September and encourages participants

Includes FREE Bandana!

$ 00

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Coquitlam resident Norman Ng won first place in the Wild Settings category of the BC SPCA’s Wildlife-inFocus Photography Contest with this image of three Green Heron chicks perched on a branch. — will be featured in the BC SPCA’s spring/summer issue of AnimalSense magazine; the top three in each category will receive a prize that may include: a handbag from Astrosatchel, a point-andshoot camera from Broadway Camera, a Wild ARC prize pack, or subscriptions to either Canadian Geographic Magazine or Canadian Art Magazine. The 2013 winners are:

to explore green spaces, roadsides, beaches and their own backyards to find striking images of local wildlife living in such close proximity of humans. “Wildlife” includes free-living birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, fish and insects but not exotic, feral or domestic animals, or wildlife in zoos or rehab facilities.

Westminster • Donna Peet, Prince George • Claire Arnett, Abbotsford • Tania Simpson, Peachland • Martin Smart, Nanaimo

OFF

A

trio of Green Heron chicks, perfectly perched on a branch in B.C.’s beautiful outdoors, appear to be posing for the camera, their striking features captured in sharp detail. Coquitlam photographer Norman Ng snapped this amazing photo for the BC SPCA’s 2013 Wildlife-inFocus Photography Contest, which earned him the firstplace win in the Wild Settings category. Contest participants helped raise $3,900 for wild animals in need in British Columbia, submitting nearly 700 photos. “We live in one of the most beautiful places on Earth and are surrounded by such a diversity of wildlife throughout the province,” says Sara Dubois, manager of wildlife services for the BC SPCA. “The images of our local wild animals that were captured by such a wide range of photographers are absolutely stunning.” First-prize winners in both categories — Backyard Habitats and Wild Settings

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Coquitlam Animal Shelter, 500 Mariner Way • 604-927-7387

Open Monday to Friday from 9am-8pm, weekends & holidays from 10am-4pm. Interested in volunteering or fostering? ...please call us."

CHESSIE • ANIMAL: CAT • BREED: SPAYED FEMALE • SEX: DOMESTIC SHORT HAIR, ADULT

Chessie was left behind when her owners moved and we can’t imagine why. She is a very sweet and affectionate cat. Chessie loves to have cuddles and will roll over to get her chin rubbed. She’s been doing very well with the other cats and if matched appropriately, would do fine in a home with other cats.

LEON

CHARLIE

• ANIMAL: DOG • BREED: SHIH TZU MIX, ADULT • SEX: NEUTERED MALE,

Leon can be a bit timid at first when he meets new people but once he trusts you heís a little cuddly and kissy boy. He would do best in an adult only home that can help him gain some confidence, and children would be very overwhelming for him. Leon doesnít seem to have had any training and will need someone to teach him the basics. He also needs to be housetrained in his new home.

• ANIMAL: DOG • BREED: NEUTERED MALE • SEX: GERMAN SHEPHERD, ADULT

Charlie is a young and energetic dog who needs an experienced home. He acts like a puppy (an 80lb puppy) and need someone who can handle a large dog. Charlie gets along well with other dogs, but would need to be introduced to any dog in the home prior to adoption. Contact the shelter for more info on Charlie!

Coquitlam Animal Shelter - Help Locate Your Cat if it Goes Missing @"E78&"&A 38A ?$"&A?*38A?%& 38& B"9# E">&?A" '%> ;?AB '%>E #"A CB%>9$ ?A D% 7?CC?&D) 6F '%>E 38A B8C 8 A8AA%% %E 8 7?3E%3B?#+ E"D?CA"E ?A ;?AB AB" ,%!>?A987 0&?789 :B"9A"E 8&$ ;" ;?99 8$$ ?A A% %>E $8A858C") :B%>9$ '%>E 38A D% 7?CC?&D 8&$ 5" 5E%>DBA A% AB" 0&?789 :B"9A"E+ ;" ;?99 5" 859" A% 78A3B '%>E #"A !>?3<9' 8&$ 3%&A83A '%>)

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22

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Documentary looks at one man’s fame CINEPHILIA

Joshua Cabrita

SLAUGHTER NICK FOR PRESIDENT Starring: Rob Stewart Directed by: Rob Stewart, Marc Vepsi, Liza Vepsi Running time: 73 minutes

A

ndy Warhol famously said, “In the future, everyone will be worldfamous for 15

minutes.” For Rob Stewart — an obscure and failing Canadian actor who in his 50s was still living in his parents’ basement — his 15 minutes came

SUBMITTED PHOTO

A new documentary playing at the Vancity Theatre focuses on the unlikely fame of Canadian actor Rob Stewart, who’s a cult hero in Serbia. on a relatively unknown 90s crime show titled “Tropic Heat.” Maybe it was the 11:30 p.m. start time that caused the show to be cancelled after three short seasons, but I highly doubt it (since David Letterman snagged the spot and had great success). “Tropic Heat” was (to put it lightly) very flawed: poor

production values, cheesy dialogue and laughable acting. But little did he know, his brief 15 minutes were being lengthened to 15 years — not in Canada or in the U.S. but far away in a desperate country, stricken with war and political unrest: Serbia. CONTINUED ON PAGE 25

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

23

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Art show and sale starts today in PoCo John KURUCZ jkurucz@thenownews.com They bill themselves as one the most approachable and inclusive art groups around. The Art Focus Artists’ Association will highlight its 20th anniversary celebrations today (Friday, Nov. 15) through Sunday, when club members host their annual fall art show and sale at the Outlet in Port Coquitlam. Nineteen members will showcase roughly 80 works, ranging from paintings and miniatures, to photography and mixed media.

This club, particularly, is very friendly. –Doris Patko Art Focus Artists’ Association “We have a wide array of people who belong to the club: younger people, working folks and then some of us have been with the club for a very long time. It’s quite diversified,” said founding member and club historian Doris Patko. “And this club, particularly, is very friendly. That’s the one comment we get more often than others.” For Patko, membership in the club represents a relationship with art that has come full circle. She had a keen interest in the arts at a young age, and took classes at Emily Carr University before “life got in the way.” “There was marriage and children, and all that kind of stuff. It took me a while, but I did get back to it,” she said. Patko’s re-entry into the world of arts saw her teach at Pinetree Community Centre, Dogwood Pavilion, and Wilson Centre. She’s delved into all forms of painting, including watercolours, acrylics and oil. “I like weird stuff. Instead of painting the forest, I would rather get right up to the root of the tree and find something interesting, like on a macro level, and paint that,” she said. Having bounced around clubs in Burnaby and Port Moody, Patko then joined up with the fledgling Art Focus group in 1993. The club’s first meeting featured roughly a dozen members who met at Hazel Trembath Elementary, and from there, the meetings and demos moved throughout the community from Terry Fox Library, to Terry Fox Secondary. The group eventually settled at the Outlet in Leigh Square, and still meets three

times a month for demonstrations from outside artists, and to bounce ideas off of one another. “The people who are new to the club or are new to painting, they will ask for opinions,” she said. “But we don’t force ourselves on anyone. We encourage our members.” And unlike other groups, Art Focus has few, if any, requirements for joining. “It doesn’t matter if it’s

LISA KING/NOW

Art Focus Artists’ Association members Heather Volpe, Doris Patko and Lindsay Watson are celebrating the club’s 20th anniversary this year. Along with other members, they’ll be taking part in a show and sale that starts today (Friday, Nov. 15) and runs through Sunday in PoCo.

carvings or photographs; we’re open to all kinds of mediums,” Patko said. “You just have to show up. We don’t have any prerequisites about having to bring your artwork to have it juried or anything like that. If you have an interest, you’re welcome to join us.” The fall show and sale runs at the Outlet from 7 to 9 p.m. today, and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

"6)!0468'6,19 *..'..8'6, 4& ,#' -0434.'( "1%9' 54+6,1!62$44(7/0' Gas Pipeline Project Open House and Invitation to Comment >#HB@E/. 4DH#!#%J%B3 @E !H#!#E@%F BCJ A9F:J 1#?%B9@%+5##"(7HJ <9E D@!J:@%J Project. The proposed Project consists of the expansion of the Proponent’s existing pipeline constructed in 1990 to serve the Sunshine Coast and Vancouver Island. The expansion includes the addition of an approximately 52km long 20 inch (NPS 20 or 508 mm) diameter natural gas pipeline from the area north and outside of the CoIuitlam 5atershed in the <reater Vancouver =egional ,istrict (1etro Vancouver) to 5ood(7re- south&est of SIuamish. In addition to the pipeline- the proposed project also reIuires additional compression at the Proponent’s compressor station at Eagle Mountain ,rive in north CoIuitlam and at Port Mellon north of <i7sons along &ith the construction of a ne& compressor station in or near SIuamish. 2ncillary facilities such as metering stations- mainline valves and temporary stockpile sites and equipment storage areas are also required at different points along the pipeline route. The proposed Project is su7ject to revie& under /ritish Colum7ia’s Environmental Assessment Act. The Proponent must o7tain an Environmental 2ssessment (KE2)) Certi(cate 7efore any &ork can 7e undertaken on the proposed Project. ;o&ever- prior to su7mission of an application (2pplication) for the E2 Certi(cate 7y the Proponent- the Environmental 2ssessment Gf(ce of /ritish Colum7ia (E2G) must (rst approve the 2pplication Information =equirements. The 2pplication Information =equirements document speci(es the studies to 7e conducted and the detailed information to 7e provided 7y the Proponent in its 2pplication. The E2G has no& received the draft 2pplication Information =equirements from the Proponent and invites pu7lic comments on this draft during a 60+day Pu7lic Comment Period- 7et&een November 15th, 2013 and December 16th, 2013. In order to 7e considered- your comments must 7e su7mitted during this speci(ed time frame. The E2G also invites the pu7lic to attend t&o Open Houses related to this comment period to 7e held as follo&s* November 16, 2013 1pm – 5pm Executive Suites ;otel ' =esort 40900 Tantalus Road Squamish- /C

November 21, 2013 4pm – 8pm 5est&ood Plateau <olf ' Country Clu7 3251 Plateau Blvd. Coquitlam- BC

2t this stage of the process- the primary intent of seeking pu7lic comments is to receive feed7ack a7out the information required and the scope of the studies to 7e undertaken in the 2pplication. The information included in the 2pplication Information Requirements &ill direct the Proponent’s efforts for a comprehensive assessment of the potential effects that may result from constructing and operating the proposed Project on the environmentaleconomic- social- heritage and health valued components identi(ed &ithin the proposed Project footprint. 2ll comments received from the pu7lic &ill 7e for&arded to the Proponent for consideration and response. 5hen satis(ed &ith the Proponent’s responses (that may require changes to the draft Application Information Requirements) the EAG &ill (nali$e the draft Application Information Requirements and issue it to the Proponent. The EAG accepts &ritten pu7lic comments online- 7y mail or 7y fax as follo&s* • By online form at eao.gov.bc.ca • By mail* Environmental Assessment Gf(ce P.G. Box 9420 Stn Prov <ovt Victoria- BC V85 9V1 Attention* 8osh ;andysides • By Fax* >ax* (250) 356-6448 An electronic copy of the draft Application Information Requirements and information regarding the environmental assessment process are availa7le at.eao.gov.bc.ca. Copies of the draft Application Information Requirements are also availa7le for vie&ing at li7raries and Municipal Gf(ces in Squamish and Coquitlam. A su7sequent formal pu7lic comment period &ill 7e held during the Application revie& stage. The pu7lic &ill have the opportunity to assess ho& the information required in the Application Information Requirements &as addressed 7y the Proponent in their Application for an Environmental Assessment Certi(cate.

Note: All submissions received by the EAO during the comment period in relation to the proposed Project are considered public and will be posted to the EAO website.


24

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Film is interesting, but stays superficial CONT. FROM PAGE 22

Rob Stewart’s character, Nick Slaughter, became an icon for the resistance against the tyrannical rule of Slobodon Milosevic and an escape from the civil wars that plagued the region during the separation of Yugoslavia. Instead of flocking to news networks that only furthered the Serbians’ melancholic psychological state, this dumb American production gained huge popularity, offering the fantasies of simple and positive resolutions: the hot good guy with a patch of chest hair was always victorious and the pleasure of being visually transported to paradise — Florida beaches that caused many Serbians’ to reminisce about summer getaways to Croatian shores. This documentary, Slaughter Nick For President, plays like a travelogue and an ode to escapist entertainment, following Rob Stewart as he leaves the comfort of his quiet Brampton, Ont. home for the chaos of Serbia to perform live on stage with Atheist Rap — a punk rock

To see a trailer for this film, scan with Layar

band that wrote a song titled “Nick Slaughter, Serbia Hails you,” while being constantly bombarded by media and fans. Imagine one day people who know you inform you they have never seen you perform, yet the next day you are a superstar with mobs hollering for a picture or an autograph. The story and subtext for this documentary are incredibly rich but this film fails to plunge to such depths, staying superficial instead. A viewer expecting a twopronged approach to the Serbian heartache and the quotidian life of an unknown Canadian actor will likely be left unsatisfied. I was. But perhaps my feelings are unreasonable and my expectations misguided because Rob Stewart (and company) elect to write, direct and edit their film intuitively, telling the story with

Enclave 3: Now Released

a concise and matter-of-fact execution. They tell us the facts and the story, but never capture the human suffering and eventual triumph of Rob Stewart and the Serbian people. The tale on its own is enough to sustain interest for a brief 73 minutes. It just could have been so much more. The uplifting message could have been way more inspirational! I should have deduced that my everyday actions have unforeseen meaning and purpose and the ability to even inspire a nation, but instead I was simply told it in a concluding monologue. Slaughter Nick for President is playing at the Vancity Theatre in downtown Vancouver on Sunday, Nov. 17 (this screening will be hosted by CTV film critic and Travel Guy Jim Gordon) and Monday, Nov. 18. Both shows start at 6:30 p.m. Joshua Cabrita is a Grade 12 student at Riverside Secondary in Port Coquitlam. His film reviews run on Fridays, only in the Tri-Cities NOW.

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

25

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Artist finds success John KURUCZ

jkurucz@thenownews.com Ola Volo doesn’t appear to have time for down time. At just 24, the Coquitlam artist has already amassed a laundry list of who’s who clients, travelled across the world and established herself as a full-time artist. That she’s done it all at such a young age speaks to Volo’s need to continuously leave her comfort zone. “I think there can be a big fear that can be brought on when something feels so comfortable,” she told the Tri-Cities NOW. “I tell myself, and my advice to other artists, is to just keep on finding new mediums, new challenges and things that make you feel a bit uncomfortable.” An illustrator and designer by trade, Volo’s most recent high-profile gig saw her team up with a series of other local artists to construct a massive mural along Vancouver’s seawall for Lululemon founder Chip Wilson. That collaborative effort came on the heels of a sixmonth residency in New York City that saw Volo’s work exposed to arguably the biggest art market on the planet. “Being there, collaborating with lots of people and concentrating on my work was a big thing for me,” she said. “I was able to see what the art world is all about in New York, and it pushed me to work much harder. Being there really cut to the core of what my work is about.” Though her artistic offerings range from graphic design work to illustrations, murals and paintings, Volo’s inspiration is firmly rooted in

Europe. Born in Kazakhstan, Volo finds her muse in European folk tales and the imagery evoked by the characters — specifically animals — found in those stories. “A lot of these animals had characteristics and personalities that were consistent throughout,” said Volo. “A lot of the time when I’m trying to convey an idea, an animal represents somebody in a much more well-rounded way. I think it speaks on a more international level rather than just depicting a particular person.” On top of that folklore, Volo credits the cultural mishmash she experienced while growing up: her mother’s Polish, while Russians, Germans and a host of other cultures convened in Kazakhstan. Volo’s family moved to Canada when she was eight and she continued her artistic pursuits throughout her time at both Gleneagle and Riverside secondary schools. At the same time, she enrolled at Emily Carr University to begin her postsecondary studies while still in Coquitlam. “I never thought I could be a full-time artist, but once I committed to it, the passion came through,” she said. “Once you’re so excited about something, people just catch on and want to work with you.” That passion has paid off in spades, as Volo’s list of clients continues to grow exponentially. Whether it’s through commissions or pieces she ends up selling, Volo has worked for Hootsuite, the City of Vancouver, the Dragon Boat Festival, Mobify and a wide range of magazine and trade publications.

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She’s also helping to design thousands of shirts for Pink Shirt Day anti-bullying initiatives next year. “It’s kind of like a chain reaction. Once you do one project, others come up for you as well,” she said. “But I don’t think these things come just naturally. You really have to commit, take the time to do it and perfect it.” Volo’s works will be on exhibit in Vancouver at Kafka’s Coffee and Tea, located at 2525 Main St., from Nov. 28 to Jan. 6. For more information, see www. olavola.com.

SHOW SANTA YOU’RE NICE WITH A PHOTO BY DONATION Come to the Grand Court and get your picture taken with Santa. Photos are by donation (minimum $2 per photo) and all funds go to the Burnaby Christmas Bureau, a charity that provides low-income families with food gift certificates and new toys at Christmas. November 22 – December 24* Monday – Saturday (and Sunday, December 22) 11 am – 1 pm 2 pm – 5 pm 6 pm – 8 pm Sunday 11 am – 2 pm 3 pm – 6 pm *We close at 5 pm on Christmas Eve

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LISA KING/NOW

Coquitlam’s Ola Volo is a full-time artist at 24 years old. She recently completed a six-month residency in New York City, and collaborated with other artists on a mural for Lululemon founder Chip Wilson. Her work is currently on display at Kafka’s Coffee and Tea on Vancouver’s Main Street.


26

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

COMMUNITY

FRIDAY, NOV 15 Tri-City Singles Social Club meets at 7 p.m.

at the Royal Canadian Legion, 2513 Clarke St., Port Moody. This group provides singles 50-plus to meet new friends and enjoy activities such as dancing, theatre, concerts, dining, movies, day trips and travel. Membership is $20 per year. Info: Darline at 604-466-0017. SHARE Family & Community Services is partnering with Eden West Fine Foods to collect non-perishable food items for local families in need this Christmas. Drop off non-perishable items during their open house Friday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.), Saturday (9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) and Sunday (noon to 5 p.m.) at 2500 St. John’s St., Port Moody. Team Motley Crew is hosting a Ride to Conquer Cancer fundraiser, 7 p.m. at the Golden Spike Pub, 3224 St. John’s St., Port Moody. The ‘80s Pub Night features costume prizes, silent auction and more to benefit the 2014 Ride to Conquer Cancer team. Tickets are $20. Info: 778-938-7968 or www.themotleycrew.ca.

SATURDAY, NOV 16 Our Lady of the Assumption Church hosts

its 29th annual fall fair from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m at 3141 Shaughnessy St. in Port Coquitlam. Garage sale, games, crafts, bake sale, ‘50s diner, Filipino food and more. Info: 604-942-7808. Friends of the Coquitlam Public Library Society meet at 10:30 a.m. in Room 127 of the City Centre branch of the Coquitlam Public Library, 1169 Pinetree Way. New members always welcome. Info: 604-937-4130. The Pacfic Digital Photography Club hosts its 10th annual Photomotion juried slide show events, 2 and 7 p.m. at Port Moody’s Inlet The-

atre, 100 Newport Drive. A selection of three-tofour minute long audio-visual presentations will be viewed, with refreshments and door prizes. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at www. pdpc.ca/Photomotion/PhotomotionTickets.html.

SUNDAY, NOV 17

Hyde Creek Watershed Society holds its 14th annual Hyde Creek Salmon Festival from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hyde Creek Recreation Centre, 1379 Laurier Ave. and at Hyde Creek Education Centre & Hatchery, 3636 Coast Meridian Rd. in Port Coquitlam. Hatchery tours, crafts, interactive environmental displays, BBQ and more. Info: www.hydecreek.org.

MONDAY, NOV 18

The Moody Centre Community Association (MCCA) invites Port Moody residents to attend an information and informal discussion regarding the city’s official community plan, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Kyle Centre, 125 Kyle St.

TUESDAY, NOV 19 The PoCo Garden Club meets at 7:30 p.m.

at Trinity United Church, 2211 Prairie Ave. November’s guest speaker is Randy Solomon from the Backyard Bird Centre in Newport Village, on how to attract birds to your yard over the winter months. The club will also hold its AGM. Info: 604-942-3565.

WEDNESDAY, NOV 20 The Singles Travel Club meets 6 p.m. at

the ABC Restaurant, 300-100 Schoolhouse St., Coquitlam. The club offers group tours for solo travellers, to enjoy the security of group travel and avoid the costly single traveller supplement. RSVP to Val at 604-669-6607 ext. 304. SHARE Society offers an education series

around alcohol and drug use for those who have an alcohol or drug problem, and for those concerned about their use or the use of others. The topic will be “Marijuana: a second-class addiction?” The session includes a video, brief presentation and open discussion, and runs from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 2615 Clarke St. in Port Moody. Registration is not required. This is part of a 13week drop-in series that runs Wednesdays until Jan. 29. Info: 604-936-3900.

THURSDAY, NOV 21 The PoCo Heritage Society holds a general

meeting, 1 p.m. in the Community meeting room at the Gathering Place, 2100-2253 Leigh Sq. Guest speaker Bill Hall, a military artist and veteran, will give a presentation called “A Moment in Time.” Info: 604-927-8403, pocoheritage1@gmail.com. The Terry Fox Library, 2470 Mary Hill Rd., Port Coquitlam, presents a Hunger Games Teen Challenge, coinciding with the release of the film Catching Fire, 4 to 5 p.m. Prizes and fun for those willing to test their skill and cunning. Info/registration: 604-927-7999. GE Free Tri-Cities and Coquitlam Family Chiropractic present two Canadian scientists who will discuss and answer questions regarding genetically engineered (GE) foods and human health, 7 p.m. at Douglas College-David Lam campus, Room A1470, 1250 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam. This is a free event, with donations accepted. Info: http://facebook.com/GEFreeBC. The Northeast Coquitlam Ratepayers Association (NCRA) holds its monthly meeting, 7 p.m. at Victoria Hall, 3435 Victoria Dr. All Burke Mountain residents are invited, with attendees asked to bring a non-perishable food item for the food bank. Info: 604-941-2260 or 604-942-9725.

FRIDAY, NOV 22

Place Maillardville presents Baby’s 1st Two years, 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Heritage Room at Place Maillardville Community Centre, 1200 Cartier Ave., Coquitlam. A free drop-in program for expectant parents, parents, and/or guardians, with guest speakers on related topics. This week’s discussion is on child care, with guest speaker Rae Ingram. Info: 604-933-6146.

ONGOING Tri-Cities Better at Home, presented by

SHARE Family & Community Services, helps seniors with simple day-to-day tasks, thereby helping them maintain their independence and connection with the community. The program offers light housekeeping, transportation to doctor appointments, and grocery shopping for seniors 65 and older. To register for this service contact Paola at 604-937-6991, 604-936-3900 or betterathome@sharesociety.ca. Recovery International is a self-help peer-topeer support group for people who struggle with stress, fear, anger, depression, anxiety, panic and nervous symptoms. Cognitive behavioural techniques are discussed at the Port Coquitlam meeting. Info: Phyllis at 604-931-5945 or www. RecoveryCanada.ca. MOSAIC Kindness Club needs host volunteers to help newcomers adjust to Canadian life. Commitment is for two hours a week for 13 weeks. Info: 604-254-9626. Parent Support Services of BC offers free weekly parent and grandparent support circles led by trained facilitators across the Lower Mainland. Learn new ways to nurture your child through discussing parenting techniques, challenges and stresses, and receiving support. Info: www.parentsupportbc.ca or 604-669-1616.

14TH ANNUAL

The Royale Astoria

Festival of

Lights December 2013

Hyde Creek Salmon Festival SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 • 11AM-3PM

PROGRAM at Hyde Creek Rec Centre – Laurier Ave

Visit the Hyde Creek Education Centre & Hatchery. Follow the colourful banners along the trail and tour a 11:00 WELCOME TO ALL – Opening Ceremonies working hatchery, crafts, muralshatchery, of Hyde Creek seasons, banners along the trail and tour a working crafts, murals of Hyde • Cliff Kelsey, President Hyde Creek Watershed Creek seasons, Starbucks coffee and much more. Starbucks coffee and much more. Society 3636 Coast Meridian Rd • Jean Peachman, Festival Coordinator • Councilor Darrell Penner – Master of Ceremonies • Mayor Greg Moore – City of Port Coquitlam 12:00 1:00 2:00

Rock and roll your way through our magical light display with Elvis! Join us at The Royale Astoria for a Blue Hawaiian celebration. Voluntary donations will be accepted in support of the Eagle Ridge Hospital Foundation. Complimentary snacks and refreshments will be served

November 19th 2:30pm - 3:30pm Call 604.944.2341 for more information

FREE FAMILY EVENT

12:20 11:30 12:30 1:30 2:30 12:30 1:30 1:00

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In Stream Salmon Demonstrations (3 sessions) – 20 minutes at the Observation Deck on Hyde Creek. Live Salmon available for close up viewing and observation. Salmon Dissection at Observation Deck TaDa Lady and the Nylon Zoo 4 Shows with children participating Outside east of the Observation Deck At the inflatable fish Nature Walks (2 sessions) Meet at the Observation Deck

Try a famous Salmon Burger and Salmon Chowder, available at the Lions of Port Coquitlam BBQ. There will Hot Dogs and other refreshments as well! Win a Sky Helicopter trip, a Fraser River Safari tour, Poco Inn & Suites accommodation, theatre & event tickets, and more at our fund raising raffle.

1379 Laurier Ave FREE PARKING

Riverside Fly & Tackle casting demonstration East of the Observation Deck

1:30 OWL Presentation with Live Owl & Vulture -15 minutes

The Royale Astoria 2245 Kelly Avenue Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 0B1

2:00 Greater Vancouver Zoo – Presentation – Plight of the Western Painted Turtle- 15 minutes 3:00 Raffle Draw. You don’t have to be present to win. ON-GOING: Informative displays and interactive exhibits, Salmon BBQ, JR-FM Radio, crafts, face painting, sea aquarium, Home Depot build project. Take a short walk down the trail to see an operating salmon hatchery and many more exhibits.

For more information email hcws.info@gmail.com or check out our website at www.hydecreek.org


SPORTSNOW

THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

27

GOT SPORTS?

Contact Dan

Phone: 604-444-3094 Fax: 640-444-3460 Email: sports@thenownews.com

SPORTS SHORTS ADANACS WIN IN OT

It required some overtime magic, but the Coquitlam Adanacs under-14 boys field lacrosse team carted off the gold medal at last week’s Richmond tournament. Coquitlam won the final 8-7 on Rhys Blake’s dramatic goal with just 27 seconds remaining in the four-minute overtime frame against Delta. A fast start, which saw Coquitlam stake out a 6-1 lead at halftime, provided little comfort down the stretch as Delta put together a fierce rally. It was a late goal in the dying seconds of regulation that earned the Adanacs a chance in OT, as they rallied for the equalizer. “The boys played extremely well in this tournament,” remarked coach Jim Barnes. “We battled back from being down almost every game to go undefeated.” It capped a great run for the squad, which finished the event with a perfect 5-0 record. Also playing well were netminder Mathew Chapman, Ben Steinkampf and Griffin Bare.

LOCALS LISTED FOR ‘14 Coquitlam natives Adam Rockwood and Jeff Wight don’t play on the same team anymore, but they are on the same list — the latest NHL Central Scouting preliminary rankings watch list, released Thursday. Rockwood, a member of the Coquitlam Express, sits tied for fifth in B.C. Hockey League scoring with four goals and 24 assists in 17 games. Wight, who skates for Merritt and last week scored the key goal in Canada West’s bronze medal win at the World Junior Challenge, has six goals and 11 assists in 18 games. They are currently ranked as potential fourthto-sixth round picks for the 2014 NHL Draft. Coquitlam begins a busy weekend tonight (Friday, 7 p.m.), when they host the Langley Rivermen. On Saturday, they visit Chilliwack, before returning for a 2 p.m. Sunday test against the Victoria Grizzlies at the Poirier Sports Centre.

O’BRIEN NETS SILVER

A terrific performance by a Canadian trio scored silver at the World trampoline and tumbling championships in Bulgaria last week. Coquitlam’s Tamara O’Brien teamed with Albertans Corissa Boychuk and Lexi Giesbrecht to capture second place in the women’s double mini trampoline event. The Canadians score of 102.200 points trailed the gold medal champion U.S., who tallied 104.400, while Russia placed third with 101.600 points.

SQUEEZE PLAY: Two Coquitlam Adanacs keep a Delta rival in check during recent under-12 field lacrosse action.

KEVIN HILL/NOW

Ball stoppers get hall dues Dan OLSON

sports@thenownews.com Standout career numbers have put a lot of players at the doorstep of the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Standout numbers combined with longevity opened the door for two legendary Western Lacrosse Association goalkeepers last week. The careers of Dallas Eliuk and Dwight Maetche featured numerous duels and standoffs, but the tale of the tape will show both earned their marks through lengthy stretches of stellar acrobatics and intense focus. The hall honour was both appreciated and overwhelming, said Maetche. “It’s kind of a weird feeling, because when you’re playing or starting to play you don’t think about the Hall of Fame, your eyes are on

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winning this game, winning a championship,” noted Maetche. “You never think of the Hall of Fame, so when it does come it’s like the icing on the cake after you’ve eaten the cake.” Both began in the Western Lacrosse Association with mediocre clubs and achieved championship rewards in the later stages of their careers. Eliuk, who was unavailable for an interview at press time, hung up the goalie gear in 2008 after a career that spanned 22 years at the pro and WLA levels. His career includes four National Lacrosse League championships, and a Mann Cup ring in 2001 with the Coquitlam Adanacs. In 1992 while with Burnaby, Eliuk set the still-standing WLA record for best save percentage at 85.47 and was named the league playoff MVP a record five times.

Maetche, meanwhile, played for 24 years and won a pair of Mann Cup titles with Victoria in 2003 and 2005. Among his records are the most points recorded by a goalie, 243, as well as most penalty minutes, 199. Maetche also was named the league’s goalie MVP a record five times. He toiled 15 seasons with the Burrards and North Shore-Okanagan Indians, teams that were for the most part on the outside looking in when it came to playoff success. “Dallas and I have a mutual respect for each other and what we’ve achieved,” said Maetche. “He’s always been extremely gracious, and I always admired how well he played, and I thought he set the bar during those years that all goalies were measured to.” — for the full story, go to www.thenownews. com.

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28

THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

SPORTSN0W

Rookie makes headway Dan OLSON sports@thenownews.com Quick wheels and a nose for the net are the traits that have made Anmore’s Nicholas Rasovic one of the B.C. Hockey League’s most promising prospects in the 2013-14 season. The 17-year-old winger was one of five BCHL players who participated in the Canada Junior Hockey League’s Prospects game in Nova Scotia last week. Joining teammate Adam Rockwood, Rasovic skated for Canada West in a two-game series with Canada East. The East won both games 4-2. “I was really excited to be invited and to get to play with so many good players,” said Rasovic, a student at Heritage Woods secondary. “I had high expectations going in about the experience, and I really enjoyed it… It was a typical all-star game where there wasn’t too much checking. For

the most part it was a lot of skating and scoring chances.” In the major midget circuit last year Rasovic produced 11 goals and 14 assists over 27 games, while also accumulating 73 penalty minutes. This season his numbers — two goals and three assists over 13 games — are more modest, but he continues to progress in his day-to-day contributions. His rookie year so far has seen a lot of adjustments for the five-foot-11 Burnaby Winter Club product. The biggest leap comes against players who are stronger and quicker, he said. “(Speed) is a big part of my game, and I love to play with the puck,” said Rasovic. “Up here it’s a lot faster than major midget and the players are tougher, play more physical.” Not one to shy away from contact, Rasovic stirred it up in the team’s recent win over Surrey on Nov. 6 — drawing the ire of Eagles netminder

Devon Fordyce. “I had a partial breakaway and he wasn’t impressed that I skated so hard to the net with the play off side,” recalls Rasovic. “He kind of got his stick up… It was all good.” It was only the club’s second win on home ice and ended a five-game losing streak. They will look to create a win streak tonight (Friday) when they host the Langley Rivermen, 7 p.m. at the Poirier Sports Centre. The evening kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with a pre-game BBQ (by donation) presented by Thrifty Foods. Sunday’s 2 p.m. home game against Victoria features family-friendly entertainment, including the Vancouver Tumblebus prior to the puck drop, and during-game events including a bouncy castle and face painting. Tickets are available at the Express office (604-9364625) or at the Poirier box office prior to the game.

CHECK US OUT ONLINE

Looking for more stories covering local Tri-Cities athletes and achievements? Go to www.thenownews.com and scroll through the Sports section, where you’ll find more stories of what’s going on and what local athletes have done.

Coquitlam in cruise control The Coquitlam Chargers continued its climb up the playoff charts. The bantam football team blasted Cloverdale 42-7 in the first round of the Vancouver Mainland Football League playoffs, advancing to the final. Matt Shuen and Martin Norman gave Coquitlam a quick 15-0 lead, while Shuen would score two more majors before halftime. Up 28-7 heading into the second half, the

Chargers defence did a tremendous job of shutting down Cloverdale while getting huge efforts from Jason Gee, Darrel Gelera, Devin Pal and Liam Stewart. The big play of the game came in the third quarter, when Shuen intercepted a Cloverdale pass on the Chargers’ one-yard line and ran it back for a major. Norman would cap the offence with a TD run. Putting the ball in great field position was Bowen Goldade.

Strikers sharp in WV tourney

It was a perfect 3-0 run for the Port Coquitlam Eurorite Strikers at the West Vancouver Remembrance Day under-12 soccer tournament. Behind two shutouts from netminder Miles Rusk, the Strikers rolled past the compe-

tition, outscoring them 9-2. PoCo opened with a 4-2 doubling of North Van, with tallies by Marco Bronfen, Jacob Brown, Nicholas Garofalo and Matthew Lew-Henriksen. In their second test, they blanked ICSF 4-0, with Brown

notching a pair and singles by Liam Wheeler and Garofalo. The Strikers capped the day by nudging North Van Roma 1-0, with Wheeler supplying the lone goal.

All proceeds support Crossroads Hospice Society

Bullying damages our kids. Do something about it.

Friday, November 22, 2013

uwlm.ca/preventbullying LAND OF DEBORAH

Deborah’s music a cornucopia of feel good, infectious songs that are personal, eclectic and downright fun! Come visit and listen awhile!

The Gathering Place 1100 - 2253 Leigh Square Port Coquitlam Info: 604-945-0606 $5 admission at the door 7:00pm doors open 7:30pm open stage 9:00pm feature performer

www.crossroadshospice.bc.ca/coffee THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Coffee by Starbucks Shaughnessy and Cookies from Inno Bakery Poco

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013


THE TRI-CITIES NOW | FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

musicforyourears EARN YOUR OWN MONEY AND YOU CAN

Buy a computer — and you won’t have to wait for Mom to get off Facebook before you surf, play games and chat with your friends (or even do homework). Buy a cool ipod — and play all your own tunes, all the time (no more of Mom’s lame music). Buy a great camera — and show off your pix to all your friends.

THERE’S SO MUCH IN STORE

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HOURS OF OPERATION

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TRI-CITIES

APRIL 19, 2013

GETTING A CHARGE Port Moody unveils four electric vehicle charging stations

5

thenownews.com

THE NOW FRIDAY

Tuesday - Saturday 9:30am-4:30pm Thrift Thursday open until 7pm Super Sa*in(s Saturday !%rst Saturday of ea+h month,

FANTASTIC FEAST Tri-City Potters display juried works at centennial exhibit

11

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Serving COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM, PORT MOODY, ANMORE and BELCARRA since 1984

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Mayor calls for median on Lougheed NEWS A6

Is Bear Fewer Aware geese at message Como Lake Park sinking in? NEWS A4

NEWS A4

NOW FILE PHOTO

School trustees will provide more details on proposed cuts at a meeting Tuesday at the district’s offices.

District to cut 142 jobs PROJECTED OPERATING DEFICIT ESTIMATED AT $12M Jeremy DEUTSCH

InQuiring Minds Show tonight at Evergreen

ARTS A10

FINDING BALANCE IN A BUSY WORLD LIFE A15

A self employment opportunity

jdeutsch@thenownews.com School District 43 officials knew they would have to make cuts to deal with a ballooning deficit, and on Tuesday employees and the public learned just how deep the reductions will be once the budget is done. To make up for a $12.1-million projected operating deficit for the 2013/2014 school year, the district is looking at cutting six per cent of its staff across the board. More specifically, it’s proposing to cut 142 pos-

itions within the district. A further breakdown of the numbers has the district cutting 81 teachers, 19 teacher assistants/special education assistants/youth workers along with 32 clerical/custodial/IT and facilities positions and 10 from administration. The staffing cuts add up to $11.5 million in savings. Some of the positions being cut will be offset by attrition, with as many as 30 staff in various positions already putting in their retirement papers for the end of the year. CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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THE TRI-CITIES NOW

| FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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The Tri-Cities NOW November 15 2013  

The Tri-Cities NOW November 15 2013