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JACKSON HOLE’S ALTERNATIVE VOICE | PLANETJH.COM | DECEMBER 21-27, 2016

W E N THE FOOD L A C O L Y

M O N ECO

HOW TO HARVEST THAT FRESH FARMERS MARKET FEELING YEAR-ROUND.


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

2 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

RABBIT ROW REPAIR WE SERVICE THEM ALL …

4 2 8 0 W. L E E P E R • W I L S O N • 3 0 7 - 7 3 3 - 4 3 3 1


JACKSON HOLE'S ALTERNATIVE VOICE

VOLUME 14 | ISSUE 50 | DECEMBER 21-27, 2016

9 COVER STORY THE NEW LOCAL FOOD ECONOMY How to harvest that fresh farmers market feeling year-round.

Cover photo by Hannah Hardaway

4 THE BUZZ

28 MUSIC BOX

6 THE BUZZ 2

30 CREATIVE PEAKS

14 CREATIVE PEAKS

38 SATIRE

THE PLANET TEAM

ART DIRECTOR

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December 21-27, 2016 By Meteorologist Jim Woodmencey

Jim has been forecasting the weather here for more than 20 years. You can find more Jackson Hole Weather information at www.mountainweather.com SPONSORED BY GRAND TETON FLOOR & WINDOW COVERINGS

So far in December, overnight low temperatures have ranged from 24-degrees below zero on December 8th, to 35 degrees above zero on December 16th. That was a 59-degree shift from week two to week three. The average low temperature this week in town is 5-degrees, which would seem more “normal” for late December. The record coldest day ever during this week is Minus 40-degrees, from back on December 23rd, 1990.

Afternoon high temperatures this December have also been either much above or much below the norm. Ranging from a maximum of 39-degrees on December 16th to a very cold high of just 4-degrees on December 7th. The average high this week is around 27-degrees. The hottest temperature we have ever had during this week was on the Solstice, way back in 1933. On December 21st, 1933 it reached 55-degrees in the Town of Jackson.

NORMAL HIGH 27 NORMAL LOW 5 RECORD HIGH IN 1933 55 RECORD LOW IN 1990 -40

THIS MONTH AVERAGE PRECIPITATION: 1.5 inches RECORD PRECIPITATION: 5.9 inches (1964) AVERAGE SNOWFALL: 17 inches RECORD SNOWFALL: 47.5 inches

Carpet - Tile - Hardwood - Laminate Blinds - Shades - Drapery Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm Open Tuesdays until 8pm 1705 High School Rd Suite 120 Jackson, WY 307-200-4195 www.tetonfloors.com | www.tetonblinds.com

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 3

When you woke up on Wednesday morning, it was officially “Winter”. At exactly 3:44 am MST on December 21st the Winter Solstice occurred, and that put the “Autumn” season in the rear-view mirror. Not that it hasn’t felt like winter for most of the last three weeks, but we can now say we are in it for sure, for the next three months. The shortest days of the year are upon us, sun angles are as low as they get in the sky, with the sun as far south of the equator as it gets.

WHAT’S COOL WHAT’S HOT

THIS WEEK

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JH ALMANAC


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

4 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

THE BUZZ Healthy Uncertainty The repeal of Obamacare would affect thousands of Teton County residents. BY SARAH ROSS

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eton County residents added to the record number of Americans hurrying to register for health insurance this week through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly referred to as ACA or Obamacare), as its future becomes increasingly uncertain. Julia Heemstra has been an ACA navigator since its advent. The number of signups over the last week is “jaw-dropping,” said Heemstra, director of the Wellness Department at St. John’s Medical Center. Heemstra says she received more calls from folks interested in enrolling for coverage that begins January 1 than in years past. “Consumers are scared, and rightfully so,” she said. People’s fear seemingly stems from President-elect Donald Trump’s murky plan for the future of ACA. He has stated he supports certain aspects of Obamacare such as coverage for pre-existing conditions. But he has also vowed to repeal ACA. However, looking at what ACA has accomplished since its inception reveals its effectiveness at covering uninsured Americans. In his last press conference of the year, President Obama noted that before he took office, 44 million people were uninsured. Since its launch, ACA has covered more than 20 million people. For the first time, an unprecedented 90 percent of Americans are insured. Data from the National Health Interview Survey confirms this statistic. Just 8.6 percent of Americans across all ages lacked health insurance during the first quarter of 2016, the survey reported. Obama also noted that December 15, the original deadline to sign up for insurance through ACA slated to begin January 1, was a record-breaking day. More than 670,000 people enrolled for insurance, and more than one million people requested information from Healthcare.gov, ACA’s online “insurance marketplace” portal. Historically, Teton County has had one of the highest rates of uninsured residents in Wyoming. However, as Heemstra reports, the county has enrolled the highest percentage of its population in ACA insurance plans in the state. In 2016 alone, Teton County enrolled 2,812 individuals—12 percent of residents. The year before, in 2015, 2,722 residents signed up for coverage. The consequences of changing or

repealing ACA could be profound here. Heemstra warned significant changes to ACA would impact the community, even those who are not signed up for ACA. “The majority of Teton County residents are insured in group plans through employers, and the ACA established strict guidelines that really protect employees,” she explained. These guidelines ensure all plans offer minimum essential benefits, such as maternity care, mental health services, prescription drugs, preventative care and emergency services. Jacksonites like Ben Johnson are among those concerned about the future of ACA. Johnson’s coverage through ACA drastically altered the outcome of an injury he sustained in 2014 while he was climbing the Middle Teton. After he pulled a rock down on his finger and severed a flexor tendon, surgery and physical therapy amounted to a full year’s salary—$20,000. Johnson is a contract-based college field course instructor without worker’s compensation, sick leave, disability, or unemployment. Prior to his ACA coverage, his “catastrophic” policy had a deductible of about $7,500 and an out of pocket maximum of about $15,000. However, he ended up paying only about $3,500 through his ACA coverage. “It could have been way worse with lesser or no insurance,” he said. Johnson says he likely would have had to leave Jackson. “I would be in enormous debt today.” Heemstra says Johnson’s story is not uncommon. “As someone on the front lines, I’ve seen the life changing difference [the ACA] has made,” she said. Benedict Yat Long, a master’s student at University of Austin with a pre-existing condition, has benefited from Obamacare coverage. Earlier this year, he received surgery to correct a dramatic underbite. Without coverage through ACA, he says his surgery would not have been covered, and would have cost more than $100,000 with x-rays, molds, consultations and anesthesiologist fees, CT scans, blood tests and surgeon fees, to name just some of the associated costs. With his insurance, Yat Long paid $1,000. Preventative care, which Heemstra says aims to protect the patient and healthcare as a system, is one of ACA’s cornerstones. “When we catch diseases early on, they’re easier and less expensive to treat,” she said. Hospitals don’t have to pay out as much from their patient assistance funds, people can afford their medication, and they’re receiving help before issues progress. Over time, Heemstra said this makes the whole population healthier. But ACA, she says, was not designed to meet the needs of the entire U.S. population. “It’s purpose is to help people afford insurance who wouldn’t be able to otherwise.” Wendell Field, a 51-year-old Jackson artist, is one of those people. He didn’t have insurance for several years because it was simply cost prohibitive, draining about

a third of his income each month. Now, he receives coverage through ACA, which makes insurance affordable. Without it, he would be paying more than $600 a month. He pays $80 with the Obamacare subsidy. But although ACA has made insurance accessible to Field, he acknowledges flaws in the system. He’s noticed $75 doctor bills just for getting an ACE bandage put on. “How much is going to insurance companies and hospitals for inflated charges?” he wondered. Field lamented that providers do not appear to be held accountable to patients or in communication with them. “The conventional ways of doing business don’t exist in healthcare,” he said. Field has received medical care in Thailand, China, India, and New Zealand, and feels that in comparison the U.S. system is expensive and confusing. In Thailand, he visited several specialists for a partially torn eardrum, and paid a total of $30 for treatment and medication. In contrast, Field had outpatient surgery for a torn hydrocele in Jackson in 2000. He doesn’t remember ever having a conversation with the surgeon before or after the procedure. He said the surgery was very expensive and caused complications leading to doctor visits that were not covered by insurance. He also wants to see providers embrace the benefits of holistic care. “My dad had a mental illness and he just kept being prescribed pills because it’s lucrative for doctors and drug companies,” he said. “It just masked the symptoms.” His father’s mental health subsequently deteriorated. Field believes that alternative health approaches might have saved his father. But those treatments—from bodywork to counseling—are often not covered under insurance plans. In the current system, individuals often struggle through pain and debt alone. “We don’t have collective or community immunity anymore,” Field said. However, ACA has taken steps to support communities in identifying collective health needs. Heemstra pointed out that Obamacare mandated that hospitals

identify and respond to local factors impacting public health. “One of the strengths of the ACA was in asking communities to utilize their collective resources to start to address the community’s health needs,” she said. Locally, St. John’s Wellness Department collaborated with Teton County Public Health on the most comprehensive community health needs assessment to date. Through working with more than 35 organizations for 16 months, they identified 10 of the most urgent public health needs in Jackson. The top five included access to health services, severe housing conditions, food insecurity, routine health screenings, and transportation. Cutbacks to ACA have already impacted the Cowboy State. When Wyoming, along with 22 other states, rejected federal funding for Medicaid, Heemstra says it hurt the most vulnerable members of the populace. Without expanded Medicaid, many of Wyoming’s lowest income residents still couldn’t qualify for services because they didn’t meet the narrow standards for disability/health conditions or the income parameters designated for Medicaid recipients by the state. If these same residents fall under the 100 percent federal poverty level, they’re not eligible for subsidies on the marketplace. An individual who makes $6,000 a year is paying the same premiums for an ACA insurance plan as someone who makes $50,000 a year. “This is a tragedy,” Heemstra said. Though navigators like Heemstra speculate significant changes will not be made to ACA insurance plans for 2017, she encourages people to sign up for coverage before January 31, and take advantage of as many services as possible right now. “It is not the time to put off preventative care,” she urged. The last day of open enrollment for 2017 health insurance through ACA is January 31. Visit healthcare.gov to register. PJH


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OLD TIME PACK TRIPS ON HORSEBACK: THE WONDER AND ADVENTURE, by Doris Platts. Hand-lettered in the author’s traditional style, with full color photos, this was her final contribution to the valley she loved, completed just before her death in 2015.

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A DECEMBER TO REMEMBER

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first week of December more than 40 inches of new snow stressed the snowpack and many avalanches occurred. After only a few days of high pressure, snowfall returned on December 8 and continued for 10 days. During this time Rendezvous Bowl received more than 70 inches of snowfall with more than eight inches of water. Again, the rapid loading stressed the snowpack causing many large, destructive avalanches to trigger naturally. Once skies cleared, six-foot crowns were reported where the snow had failed on the persistent problem layer of facets on a crust. As we pass the winter solstices the 2016/17 season begins and the snowpack is blanketing the hills. How the snowpack will change remains unclear, but we are well on our way with more than 200 inches for the season. So enjoy this memorable December.  – Lisa Van Sciver

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 5

ust as people started to wonder when winter would commence, it arrived this month with record-breaking snowfall. The first layers of this season’s snowpack came in early October with wet, heavy snow and surprisingly good skiing. But winter’s early start came to an end mid-October with rain, and then unseasonably warm temperatures into November. By the end of October at 9,000 feet 20 inches of snow cloaked the ground and more than 50 inches of snow had already fallen. On November 16 new snow covered the old snow, which had become a crust, on northerly aspects above 8,500 feet. Once buried, the old snow surface became a persistent problem at the bottom of the snowpack, which was not reactive until the rapid loading of December’s snowfall. Storm after storm loaded the mountain slopes forming this year’s early season, unconsolidated snowpack. By the end of the

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

SNOW PACK REPORT

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6 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

THE BUZZ 2 Petition Prowess Can Jackson’s record of grassroots online changemaking carry over into larger political realms? BY MEG DALY @MegDaly1

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ackson residents are accustomed to their opinions carrying weight, on the internet and on the street. Especially when it comes to online petitions and fundraising, Jacksonites are known to unite for community causes. In 2014, Madeleine Mundt led a campaign on Change.org to restructure Jackson’s post office procedures so that packages without a street address didn’t immediately get returned. Five hundred people signed the petition and the campaign resulted in the town council asking postmaster Jennifer Grutzmacher how services could be improved. Grutzmacher promised to refer the matter to her bosses. Mundt reported on Change.org  on February 11, “The Post Office agreed to institute changes to their back of house operations in an effort to reduce auto-returns.” Just this past fall, Save Historic Jackson Hole conducted a door-to-door petition that resulted in a special referendum vote allowing Jackson residents to decide shortterm rental incentives available to developers in District 2. In July 2015, the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance used Facebook to rally dozens of people to attend a town council meeting focused on downtown commercial zoning. The effort raised awareness about the housing crisis and helped spark ongoing public engagement. “Facebook leverages and compliments existing relationships and helps get the word out quickly to people who already care passionately about an issue,” Alliance executive director Craig Benjamin told PJH. “It’s a helpful tool to connect with folks and provide them with opportunities to speak up for their values.” In June 2016, Shelter JH organized on Facebook and led a housing rally that brought 100 people to town hall. People personally affected by the housing crisis told their stories before and during a town council meeting, forcing elected officials to confront how the housing crisis is affecting locals. Social media aside, on the fundraising front, in 2016, Old Bill’s Fun Run raised $12,150,629 for area nonprofits; 3,774

people donated. Perhaps most noteworthy about this effort is that it hinged on collective generosity—52 percent of the gifts were less than $250.

Beyond the Jackson hood In the wake of the presidential election, some Jackson residents have been taking to social media to share petitions, actions and donation drives aimed at protecting democracy. But which online efforts are most effective? Artist Rosanna DeSario Mitchell is signing every petition she can. “Every day there is something new to sign,” she said. Mitchell says she is motivated out of concern about the future of the US under a Donald Trump presidency. “A dictator ... is about to run our country and I am quite terrified he will destroy it.” Jewelry-maker Nancy Carson says that online activism is part of her wheelhouse of resistance, which she too is now focusing on the president-elect. “I expect him to declare martial law as soon as he has the least excuse.” Regardless of anyone’s political leanings, the question is what role does online activism play in creating change on a national level? Some petitions appear to simply serve the purpose of making the signatories feel engaged, like the #StopTrump and #DefendDemocracy petition on ActionNetwork.org. Signed by writers and leftist luminaries like Rebecca Solnit, Barry Lopez, and Eve Ensler, the petition asks signers to “commit to daily actions to focus on the most strategic leverage points, to build and strategize to maximize our power, to seize the opportunities that arise as the situation changes, and to be what the moment demands,” or in other words, be at the ready. But for what exactly? However, other efforts point to tangible, targeted results. For instance, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi reportedly sought citizen support for her call for a bipartisan Congressional review of Russia’s interference in the U.S. presidential election. The one-day action asked citizens to send a letter of support to Pelosi via her online contact form. The suggested text for a message to Pelosi read: “I am writing to you as an American citizen who is deeply concerned that our ‘President Elect’ has numerous unresolved conflicts of interest … Our electors need time to review all relevant evidence and think deeply about their votes before the Electoral College is scheduled to meet on 12/19. Therefore, I cannot urge you strongly enough to personally contact President Obama to request a temporary stay of the electoral vote.” Efforts like Pelosi’s failed, however. On Monday, the electors voted solidly for Trump, with more electors “defecting”

from Clinton than the president-elect. While online petitions and form letters hold the appeal of making people feel like at least they are doing something, the logic of “it can’t hurt” is not always accurate, according to writer Emily Ellsworth. A former congressional staffer, Ellsworth is the author of Call the Halls: Contacting Your Representatives the Smart Way. “The most important part of action is deliberation and thoughtfulness. When you engage with your elected official, you want to sound as credible and knowledgeable as possible,” Ellsworth wrote in a newsletter. “It’s human nature that you want to engage with someone who knows what they want and has a grasp on the situation—congressional staffers are no different.” A new website, DailyAction.org, purports to make instant experts of everyone, and make it easy to call legislators on important issues. People sign up via their phones by texting “DAILY” to the number “228466.” Following a prompt to enter your zip code, you are signed up to receive once-daily action alerts. The alerts include a phone number to call and listen to a recording about the day’s issue. Callers are then routed directly to their elected official. The power of thousands of voices cannot be ignored, Ellsworth told The New York Times recently. “It brings a legislative issue right to the top of the mind of a member,” she said. “It makes it impossible to ignore for the whole staff. You don’t get a whole lot else done.” Emails, however, do not carry the same weight. They are easy to skim or batch together in themed groups, whereas personal voices and personal stories are more effective with the staffers who typically answer phones for legislators, Ellsworth noted. That said, those hoping to shift the behavior of Wyoming’s die-hard conservative senators and representatives may not have it so easy. Carson makes the calls in spite of her doubts about influencing her legislators. “When I have phoned my U.S. representatives their staffers have treated me respectfully, but I have little hope Barrasso, Cheney and Enzi will see or care about my point of view,” she said. But she’s going to keep calling and writing anyway. “I am motivated by my love of the natural world, mostly, and my desire for my grandchildren to inherit clean air, water, and a USA that welcomes diversity and deals with the many problems we face sensibly and scientifically.” Mitchell says she calls her legislators whenever possible. Both she and Carson also talked about contributing to progressive causes and organizations like Planned Parenthood. “I hope that people stay active and don’t fall into another trance, thinking everything will be fine,” Mitchell said. “It won’t.” PJH


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Through Christmas Eve

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COME ENJOY OUR VALLEY AFTER DARK. LISTED BUSINESSES ARE OPEN PAST 6PM.

participating businesses:

from 5-7pm

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 7


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8 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

N A E P O R U E

F O H ‘ E H

Y L E U Q I N U

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R E N N I D I E G H A C L N ON VIL U L I T T E T S A N I F K F A O E H R N RÈS B E ALPE P A S MA AT TH

Z T IST Z R A J H C D AN MIDNIGH 32 R E R N E B IN DECEM AR’S EVE DHE BAR 10 E Z IN T Y W E AT THE N ’S JAZ R EA Y W E N 307.733.3242


W E N THE FOOD L A C O L Y

M O N ECO

T S E V R A H O T W O H H S E R F THAT RS FARME LING E E F T E MARK OUND. YEAR-R

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DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 9

HANNAH HARDAWAY PHOTO

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2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE | PLANET JACKSON HOLE | 10 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

F O E L TA B E N T S CONT E FATHER OF THE S R E M R A F .12 P T E K R MA E L B I S S E A CC .13 P E S S E FIN R U O Y R O F .16 P H T L A HE BLOODYS G N I L R A D p.18

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ccess to local food year-round is not among the perks of living in a mountain town. After all, winter here is long and the growing season is short. Even the most resolute locavore struggles to source local food once the snow flies in Jackson Hole. Now the community’s enthusiasm for farmers market fare, typically available from July to October, is about to be put to the test. Slow Food in the Tetons, the local chapter of the international organization devoted to local food culture, just launched a winter farmers market in Jackson. Yes, you read that right: a winter farmers market. Just like the Wednesday market that locals have come to know and love in the summer, this winter iteration of the Jackson Hole People’s Market, the brainchild of Slow Food director of operations Scott Steen, has a happy hour atmosphere, live music, and local and regional produce for sale directly from farmers. It’s only one Saturday a month, but it’s a start. Not only will you be picking up fresh produce and more at the winter market, there are a number of food entrepreneurs launching permanent businesses in Jackson to keep that farmers market feeling going all year. Missing the Sunnyside Swine breakfast sammy from Sweet Cheeks Meats? Now you can visit their permanent butcher shop, that opened this month in Midtown, where it’s on heavy rotation in the sandwich line-up. Maybe you became addicted to all the little jars of fermented goodness at Maya Organics? Now owner and chief fermentista Maya Nagy brings her farm stand to your door with a delivery service of her all-organic line of nut butters, nut milks, condiments, fermented fruits and veggies, and more. Even your weekly bundle or box of local food purchased through a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm share doesn’t have to end just because it’s winter. There is an ever-expanding list of winter farm shares available for meat, dairy, produce, canned goods, and even prepared foods. Oh, and what about “local winter produce,” a phrase that is rarely uttered in a mountain town? Last winter intrepid farmers Alex Feher and Brent Tyc of Huidekoper Ranch rigged up an old wood-burning stove to grow winter greens in their greenhouse on Teton Pass. This year they are offering a microgreen salad mix grown in their new “grow room.” This is the first winter that Vertical Harvest, Jackson’s very own hydroponic vertical greenhouse, will be cranking out greens, herbs, tomatoes and microgreens from the side of a parking garage. “When it comes to eating local food, summer is covered; it’s dialed in,” said Ian McGregor, Slow Food in the Tetons’ board president. “It’s the other eight months we need to figure out.” Indeed, many locals hope the valley’s food economy will grow with even more options for eating close to home. Which begs the question: Are we ready to embrace a yearround local food economy in Jackson Hole? If the farming community rallies to grow produce in the winter, will we all show up to buy it? “I think it will sell like hotcakes,” McGregor said. (Read more about this savvy local foodie on page 19.) The definition of “local food,” as per the People’s Market bylaws, is food that is grown within a 175-mile radius of Jackson. According to Steen, only 5 percent of the food consumed in Teton County is locally produced. No one really knows the exact impact winter farmers and Vertical Harvest will have on increasing that 5 percent. Nona Yehia, co-founder and CEO of Vertical Harvest, estimates the hydroponic greenhouse will grow 100,000 pounds of produce per year, satisfying just 1 percent of the county’s need. “We are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of addressing the demand for local food in our community,” she said.

But remember what it was like to buy food in Jackson Hole in winters past? Many of you have deeper roots than me, but my memory goes back to my first winter as a fulltime Jackson resident in 1994. The term “food desert” had not yet been coined but it aptly described the lack of quality food in my adopted mountain town. There were no farmers markets, no community gardens, no CSAs. Surely there were a handful of hardy locals growing food for their own consumption, but gardening was definitely not a thing. Everything on the shelves at the only two supermarkets in town, Albertson’s and Food Town, was imported from afar, accruing thousands of food miles in the journey. Fred’s Market, in the space that now houses Sotheby’s International Realty on Broadway, had a check-out line designated “locals only” but the food was anything but local. Alpenglow Farms farmer Ted Wells of Victor, Idaho, was the first to sell local greens and garlic to Jackson Hole businesses and a handful of restaurants. Harvest Bakery and Café and Choice Meats carried his produce, followed by the Westside Store and Deli (now Aspens Market). Chefs at the Snake River Grill, the Blue Lion, Nani’s and the Range (RIP) were the first to embrace sourcing food directly from a local farmer. Wells, by the way, still grows certified organic greens, garlic, herbs, flowers, and highly coveted Sungold tomatoes from his farm over the hill. Of course, Calico was ahead of its time by actually growing its own produce behind the restaurant. Who remembers picking up a bag of spinach and a pizza to go at the old Calico? It could be argued that the course of the local food culture changed forever in 1995 when Sloane Andrews Bergien purchased a small farm stand, called it the Jackson Hole Farmers Market, and started sourcing produce from Teton County, Teton Valley, and as far away as Washington State. Bergien developed a loyal following who trusted her to hunt down the best fruits and veggies around. Then sometime in 2000, businessman Jim Darwiche had an idea. A radical, outlandish, fantastic idea. With lots of new people moving into the valley, and along with them, an influx of money, he sensed the community was losing its core. He wanted a place where everyone would be welcome: old-timers, newcomers, everyone. “Where everyone can be even,” he said. “It has to be free. It has to be fun.” The Jackson Hole Farmers Market on the Town Square was born. (Read about Darwiche, the father of this area’s farmers market, on page 12.) Around the same time, locals were introduced to the concept of buying a farm share, or CSA. Two farms in Victor, Idaho, paved the way for CSA culture: first, the now defunct Blue Flax Farm, followed by Cosmic Apple Gardens, the area’s first certified organic and biodynamic farm established by Jed Restuccia in 1996. (Raise your hand if you were a charter member of one of these first CSAs!) As locals started getting to know their farmers, and with time, their ranchers too, the demand for local food grew each year. When food enthusiast and writer Sue Muncaster launched a Teton chapter of Slow Food USA in 2008, the community was ready to embrace an organization that celebrated local food. (Read more about Muncaster’s vision for the local Slow Food chapter on page 15.) Slow Food in the Tetons has since spawned a series of community programs designed to increase access to local, clean and fair food. They created a partnership that helped Vertical Harvest get off the ground and launched the Wednesday People’s Market in 2015. They host events throughout the year designed to connect people with the sources of their food supply. And they are cultivating the next generation of foodies by taking elementary school kids into the kitchen and out into the field to learn where their food comes from.


Fast forward to 2017. Teton County is no longer a “food desert” but it makes me bristle when I hear newcomers call it that. We will never have the year-round bounty of California, the South or the Pacific Northwest. After all, mountains outnumber agronomics around here. But check out the menus at all of the best restaurants and see how chefs are doing amazing things with local food. Walk the aisles of Jackson Whole Grocer, Pearl St. and Aspens Markets, and Lucky’s Market and check out all the locally sourced foods. “It brings me joy to walk around Jackson Whole Grocer with my beer and see them as part of that vision,” Muncaster said. “They wouldn’t exist if people weren’t embracing local and organic food.” What does the future hold for this area’s burgeoning yearround food economy? Do we have the capacity to grow more of our own food? And is it possible to have a glut of local food? “As long as the industrial food system still exists, we simply cannot have enough local food producers,” Feher said. “The more we can produce within our community, the more we limit what we need to source from across the country.” Tyc agrees, and he believes that in order to embrace a local food economy, people need to change their expectations about what types of food should be available to them throughout the year. “If we were to buy food more seasonally, buy more in bulk for freezing/preserving and be willing to sacrifice some of our daily menu choices, then our local food economy would really start to boom.” It’s also about being open to innovation. McGregor likened Vertical Harvest to the first airplane. “It’s one of the first of its kind. It excites and motivates people to build structures like them, so we are not so dependent on global systems to ship in food.” Now, McGregor wants to tackle the cost of local and organic food. “It’s just not the cheapest option,” he said. “We need to shift the food economy so it is more affordable for

a wider range of people. It’s sort of exclusive and elite at the moment. With increased production, that price could come down.” Maybe we need to look no further than our backyard to start doing that. Curtis Haderlie of Haderlie Farms sees a way. “Yes, right now Jackson is not being fed completely by local producers, but I do think it’s possible,” he said. “I think as a state, Wyoming has the ability to become food independent. I say that because of our abundant energy resources that could be an inexpensive heat source for greenhouses, especially if we could use flare gas. Using cogeneration at coal-fired power plants could also provide inexpensive heat. “Wyoming has enough beef to feed our citizens,” he continued, “why do we ship most of it out of state? We have enough sheep for meat and wool. We have enough land, clean air and water and labor resources.” Haderlie laments the public’s lack of understanding about the risks of outsourcing food to other states and/or countries. But he says Jackson can be the leading community in the state to establish a true local food culture. During the first Jackson Hole People’s Market of the winter last Saturday the parking lot of the Teton County Fair Building was full. The Minor Keys played old-time blues, and there were throngs of people perusing the farmers market stands. Locals lined up to purchase microgreens, vegetables, bone broth, fermented foods, canned goods, beef, cheese, and local beer and wine. It was impressive to see how many people had come out for the market on the first bona fide powder day of the season. Surveying the scene, Carter Cox, a Slow Food board member, observed, “Embracing local food is not just a trend. It’s really here to stay.”

- Annie fenn, MD

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE | DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 11


MEGAN PETERSON PHOTO

2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

Father of the Farmers Market

How Jim Darwiche gave birth to a farmers market culture in Jackson Hole.

12 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

BY ANNIE FENN, MD

“I

saw that we needed something to bring the community together,” explained Jim Darwiche. A Jackson resident since 1971, Darwiche is a local businessman and former Teton County commissioner. I caught up with Darwiche over a cup of tea in the lobby of Hotel Jackson, the boutique hotel he and his family own and operate on Glenwood Street. I wanted to know how he came up with the idea to start a farmers market on the Town Square in Jackson and how he made it happen. “You have to understand what it was like back [in the 1990s],” he said. “There was no community anymore. People were leaving. A lot of powerful people came into the valley and got involved in the music festival, the arts, the wildlife. But it was like we lost the core of our community. All of a sudden you had to spend a lot of money to go to an event.” Darwiche wanted to create a community event where everyone would feel welcome. “Something that an old timer can come to, a newcomer can come, everyone is even.”

t r y, me counson. o h s i h of ck f lavor s nside Hotel Ja e h t h t i i w iche wbanon, at F igs Jim Dar Le Dar wiche’s only requirements: It had to be free. It had to be fun. Around that time Darwiche had been visiting a friend in Germany. When the woman who ran his guesthouse took him to the local Saturday farmers market, he knew just what Jackson needed. “I was in a leadership program through the Chamber,” Darwiche recalled, “and I said: I’d like to start a farmers market here. Who’s on board? Who wants to help?” Only two hands went up. “Some people told me: You are out of your mind. We don’t grow anything in Jackson.” Yet he couldn’t shake the idea that Jackson needed a farmers market, and it needed to be on the Town Square. So, “just like planning a business, I started planning the farmers market,” he said. Darwiche handpicked the board to represent one person from every click in town—young, old, marketing, real estate, music, design. “Some people I didn’t even know, but I invited them to join,” he said. “You have to bring people from all walks of life.” Once the seed was planted that Jackson Hole needed a farmers market, Darwiche says the rest was an uphill battle. “I sat on the phone for more than four days trying to convince people from Ogden and Logan to bring food here. People said we needed to be organic. I said, ‘We can’t be picky! Bring the food and let the people make the choices.’” In July 2001, the first Jackson Hole Farmers Market on the Town Square was launched with just a few tables and a handful of vendors. “The first market was like a baby,” Darwiche said. “All the conditions are hard. It needs attention; you can’t just let the baby run in the street.”

But with time, the farmers market grew up. “We added a chef,” Darwiche said, “and that wasn’t easy in the summer. We added one nonprofit organization a week. It’s their market; we give them everything we make.” Darwiche devised a system where each vendor takes 10 percent of their income from that market and passes it on to the nonprofit of the week. “It’s all on the honor system,” he said. The farmers market itself only makes money for operations from the sale of canvas bags imprinted with their logo. Now that his farmers market baby is almost 16, Darwiche is a proud parent. “It’s very successful, I see it as a fun event for the community. There should never be a fee to come into the farmers market.” When Darwiche was asked to join the Wyoming Farmers Market Association, there were only two farmers markets in the state, Jackson and Cheyenne. He helped open 21 farmers markets in the Cowboy State. “I literally set up the Casper farmers market in one day; they had a workshop and by the end of the day we had set up a market.” Today there are 37 farmers markets across the state. How does Darwiche see the future of the food movement in Jackson Hole? “The food is an important element, it’s our nourishment,” he said. “Some say what you eat is who you are. But the other nourishment is from the love of your community, the lifestyle you live, and the people around you. We have to be conscious of those things.” PJH


FOODTERRA PHOTO

A filmmaker and a chef want to change your world with what’s on your plate.

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BY TRACI MCCLINTIC

cook ing on a grill in the middle of a hay field. Everything was on the fly from the location to not knowing what ingredients were going to be on hand,” Oksanen recalled. “One day, I was standing behind the camera and looked back over my shoulder and watched this massive bank of black storm clouds coming up over the valley.” The team took shelter in a truck and waited out mother nature’s wrath. Erika Eschholz and Ken Michael, owners of Teton Full Circle Farm in Victor, Idaho, were in Maine last week, exploring the work of gardening expert, Eliot Coleman, who developed techniques for planting and harvesting winter crops. They took time to answer a few questions about the Just Picked episodes they hosted. “CSA members who had been tuning into the episodes seemed to be getting a sense of spark and excitement

about their vegetables,” Eschholz said. “We found ourselves excited to see what [Erik Wilson] was going to make using our produce.” Michael added, “A lot of the people who were already comfortable in the kitchen were able to take it to the next level and change their approach to the vegetables that they cook every day. People were branching out and trying new things, discovering flavors and combos they didn’t know about.” Full Circle happens to be exploring ideas for winter cultivation, as Oksanen and Wilson are also looking to the snowy months for their next project, Winter in Wydaho, an in depth exploration of the farmers, crops, and food purveyors along the Wyoming/ Idaho border who are making things happen amid the ice and snow. To view episodes of Just Picked, check Foodterra.com PJH

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE | DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 13

he benefits of joining a CSA are multifold, from access to fresh produce to supporting and strengthening the local agricultural economy. But who hasn’t picked up a pre-paid basket of veggies and stared bewildered at heaps of bok choy and collard greens. Or maybe you sidestep the cooler labeled “pork belly” at the farmers market because, well, who knows what to do with the stuff? While those who participate in supporting local farmers have both good taste and good intentions, they may not always know how to approach the bounty that shows up on the kitchen counter every week. Three years ago, something similar happened to Jackson native and co-creator of the Just Picked web series, Arden Oksanen. Known for producing award winning footage of high adrenaline action sports and adventure film documentaries for National Geographic and TGR, Oksanen down shifted after his wife was diagnosed with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder where gluten damages the small intestine. As they focused on finding solutions to combat the disease and begin the healing process, fresh unprocessed foods from Cosmic Apple became part of the cure. But,

like many other CSA shareholders, they were sometimes at a loss for what to do with their weekly bounty. Galvanized by the positive impact locally grown food had on his wife’s health and the health of their family, Oksanen decided to turn his talents to learning more about food and helping get producers and consumers on the same page. “I decided it was time to limit the risk in my career and create a project that would have a positive impact on our local community ... I wanted to show people where their food was coming from, teach them how to use it, and take away the intimidation factor.” CSAs can be problematic for some. When people invest in shares, he noted, they may choose not to renew if they feel that they have wasted foods, items they’re not sure how to cook. But sustainable farming involves planting crop varieties that are not only healthy for humans but also necessary to add valuable nutrients to the soil. To tackle the issue, Oksanen called his good friend Chef Eric Wilson. This time, he wanted more than a few ideas for bok choy prep. He wanted to pitch the idea to start a food and community focused organization, FoodTerra, and a season of 17-minute cooking shows called Just Picked with the tag line, “Change your food, change your world.” Wilson’s answer was yes, and he committed one day a week out of his busy summer calendar to cook outdoors in front of the camera, making dishes that run the gamut, from coal roasted cabbage with spicy peanut vinaigrette to pork belly infused collard greens with a spicy rhubarb chutney. Of course, filming “on location” and the crew’s reliance on using what was literally just picked introduced some challenges. “The studio was a farm, a ranch, a riverbank,

FOODTERRA PHOTO

Accessible Finesse

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2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE | PLANET JACKSON HOLE | 14 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

beyond the farmers market Where to find specialty items from some of your favorite farms and burgeoning food purveyors. BY TRACI MCCLINTIC PHOTOS BY MEGAN PETERSON

I

f you had plans to attend the winter People’s Market on Saturday, but got stuck in gridlock leaving the Village, have no fear. More than a handful of stores in the valley carry local items throughout the year. The Aspens Market sells grass-fed, antibiotic/hormone-free beef from Lockhart Cattle Company and the Robinson Family Farm and Ranch in Bedford, Wyo. Look for Yukon Nugget, Baby Red Potatoes, and microgreens from Huidekoper Ranch Farms in Wilson and Paradise Spring Farm in Victor, along with tomatoes and greens from Vertical Harvest. In Jackson, visit Local Butcher, launched by the owners of Local and Trio, Chefs Will Bradhof and Paul Wireman. Here, you can stare down Lockhart’s Tomahawk Steak. Essentially a rib eye with a good portion of the rib bone still attached, this impressive cut of meat is dry aged for 28 days. Manager Clarke Todd says he’s proud of the shop’s relationships with area farmers and purveyors. “People are seeing that they don’t have to travel very far to have a great dining experience. You can grab a bone in rib eye here and it’s going to be just as good as a steakhouse in New York, but it’s coming from just two miles down the road.” Local Butcher also carries products from Bio Dynamic Cheeses from Paradise Springs Farm in Teton Valley, Idaho, the Hot Shot Chevre from Winter Winds Farm in Victor, an assortment of jams and jellies from Roots Kitchen and Cannery, along with a healthy supply of Lockhart beef bones to make your own bone broth. For those who like to multitask, Lucky’s Market serves local brews and libations to shoppers. Sip beer from Snake River Brewing and Melvin or sample whiskey, bourbon or vodka from Grand Teton Distillery in Driggs. Enjoy an uber-local buzz with Jackson Hole Still Works’ Highwater Vodka or Great Grey Gin. Buy a bag of artisan popcorn from Jackson Hole Pop to go with your beverage or peruse meal accoutrements, like Yellowstone Natural Salt, which comes from an artesian spring on the Bridger Teton National Forest. Drinking and shopping are welcome at Jackson Whole Grocer too. But it’s also the place to stock up on local breakfast ingredients to fuel your outdoor outings. Pick up a rustic loaf of Pain au Levain from Persephone. Top with Queen Bee Honey out of Lovell or pair with eggs from Paul Smith’s Wyoming Chicken Ranch. Garnish with greens from Cosmic Apple or take a more gluttonous approach with a Maple Glazed Donut from Nom Nom Doughnuts. Missing something? While the Wyoming Food Freedom Act, signed into law by Governor Matt Meat in 2015, allows vendors to sell directly to people from their home kitchens, those selling to grocery stores must comply with state and federal guidelines in regards to food preparation. Raw milk, as well as some cheeses, canned goods, broths and fermented foods made outside of a certified kitchen must be purchased directly from the producer (we’ve given you a few ways to contact those folks in this issue). PJH

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COURTESY SUE MUNCASTER

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2008

slow and steady... How one woman brought food to a new pace in the Tetons.

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BY ANNIE FENN, MD

Daily pick-up and delivery service available. www.bluesprucecleaners.com • 307-734-0424

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE | DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 15

low Food International is an organization started by Carlo Petrini in Rome, Italy, in 1986. When McDonald’s tried to erect its golden arches just a block from the Spanish Steps, Petrini rallied his fellow Italians to fight fast food with “slow food.” His initial objective was to defend regional traditions, good food, gastronomic pleasure and a slow pace of life. Now with more than one million members in 160 countries, SFI has launched dozens of grassroots initiatives, such as Slow Fish, Slow Meat, Ark of Taste, 10,000 Gardens in Africa, and the Slow Food Youth Network. When local writer and food enthusiast Sue Muncaster first came across the Slow Food website back in 2008, she was doing research for a cookbook she was writing about family recipes. “I read about Carlo Petrini,” Muncaster said, “and it made my heart beat. I read their mission statement and I thought: this is exactly what I think. I looked into starting a chapter.” Muncaster gathered four friends who were also passionate about local food. “It started out super small,” she said. “We started having dinners. One Thanksgiving we did a local food dinner where everyone brings a dish made from locally sourced food. That sounds so normal now, but back then it was unique.” When Muncaster traveled to Italy for the SFI summit at Terra Madre in 2008, she got

the idea for Slow Food in the Tetons’ first big event: Locavore’s Night Out, a local food fair held in Teton Valley. “There were representatives from all the local food producers; there was local wine and beer,” she said. “It was the first local food event that was public. Over 400 people showed up.” As support for Slow Food in the Tetons grew, the chapter moved over the hill to be based in Jackson. At this point, Muncaster left her active role on the board to launch Teton Family Magazine. The new generation of SFIT board members continued to organize events designed to bring people closer to the source of their food—food education, the Teton Food Tour, the People’s Market, the Lockhart Ranch Party, the Youth Culinary Project, and many more. Slow Food partnered with Vertical Harvest to help it get off the ground. Muncaster is pleased with how her super small, four-person, grassroots organization has grown. She loves seeing the progress the community has made to embrace the mission of Slow Food to promote good, clean and fair food. “Preserving diversity is a big thing,” she said. “The country was losing our grains, our cheese. Now look at all the microbreweries we have. We even have tons of local distilleries. And 10 years ago there were only two or three kinds of apples in the grocery store. Now all these apples are coming back because there is demand.” When asked about tips for eating locally in the winter, Muncaster advised: “Don’t beat yourself up. Every little baby step you make is great. And if it’s not local and organic, it’s OK. Even if you can’t get all the ingredients locally, if you are at home cooking from scratch, you are your own source of local food. We all have the potential to cook and make things from scratch.” These days you can find Muncaster and her husband Christian Santelices living in East Jackson with their two children, and running the Treetop Adventure Park at Snow King Mountain Resort. PJH

We can help every foodie with well-earned food stains. From wine to mustard, Blue Spruce has your clothes covered!


WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

2016

For Your Health

CSAs and other ways to load up on local fare this winter. BY TRACI MCCLINTIC

W

hile many were queuing hours for the gondola to open on Saturday, more than a handful of hard working folks set up shop at the Teton County Fairgrounds building and queued up their own lines of root vegetables, ranch raised beef, raw milk, artisan breads and cheeses, along with canned jellies, jams, and a variety of fermented foods. Spirits were high in both settings, as beginnings herald not only an appreciation for the moment, but also the anticipation of good things yet to come. Still in its fledgling stage, the winter market had all the good things locals have come to expect from events sponsored by Slow Food in the Tetons. As if to whet the appetite, attendants were met upon arrival by the roasted butter aroma of artisanal popcorn from Mike Daus’ Jackson Hole POP! Scott Stein, Slow Food’s director of operations, held down a table at the entryway, meeting and greeting new arrivals, directing people to sip wine from Jackson Hole Winery and beer from Snake River Brewing Company. Further along was a track of booths filled with stinky delicious artisan goat cheese, dark crusted raisin bread, homemade bone broth, alfalfa clover honey, ginger peach basil jam, wakame seaweed kimchee, fermented coconut mayonnaise, and the list goes on. All of this was choreographed to music from Jackson Hole’s bluesy jazz swing band, The Minor Keys. As with the summer market, this venue puts a spotlight on vendors who are producing high quality, locally made

products. Some, like Daily Roots and Mother Nature Kitchen, bring fermented foods and bone broth to sell in addition to offering CSA shares at discounted prices throughout the winter. Conversely, farms and ranches like Haderlie, Huidekoper, Purely by Chance and Lockhart Cattle Company simply bring whatever fresh products they have on hand. A few other vendors add variety to the scene, selling handmade jewelry, massage oils, tinctures, soaps, lotion, herbal remedies, and, for those who managed to hit both the slopes and the market, pay by the minute massage. If an addiction to powder lured you away from town, this is understandable. But no worries—the market is slated for the second Saturday of the month from now through May. Here are some of the unique vendors you should know.

Daily Roots

explained. If it’s the middle of winter and your mind is cloudy, your immune system is down, or maybe you are feeling the kind of blah that you just can’t put your finger on, consider Van Sickle’s fermented vegetables to help lift the fog. The Deep Sea Kimchi is a blend of green cabbage layered with onion, carrot, turnip, radish, ginger, cilantro, sesame seeds, and wakame. Specialty spices, fermented hot sauce and a variety of condiments are also on the menu.  It takes two to four weeks to create a batch of organic fermented vegetables and when refrigerated, a jar can continue its positive probiotic building evolution for several months. $11 half pint; $20 full pint; six pickups; $1 refund when you return the jar/pro-rated options.  Available at the winter People’s Market; Healthy Being Juicery and Daily Roots Kitchen, 265 West Broadway (behind NY Sub Shop). dailyroots@outlook.com; 307-429-0337.

Meet Daily Roots founder and Wyoming native,  Poa  Jacobson Van Sickle, who operates as a Community Supported Fermentista out of a small kitchen Anyone looking to warm their bones this winter need on West Broadway. She is calm, quiet, and unassuming with a rich vein of good humor and she is completely committed look no further than Mother Nature Kitchen, the young offto healing your body, mind, and possibly even your spirit shoot of Mother Nature Nutrition, created in 2015 by Martha Berkesch Lewis, MS. through her fermented creations.  Taking advantage of the Wyoming Food Freedom Act, After teaching health and nutrition courses to grade school children in Guatemala, Van Sickle returned to the U.S. Lewis is cranking out quart after quart of the mineral rich with more than just fond memories of her travels. Parasites liquid gold known as bone broth. It has long been touted present in the water and food took their toll on her, as they do for its medicinal benefits that include improved gut health, to many a world traveler, and aggressive medical treatments increased collagen production for healthy skin, hair and nails, and anti-inflammatory properties. here left her body depleted of nutrition. With a beef broth recipe using pasture raised beef from Continuing her studies in an effort to recover from her condition, she found good gut health to be the answer to a lot Lockhart Cattle Company and the Mead Ranch, vegetables of society’s major health problems including arthritis, diabe- from Cosmic Apple and Haderlie Farms, and onions and carrots from her own garden plot, she does her best tes, cancer, depression and heart disease.  “The root cause of these problems begins in the gut, and to keep business close to home. when it comes to healing the gut, real food is better than supt ur e ther Na ot s. o plement capsules because of the diversity and quantity M d n i o s beh il y R of good bacteria [fermented s, lef t , i ht s car e of Da i w e L h foods] traveling through Berkesc r mented delig your body naturally,” she Mar tha t : Fe

Mother Nature Kitchen

. Righ

HANNAH HARDAWAY PHOTO

MEGAN PETERSON PHOTO

16 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

K itchen


Purely by Chance Farms

Andy and Sue Heffron’s Purely by Chance Farms in Alta is home to more than 75 laying hens, a rotating crop of more than 9,000 Heritage Red Ranger and Cornish Cross broiler chickens, and a number of turkeys and hogs. This winter get in touch with Andy and reserve eggs for pickup in his office at the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce. True to its name, Purely by Chance began by happenstance in an effort to heal the Heffrons’ young grandson, who was diagnosed with a type of asthma that pediatricians correlate directly to foreign proteins in certain food groups, particularly those containing GMOs. “After seeing our grandson in an oxygen bubble, we decided to opt out of the traditional food system and live off the land,” Andy Heffron said. The gamble paid off and the family attributes their grandson’s successful recovery to their efforts. “We had three goals,” he explained. “Number one was to produce good healthy nutrient rich food for our family, the second was to heal our land, which had been overgrazed by

previous ranching practices, and the third was to help teach others how to do the same.” While their products are not certified organic, the birds are hormone- and antibiotic-free and consume a soy-free diet of Big Sky Organic Feed and pasture grass in the summertime. Eggs and sausage will be available throughout the winter, but those wishing to purchase chicken, turkey, and pork shares must wait until February to sign up for the 2017 growing season. $8 for a dozen eggs, $10 a pound for choice of hot Italian or breakfast sausage. Available at Chamber of Commerce after contacting Heffron or at the winter People’s Market. andy@ purelybychance.com/307-699-3129                            

Haderlie Farms

a stockbroker and in software sales. Upon returning to Wyoming, he began “playing” with the farm, a hobby that soon became a full-time job. Now, he is looking to the next generation to step up and help carry on the momentum. With a quality product and no plans to slow down, it seems that the family is staying true to their tagline, “Farming at 6,000 feet in the mountains of Wyoming and loving it…”

early bird special

Local farmers are working on building energy efficient, sustainable answers to year-round cultivation here. From solar power and wood stoves, to sub soil heating cables and late season planting, solutions are on the horizon. Until then, it’s never too early to think about your summer CSA, from beets, greens, carrots, and bok choy to artisanal cheeses, freerange eggs, cut flowers, and fresh baked bread. People interested in purchasing CSA shares should consider the benefits of purchasing a share now. “Investing in shares this time of year is a win-win,” said Erika Eschholz, co-owner of Teton Full Circle Farms. “The customer gets a good deal, the farm receives funds for early season supplies, the earth benefits from regenerative agriculture and less fossil fuels are used to transport veggies.” On average, a full summer’s share costs about $500. Folks who purchase shares before January 1 can save as much as $100 depending on where they buy. Shares are available from the following farms: Cosmic Apple Gardens, Victor, Idaho EverGreen Farm, Smoot, Wyoming Purely by Chance Biodiverse Farm, Alta, Wyoming Teton Full Circle Farm, Victor, Idaho Robinson Family Farm, Bedford, Wyoming PJH

Owned and operated by Curtis Haderlie and a handful of dedicated agrarians, Haderlie Farms cranks out a variety of goods all year long including raw milk, cream, butter, eggs, egg nog, beef, pork, lamb, chicken and produce. Visitors to summer and winter markets alike will recognize their stand from a vast assortment of colorful coolers marked with contents and prices, and from the serpentine line of repeat customers. Haderlie contributes his success to the wide variety of products he has to offer. Along with the standard fare, Wyoming soaps, Wind River herbs, and a light and sweet variety of clover honey are on the menu for the winter market. After December, the only thing missing will be the produce, which faded away by the first of the month. “Our high tunnels were still operating up until a few weeks ago, but we pulled the plug at negative 20. It’s just not economically viable,” Haderlie said. However, the farm has invested in a solar green house and has plans to extend the growing season in 2017. “We will fire up the greenhouse in March and hope to be producing greens by the end of April. The farm will have carrots, cabbage, and beets through the first part of January. Haderlie, who grew up We on the farm, once worked as

l not

ar e st il

st . ame f ir c h c i h sur e w

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE | DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 17

PURELY BY CHANCE

“The broth is neutral to allow for a variety of uses. Add a little salt if you want to drink it plain or use the broth to cook greens, steam vegetables, or as a base for soup,” said Lewis, who holds an MS in holistic nutrition from Clayton College of Natural Health. Since moving to the valley in 2004, Lewis’ passion for promoting healthy, organic, locally grown food has been a full-time endeavor. She happens to be the founder of the local chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation. The nonprofit is focused on healthy food education, research and activism. Managing the natural living department at Lucky’s, Lewis has also been on the board of Slow Food in Tetons and worked as a Cosmic Apple workshare manager and market girl. $240 for a 20-week share, $12 quart weekly through the end of March, alternates chicken & beef broth, pro-rated options. Available at the winter People’s Market/arranged pickup in Jackson/martha@mothernaturenutrition.com/307-690-1502


ANNIE FENN, MD PHOTO

2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

ple th T he cou

.. ge ther. o t t a e er s m a t bu t c h

bloody darlings

Sweet Cheeks Meats’ butchered nose-to-tail offerings are nostalgic of a simpler time. BY ANNIE FENN, MD

18 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

W

hen you walk into the Sweet Cheeks Meats butcher shop, just opened in Midtown, you’ll notice the gleaming white tile, the wall-to-wall butcher case, and that the whole animal processing happens right behind the counter. “I wanted transparency,” said Nick Phillips, who opened the shop with his wife Nora. “I couldn’t think of a better way than to put it all right in the middle of the shop.” Between laughs, Nick recalled the launch of the Sweet Cheeks Meats farm stand back in 2015. The stainless steel cooktop he had built the day before had buckled with the heat. The clamps he had jerry-rigged to secure it to the grill had blown out. “We were dying so miserably out there for four hours,” he said. It didn’t take long for Nick and Nora to develop a cult-like following of loyal farmers market customers who didn’t mind standing in line on Saturday mornings for a Sunnyside Swine breakfast sandwich. The duo hired some help, got fast on the line, and by the end of last summer they were serving up to 900 customers a week between the farmers market and the Jackson Hole Live outdoor summer concert series. You could say Sweet Cheeks Meats was

born when the Phillips’ brought home a pig from Cosmic Apple Gardens and spent the next four days teaching themselves from a book how to butcher it. Soon Nick, a civil engineer, was building a butcher table and sourcing whole animals. He took courses in charcuterie and butchery. He offered his services to friends who hunt. In March 2015 Nick left his day job to start an apprenticeship in Reno, Nevada, for three months, 60 hours a week. “Each week we did six hogs, a cow and two lambs. I was given full rein to develop my own recipes.” As his recipes made it to the permanent menu, Nick gained confidence. “By no means am I a chef, but I’m a good cook. We cook good food.” Starting out at the farmers market gave Nick and Nora a platform to test out the waters. “We wanted to put our brand out there, start tossing menu items around, and see how people reacted,” Nick said. “Some things, like the Sunnyside Swine, have never left the first menu. Others have been a total flop. I think there’s nothing better than bacon on a stick, but people didn’t know how to eat it.” Making local meats more accessible than ever before is part of the Sweet Cheeks Meats business plan. “We’re not doing anything new here with the butcher shop,” Nick said. “We’re stepping back in time. All these animals are raised in a sustainable fashion in a humane manner. That’s what we believe in and we support. We’re really fortunate in this town ... people are interested in knowing what they put in their bodies, and they care about nature, animals and humanity.” Nora, who is up with the snowplows to bake biscuits, make chorizo gravy, and prep for the 7 a.m. breakfast crowd, noted: “It’s such a thrill to give people a good product at a good price. We think it can be both really good and really fair. And I think people like that we are just doing what we love to do.” PJH


MEGAN PETERSON PHOTO

e ’s r Peopl n. e t n i w t o as ir s at the f rke t of the se k c a b s a M ick r egor k Ian McG

Ole McGregor A winter farmer and local food maven is looking to make big shifts in the valley’s food economy.

“D

BY ANNIE FENN, MD

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE | DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 19

o you guys have any bacteria inside of you?” Ian McGregor is discussing how salami is made with a group of 8-, 9- and 10-year-old children as they begin a handson class making meatballs at Sweet Cheeks Meats butcher shop. “Fermentation is the transformation of one food into another. It’s really fascinating to think about how alive your food is.” The foodshed class, taught by McGregor and Scott Steen as part of Slow Food in the Teton’s Culinary Youth Project, connects kids with the sources of their food. “The tendency with kids is for people to really dumb it down, but I just love taking [the level of conversation] way up,” he said. Indeed, after seeing whole animals hanging in the meat cooler, the kids had a lively discussion about probiotics, acid/base, and the transformation of food. Teaching the foodshed class is just one of the ways McGregor is deeply rooted in the local food scene. McGregor, who grows food year-round, serves as president of the board of Slow Food in the Tetons, and is becoming one of the community’s food luminaries. He grew up in Jackson, studied English at Skidmore College and has traveled the world helping others set up innovative farming initiatives. While managing Front Porch Farm, a 100-acre diversified farm in Sonoma County, California, he really connected with farming and food as a passion and a career. For three years, he was able to grow everything from

wine grapes to meat chickens to heirloom grains. While in Chile working for the Tompkins family at Patagonia National Park, he helped put together bigger greenhouses, and set up a planting and a harvest schedule. The people of Patagonia taught him how necessity really does breed innovation. “They had a lot of motivation to grow their own stuff because a head of lettuce is $15,” he said. McGregor also spent a year working at Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture outside of New York City, an innovative working farm/educational center made famous by Chef Dan Barber. Moving back to Jackson Hole in the midst of a tanking economy, McGregor planted a garden and sold salad greens and baked goods at the Farmers Market on the Town Square. (Remember the Guys Selling Pies? McGregor teamed up with Orion Bellorado for his first farm stand.) When he worked at the Cakebread Ranch in Thayne, he recalls taking the animals down to Salt Lake City to be slaughtered. “Now the Wyoming Food Freedom Act is changing all that,” he said. “There’s a renaissance of small farmers.” Wyoming was the first state in the nation to pass the FFA, which allows small meat (nonbeef) producers to sell directly to consumers without going through a regulated processing facility. Winter farming is just one of the ways McGregor hopes to make an impact on the local food economy. “Growing in the winter—I think that will be my niche in the food world.” McGregor devised a low cost, low infrastructure mini-hoop setup to grow spinach, mache and collard greens. This year he’ll be adding leeks. “The mini-hoops are so short you have to crawl to get into them,” he said, “but they did really well last year, even though they were under 10 inches of snow for months.” Enthusiastic about the future of food in this mountain community, McGregor noted, “being part of Slow Food has started me thinking about the future, instead of just what my niche is as a farmer. I meet people all the time who are trying to raise or grow something and sell it locally. I think this is the start of a big shift in buying locally based food.” PJH


MEGAN PETERSON PHOTO

2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

May

Kimchi cool

A fermentista delivers her farmstand and health enhancing products to your door.

20 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

BY ANNIE FENN, MD

T

he first thing you’ll notice about Maya Cirkovic Nagy of Maya Organics is that everything about her glows—her skin, her eyes, and especially her passion for healthful living. If you’ve been to the Farmers Market on the Town Square, you’ve probably visited Nagy’s farmstand and perused her organic line of fermented foods. Last year Nagy launched the Gourmet Health Food Club, a home delivery service of her food products. “I want to change people’s view of health food,” she said. “I eat something fermented with every meal.” One would expect Maya Organics to have a full line of sauerkrauts and fermented veggies, like her wildly popular Teton Kimchi and Ginger-Orange Beets. But Nagy ferments more than just veggies. There are good-for-your-belly fermented fruits, like the dark plum butter, the apricot-fig jam and the digestive orange and ginger relish. There are sprouted seeds and nuts, like the pumpkin seed butter, chocolate hazelnut spread and coconut honey cashew butter. There are fermented drinks, or “kvass,” made with ginger and lemon, beets or berries. And there are fermented condiments—salsas, pickled serranos, ketchup, chipotle sauce and chili-garlic sauce. In other words, this is a whole new world of fermented foods. Nagy has worked as a pharmacist’s assistant, a banker and

’ tomer s . s u c r e h e pr ov ingne jar at a t im m i s i y g o ic Na health a Cirkov

a preschool teacher, but it wasn’t until she got sick and started healing herself with traditional foods that she found her niche in life. “I developed a chemical sensitivity when I moved here, which is what took me down this path,” Nagy explained. She had been traveling to Jackson for 10 years from her native country of Serbia (former Yugoslavia), working seasonal jobs to escape the heat at home. When she moved here full-time three years ago, she stopped eating the foods she had grown up with and just ate whatever was cheap and available. “After a month, I got so sick my immune system was not working. I wasn’t getting nutrients I needed to support my system,” she said. “I started making healthy foods for myself, the foods I had grown up on.” Nagy is talking about her microbiome, that kilogram mass of microorganisms that live in the gut, forming an ecosystem that affects your health in ways people are just beginning to understand. As Michael Pollan writes in Cooked, A Natural History of Transformation, “In addition to bringing large numbers of probiotic guests to the party, the vegetables themselves also supply plenty of probiotics—nourishment for the bacteria already there. Since they have been in the human diet for thousands of years, it makes sense that these fermented foods would by now have become tightly woven into our biology.” Variety, Nagy advised, is the key when it comes to fermented foods. “Start with a very small amount of anything. Sauerkrauts are my favorite because they have the best bacterial profile. That’s why I have so many different products.” Nagy never intended to start a food business, but when friends came over to visit she fed them samples of all her fermented creations. “We have a really strong food culture in Serbia. And we feed people when they come over,” she said.

“So I was always feeding my friends from all my jars. I made quite a lot of nut butters, and some fermented goods. I never really imagined that people would find them interesting.” Nagy described life in Serbia like a scene from My Big Fat Greek Wedding. “I spent weekends at my grandparents’ farm, and we were always helping with the food. If an animal was slaughtered, we had to help process it. If harvesting was going on, we had all the women from the extended family come into the home. If there was anything to be preserved, like big batches of sauerkraut, or peppers, those were chores for us kids.” Nagy starts at the local farms to search for the highest quality, organic ingredients. But she also believes that if you want to eat good food, “you have to prepare them the right way. You have to enhance them to get rid of bad things.” That’s why she soaks and sprouts certain foods to get rid of oxalates and phytic acid. “That’s literally traditional wisdom,” she said. In the last two years that Nagy has been selling fermented foods, she has seen a huge interest in her products. “I’ve noticed with my customers, they may be shy at first but they keep going back for more,” she said. “Before they know it, their fridge is full of fermented foods. Once you start eating it, your body craves it naturally. With food, you should go with what you crave the most.” If you are new to fermented foods, Nagy recommends that you start small, slowly increase your intake and try different things. “Every single jar has a different bacterial profile because of the different bacteria that lives on the vegetables.” “And cook from scratch,” she said. “When you cook you are investing in longevity and wellness.” To sign up for Nagy’s The Gourmet Health Food Club email list, email mayaorganicsjh@gmail.com. Visit Nagy at the winter People’s Market, the second Saturday each month of the winter, at the Teton County Fairgrounds building. PJH


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 21


2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

DINING LISTINGS L A T N E N CONTI AMANGANI GRILL

1535 NE Butte Rd., Jackson 307-734-7333

THE ALPENHOF

3255 Village Dr., Teton Village 307-733-3462 Alpenhoflodge.com/dining

THE BIRD

4125 S. Pub Place, Jackson 307-732-BIRD Thebirdinjackson.com

BLUE LION

160 N. Millward St., Jackson 307-733-3912 Bluelionrestaurant.com

BIG HOLE BBQ

325 W Pearl Ave., Jackson Bigholebbq.com

BUBBA’S BAR-B-QUE

100 Flat Creek Drive, Jackson 307-733-2288 Bubbasjh.com

CAFE GENEVIEVE

22 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

135 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-1970 Genevievejh.com

CUTTY’S BAR & GRILL 1140 W. WY 22, Jackson 307-732-0001 Cuttysgrill.com

DOWN ON GLEN

25 S. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-733-4422

DORNAN’S PIZZA & PASTA COMPANY Moose, Wyoming 307-733-2415 Dornans.com

ELEANOR’S

832 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-7901 Eleanorsbarandgrill.com

E.LEAVEN FOOD CO. 175 Center St., Jackson 307-733-5600 Eleavenfood.com

GAMEFISH

In Snake River Lodge & Spa 7710 Granite Loop Rd., Teton Village 307-732-6040 Snakeriverlodge.com/gamefish-restaurant

GATHER

72 S. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-200-7766 Gatherjh.com

THE GRANARY

Spring Creek Resort 1800 Spirit Dance, Jackson 307-733-8833 Springcreekranch.com/dining/the-granary

THE GUN BARREL STEAK & GAME HOUSE 862 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-3287 Gunbarrel.com

THE HANDLE BAR

In Four Seasons Resort 7680 Granite Rd., Teton Village 307-732-5157 Fourseasons.com/jacksonhole/dining/restaurants/ the_handle_bar

HAYDENS POST

In Snow King Resort 537 Snow King Loop, Jackson 307-734-3187 Snowking.com/restaurants/haydens_post

JACKSON HOLE PLAYHOUSE & SADDLE ROCK SALOON 145 W. Deloney Ave., Jackson 307-733-6994 Jacksonplayhouse.com

KING’S GRILL

At Snow King Mountain 402 E. Snow King Ave., Jackson 307-201-5292 Snowkingmountain.com/jackson-hole-dining

THE KITCHEN

155 Glenwood St., Jackson 307-734-1633 Thekitchenjacksonhole.com

LOTUS CAFE

140 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-734-0882 Theorganiclotus.com

LOCAL RESTAURANT & BAR 55 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-201-1717 Localjh.com

MCDONALD’S

1110 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-7444

MANGY MOOSE RESTAURANT & SALOON 3295 Village Dr., Teton Village 307-733-4913 Mangymoose.com

MILLION DOLLAR COWBOY STEAKHOUSE 25 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-733-4790 JHCowboysteakhouse.com

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE 140 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-203-2900 Moesoriginalbbq.com/lo/jackson

NORA’S FISH CREEK INN 5600 W. Hwy. 22, Wilson 307-733-8288 Norasfishcreekinn.com

THE PINES RESTAURANT 3450 N. Clubhouse Rd., Wilson 307-733-1005 Tetonpines.com

PISTE MOUNTAIN BISTRO

3395 Cody Lane, Teton Village 307-732-3177 Jacksonhole.com/piste-mountain-bistro.html

RENDEZVOUS BISTRO

380 S. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-1100 Rendezvousbistro.net

RUSTIC INN BISTRO AND BAR

NOODLE KITCHEN

475 N Cache St., Jackson 800-323-9279 Rusticinnatjh.com

LIBERTY BURGER

2550 Teton Village Rd., Wilson 307-739-0700 Qjacksonhole.com

LIFT RESTAURANT

945 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-5766 Sidewinderstavern.com

945 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-1977 Noodlekitchenjh.com 170 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-200-6071 Givemelibertyburger.com 645 S. Cache St., Jackson 307-733-0043 Liftjacksonhole.com

Q ROADHOUSE

SIDEWINDERS TAVERN


SILVER DOLLAR BAR & GRILL in The Wort Hotel 50 N. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-732-3939 Worthotel.com/silver-dollar-bar

SNAKE RIVER BREWERY 265 S. Millward St., Jackson 307-739-2337 Snakeriverbrewing.com

SNAKE RIVER GRILL

84 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-0557 Snakerivergrill.com

SPUR RESTAURANT & BAR

In Teton Mountain Lodge, Teton Village 307-732-6932 Tetonlodge.com/spur-restaurant

STIEGLER’S AUSTRIAN RESTAURANT & COPPER BAR 3535 Teton Village Rd., Wilson 307-733-1071 Stieglersrestaurant.com

STREETFOOD @ THE STAGECOACH 5755 WY-22, Wilson 307-200-6633 Streetfoodjh.com

I H S U S & ASIAN BON APPE THAI

245 W. Pearl St., Jackson 307-734-0245 Bon-appe-thai.com

FIGS

In Hotel Jackson 120 N Glenwood St., Jackson 307-733-2200 Hoteljackson.com/dining/figs

N A C I X E M EL ABUELITO

CHINATOWN

850 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-8856

385 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-1207 Elabuelitocafe.com

HONG KONG BUFFET

HATCH TAQUERIA AND TEQUILAS

826 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-8988

KAZUMI

265 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-9168 Jacksonholesushi.com

KIM’S CORNER CAFE

120 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-203-2780 Hatchjh.com

MERRY PIGLETS

160 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-733-2966 Merrypiglets.com

PICA’S MEXICAN TAQUERIA

SWEETWATER RESTAURANT

In Snow King Center 100 E Snow King Ave., Jackson 307-413-8331 Facebook.com/Kimscornercafe

THE PINSETTER

75 S. King St., Jackson 307-264-1630 Kingsushijh.com

65 South Glenwood St., Jackson 307-734-5407

SUDACHI

545 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-264-1577

85 King St., Jackson 307-733-3553 Sweetwaterjackson.com

At Hole Bowl 980 W Broadway Ave., Suite 3, Jackson 307-201-5426 Holebowljh.com

TRIO

45 S. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-734-8038 Bistrotrio.com

VIRGINIAN RESTAURANT 740 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-4330 Virginianrestaurant.net

WESTBANK GRILL

WILD SAGE RESTAURANT In Rusty Parrot Lodge 175 N. Jackson St., Jackson 307-733-2000 Rustyparrot.com/dining

WHITE BUFFALO CLUB 160 W Gill Ave., Jackson 307-734-4900 Whitebuffaloclub.com

346 N. Pines Way, Wilson 307-734-7832 Sudachijh.com

TETON THAI

7342 Granite Rd., Teton Village 307-733-0022 Tetonthaivillage.com

TETON TIGER

165 Center St., Jackson 307-733-4111 Tetontiger.com

THAI ME UP

75 E. Pearl St., Jackson 307-733-0005 Thaijh.com

THAI PLATE

135 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-734-2654 Tetonthaiplate.com

22 200 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson BIN

307-739-9463 Bin22jacksonhole.com

EL TEQUILA

A Z Z I P & ITALIAN ARTISAN PIZZA ITALIAN KITCHEN 690 S. Hwy. 89, Jackson 734-1970 Pizzaartisanjh.com

CALICO ITALIAN RESTAURANT & BAR 2650 Moose-Wilson Rd., Wilson 307-733-2460 Calicorestaurant.com

DOMINO’S

520 S. Hwy 89, Jackson 307-733-0330 Pizza.dominos.com/wyoming/jackson

DORNAN’S PIZZA & PASTA Moose, Wyoming 307-733-2415 Dornans.com

MALAKA’S PIZZA

In Inn of Jackson Hole 3345 West Village Dr., Teton Village 307-264-1504

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 23

N A E N A R R MEDITE

SANCHEZ

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

In Four Seasons Resort, Teton Village 7680 Granite Rd., Teton Village 307-732-5001 Fourseasons.com/jacksonhole/dining/restaurants/ westbank_grill

KING SUSHI

1160 Alpine Way, Jackson 307-734-4457 Picastaqueria.com


2016 WINTER FOODIE ISSUE

ORSETTO

161 N. Center St., Jackson 307-203-2664 orsettojh.com

PINKY G’S PIZZERIA

50 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 734-PINK Pinkygs.com

PIZZERIA CALDERA

HEALTHY BEING JUICERY 165 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-200-9006 Healthybeingjuice.com

ASPENS MARKET

JACKSON HOLE ROASTERS

4015 W. Lake Creek Dr., Wilson 307-200-6140 Aspensmarket.com

50 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-200-6099 Jacksonholeroasters.com

PIZZA HUT

CREEKSIDE MARKET & DELI

PEARL STREET BAGELS

545 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-733-7926 Creeksidejacksonhole.com

145 W. Pearl Ave., Jackson 307-739-1218 Pearlstreetbagels.com

FULL STEAM SUBS

PEARL STREET BAGELS - WEST

180 Powderhorn Lane, Jackson 307-733-8550 Order.pizzahut.com/locations/wyoming/jackson/012424

II VILLAGIO OSTERIA

S E G N U O L BARS & BIN

22

200 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-9463 Bin22jacksonhole.com

THE BIRD

4125 S. Pub Place, Jackson 307-732-BIRD Thebirdinjackson.com

ELEANOR’S

832 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-7901 Eleanorsbarandgrill.com

THE ROSE

50 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-1500 Therosejh.com

SILVER DOLLAR BAR & GRILL | PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

S N E S S E T DELICA

20 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-201-1472 Pizzeriacaldera.com

In Hotel Terra, Teton Village 307-739-4100 Jhosteria.com

in The Wort Hotel 50 N. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-732-3939 Worthotel.com/silver-dollar-bar

SNAKE RIVER BREWERY 265 S. Millward St., Jackson 307-739-2337 Snakeriverbrewing.com

STAGECOACH BAR 5755 W. Hwy 22, Wilson 307-733-4407 Stagecoachbar.net

VIRGINIAN SALOON

24 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

ELEVATED GROUNDS

3445 N. Pines Way, Suite 102, Wilson 307-734-1343 Elevatedgroundscoffeehouse.com

750 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-9891 Virginianlodge.com

TOWN SQUARE TAVERN 20 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-3886 Townsquaretavern.com

180 N. Center St., Jackson 307-733-3448 Fullsteamsubs.com

JACKSON WHOLE GROCER 975 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-0450 Jacksonwholegrocer.com

LOCAL BUTCHER

50 W. Deloney St., Jackson 307-203-2322 Localbutcherjh.com

LUCKY’S

1230 Ida Dr., Wilson 307-739-1261 Pearlstreetbagels.com

PERSEPHONE BAKERY

165 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-1700 Persephonebakery.com

PICNIC

1110 Maple Way, Jackson 307-264-2956 Picnicjh.com

STARBUCKS

974 W Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-264-1633 Luckysmarket.com/jackson-wy/

Inside Albertson’s 105 Buffalo Way, Jackson 307-733-5950

NEW YORK CITY SUB SHOP

STARBUCKS

20 N. Jackson St., Jackson 307-733-4414 Nycss.com/jackson-hole-wyoming

PEARL ST. MARKET 40 W. Pearl Ave., Jackson 307-733-1300 Pearlstmarketjh.com

QUIZNO’S

1325 S. Hwy. 89, Jackson 307-733-0201 Restaurants.quiznos.com/wy/jacksonhole/ jacksonhole-83001

SUBWAY

520 S. Hwy 89, Jackson 307-739-1965 Subway.com

SWEET CHEEKS MEATS 185 Scott Lane, Jackson 307-203-0725 sweetcheeksmeats.com

COFFEE COWBOY COFFEE

125 N Cache St., Jackson 307-733-7392 Cowboycoffee.com

Inside Smith’s 1425 S. Hwy 89, Jackson 307-733-8908 starbucks.com

STARBUCKS

10 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-4471 starbucks.com

TS E E W S & S E BAKERI ATELIER ORTEGA

150 Scott Lane, Jackson 307-734-6400 Atelierortega.com

BREAD BASKET OF JACKSON HOLE 185 Scott Lane, Jackson 307-734-9024 Breadbasketjh.com

THE BUNNERY

130 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-734-0075 Bunnery.com

COCOLOVE

53 N. Glenwood St., Jackson 307-734-6400 Atelierortega.com


DAIRY QUEEN

575 N. Cache St., Jackson 307-733-2232 Dairyqueen.com

HAAGEN DAZS

90 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-1880 Haagendazs.us

MEETEETSE CHOCOLATIER 265 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-413-8296 Meeteetsechocolatier.com

MOO’S GOURMET ICE CREAM 110 Center St., Jackson 307-733-1998 Moosjacksonhole.com

PERSEPHONE BAKERY

165 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-1700 Persephonebakery.com

YIPPY I-O CANDY CO.

84 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-3020 Yippyi-ocandy.com

CE U A S E H T F SELLERS IONE & LIQUOR) (BEER , W

SMITH’S LIQUORS 1425 US-89, Jackson 307-733-8908

STAGECOACH LIQUOR STORE 5755 W. Highway 22, Wilson 307-733-4590

VIRGINIAN LIQUOR STORE 750 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-2792

WESTSIDE WINE & SPIRITS In The Aspens 4015 N Lake Creek Dr., Wilson 307-733-5038 westsidewinejh.com

, ID S G G I R D & VICTOR

22 200 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-739-9463 bin22jacksonhole.com

BODEGA

3200 W. McCollister Dr., Teton Village 307-732-2337 bodegajacksonhole.com

40 Depot St., Driggs, ID 208-354-5623 Pendlspastries.com

PROVISIONS

95 S Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-2333 Provisionsdining.com

ROYAL WOLF

63 Depot St., Driggs, ID 208-354-8365 Theroyalwolf.com

SEOUL

528 Valley Centre Dr., Driggs, ID 208-354-1234 seoulrestaurantdriggs.com

SCRATCH

185 W. Center St., Victor, ID 208-787-5678 Scratchvictor.com

SHERWOOD’S POST

AGAVE

310 N. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-2003

BANGKOK KITCHEN 220 N. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-6666

BIG HOLE BAGEL & BISTRO 285 N. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-2245

BIG HOLE BBQ

BIN

PENDL’S BAKERY & CAFE

22 W. Center St., Victor, ID 208-270-9919 Bigholebbq.com

THE BRAKEMAN AMERICAN GRILL 27 N. Main St., Victor, ID 208-787-2020 brakemangrill.com

FORAGE BISTRO AND LOUNGE

20 N. Main St., Victor, ID 208-787-0998 sherwoodspost.menufy.com

SPOONS BISTRO 32 W. Birch, Victor, ID 208-787-2478 Spoonsbistro.com

TATANKA TAVERN

18 N. Main, Colter Building, Driggs, ID 208-980-7320 Tatankatavern.com

TETON THAI

32 Birch St., Driggs, ID 208-787-8424 Tetonthai.com

THREE PEAKS DINNER TABLE 15 S. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-9463 Threepeaksdinnertable.com

BUD’S EASTSIDE LIQUOR

285 Little Ave., No. A, Driggs, ID 208-354-2858 Forageandlounge.com

TJ’S GRILL AND PIZZERIA

582 E. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-1181

JACKSON WHOLE GROCER

GRAND TETON BREWING

VICTOR EMPORIUM

974 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-0450 Jacksonwholegrocer.com

430 Old Jackson Hwy., Victor, ID 208-787-9000 Grandtetonbrewing.com

LIQUOR DOWN SOUTH MARKET AND WINE SHOP

GRUMPY’S GOAT SHACK

31 W. Center St., Victor, ID 208-787-5000

THE LIQUOR STORE/THE WINE LOFT 115 Buffalo Way, Jackson 307-733-4466 jacksonholewine.com

MANGY MOOSE MARKET & CELLARS PLAZA LIQUORS

832 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-733-8888

SIDEWINDER’S WINE, SPIRITS AND ALE 945 W. Broadway Ave., Jackson 307-734-5766

KNOTTY PINE SUPPER CLUB 58 S. Main St., Victor, ID 208-787-2866 Knottypinesupperclub.com

O’ROURKES SPORTS BAR & GRILL 42 E. Little Ave., Driggs, ID 208-354-8115

WEST SIDE YARD WARBIRDS CAFE

675 Airport Rd., Driggs, ID 208-354-2550 tetonaviation.com/warbirds-cafe

WILDLIFE BREWING & PIZZA 145 S. Main St., Victor, ID 208-787-2623 Wildlifebrewing.com

WRAP & ROLL

220 N. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-7655

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 25

Mangy Moose Bldg., Teton Village 307-734-0070

HEADWATERS GRILLE

In Teton Springs Lodge & Spa 10 Warm Creek Lane, Victor, ID 208-787-3600 Tetonspringslodge.com/dining/range-restaurant

45 S. Main St., Victor, ID 208-787-2221

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

4125 US-89, Jackson, Jackson 307-200-6103

37 S. Main, Victor, ID 208-787-2092 Goatshack.com

364 N. Main St., Driggs, ID 208-354-8829


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

26 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

Come check out your favorite NFL/College team on our 10 HD tvs! •••••••••••

HAPPY HOUR

1/2 Off Drinks Daily 5-7pm

••••••••••• Monday-Saturday 11am, Sunday 10:30am 832 W. Broadway (inside Plaza Liquors)•733-7901

OLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR THE LATEST PLANET HAPPENINGS! @

December 29, 6:00pm E.Leaven Food Co. 175 Center Street • Jackson, WY Suggested Donation: $10 adults, $5 kids (Pay what you can) Includes latkes, wine, beer, non-alcoholic drinks, games, activities & favors.

Come to this action-packed party complete with kids Chanukah games and activities, wines and beers, great Israeli music and the poignant community candle lighting so bring a Hanukiah (menorah) and we'll provide the candles.

POTLUCK: BRING A MAIN DISH TO SHARE. SALADS AND SIDES NEEDED, BUT LESS SO. This will be the last chance to purchase a limited supply of Mountain Chai Chanukah gelt from Bet Sefer students or to pick your pre-orders up. Any questions: info@jhjewishcommunity.org or 734-1999

THIS WEEK: December 21-27, 2016

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21

n Yoga 7:00am, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n Toddler Gym 8:30am, Teton Recreation Center, $4.00, 307-739-9025 n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Fables Feathers & Fur 10:30am, National Museum of Wildlife Art, 307-732-5435 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847 n Total Fitness 12:10pm, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n PTO 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913 n Things That Go Boom: Science & Games (Afterschool) 3:45pm, Teton County Library Youth Auditorium, Free, 307733-2164 n Advent After School 4:00pm, Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church, Free, 307-733-4382 n Christmas Sweater Party 4:00pm, Snake River Brewing, Free, 307-739-2337 n Santa On The Square 5:00pm, Town Square, Free n The Winter Solstice Celebration 5:00pm, R Park, Free, 307-7333913 n MELT® into the Holidays 5:45pm, Dancers’ Workshop, $25.00, 3077336398 n Barbara Trentham Life Drawing 6:00pm, Art Association of Jackson Hole, $10.00, 307-7336379 n Open Studio: Figure Model 6:00pm, Art Association of Jackson Hole, $10.00, 307-7336379 n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307-733-3316 n Winter Solstice Stargazing at R-Park 6:00pm, Rendezvous Park, Free n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994

SEE CALENDAR PAGE 28

n Trivia Night 7:00pm, Town Square Tavern, Free, 307-733-3886 n KHOL Presents: Vinyl Night 8:00pm, The Rose, Free, 307733-1500 n The Bo & Joe Sexy Show 9:00pm, Town Square Tavern, Free, 307-733-3886

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22

n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n Yoga 9:00am, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Toddler Time 10:05am, Teton County Library Youth Auditorium, Free, 307733-2164 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847 n Visit From Santa 11:00am, Grand Targhee Resort, Free, 800-TARGHEE n Spin 12:10pm, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Stackhouse 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913 n Center Stage: Theater & Story-crafting (Afterschool) 3:45pm, Teton County Library Youth Auditorium, Free, 307733-2164 n Advent After School 4:00pm, Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church, Free, 307-733-4382 n JHHS Holiday Market 5:00pm, Jackson Hole High School Commons, Free, 307732-1530 n Santa On The Square 5:00pm, Town Square, Free n Jazz and Art Night - A very special Holiday Art Walk 5:00pm, Grand Teton Gallery, Free, 307-201-1172 n Great & Small: A Holiday Miniature Show 5:00pm, Diehl Gallery, Free, 307-733-0905 n Holiday Art Walk at the Art Association 5:00pm, Art Association Gallery, Free, 307-733-6379 n REFIT® 5:15pm, First Baptist Church, Free, 307-690-6539

Compiled by Caroline LaRosa n Zumba 5:30pm, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307-733-3316 n Christmas Carol SingAlong 6:00pm, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Free, 307-774-5497 n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n Aikido Classes 7:30pm, 290 N Millward, Free, 307-690-3941 n Major Zepher 7:30pm, Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n Salsa Night 9:00pm, The Rose, Free, 307733-1500 n Sandee Brooks and Beyond Control 9:00pm, Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, $5.00, 307-733-2207

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23

n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n Toddler Gym 8:30am, Teton Recreation Center, $4.00, 307-739-9025 n Portrait Drawing Club 9:00am, Art Association of Jackson Hole, $10.00, 307-7336379 n Yoga 9:00am, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Open Studio: Portrait Model 9:00am, Art Association of Jackson Hole, $10.00, 307-7336379 n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Tai Chi for Better Balance 10:30am, Senior Center of Jackson Hole, $3.00, 307-7337300 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847 n Zumba 12:00pm, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025 n Feathered Fridays 12:00pm, Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center, Free, 307-201-5433 n Total Fitness 12:10pm, Teton Recreation Center, $8.00, 307-739-9025


Elizabeth Kingwill,

MA/LPC

Licensed Professional Counselor • Medical Hypnotherapist

Counseling: • Individual • Premarital • Marriage/Family • Anxiety, Stress

DUD e , WHere’s my car?

The Town of Jackson’s overnight parking ban has gone into effect. SO, if you want to void all kinds of hassles, listen up!

PARKING RESTRICTIONS

Flexible Hours - Evening & Weekends • Now Accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield

SHOVELING REQUIREMENTS Additionally, we would like to remind people: Town residents are responsible for keeping sidewalks shoveled. • The TOJ assists with snow removal in the downtown core and along Broadway. • Residents should not put their garbage cans out the night before, but rather after 7:00am on garbage days. • Please keep trash cans, cars, and other obstacles out of the streets and off of the curbs. This saves your property and makes the streets more clear of drifts and snow. • Residents are also encouraged to help keep fire hydrants clear of snow.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FRIENDLY FOLKS AT THE TOWN OF JACKSON

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 27

it is illegal to park overnight on Jackson streets, including public parking lots, regardless of weather (rain, snow or shine). Crews begin plowing at 3am. Parked cars on town streets make the job of keeping roads clear of snow more difficult. Consequently, cars left on town streets between 3am & 7am will be ticketed and may be towed by Jackson police. To retrieve your car, contact Ron’s Towing at 733-8697, 1190 S. Hwy 89. Overnight parking for 48 hours or less is allowed in the public parking structure at W. Simpson Ave. and S. Millward St. but not on other town parking lots.

733-5680

Practicing in Jackson since 1980 • www.elizabethkingwill.com

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

Through April 15th, between 3:00am & 7:00am,

• Anger Management • Pain Relief • Depression • Stop Smoking


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

28 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

MUSIC BOX The Holiday Psyche Be merry with jazz, polka, saxy beats, and preschool carolers. BY AARON DAVIS @ScreenDoorPorch

W

hether you’re a fan or not, Christmastime and holiday music stirs up memories and nostalgia. The recycling and updating of the great Americana songbook is a part of this tradition, and some of the most inviting soundscapes can be found in the local jazz community. The Granary at Spring Creek Resort is a mainstay in the jazz community, and Friday nights are led by the dancing fingers and effusive personality of pianist Pam Phillips. Phillips’ early career as a standout Broadway musician in New York City as well as forays into classical, new age, and pop are among the foundations for her acclaimed ragtime and jazz performances. Usually a trio with rotating musicians, like world-renowned bassist Bill Plummer, Phillips often has colorful guests that sit-in. The result: Phillips has her very own dynamic micro-community, which has become part of the attraction. Pam Phillips Trio, 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, December 23 at The Granary. Free. Peter Chandler, a.k.a. “Chanman” for reggae and “Papa Chan” for jazz, is the most accessible of acts this week as he’ll be playing three different rooms. Old-time jazz from the 30s, 40s and 50s via Louis Armstrong, Tony Bennett, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter is the heart of Papa Chan Trio, which features Chandler on hollow body guitar/vocals along with John Clark a.k.a. Johnny C Note on upright bass. Saxophonist Jason Fritts rounds out the trio. Trumpeter Rachel Gray Bundy and drummer Jacob Gampe will join for a quintet on Friday at the Alpenhof Bistro in Teton Village.

Joe Rudd This is an aside, but what about polka? Chandler also leads the Hof Band, a polka seven-piece that delivers the Austrian vibe directly to your ears. Get on board with your ski boots every Sunday at the Alpenhof starting on New Year’s Day. “The Hof Band features a lot of Community Band members that can step in and read charts, so it’s really a different type of band for me,” Chandler said. “It’s quirky.” Papa Chan Jazz, 3 to 6 p.m. Friday, December 23 at the Alpenhof Bistro; 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, December 24 at the Trap Bar at Grand Targhee; 6 to 10 p.m. Sunday, December 25 at the Silver Dollar Showroom. All shows are free.

Young and merry For the last seven years The Wort Hotel has hosted Kids Karols on the Silver Dollar stage. An evening that used to host middle school-aged students singing holiday carols has evolved into a choir of preschool aged kids, and the

people dig it. “It’s the staff’s favorite event of the year because it’s just so adorable,” said Andi Caruso, event founder and organizer. “There are about 20 kids from each of the five preschools in attendance that will perform.” Those preschools include Jackson Hole Discovery, Children’s Learning Center, Little Learners, Bright Beginnings, Little Lambs, and The Fireflies. Kids Karols, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, December 21 at the Silver Dollar Showroom in The Wort Hotel. Free.

Sax on the beats

There’s an element of spontaneity in everything Joe Rudd has been pursuing since moving to Jackson from L.A. last spring. A heads-up, quick-on-your-feet type of musician like Rudd is sought after, and his various projects reflect that. From a studio remix that made it onto Sneaky Pete & the Secret Weapons’ new album Dojo to

SEE CALENDAR PAGE 31 n Sweet Thursday 3:00pm, The Trap Bar & Grill, Free, 307-353-2300 n Screen Door Porch 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913 n Fun Fridays: Self-directed play (Afterschool) 3:45pm, Teton County Library Youth Auditoirum, Free, 307733-2164 n Friday Tastings 4:00pm, The Liquor Store of Jackson Hole, Free, 307-7334466 n Advent After School 4:00pm, Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church, Free, 307-733-4382 n Santa On The Square 5:00pm, Town Square, Free

n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307733-3316 n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n Pam Drews Phillips Plays Jazz 7:00pm, The Granary at Spring Creek Ranch, Free, 307-733-8833 n Art Opening: Eliot Goss 7:00pm, The Rose, Free, 307733-1500 n Free Public Stargazing 7:30pm, Center for the Arts, Free, 844-996-7827 n Silver Dollar Ugly Sweater Holiday Party 7:30pm, Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939

n Sax on the Beats! 9:00pm, Town Square Tavern, Free, 307-733-3886 n Friday Night DJ Featuring Souly Hitz 10:00pm, Pink Garter Theatre, Free, 307-733-1500 n Sandee Brooks and Beyond Control 9:00pm, Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, $5.00, 307-733-2207

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24

n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n REFIT® 9:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $20.00, 307-733-6398

n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847 n Christmas Eve at the Trap with Papa Chan Trio 3:00pm, The Trap Bar & Grill, Free, 307-353-2300 n Holiday Roundup Begins: Santa Drops In! 4:30pm, Base of Aerial Tram, Free, 307-733-2292 n Santa On The Square 5:00pm, Town Square, Free n Caroling on the Town Square 5:30pm

n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307733-3316 n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n Jackson Six Christmas Eve Party 7:30pm, Silver Dollar Showroom in The Wort, Free, 307-733-2190 n Santa Polk 9:00pm, Town Square Tavern, Free, 307-733-3886 n Jameson Black Barrel Music Series Presents: The Frits Project 10:30pm, Pink Garter Theatre, Free, 307-733-1500

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25

n Ski with Santa 9:00am, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Free, 307-733-2292 n Ugly Sweater Day 9:00am, The Trap Bar & Grill, Free, 307-353-2300 n NFL Sunday Football 11:00am, The Trap Bar & Grill, Free, 307.353.2300 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847 n Major Zephyr 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913


“guest saxing” with DJs and multiple bands across nearly every genre, the Wyoming-born, Hoback-livin’ social butterfly is utilizing his talent to leave an indelible mark on the Jackson scene. This mentality will play out Friday in collaboration with DJ Fiesta Bob, who produces house beats. The two have never performed together, and the session will be impromptu. DJ Fiesta Bob & Joe Rudd present Sax on the Beats, 10 p.m. Friday, December 23 at Town Square Tavern. Free. Rudd’s love of beat production and song mapping in his studio has translated to the club side under his moniker Goldcone. The Weapons’ members—drummer Phil Walker and guitarist Jack Tolan—have been joining him on the live instrumentation side along with Rudd’s arsenal of sax sounds for what has been a growing dance experience. “I’ve been working on the production side so hard,

WEDNESDAY Kids Karols (Silver Dollar), PTO (Mangy Moose), Bo Elledge & Joe Rudd (Town Square Tavern) THURSDAY Salsa Night (The Rose), Major Zephyr (Silver Dollar) THURSDAY Pam Phillips Trio (The Granary), Sax on the Beats (Town Square Tavern)

Bo Elledge

SATURDAY Jackson 6 (Silver Dollar), Papa Chan Jazz Trio (The Trap)

and I wasn’t quite expecting how much people are loving it at The Rose,” Rudd said. “I’ve dug out some beats from old school funk music and I’ve been using a vocoder for some Daft Punk-style vocals. It made me nervous at first because there’s so many moving parts, but its been working well.” Goldcone and guests, 10 p.m. Friday, December 30 in the lobby of The Rose (DJ ERA will play inside The Rose). Free. Rudd and Canyon Kids guitarist/vocalist Bo Elledge will join forces for a smooth indie folk vibe every Wednesday at the Tavern, something he says is also evolving. Bo Elledge & Joe Rudd, 10 p.m. Wednesdays at Town Square Tavern. Free. PJH

SUNDAY Papa Chan Jazz Trio (Silver Dollar), Open Mic (Pinky G’s)

Aaron Davis is a singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, recording engineer, member of Screen Door Porch and Boondocks, founder/host of Songwriter’s Alley, and co-founder of The WYOmericana Caravan.

TUESDAY Maw Band (Mangy Moose) Open Mic (Virginian)

MONDAY Tucker Smith Band (Mangy Moose), Jackson Hole Hootenanny (Dornan’s)

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 29


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

30 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

CREATIVE PEAKS

Poignant Pow Bryan Iguchi ascends to new heights with his first solo show, and snowboard luminaries discuss their craft.

P

aint explodes across a wood panel while the voluptuous curve of mountaintop emerges from the spray. This arresting image, “Tis-sa-ack,” is one of several new paintings by legendary snowboarder and Wilson resident Bryan Iguchi, whose exhibit of new work opens tonight at Asymbol. Iguchi also happens to be the cover artist for this year’s Jackson Hole Snowboarder Magazine. His sleek spray painted work, “The Cathedral Group,” is a striking piece adorning the cover. “This is the first show in our new space,” said Josi Stephens, Asymbol’s social media manager. Asymbol moved to Scott Lane in August, marking a shift from its previous pristine gallery space on Broadway to a more informal space that harkens back to the roots of this iconic board sports art company. The inner workings of the print shop are on display as well as the gallery of art. The show is Iguchi’s first solo exhibition, a fitting celebration of the new space. “Bryan has been an artist with Asymbol from the beginning,” Stephens said. “He is family to us and the mutual support has fostered growth and longevity in both him and our company.” The dozen or so paintings signal a new depth of exploration of the artist’s fascination with mountain imagery and, similar to pro-snowboarder Travis Rice, Iguchi’s obsession with hydrology. The show’s subtitle, “scratching the surface of time and space,” speaks volumes about Iguchi’s latest preoccupation. Using wood paneling, spray paint, acrylic, pen, fire and resin, Iguchi’s new work delves into cycles of erosion. He uses a traditional Japanese wood-burning technique in a nod to his Japanese-American heritage. The forms highlighted by the burning could be clouds or waves or billowy snow, a deliberate subtlety by the artist. “Bryan has become really fascinated with the concept of erosion,” explained Asymbol co-owner Alex Hillinger. “How water strips away surfaces of mountains, but that water carries minerals out into the ocean and living things feed on those minerals. It’s part of the big picture for him of the cycle of life.”

See new work from Bryan Iguchi, left, at Asymbol during an opening reception Wednesday, December 21. Keep the shred vibe going the following Wednesday, December 28, when a panel of snowboard luminaries discuss their snow-inspired paths. Iguchi has long worked with elements of hydrology, exploring the connections between the different forms of water that he surfs and boards, from ocean waves and river rapids to snow cloaked peaks. His new work takes that inquiry deeper. Iguchi plays with the heavy solid lines of mountains and the ethereal spray of snow and water. “The Cathedral Group,” like “Tis-sa-ack,” is painted on board, echoing the artist’s favorite mode of play and transport. The iconic Teton Cathedral Group is rendered using spray paint and stencil in black and white. The mountain shadows speak of perhaps a new day dawning high in the peaks, or maybe of the unpredictable ancient power of granite. Iguchi’s spray paint sensibilities dot the surrounding atmosphere like colorful constellations in a night sky. It’s a piece with weight and light, respectful of its subject. In addition to exploring new techniques and media, Iguchi’s style has evolved over the past several years as he became a family man and endured inner transformations. “Bryan’s personal evolution is that he went from being that classic pro-snowboarder, where it’s all about yourself, to being a father and seeing his role as someone who needs to understand bigger things about the world,” Hillinger said. “His work reflects his recognition that it’s not just about him anymore; it’s about his family too and how he wants their lives to be.” Iguchi and his family will attend the reception, as will Asymbol co-founder/owner Travis Rice. Stephens says Iguchi’s longevity in the snowboard industry is testament to the dedication he pours into each arena of his life. “He is a peaceful man with a subtle fire inside and that truth is intertwined with everything that he does. He’s one of our most cherished artists, mainly due to his collaborative and inquisitive way of existing.” — Meg Daly Opening reception for “The Art of Erosion” 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, December 21 at Asymbol, 150 Scott Lane, Suite E. asymbol.co

Secrets of the Shred Jackson Hole’s royal snowboard family comes together Wednesday, December 28 to dig into their craft for young and old riders alike during SHREDtalk. When the snow’s flying, it’s no easy feat to assemble the following group in one room: Travis Rice, Rob Kingwill, Mark Carter, Lance Pitman, Alex Yoder, Mikey Franco, Halina Boyd, Cam FitzPatrick, Willie McMillon, Blake Paul (and the

list goes on, including Hana Beaman who is making a special trip to Jackson for the event). But the folks at Jackson Hole Ski and Snowboard Club were able to wrangle this panel of athletes who each stand at a different milestone in their shred trajectory. Jeff Moran, JHSC’s advancement director, organized the talk with help from “The Grasshopper Fund,” an annual gift from an anonymous donor focused on JHSC’s education, scholarships and equipment. “This SHREDtalk is part of the educational component,” Moran said. “It’s a way for us to create a series of videos with tips from pro-snowboarders about how they ride, what they ride and how they got to where they are today.” The panelists are all based in Jackson Hole or have strong ties to the community and JHSC. “Every snowboarder on the panel is connected to the Jackson Hole Ski and Snowboard Club  as an alumni, donor, coach, partner and/or sponsor,” Moran said. Indeed, JHSC alumni like Travis Rice and his protégé Cam FitzPatrick are potent evidence of the organization’s ability to help mold some of snowboarding’s most gifted and passionate riders. Moran also wanted to present a mix of athletes—those who are in different places in their snowboarding careers, and those who have used snowboarding as a vehicle to pursue other ventures. Panelist Mikey Franco is a backcountry guide and an instructor trainer who builds custom snowboards under his company Franco Snowshapes.  Then there are renegades like JHSC’s head snowboard coach Lance Pitman. “He is one of the first people to really put Jackson Hole on the map in the snowboard world,” Moran said. Halina Boyd is a strong representation and inspiration for female riders. A Jones Snowboards team rider, Boyd is also involved in activism efforts. She is an ambassador to the Winter Wildlands Alliance, a nonprofit centered on exploration and conservation. Panelists will discuss everything from stance and different board types to sponsorship and personal tips. The videos made from this session will be accessible on the web through JHSC and Rob Kingwill’s online vault of ShredX talks, snow focused discussions he has hosted during the Jackson Hole PowWow. “The videos will act as a reference for young athletes for years to come,” Moran said. — Robyn Vincent SHREDtalk, doors at 5:30 p.m., autograph signing 5:45 to 6:30 p.m.; talk at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday, December 28 at Pink Garter Theatre. $9 pre-sale, $13 day-of-show. All proceeds to benefit JHSC. jhskiclub.org PJH


n Hospitality Night - Happy Hour 9:00pm, The Rose, Free, 307733-1500

MONDAY, DECEMBER 26

n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847

n B.O.G.D.O.G - Band On Glen Down on Glen 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913 n Cookie Decorating 4:00pm, Kids Ranch- JHMR, Free, 307-733-2292 n Hootenanny 6:00pm, Dornan’s, Free, 307733-2415 n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307733-3316 n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n Sandee Brooks and Beyond Control 9:00pm, Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, $5.00, 307-733-2207

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27

n Dance & Fitness Classes All Day 8:00am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $16.00, 307-733-6398 n REFIT® 8:30am, Dancers’ Workshop, $10.00 - $20.00, 307-733-6398 n Sleigh Rides 10:00am, National Elk Refuge, $15.00 - $21.00, 307-733-0277 n Toddler Time 10:05am, Teton County Library Youth Auditorium, Free, 307733-2164 n Beautiful World Holiday Pop-Up Store 11:00am, Jackson Town Square, Free, 307-413-5847

n White Lightning Open Mic Night 3:00pm, The Trap Bar & Grill, Free, 307-353-2300 n The Maw Band 3:30pm, Mangy Moose, Free, 307-733-4913 n Cats and Dogs 4:00pm, Kids Ranch - JHMR, Free, 307-733-2292 n REFIT® 5:15pm, First Baptist Church, Free, 307-690-6539 n Cribbage 6:00pm, Valley of the Tetons Library, Free, 208-354-5522 n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307733-3316

n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n The Center Presents Rhythmic Circus! Red and Green 7:00pm, The Center Theater, $53.00 - $69.00, 307-733-4900 n Aikido Classes 7:30pm, 290 N Millward, Free, 307-690-3941 n One Ton Pig 7:30pm, Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n B.O.G.D.O.G. 9:00pm, Town Square Tavern, Free, 307-733-3886 n Sandee Brooks and Beyond Control 9:00pm, Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, $5.00, 307-733-2207

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 31

n Special Christmas Dinner 5:00pm, Branding Iron Grill Grand Targhee, 800-TARGHEE n Stagecoach Band 6:00pm, Stagecoach, Free, 307733-4407 n Christmas Day Jazz with Chanman Trio 6:00pm, Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n Great Until Late 6:00pm, Local Stores, Free, 307733-3316 n Snowed in for Christmas 6:30pm, Jackson Hole Playhouse, 307-733-6994 n Aikido Classes 7:30pm, 290 N Millward, Free, 307-690-3941

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

FOR COMPLETE EVENT DETAILS VISIT PJHCALENDAR.COM


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

32 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom and pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves!

ASIAN & CHINESE TETON THAI

Serving the world’s most exciting cuisine. Teton Thai offers a splendid array of flavors: sweet, hot, sour, salt and bitter. All balanced and blended perfectly, satisfying the most discriminating palate. Open daily. 7432 Granite Loop Road in Teton Village, (307) 733-0022 and in Driggs, (208) 787-8424, tetonthai.com.

THAI ME UP

Home of Melvin Brewing Co. Freshly remodeled offering modern Thai cuisine in a relaxed setting. New tap system with 20 craft beers. New $8 wine list and extensive bottled beer menu. Open daily for dinner at 5pm. Downtown at 75 East Pearl Street. View our tap list at thaijh. com/brews. 307-733-0005.

Two- fer Tuesday is back !

Two-for-one 12” pies all day. Dine-in or Carry-out. (LIMIT 6 PIES PER CARRYOUT ORDER, PLEASE.)

11am - 9:30pm daily 20 W. Broadway 307.201.1472

PizzeriaCaldera.com

Mangy Moose Restaurant, with locally sourced, seasonally FRESH FOOD at reasonable prices, is a always a FUN PLACE to go with family or friends for a unique dining experience. The personable staff will make you feel RIGHT AT HOME and the funky western decor will keep you entertained throughout your entire visit. Reservations at (307) 733-4913 3295 Village Drive • Teton Village, WY

www.mangymoose.com

CONTINENTAL ALPENHOF

Serving authentic Swiss cuisine, the Alpenhof features European style breakfast entrées and alpine lunch fare. Dine in the Bistro for a casual meal or join us in the Alpenrose dining room for a relaxed dinner experience. Breakfast 7:30am-10am. Coffee & pastry 10am-11:30am. Lunch 11:30am-3pm. Aprés 3pm-5:30pm. Dinner 6pm-9pm. For reservations at the Bistro or Alpenrose, call 307-733-3242.

THE BLUE LION

A Jackson Hole favorite for 38 years. Join us in the charming atmosphere of a historic home. Ask a local about our rack of lamb. Serving fresh fish, elk, poultry, steaks, and vegetarian entrées. Live acoustic guitar music most nights. Early Bird Special: 20% off entire bill between 5:306:0pm, Open nightly at 5:30 p.m. Reservations recommended, walk-ins welcome. 160 N. Millward, (307) 733-3912, bluelionrestaurant. com.

FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT PIZZAS, PASTAS & MORE HOUSEMADE BREAD & DESSERTS

CAFE GENEVIEVE

FRESH, LOCALLY SOURCED OFFERINGS

Serving inspired home cooked classics in a historic log cabin. Enjoy brunch daily at 8 a.m., Dinner Tues-Sat 5 p.m. and Happy Hour TuesSat 3-5:30 p.m. featuring $5 glasses of wine, $5 specialty drinks, $3 bottled beer. 135 E. Broadway, (307) 732-1910, genevievejh.com.

TAKE OUT AVAILABLE Dining room and bar open nightly at 5:00pm (307) 733-2460 • 2560 Moose Wilson Road • Wilson, WY

A Jackson Hole favorite since 1965

ELEANOR’S

Enjoy all the perks of fine dining, minus the dress code at Eleanor’s, serving rich, saucy dishes in a warm and friendly setting. Its bar alone is an attraction, thanks to reasonably priced drinks and a loyal crowd. Come get a belly-full of our two-time gold medal wings. Open at 11 a.m. daily. 832 W. Broadway, (307) 733-7901.

THE LOCALS

FAVORITE PIZZA 2012, 2013 & 2014 •••••••••

$7

$4 Well Drink Specials

LUNCH

SPECIAL

FULL STEAM SUBS

Slice, salad & soda

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

TV Sports Packages and 7 Screens

Under the Pink Garter Theatre (307) 734-PINK • www.pinkygs.com

LOCAL & DOMESTIC STEAKS SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK @ 5:30 TILL 10 JHCOWBOYSTEAKHOUSE.COM 307-733-4790

The deli that’ll rock your belly. Jackson’s newest sub shop serves steamed subs, reubens, gyros, delicious all beef hot dogs, soups and salads. We offer Chicago style hot dogs done just the way they do in the windy city. Open daily11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Located just a short block north of the Town Square at 180 N. Center Street, (307) 733-3448.

LOCAL

Local, a modern American steakhouse and bar, is located on Jackson’s historic town square. Our menu features both classic and specialty cuts of locally-ranched meats and wild game alongside fresh seafood, shellfish, house-ground burgers, and seasonally-inspired food. We offer an extensive wine list and an abundance of locallysourced products. Offering a casual and vibrant bar atmosphere with 12 beers on tap as well as a relaxed dining room, Local is the perfect spot to grab a burger for lunch or to have drinks and dinner with friends. Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30am. Dinner Nightly 5:30pm. 55 North Cache, (307) 201-1717, localjh.com.

LOTUS CAFE

Serving organic, freshly-made world cuisine while catering to all eating styles. Endless organic and natural meat, vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free choices. Offering super smoothies, fresh extracted juices, espresso and tea. Full bar and house-infused botanical spirits. Open daily 8am for breakfast lunch and dinner. 140 N. Cache, (307) 734-0882, tetonlotuscafe.com.

MANGY MOOSE

Mangy Moose Restaurant, with locally sourced, seasonally fresh food at reasonable prices, is a always a fun place to go with family or friends for a unique dining experience. The personable staff will make you feel right at home and the funky western decor will keep you entertained throughout your entire visit. Teton Village, (307) 733-4913, mangymoose.com.

MILLION DOLLAR COWBOY STEAKHOUSE

Jackson’s first Speakeasy Steakhouse. The Million Dollar Cowboy Steakhouse is a hidden gem located below the world famous Million Dollar Cowboy Bar. Our menu offers guests the best in American steakhouse cuisine. Top quality chops and steaks sourced from local farms, imported Japanese Wagyu beef, and house-cured meats and sausages. Accentuated with a variety of thoughtful side dishes, innovative appetizers, creative vegetarian items, and decadent desserts, a meal at this landmark location is sure to be a memorable one. Reservations are highly recommended.

SNAKE RIVER BREWERY & RESTAURANT

America’s most award-winning microbrewery is serving lunch and dinner. Take in the atmosphere while enjoying wood-fired pizzas, pastas, burgers, sandwiches, soups, salads and desserts. $9 lunch menu. Happy hour 4 to 6 p.m., including tasty hot wings. The freshest beer in the valley, right from the source! Free WiFi. Open 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 265 S. Millward. (307) 739-2337, snakeriverbrewing. com.

TRIO

Owned and operated by Chefs with a passion for good food, Trio is located right off the Town square in downtown Jackson. Featuring a variety of cuisines in a relaxed atmosphere, Trio is famous for its wood-oven pizzas, specialty cocktails and


Christmas and New Years

Br unch

Menu

ORDER ONLINE

145 E BROADWAY, JACKSON WY (307) 200-6708 PERSEPHONEBAKERY.COM

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK AT 5:30. LOCATED UNDERNEATH THE COWBOY BAR 307.733.4790 FOR RESERVATIONS | jhcowboysteakhouse.com

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 33

CREATIVE APPETIZERS, LOCAL & DOMESTIC STEAKS & SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

JACKSON SPEAKEASY STEAKHOUSE. COME GRAB A GLASS OF WINE OR COCKTAIL AT “THE DEN” TO START YOUR EVENING.


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

34 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

waffle fries with bleu cheese fondue. Dinner nightly at 5:30 p.m. Reservations. (307) 7348038 or bistrotrio.com.

ITALIAN CALICO Trio is located just off the town square in downtown Jackson, and is owned & operated by local chefs with a passion for good food. Our menu features contemporary American dishes inspired by classic bistro cuisine. Daily specials feature wild game, fish and meats. Enjoy a glass of wine at the bar in front of the wood-burning oven and watch the chefs perform in the open kitchen.

Dinner Nightly at 5:30pm

Local is a modern American steakhouse and bar located on Jackson’s historic town square. Serving locally raised beef and, regional game, fresh seafood and seasonally inspired food, Local offers the perfect setting for lunch, drinks or dinner.

Lunch 11:30am Monday-Saturday Dinner 5:30pm Nightly

MEXICAN

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

20%OFF ENTIRE BILL

Good between 5:30-6pm • Open nightly at 5:30pm Please mention ad for discount.

733-3912 160 N. Millward

Make your reservation online at bluelionrestaurant.com

EL ABUELITO

45 S. Glenwood

HAPPY HOUR Daily 4-6:00pm

Available for private events & catering

307.201.1717 | LOCALJH.COM ON THE TOWN SQUARE

For reservations please call 734-8038

A Jackson Hole favorite since 1965, the Calico continues to be one of the most popular restaurants in the Valley. The Calico offers the right combination of really good food, (much of which is grown in our own gardens in the summer), friendly staff; a reasonably priced menu and a large selection of wine. Our bar scene is eclectic with a welcoming vibe. Open nightly at 5 p.m. 2560 Moose Wilson Rd., (307) 733-2460.

Serving authentic Mexican cuisine and appetizers in a unique Mexican atmosphere. Home of the original Jumbo Margarita. Featuring a full bar with a large selection of authentic Mexican beers. Lunch served weekdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nightly dinner specials. Open seven days, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 385 W. Broadway, (307) 733-1207.

®

PIZZA DOMINO’S PIZZA

Hot and delicious delivered to your door. Hand-tossed, deep dish, crunchy thin, Brooklyn style and artisan pizzas; bread bowl pastas, and oven baked sandwiches; chicken wings, cheesy breads and desserts. Delivery. 520 S. Hwy. 89 in Kmart Plaza, (307) 733-0330.

PINKY G’S

1110 MAPLE WAY, SUITE B JACKSON, WY 307.264.2956 picnicjh.com

The locals favorite! Voted Best Pizza in Jackson Hole 2012, 2013 and 2014. Seek out this hidden gem under the Pink Garter Theatre for NY pizza by the slice, salads, stromboli’s, calzones and many appetizers to choose from. Try the $7 ‘Triple S’ lunch special.Happy hours 10 p.m. - 12 a.m. Sun.- Thu. Text PINK to 71441 for discounts. Delivery and take-out. Open daily 11a.m. to 2 a.m. 50 W. Broadway, (307) 734-PINK.

PIZZERIA CALDERA

Jackson Hole’s only dedicated stone-hearth oven pizzeria, serving Napolitana-style pies

using the freshest ingredients in traditional and creative combinations. Five local microbrews on tap, a great selection of red and white wines by the glass and bottle, and one of the best views of the Town Square from our upstairs deck. Daily lunch special includes slice, salad or soup, any two for $8. Happy hour: half off drinks by the glass from 4 - 6 daily. Dine in or carry out. Or order online at PizzeriaCaldera.com, or download our app for iOS or Android. Open from 11am - 9:30pm daily at 20 West Broadway. 307-201-1472.

SWEETS MEETEETSE CHOCOLATIER

Meeteetse Chocolatier brings their unique blend of European style chocolates paired with “Wyomingesque” flavors. Prickly Pear Cactus Fruit, Sage, Huckleberry and Sarsaparilla lead off a decadent collection of truffles, Belgian chocolates and hand made caramel. Sample Single Origin and Organic chocolates at our Tasting Station. Open Weekends, 265 W. Broadway. 307-413-8296. meeteetsechocolatier.com

Large Specialty Pizza ADD: Wings (8 pc)

$ 13 99

Medium Pizza (1 topping) Stuffed Cheesy Bread

for an extra $5.99/each

(307) 733-0330 520 S. Hwy. 89 • Jackson, WY

ELY U Q I N U PEAN EURO

F O H ‘ E TH

R DINNEAGE I H LUNCTETON VILL I T S IN FA BREAKE ALPENHOF AT TH

AT THE

307.733.3242


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 35


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

36 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9. No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

WELLNESS COMMUNITY WITH A ONE YEAR COMMITMENT: • 1 SQUARE = $15 cash OR $30 trade per week PLUS you’ll receive a free Budget web ad (300 x 120) • 2 SQUARES = $29 cash OR $50 trade per week PLUS you’ll receive a free Skyline web ad (160 x 600)

AD RESERVATION DEADLINE: FRIDAYS BY 4PM CONTACT SALES@PLANETJH.COM OR 732.0299

L.A.TIMES THIS GRID’S GRAY SQUARES FORM A HOLIDAY IMAGE. TREAT THEM LIKE BLACK SQUARES WHEN SOLVING.

“HOLIDAY DOINGS” By Nora Pearlstone

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2016

ACROSS 1 6 11

WWII investment Sri Lankan language It may be seen to the left of venous 16 Quashed 18 Psyched 20 Frightened 21 Frightens 22 Bagfuls for 24-Across 23 Poet Levertov 24 His personal Canadian postal code is H0 H0 H0 26 With 71-Across, holiday classic 28 Kiss and caress, in Kent 29 Cousin of the Vulcan mind meld 31 It’s bonded in bales 32 Etta of old comics 33 Word before and after “is” 35 Concert shirt 37 Indiana county or its seat 39 L.A.’s __ Center 41 Shine, in ads 42 Do-it-yourself mover 44 Columnist Hentoff 45 UV index monitor 48 Prepared with mixed vegetables, in Chinese cooking 50 Ivy support 52 Parish leader 54 Wide-eyed look 55 Seasonal hangings 57 It might accompany a “meh” 58 Hot-and-cold fits 59 Cartoon shopkeeper 60 Old map abbr. 61 Monthly payment that’s often more than the prin. 63 Sleek, in car talk 64 Capitol feature 65 Meat department buy 67 Song from Carmen

68 Last ones to deal with 69 Impact sound 71 See 26-Across 75 Longtime rival of Tiger 77 Longhorn rivals 80 Climber’s target 81 Futile 85 Team for 24-Across 88 Sharable PC file 89 Things to open 91 Fort near Fayetteville 92 __ bonding 94 Tan relative 96 Descriptively named support 97 From that time 98 They often include ages 99 Maneuverability 100 Speak 101 Embellishes 103 UPS carton phrase 105 “Bearing gifts, we traverse __” 108 Sets on tracks 112 Prettify with paper 116 Sweet-scented flower 118 Cry of revelation 119 Resonant barbershop sound 121 __ out a living 122 Bank deposit 123 Type of garden 124 __-bitty 125 Trouble 126 Narc’s employer 127 Narc’s assignment 128 To this time 129 Julia’s “Ocean’s Twelve” role 130 Rev (up)

DOWN

1 Spacewalks, briefly 2 Lugosi and Karolyi 3 Classic 71-Across 4 Popular virus remedy 5 Rabble-rouser 6 Jam on the road

7 Dance and drama 8 Got together 9 Concept 10 Sudden move 11 Winter pastime gear 12 City on the Loire 13 Attend to a holiday symbol 14 Found a new table for 15 Picnic drinks 17 U.S. Army medal 18 Instant 19 “Nonsense!” 20 Star Wars initials 25 Small construction piece 27 NFL coach Rex 30 Bailiwicks 34 German university city 35 A.L. West team, familiarly 36 “Elements of Algebra” author 38 Prevent 39 Syrian leader 40 Expenses 42 Caterer’s vessel 43 Author Yutang 46 Really comes down 47 One may end in “ese” 49 Holiday mailing 50 Indisputable 51 Slowly emerge from sleep 53 Title annual holiday character since 1965 55 Slanted page? 56 Barbershop sound 59 Mistreatment 62 Sierra Nevada vacation mecca 66 TV monitor 67 E.T. from Melmac 70 Equivocated 72 Suisse peaks 73 Relieved 74 Bid

76 “Whew!” 77 Some Wall St. traders 78 English singer Halliwell 79 Composer __ Carlo Menotti 82 Draft category 83 “Right now!” 84 Salinger title choir singer 86 Gets mixed up in 87 Outdoor event contingency 89 Outlaw 90 Ponder 93 Drop in the stadium 95 Toledo thing 102 __ vincit amor 104 Classroom exchanges 105 Allowed to ripen, as cheddar 106 Art expert’s discovery 107 Bailiwick 109 Likely to loaf 110 What you once were? 111 Carry on 113 Where no one can sit in front of you 114 Tiny bit 115 Single animal-shaped candy? 117 PC backup key 120 Mac OS part: Abbr.


WELLNESS COMMUNITY These businesses provide health or wellness services for the Jackson Hole community and its visitors. DEEP TISSUE • SPORTS MASSAGE • THAI MASSAGE MYOFASCIAL RELEASE CUPPING

Oliver Tripp, NCTM MASSAGE THERAPIST NATIONALLY CERTIFIED

253-381-2838

180 N Center St, Unit 8 abhyasamassage.com

Enjoy

TM

®

Transcendental Meditation Center of Jackson Hole Introduction - Instruction Refreshers - Advanced Programs

Professional and Individualized Treatments • Sports/Ortho Rehab • Neck and Back Rehab • Rehabilitative Pilates • Incontinence Training • Pelvic Pain Rehab • Lymphedema Treatments Norene Christensen PT, DSc, OCS, CLT Rebekah Donley PT, DPT, CPI Mark Schultheis PT, CSCS Kim Armington PTA, CPI No physician referral required. (307) 733-5577•1090 S Hwy 89

307-690-4511

www.fourpinespt.com

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 37

To advertise in the Wellness Directory, contact Jen at Planet Jackson Hole at 307-732-0299 or sales@planetjh.com

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

www.tm.org/transcendentalmeditation-jackson


| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

38 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

REDNECK PERSPECTIVE SATIRE

A Classy Christmas BY CLYDE THORNHILL

T

was the night Before Christmas When all through the trailer The girls were drinking Shots as if sailors Alice’s stockings were silk Black and lacy Her skirt rode high It was really quite racy Susie was passed out Slumped in the chair Healthy Being Juice and vodka Had put her there Then there arose a clatter It was the kind of noise Made by a fat man With a bag full of toys.

HALF OFF BLAST OFF!

Away to the door I flew like a flash Ran on the porch Stepped over the trash “Welcome back Santa,” I said With a smile “I have cold beer and chicks So stay for a while.” “Don’t mind if I do,” He said, his wandering eye Stopping when it found Alice’s exposed thigh He blew his nose Popped open a Bud Lite Sat on the couch Snuggled to Alice quite tight.

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“Have you been good?” He asked with a grin. “But you might get a better Gift if you sin.” Alice looked him over “I can be good or bad For the right gift I can surely be had.” She kissed his cheek “I want to be clear,” she said “I’m talking cars or condos Not candy reindeer!” Santa said, “I’ll forget This Christmas Eve chore, Spoiled brats in the Pines Are really a bore. Fly away with me now Let’s spend a passionate week

Where it’s sunny and warm: My time-share on South Beach.” Alice agreed, “Giving free gifts Just makes you a commie If kids want a train set They should ask their mommy.” I stopped them right there “Santa,” I said, “You are Saint Nick Kids are counting on you So don’t be a dick!” Alice kicked me hard “Don’t ruin my fun I could use a week On a beach in the sun.” I asked, “What about others, About Hog Island kids? About those in Alpine and Victor And even in Driggs?” “There are families who Don’t have a butler and maid And if you abandoned them They would feel betrayed.” Santa teared up Alice shook her head “Dam bleeding heart liberal With reindeer and sled.” Santa promised, “I’ll be back As soon as I’m done Then it’s off to Miami For booze, drugs and fun!” Alice said, “OK I’ll Wait here with Clyde, Drink some more whiskey And get totally fried.” His eyes how they twinkled His dimples how merry He looked at me with a frown Really quite wary “You have Susie for fun And juice girls are known to be easy So hands off Alice,” he said, “No need to be greedy.” “Don’t be a downer Two is better than one It’s Christmas Eve, Santa Don’t deny me some fun!” He got up And started to go. He said, “In your stocking You’ll only get coal!” He gave me the finger Placed it alongside his nose giving a nod Up the gas furnace vent he rose! And he yelled at his reindeer As he flew out of sight “Kick it in the ass I have a date tomorrow night!” PJH


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNY

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Capricorn writer Edgar Allan Poe has been an important cultural influence. His work appears on many “mustread” lists of 19th-century American literature. But during the time he was alive, his best-selling book was not his famous poem “The Raven,” nor his short story “The GoldBug,” nor his novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. Rather, it was The Conchologist’s First Book, a textbook about mollusk shells, which he didn’t actually write, but merely translated and edited. If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, 2017 will bring events to help ensure that your fate is different from Poe’s. I see the coming months as a time when your best talents will be seen and appreciated better than ever before. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “My goal is to create a life that I don’t need a vacation from,” says motivational author Rob Hill Sr. That’s an implausible dream for most people. But in 2017, it will be less implausible than it has ever been for you Aquarians. I don’t guarantee that it will happen. But there is a decent chance you’ll build a robust foundation for it, and thereby give yourself a head start that enables you to accomplish it by 2019. Here’s a tip on how to arouse and cultivate your motivation: Set an intention to drum up and seek out benevolent “shocks” that expand your concepts of who you are and what your life is about.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The birds known as winter wrens live in the Puget Sound area of Washington. They weigh barely half an ounce, and their plain brown coloring makes their appearance unremarkable. Yet they are the avian equivalents of the opera star Pavarotti. If they weighed as much as roosters, their call would be ten times as strong as the rooster’s cock-adoodle-doo. Their melodies are rich and complex; one song may have more than 300 notes. When in peak form, the birds can unleash cascades at the rate of 36 notes per second. I propose that we make the winter wren your

spirit animal in 2017, Pisces. To a casual observer, you may not look like you can generate so much virtuosity and lyrical power. But according to my analysis, you can. ARIES (March 21-April 19) NPR’s Scott Simon interviewed jazz pianist and songwriter Robert Glasper, who has created nine albums, won a Grammy, and collaborated with a range of great musicians. Simon asked him if he had any frustrations—”grand ambitions” that people discouraged him from pursuing. Glasper said yes. He’d really like to compose and sing hiphop rhymes. But his band mates just won’t go along with him when he tries that stuff. I hope that Glasper, who’s an Aries, will read this horoscope and take heart from what I’m about to predict: In 2017, you may finally get a “Yes!” from people who have previously said “No!” to your grand ambitions.

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700. to better fulfill those promises in the coming four weeks. CANCER (June 21-July 22) During the campaign for U.S. President in 1896, Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan traveled 18,000 miles as he made speeches all over the country. But the Republican candidate, William McKinley, never left his hometown of Canton, Ohio. He urged people to visit him if they wanted to hear what he had to say. The strategy worked. The speeches he delivered from the front porch of his house drew 750,000 attendees and played an important role in his election. I recommend a comparable approach for you in the coming months, Cancerian. Invoke all your attractive power as you invite interested parties to come see you and deal with you on your home turf.

such a scenario could transpire for you in the coming months. In fact, I foresee a better chance for you to get richer quicker than I’ve seen in years. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) For a bald eagle in flight, feathers are crucial in maintaining balance. If it inadvertently loses a feather on one wing, it will purposely shed a comparable feather on the other wing. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this strategy has metaphorical meaning for your life in 2017. Do you want to soar with maximum grace and power? Would you like to ascend and dive, explore and scout, with ease and exuberance? Learn from the eagle’s instinctual wisdom.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Humans have drunk hot tea for over two millennia. Chinese emperors were enjoying it as far back as the second century B.C. And yet it wasn’t until the 20th century that anyone dreamed up the idea of enclosing tea leaves in convenient one-serving bags to be efficiently brewed. I foresee you either generating or stumbling upon comparable breakthroughs in 2017, Taurus. Long-running traditions or customs will undergo simple but dramatic transformations that streamline your life.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “Poetry is a way of knowledge, but most poetry tells us what we already know,” writes poet Charles Simic. I would say the same thing about a lot of art, theater, film, music, and fiction: Too often it presents well-crafted repetitions of ideas we have heard before. In my astrological opinion, Leo, 2017 will be a time when you’ll need to rebel against that limitation. You will thrive by searching for sources that provide you with novel information and unique understandings. Simic says: “The poem I want to write is impossible: a stone that floats.” I say: Be on the lookout for stones that float.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In August 2012, a group of tourists visited the Eldgja volcanic region in Iceland. After a while, they noticed that a fellow traveler was missing. Guides organized a search party, which worked well into the night trying to track down the lost woman. At 3 a.m., one of the searchers suddenly realized that she herself was the missing person everyone was looking for. The misunderstanding had occurred many hours earlier because she had slipped away to change her clothes, and no one recognized her in her new garb. This is a good teaching story for you to meditate on in 2017, Scorpio. I’d love to see you change so much that you’re almost unrecognizable. And I’d love to see you help people go searching for the new you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “What you do is what counts and not what you had the intention of doing,” said Pablo Picasso. If I had to choose a single piece of advice to serve as your steady flame in 2017, it might be that quote. If you agree, I invite you to conduct this experiment: On the first day of each month, take a piece of paper and write down three key promises you’re making to yourself. Add a brief analysis of how well you have lived up to those promises in the previous four weeks. Then describe in strong language how you plan

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The Economist magazine reports that if someone wanted to transport $10 million in bills, he or she would have to use eight briefcases. Sadly, after evaluating your astrological omens for 2017, I’ve determined that you won’t ever have a need for that many. If you find yourself in a situation where you must carry bundles of money from one place to another, one suitcase will always be sufficient. But I also want to note that a sizable stash of cash can fit into a single suitcase. And it’s not out of the question that

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) In 2017, you will be at the peak of your ability to forge new alliances and deepen existing alliances. You’ll have a sixth sense for cultivating professional connections that can serve your noble ambitions for years to come. I encourage you to be alert for new possibilities that might be both useful for your career and invigorating for your social life. The words “work” and “fun” will belong together! To achieve the best results, formulate a clear vision of the community and support system you want.

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

DECEMBER 21, 2016 | 39


40 | DECEMBER 21, 2016

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

Planet JH 12.21.16  
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