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THE WINTER SALE 2019 February 16 | Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Boulevard | Charleston, South Carolina

THE WINTER SALE 2019

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS


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THE WINTER SALE Schedule of Events

Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. | Charleston, South Carolina Friday, February 15 SEWE Dealer Exhibition Auction Preview

10:00AM - 6:00PM 3:00PM - 5:00PM

Saturday, February 16 SEWE Dealer Exhibition 10:00AM - 6:00PM Auction Preview 8:30AM - 10:00AM Auction 10:00AM

CONTACTS THE DAY OF SALE On Site: 617.536.0030

Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544

ABSENTEE & TELEPHONE BIDS Please visit copleyart.com to leave absentee and telephone bids or use the bid forms found in the back of this catalog.

ONLINE BIDDING Live online bidding through Copley Live and Bidsquare.

Please review the Terms and Conditions of Sale on page 256 and Important Notices on page 6 of this catalog. For further information please contact us at 617.536.0030. 3


Front Cover: Lots 205, 197, 168, 193, 188, 169, 203, 170, 202, and 206 Inside Front Cover: Lot 14 Back Cover: Lots 14 detail, 4 detail, 5 detail, and 18 detail Inside Back Cover: Lots 249, 169.2, 197, and 188 Left Schedule of Events: Lot 6 Left Table of Contents: Lot 10 detail Right Important Notices: Lot 5 Left Properties Page: Lot 4

Catalog by: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. Cinnie O’Brien Colin McNair Leah Tharpe Chelsie Olney Amy Lunderville Jim Parker Bob Mosher Printed in the USA on recycled paper

© 2019 Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. All rights reserved. Like us on Facebook Facebook.com/copleyfineartauctions 4


TABLE OF CONTENTS

3

Schedule of Events

6

Important Notices

10

Session I: Paintings, Works on Paper, and Bronzes

83

Session II: Decoys and Folk Art

254

Index of Artists and Makers

256

Terms and Conditions of Sale

257

Buyer Pre-Registration Form

258

Absentee/Telephone Bid Form

259

Authorized Shipping Release Form

5


THE WINTER SALE Important Notices 1

 lease be advised that all persons wishing to bid at this P auction should read, and be familiar with, the Terms and Conditions of Sale in this catalog prior to bidding.

2 Buyer’s premium A buyer’s premium of 20% (23% for online bidding) of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 15% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the Buyer to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC as part of the purchase price. 3 Consign to our next sale Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC is accepting consignments for our Sporting Sale 2019. Please contact us by phone at 617.536.0030, or by email at consignments@copleyart.com. 4 Pre-registration Although you may register at the time of sale, we strongly encourage pre-registration to save you time at check-in. Pre-Registration forms are available online, as well as in the back of this catalog. 5 Absentee and telephone bidding If you plan to place absentee bids or to bid by telephone, please make sure that we receive your Absentee/Telephone Bid form at least 24 hours before the start of the sale. It is possible that any bids received after this time may not be accepted. You will receive an email confirmation of your absentee bid(s) within 24 hours of receipt. If you do not receive confirmation, please call our office at 617.536.0030. 6 Sales tax Purchases picked up at the auction will be subject to the South Carolina state and local tax of 9%. Buyers purchasing for resale and claiming exemption from sales tax must present a properly executed resale certificate prior to the release of property. Purchases delivered to South Carolina after the auction will be subject to the applicable South Carolina state and local taxes and purchases picked up or delivered to Massachusetts after the sale will be subject to the 6.25% Massachusetts sales tax unless exempted by applicable law. 7 Inspection of items offered at this auction All items are sold as is and should be inspected either personally or by agent before a bid is placed. Prospective buyers should satisfy themselves by personal inspection as to the condition of each lot. Although condition notes may be published or given on request, such notes are statements of opinion only. Regardless of whether or not a condition is given, all property is sold as is. The absence of condition does not imply that the property is in good condition. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC reserves the right at its sole discretion to refuse condition requests.

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8 Flat art dimensions Please be aware that all flat art dimensions are approximate and are rounded to the nearest quarter inch. 9 Additional images For lots with multiple items and only one shown, please visit copleyart.com for additional images. 10 Decoy stands Please be aware that decoy stands are not included with items purchased. 11 Condition description of wear or gunning wear Wear or gunning wear may include all types of wear and damage that can be inflicted, and may be expected from hunting, handling, use, or time. This may include, but is not limited to, paint wear, flaking, dings, scratches, checks, cracks, craquelure, age lines, dents, chips, rubs, blunts, broken eyes, shot scars, seam separations, raised grain, rust, filler loss, sap, discoloration, and altered rigging, to stick holes, and eyes. The condition of the undersides may not be listed. Clear coats such as varnish, shellac, and oil may not be listed. Repairs and restorations may include new material. Paint listed as “working,” “gunning, ” or “old” is likely not original. Repairs and construction features that are original to the work, including but not limited to putty, bungs, plugs, patches, and stabilization, may not be mentioned. Replaced and repaired bills may include touch-up near insertion point and extend through back of head, if applicable. Radiographs, or X-Ray images, may be available by request for select lots. Please submit additional condition report requests at least ten days prior to the sale date. 12 Condition description of “As found” The “as found” designation denotes that condition issues are not listed. It is the responsibility of the buyer to determine condition. The item is sold with any faults and imperfections that may exist. 13 Auction results Unofficial auction results will be available online approximately one week after the auction at copleyart.com. 14 Pick up and shipping Buyers wishing to pick up items at the sale must do so on the day of the sale. Buyers wishing to pick up items after the auction at our office may do so only by appointment starting five days after the sale. If you would like your items shipped, please complete and return the Authorized Shipping Release form found in the back of this catalog. 15 Auction day contact numbers

On site: 617.536.0030 Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544

Auctioneer Peter J. Coccoluto South Carolina License #4547


THE WINTER SALE February 16, 2019 | 10AM Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, South Carolina

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PROPERTIES FROM Kroghie Andresen Collection A descendent of Frank W. Benson A descendent of Alfred Ely Richard and Lynn Gove Collection Brian Hartmann Collection Randall Hobbs Collection Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell Rusty and Dianna Johnson Collection Donald Kirson Collection A descendent of L. H. LaMotte Dr. Samuel “Jack� Marsh Collection Grant Nelson Collection John T. Ordeman Collection Mark Smith Collection A descendent of Chester F. Spear The Barrie and Bernice Stavis Collection Ronald S. Swanson Collection William B. Webster III Collection A descendent of Milton C. Weiler Herb Wetanson Collection Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann Private Collection, Atlanta, Georgia Private Collection, California Private Collection, Cape Cod Private Collection, Connecticut Private Collection, Dallas, Texas Private Collection, Easton, Maryland Private Collection, Florida Private Collection, Hobe Sound, Florida Private Collection, Kingston, New York Private Collection, Maryland Private Collection, Massachusetts Private Collection, Midwest Private Collection, New England Private Collection, New Jersey Private Collection, North Dakota Private Collection, Pennsylvania Private Collection, Rhode Island Private Collection, Vermont Private Collection, Virginia 9


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THE WINTER SALE Schedule of Events

Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. | Charleston, South Carolina Friday, February 15 SEWE Dealer Exhibition Auction Preview

10:00AM - 6:00PM 3:00PM - 5:00PM

Saturday, February 16 SEWE Dealer Exhibition 10:00AM - 6:00PM Auction Preview 8:30AM - 10:00AM Auction 10:00AM

CONTACTS THE DAY OF SALE On Site: 617.536.0030

Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544

ABSENTEE & TELEPHONE BIDS Please visit copleyart.com to leave absentee and telephone bids or use the bid forms found in the back of this catalog.

ONLINE BIDDING Live online bidding through Copley Live and Bidsquare.

Please review the Terms and Conditions of Sale on page 256 and Important Notices on page 6 of this catalog. For further information please contact us at 617.536.0030. 3


Front Cover: Lots 205, 197, 168, 193, 188, 169, 203, 170, 202, and 206 Inside Front Cover: Lot 14 Back Cover: Lots 14 detail, 4 detail, 5 detail, and 18 detail Inside Back Cover: Lots 249, 169.2, 197, and 188 Left Schedule of Events: Lot 6 Left Table of Contents: Lot 10 detail Right Important Notices: Lot 5 Left Properties Page: Lot 4

Catalog by: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. Cinnie O’Brien Colin McNair Leah Tharpe Chelsie Olney Amy Lunderville Jim Parker Bob Mosher Printed in the USA on recycled paper

© 2019 Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. All rights reserved. Like us on Facebook Facebook.com/copleyfineartauctions 4


TABLE OF CONTENTS

3

Schedule of Events

6

Important Notices

10

Session I: Paintings, Works on Paper, and Bronzes

83

Session II: Decoys and Folk Art

254

Index of Artists and Makers

256

Terms and Conditions of Sale

257

Buyer Pre-Registration Form

258

Absentee/Telephone Bid Form

259

Authorized Shipping Release Form

5


THE WINTER SALE Important Notices 1

 lease be advised that all persons wishing to bid at this P auction should read, and be familiar with, the Terms and Conditions of Sale in this catalog prior to bidding.

2 Buyer’s premium A buyer’s premium of 20% (23% for online bidding) of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 15% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the Buyer to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC as part of the purchase price. 3 Consign to our next sale Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC is accepting consignments for our Sporting Sale 2019. Please contact us by phone at 617.536.0030, or by email at consignments@copleyart.com. 4 Pre-registration Although you may register at the time of sale, we strongly encourage pre-registration to save you time at check-in. Pre-Registration forms are available online, as well as in the back of this catalog. 5 Absentee and telephone bidding If you plan to place absentee bids or to bid by telephone, please make sure that we receive your Absentee/Telephone Bid form at least 24 hours before the start of the sale. It is possible that any bids received after this time may not be accepted. You will receive an email confirmation of your absentee bid(s) within 24 hours of receipt. If you do not receive confirmation, please call our office at 617.536.0030. 6 Sales tax Purchases picked up at the auction will be subject to the South Carolina state and local tax of 9%. Buyers purchasing for resale and claiming exemption from sales tax must present a properly executed resale certificate prior to the release of property. Purchases delivered to South Carolina after the auction will be subject to the applicable South Carolina state and local taxes and purchases picked up or delivered to Massachusetts after the sale will be subject to the 6.25% Massachusetts sales tax unless exempted by applicable law. 7 Inspection of items offered at this auction All items are sold as is and should be inspected either personally or by agent before a bid is placed. Prospective buyers should satisfy themselves by personal inspection as to the condition of each lot. Although condition notes may be published or given on request, such notes are statements of opinion only. Regardless of whether or not a condition is given, all property is sold as is. The absence of condition does not imply that the property is in good condition. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC reserves the right at its sole discretion to refuse condition requests.

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8 Flat art dimensions Please be aware that all flat art dimensions are approximate and are rounded to the nearest quarter inch. 9 Additional images For lots with multiple items and only one shown, please visit copleyart.com for additional images. 10 Decoy stands Please be aware that decoy stands are not included with items purchased. 11 Condition description of wear or gunning wear Wear or gunning wear may include all types of wear and damage that can be inflicted, and may be expected from hunting, handling, use, or time. This may include, but is not limited to, paint wear, flaking, dings, scratches, checks, cracks, craquelure, age lines, dents, chips, rubs, blunts, broken eyes, shot scars, seam separations, raised grain, rust, filler loss, sap, discoloration, and altered rigging, to stick holes, and eyes. The condition of the undersides may not be listed. Clear coats such as varnish, shellac, and oil may not be listed. Repairs and restorations may include new material. Paint listed as “working,” “gunning, ” or “old” is likely not original. Repairs and construction features that are original to the work, including but not limited to putty, bungs, plugs, patches, and stabilization, may not be mentioned. Replaced and repaired bills may include touch-up near insertion point and extend through back of head, if applicable. Radiographs, or X-Ray images, may be available by request for select lots. Please submit additional condition report requests at least ten days prior to the sale date. 12 Condition description of “As found” The “as found” designation denotes that condition issues are not listed. It is the responsibility of the buyer to determine condition. The item is sold with any faults and imperfections that may exist. 13 Auction results Unofficial auction results will be available online approximately one week after the auction at copleyart.com. 14 Pick up and shipping Buyers wishing to pick up items at the sale must do so on the day of the sale. Buyers wishing to pick up items after the auction at our office may do so only by appointment starting five days after the sale. If you would like your items shipped, please complete and return the Authorized Shipping Release form found in the back of this catalog. 15 Auction day contact numbers

On site: 617.536.0030 Cinnie O’Brien: 617.501.7544

Auctioneer Peter J. Coccoluto South Carolina License #4547


THE WINTER SALE February 16, 2019 | 10AM Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, South Carolina

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PROPERTIES FROM Kroghie Andresen Collection A descendent of Frank W. Benson A descendent of Alfred Ely Richard and Lynn Gove Collection Brian Hartmann Collection Randall Hobbs Collection Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell Rusty and Dianna Johnson Collection Donald Kirson Collection A descendent of L. H. LaMotte Dr. Samuel “Jack� Marsh Collection Grant Nelson Collection John T. Ordeman Collection Mark Smith Collection A descendent of Chester F. Spear The Barrie and Bernice Stavis Collection Ronald S. Swanson Collection William B. Webster III Collection A descendent of Milton C. Weiler Herb Wetanson Collection Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann Private Collection, Atlanta, Georgia Private Collection, California Private Collection, Cape Cod Private Collection, Connecticut Private Collection, Dallas, Texas Private Collection, Easton, Maryland Private Collection, Florida Private Collection, Hobe Sound, Florida Private Collection, Kingston, New York Private Collection, Maryland Private Collection, Massachusetts Private Collection, Midwest Private Collection, New England Private Collection, New Jersey Private Collection, North Dakota Private Collection, Pennsylvania Private Collection, Rhode Island Private Collection, Vermont Private Collection, Virginia 9


THE WINTER SALE 2019 SESSION I PAINTINGS, WORKS ON PAPER, AND BRONZES FEBRUARY 16 | 10AM

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1

1 Marguerite Kirmse (1885-1954)

Brace Mates signed “Marguerite Kirmse” lower right etching, 8 by 5 1⁄4 in. titled lower left

$300 - $500

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2 Marguerite Kirmse (1885-1954) Down South signed “Marguerite Kirmse” lower right etching, 5 3⁄8 by 8 1⁄4 in. titled lower left Arthur H. Harlow & Co. label on back

$300 - $500

3

3 Percival Leonard Rosseau (1859-1937)

Close Work signed “Percival Rosseau” lower right etching, 7 7⁄8 by 11 3⁄4 in. inscribed “Pointers ‘Kirks His Highness and Tom Draw’” on back

$200 - $300

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4 Percival Leonard Rosseau (1859-1937)

Perfection: Ned and Bob, 1928 signed and dated “Rosseau 1928” lower left oil on canvas, 18 by 14 in. John Levy Galleries, New York and The Sportsman’s Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia labels on back

This stunning painting depicts two dogs, Ned and Bob, owned by industrialist and sportsman Samuel G. Allen. Ned, a black and white setter, is featured in a 1920 Country Life article about shooting bobwhite quail in North Carolina by James Boyd. In addition to the photographs of quail and dogs, four paintings by Percival Rosseau illustrate the article. Rosseau was born near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Although considered a premier painter of sporting dogs, he did not pick up a paintbrush until the age of thirty-five. After leaving an eclectic business career, including stints as a cowboy and a lumberjack, he sailed to Paris to attend the Académie Julian. His entry at the 1904 Paris Salon, a painting of a pair of Irish wolfhounds, gained him pivotal acclaim. He returned to the United States where he found a ready market for his work among wealthy sportsmen and received many commissions from first-rate breeders of pointers and setters. Rosseau’s best works capture the tense action of hunting dogs and depict them in romantic landscapes. Among these patrons was Percy Rockefeller, nephew of oil tycoon John. D. Rockefeller and a successful businessman in his own right. Along with several investors, Rockefeller built Overhills, a private hunt and country club with stables and kennels in Cumberland County, North Carolina. He kept a cottage on the property for Rosseau to use when he traveled to the state, and the artist painted there throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Allen likely met Rosseau through Rockefeller in the rarified hunt scene in North Carolina at the time. Dog historian A. F. Hochwalt writes, “Eventually such men as Samuel G. Allen, Harry D. Kirkover and others who own high class shooting dogs began to cultivate his acquaintance, for artists who can portray the pointer and the setter, as he really appears in the field, those who are able to transfer to canvas an actual hunting scene where the dog is not a mere caricature, are few and far between the world over, but particularly so here in America.” Samuel “Allen, very well known in railway circles, has for many years been a nationally-known figure in field sports, with a wide range of experience. His kennels of fine hunting dogs at Pinehurst, North Carolina, are the envy of field trial enthusiasts,” notes Hochwalt in American Game. The New York Times reported on a Pinehurst field trial in 1929: “Hunting-dog owners from many sections had begun to arrive here tonight for the annual championship meet of the Pointer Club of America... William H. McNaughton of Jersey City, secretary of the Pointer Club, is among those here. Others are Harry D. Kirkover of Buffalo, Samuel G. Allen of New York and Elmer Simkins of Greenwich, Conn. The trials offer the richest stakes in the East and the entry is expected to set a record.”

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Allen judged multiple groups at the Westminster Dog Show over many years. His wife supported Bide-a-Wee Home for Animals in New York. He registered the Peerless Kennels in New York City in 1916 and opened a kennel with Elmer M. Simkins in Red Bank, New Jersey, to breed setters and pointers. Allen was one of the founders of the English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association in 1922, and he served on a committee to create “Standards of Judicial Practice and Field Trial Procedure” published in 1950. During World War I, Allen led the New York district of the Production Division of the Ordnance Department to increase production. He purchased Lima Locomotive Co. in 1916, and, according to his New York Times obituary, he “was chairman of the Combustion Engineering Company of New York and a director of the Franklin Railway Supply Company of Warren, Pa. For many years he had been with the Baldwin Locomotive Works and the Lima Locomotive Works.” He was a founder of the Westchester Country Club in Rye, New York, where he built his estate in 1918. Rosseau’s debt to the Barbizon tradition is apparent in Perfection - Ned and Bob, with its softly defined brushstrokes, rich colors, and pastoral setting. This work features two of the dogs from the Allen kennel. The setters are perfectly positioned in the composition, leading the viewer’s eye into the distance. With its finely rendered dogs and warm, golden foreground, Perfection - Ned and Bob, is one of Rosseau’s true gems. PROVENANCE: Samuel G. Allen Collection, Pinehurst, North Carolina William Kerr Collection, Jackson, Wyoming, acquired from The Sportsman’s Edge Gallery, New York, c. 1970 Private Collection, Atlanta, Georgia, 2003 Private Collection, Pennsylvania, acquired from The Sportsman’s Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, 2010 LITERATURE: James Boyd, “Bird-Shooting With A Camera,” Country Life, Volume XXXVIII, No. 5, September, 1920. Albert Frederick Hochwalt, Bird Dogs: Their History and Achievements, Cincinnati, OH, 1922. “Some Great Shooting Dogs,” A.F. Hochwalt, ed., Outdoor Recreation, Vol. LXII, No. 1, January, 1920. American Game, Washington, D.C., 1929. “Pointer Meet To Open: Hunting-Dog Owners at Pinehurst for Trials Starting Tomorrow,” The New York Times, December 15, 1929. “Samuel G. Allen, 86, Industrialist, Dies” The New York Times, October 17, 1956. CSR Blue Book of Dogdom, New York, NY, 1916. American Game Protective Association, American Game, Washington, D.C., 1929.

$30,000 - $50,000


PERCIVAL LEONARD ROSSEAU 1859-1937

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5 Edmund H. Osthaus (1858-1928)

On Point signed “Edmund Osthaus” lower left oil on canvas, 24 by 36 in. Berry-Hill Gallery, New York and Christie’s, New York labels on back

Benjamin D. Phillips was the original owner of this painting. A successful businessman, Phillips inherited and ran the T.W. Phillips Gas & Oil Company based in Butler, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. He attended Hiram College in Ohio, and was a generous philanthropist in his time. His memoir and letters were privately published in 1969 as B. D. Phillips: Life and Letters. Phillips owned an uncut sheet of the Inverted Jenny, one of the rarest and most collectible American stamps. In the stamp collecting world, where Phillips is noted as one of the leading collectors of all time, it is remembered, “When the Weills presented their $4.07 million offer [for his stamp collection], Phillips was attired in a hunting jacket and cap with a Purdey shotgun slung over his shoulder. Upon hearing the offer, Phillips responded ‘Sounds good, boys,’ and walked out of the room. If this account is accurate, the Weills acquired one of the greatest, if not the greatest, United States collections of all time, and the owner went off to shoot ducks.” The artist Edmund Henry Osthaus was born in Hildesheim, Germany, in 1858, the son of a prosperous farmer who subsequently emigrated to Toledo, Ohio. Osthaus studied at the Royal Academy of the Arts in Dusseldorf from 1874 to 1882 with Andreas Muller, Peter Jansen, Eduard von Gebhardt, Ernst Deger, and wildlife and landscape painter Christian Kroner. In 1883, after studying painting for six years, Edmund Osthaus became an instructor at the Toledo Academy of Fine Arts. He served as the director from 1886 to 1893, refining his painting technique and pursuing his passions: hunting and fishing. In 1893 Osthaus dedicated his full attention to painting, shooting, and field trials. He was a charter member of the National Field Trial Association established in Newton,

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North Carolina, in 1895. “Edmund Osthaus followed field trials from the fall prairie chicken trials in Canada to the important quail trials in the South in mid-winter, judging, sketching, and sometimes entering his dogs. He was a handsome, powerfully built man,” and his artistic talent combined with his love of dogs enabled him to capture the essence of the focused working dog while depicting them in precise anatomical detail. “Any painter who paints for shooting men had better be a shooting man himself, for no one is more jealously critical of detail than the man who knows guns and dogs and game... Edmund Osthaus, who trained and shot over his own setters and pointers, transformed oil paint into dog flesh quivering under the stress of a point.” This painting, depicting three hunting dogs who have found their quarry, is among Osthaus’ finest work. The exquisite detail in the faces of the dogs, and the quality of the balanced, painterly landscape in the background yields two paintings in one: a landscape and a stunning sporting dog painting, with all the hallmarks of Edmund Osthaus at his best. PROVENANCE: Benjamin D. Phillips Collection, Butler, Pennsylvania Dana Corporation Collection, acquired from Berry-Hill Galleries, Inc., New York in 1979 Private Collection, Pennsylvania, acquired from Christie’s New York, December 8, 2005, lot 117 LITERATURE: Kay and George Evans, “Dogs that Live Forever,” Field & Stream, Vol. LXXV, No. 2, June 1970, pp. 234-240. “Inverted Jenny: The World’s Most Famous Stamp,” Siegel Auction Galleries, accessed November 20, 2018, https:// invertedjenny.com/owner/70

$30,000 - $50,000


EDMUND H. OSTHAUS 1858-1928

5

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6 Edmund H. Osthaus (1858-1928) A Fine Pair signed “Edmund Osthaus” lower right oil on canvas, 29 1⁄4 by 22 1⁄2 in.

According to the consignor, this work is one of five paintings commissioned by the MacDonald family from Edmund Osthaus. The family, known for breeding AKCquality setters in Kentucky, retained three of the works for many years. Additionally, a note from Sandra MacDonald indicates the painting “was donated in my mother[’]s name to [the] Long Beach Museum of Fine Arts. The Museum never came to be. The painting was returned to my father CG Macdonald. It is now [in] an Estate of my father[‘s]. Who died Nov[ember] 2, 1969.”

The two setters in this autumnal work exemplify Osthaus’ dedication to field trials and sporting dogs. The work perfectly captures a realistic fall landscape with golden grasses and russet leaves. The fit dogs are rendered in masterful detail, as their taut bodies, full of energy, with feathered tails, lead the viewer’s eye through a dynamic, diagonal composition. The confident artist, with his wealth of knowledge of bird dogs allows us the viewers to take in an up-close moment in the field. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, California, acquired from Fisher Galleries, Palm Springs, California, 1974

$20,000 - $30,000

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EDMUND H. OSTHAUS 1858-1928

6

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FRANCIS LEE JAQUES 1887-1969

7

7 Francis Lee Jaques (1887-1969) Birds of the Pine Woods signed "F.L. Jaques" lower right oil on canvas, 28 by 24 in.

Also titled Birds of the Pinelands, Alexander Sprunt, Jr. describes this painting in his 1954 update of Florida Bird Life: “Some birds are so completely characteristic of pinelands that they are found nowhere else. Of these are the Pinewoods Sparrow, upper right; two Nuthatches, Florida White-breasted (left) and Brown-headed (right), right center. Beneath them is a Red-cockaded Woodpecker. At the upper left center is a pair of Pine Warblers, male at left; at lower left is a Yellow-throated Warbler.” Lot 7 and 8 are two paintings “Jaques painted for various bird identification books … [that] skillfully marr[y] scientific accuracy with artistry.” Jaques provided paintings for Florida Bird Life by Arthur H. Howell in 1932, which was updated and republished in 1954 by Alexander Sprunt, Jr. of the National Audubon Society. The artist also painted for South Carolina Bird Life, published by the University of South Carolina Press in 1949, along with John Henry Dick (19191995) and Roger Tory Peterson (1908-1996).

Patricia Johnston writes, “Lee and Florence were avid birders and often invited friends along on their bird-watching trips. ‘We would go on the annual Christmas bird count in Washington County,’ one former North Oaks neighbor remembers…’You could learn an awful lot just standing close to Lee. One time ... we went up to Duluth ... to watch the hawks coming by Hawk Ridge. We spent an entire day there. Lee could identify and describe every hawk in the sky plus turkey vultures, eagles, osprey, everything.” Jaques’ dedication to close observation in the field confers authority and authenticity to his ornithological paintings. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, New York

LITERATURE: Patricia Condon Johnston, The Shape of Things: The Art of Francis Lee Jaques, Camden, SC, 1994, p. 143. Arthur H. Howell, Florida Bird Life, Tallahassee, FL, 1932, pl. 49, illustrated. Alexander Sprunt, Jr., Florida Bird Life: Based on and Supplementary to Florida Bird Life by Arthur H. Howell, published in 1932, New York, NY, 1954, pl. 49, p. 325, illustrated.

$14,000 - $18,000 18


FRANCIS LEE JAQUES

1887-1969

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8 Francis Lee Jaques (1887-1969) Birds of the Scrub signed "F.L. Jaques" lower right oil on canvas, 28 by 24 in.

In his 1954 update of Florida Bird Life, Alexander Sprunt, Jr. describes this painting, “One of the most characteristic topographical features of Florida is the Scrub, sandy wastes of stunted pine, small oaks and low palmetto. Here dwell birds such as are shown. At upper left is the Loggerhead Shrike, to the right of which is a pair of Florida (Scrub) Jays, and to the right, a Mockingbird. In flight below are two Myrtle Warblers, in lower center, a pair of White-eyed Towhees, the male above. Perched at right center is a Palm Warbler, one of the most abundant wintering birds of Florida.�

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, New York

LITERATURE: Arthur H. Howell, Florida Bird Life, Tallahassee, FL, 1932, pl. 48, illustrated. Alexander Sprunt, Jr., Florida Bird Life: Based on and Supplementary to Florida Bird Life by Arthur H. Howell, published in 1932, New York, NY, 1954, pl. 48, p. 320, illustrated.

$14,000 - $18,000

Few bird illustrators went the lengths that Jaques did to capture birds in their natural environment. His ability to instill a feeling of atmosphere was second to none, and these two oils reveal his mastery.

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9 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Woodcock by the Stream signed “© A. Lassell Ripley” lower right watercolor, 18 by 29 in.

Mercedes G. Shoemaker lived in the Pittsburgh area and was the wife of the late G. Albert Shoemaker, retired President of Consolidation Coal Company. She was made an Honorary Alum of Penn State in 2000 in recognition of her service to the University, where The G. Albert Shoemaker Program in Business Ethics at Smeal College of Business is named in her husband’s honor. According to her obituary, Mercedes had a passion for fly fishing. This bright upland watercolor is classic Ripley; staunch dogs on point, hunters at the ready, and woodcock flying.

PROVENANCE: The Estate of Mercedes Shoemaker, acquired from The Crossroads of Sport, New York Private Collection, Massachusetts

$20,000 - $30,000

Ripley with one of his favorite hunting dogs. Courtesy of A. Lassell Ripley papers, 1873-1973, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

20


AIDEN LASSELL RIPLEY

1896-1969

9

21


10 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969)

Mallards Lighting In signed “A. Lassell Ripley ©” lower right watercolor, 20 by 29 in. titled on Sporting Gallery and Bookshop, New York label on back

Born in Wakefield, Massachusetts, Aiden Lassell Ripley was the son of a Boston Symphony Orchestra musician. From an early age he excelled at music, but he soon discovered a deeper interest in painting. By his mid-teens, Ripley was committed to a career in art, commuting into Boston to take classes. After returning from service in World War I, he attended the Boston Museum School where he studied with the country’s top artists, including Philip Leslie Hale (18651934) and Frank W. Benson (1862-1951). Ripley was awarded a Paige Traveling Fellowship to study in Europe. While abroad, he painted watercolors “en plein air” in North Africa, France, and Holland. Upon his return in 1925, he was elected to the prestigious Guild of Boston Artists. His work focused on the New England countryside as well as depictions of city life and railroad commuting scenes. The Great Depression, however, limited the sales potential for these works. Following a successful one-man show in 1930 of his sporting art, Ripley decided to change tack and specialize in hunting, fishing, and outdoor scenes as subjects.

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Along with his contemporary Ogden Pleissner (1905-1983), Ripley exemplified the life of a successful sporting artist. Collectors of Ripley’s sporting art endorsed his numerous trips to the salmon rivers of New Brunswick and the quail plantations of Georgia, where the artist indulged his passion for hunting and fishing while recording material he would use in his art. A rare subject for the artist, the majority of his large-scale waterfowl paintings feature black ducks. This masterwork depicting mallards shows Ripley at the full height of his artistic prowess. PROVENANCE: Private

Collection, New Jersey

LITERATURE: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson Wildfeuer, The Art of Aiden Lassell Ripley, Boston, MA, 2000, p. 146, pl. 133, illustrated.

$30,000 - $40,000


AIDEN LASSELL RIPLEY

1896-1969

10

23


AIDEN LASSELL RIPLEY 1896-1969

11

11 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969)

12 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

Flight Woodcock signed “A. Lassell Ripley ©” lower right watercolor, 18 3⁄4 by 28 in. titled on The Sportsman’s Gallery, New York label on back

Setter Pair signed “Matia” on side of base bronze, 11 3⁄4 by 15 3⁄4 by 7 in. edition 4 of 24

$5,000 - $10,000

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$1,000 - $1,500

13 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953) Red Wolf signed “Matia” on side of base bronze, 8 3⁄4 by 8 3⁄4 by 4 1⁄2 in.

This bronze was created as a gift for donors to the Conservation Fund on a red wolf project in North Carolina. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$300 - $500

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WALTER T. MATIA

B. 1953

12

13

25


14 Bob Kuhn (1920-2007) Running Wild signed “Bob Kuhn” on back oil on masonite, 20 by 42 in.

Born and raised in Buffalo, New York, Bob Kuhn enjoyed visiting the Buffalo Zoo and sketching its inhabitants as a child. After studying design, anatomy, and life drawing at the Pratt Institute in New York City, Kuhn made his living working as an illustrator for various wildlife and outdoor magazines. In the early 1970s Kuhn switched to painting full time. Kuhn’s work is featured in the permanent collections of the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and the John L. Wehle Gallery of Sporting Art at the Genesee Country Village and Museum in Mumford, New York.

26

Running Wild relates closely to Firestorm, the record-setting piece by Kuhn. Firestorm depicts deer at full run in a fiery forest setting, while Running Wild is a more tranquil scene of white-tail deer bounding through a vibrant late afternoon landscape with contrasting darks and lights. It is similar in size, shape, and scope to the record work. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, New Jersey

$100,000 - $200,000


BOB KUHN

1920-2007

14

27


NICHOLAS COLEMAN B. 1978

15

15 Nicholas Coleman (b. 1978)

Through the Sage, Mule Deer, 2018 signed “Nicholas Coleman” lower right oil on board, 16 by 12 in. signed and titled on back

$1,000 - $2,000

16

16 Nicholas Coleman (b. 1978)

Hazards of the Trail - Grizzly, 2018 signed “Nicholas Coleman” lower right oil on board, 16 by 12 in. signed and titled on back

$1,000 - $2,000

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LUKE FRAZIER B. 1970

17

17 Luke Frazier (b. 1970) Something Amiss, 2018 signed “l. frazier” lower right oil on board, 20 by 32 in.

Luke Frazier is one of the West’s top wildlife artists. Born and raised in the mountains of northern Utah, Frazier spent much of his youth hunting and fishing. His early forays into nature inspired a passion for the outdoors. As a child Frazier spent countless hours sketching and sculpting wildlife, demonstrating not only a passionate interest, but also an instinctive ability. Later, he received his formal art training

at Utah State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting and a Master of Fine Arts degree in illustration. Frazier cites the influence of Winslow Homer, Edgar Payne, Bruno Liljefors, Carl Rungius, and Bob Kuhn in his work. $7,000 - $10,000

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18 Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (1819-1905)

Wide Awake, Raquette Lake, 1879 signed and dated “A.F. Tait-N.A. 79” lower right oil on canvas, 26 1⁄4 by 22 1⁄2 in.

Depicting two alert deer at Raquette Lake in the Adirondacks, Tait finished this work at the YMCA on 23rd Street on January 8th, 1879. He sent it to the Utica Exhibition in New York on January 13, 1879, where it sold for $225.00. Known as one of America’s earliest sporting artists, Arthur Fitzgerald Tait was born in Liverpool, England, in 1819. From an early age he was interested in both art and the outdoors. Tait worked for the firm of Thomas Agnew, a famous art dealer and lithographer in Manchester, trained in lithography and drawing, and explored the open land around the city. However, many of the most beautiful vistas and hunting grounds were private and off-limits. While in the employ of the art firm, Tait was exposed to the works of Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), Richard Ansdell (1818-1885), and John Frederick Herring (1815-1907), among others. In Liverpool, beginning in 1843, Tait spent time with fellow artist George Catlin (1796-1872), which may have whetted the young artist’s appetite to explore life in America. Catlin, who was twenty-three years older than Tait, had spent much of the previous decade living in the American West chronicling the life of American natives through his careful drawings and sketches of their clothing, weapons, and ceremonies. There is little doubt that Catlin’s stories would have captivated the young and talented Tait. In 1850, Tait boarded a boat with his wife and came to America. By 1852 Tait was pursuing his interests in wildlife and hunting, based on the subject matter of his works. He worked from a studio in New York City, but spent a great deal of time on Long Lake in the Adirondack region, where he acquired skills as an angler, hunter, and keen observer of wildlife. These skills were as important for Tait’s art as his fine ability with brush and pigment, since they gave an authenticity to his portrayals of outdoor life which was virtually unrivalled at the time. His relative freedom to paint wherever he wanted in the vast public lands of New York was obviously liberating to the artist, who had felt confined by the strict laws governing trespassing and hunting on private property in England.

era. The exceptionally popular American Field Sports series showcased Tait’s abilities as an upland bird and dog painter and included the four lithographs A Chance for Both Barrels, Flushed, On a Point, and Retrieving. These hunting scenes, along with his camping and woodland scenes, resonated with the public as an integral part of the American experience and continue to inform us of our history as a nation. Seminal works by Tait, such as An Anxious Moment, A Tight Fix, and Trappers at Fault: Looking for the Trail, have become embedded as part of our heritage and serve as signposts along our path as a nation. Today Tait’s wilderness, frontier, and wildlife scenes hang in some of the most prominent museums and private collections, including the permanent collections of the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts; the Adirondack Museum, Blue Mountain Lake, New York; the American Museum of Western Art, Denver, Colorado; the Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Denver Art Museum, Colorado; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the National Museum of Racing, Saratoga Springs, New York; the Shelburne Museum, Vermont; the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut; the Tate Gallery, London; and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, among others. Wide Awake, Raquette Lake relates directly to On the ‘Qui Vive’ Raquette Lake, in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Both display alert deer on the shores of Raquette Lake in the Adirondacks, where Tait lived for a time and often painted. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Morristown, New Jersey Copley Fine Art Auctions, July 26, 2006, lot 184 Private Collection, New Jersey LITERATURE: A.F. Tait: Artist in the Adirondacks, The Adirondack Museum, Blue Mountain Lake, NY, 1974. Warder H. Cadbury, Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait: Artist in the Adirondacks, Newark, DE, 1986.

$60,000 - $70,000

With this liberation and experience of the outdoors, Tait’s artistic career flourished. In 1852, only two years after Tait arrived in New York, Nathaniel Currier (1813-1888) and James Merritt Ives (1824-1895) purchased the first of many works from the budding artist. In that same year, Tait was asked to hang a half-dozen works at the National Academy of Design’s annual exhibition. By 1854 he had achieved an associate membership and four years later he became a full member. Editions of Tait’s works for Currier and Ives were reproduced by the thousands and formed some of America’s most iconic images of the Victorian This work, titled On the Qui Vive, Buck and Three Does, 1871, oil on wood, 13 by 16 inches, is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum in New York and relates closely to Wide Awake, Raquette Lake. 30


ARTHUR FITZWILLIAM TAIT

1819-1905

18

31


CHET RENESON B. 1934

19

20

32


CHET RENESON

B. 1934

21

Chet Reneson graduated from the University of Hartford, Connecticut, in 1960. Reneson's art teacher, Henrik Mayer, emphasized the importance of simplicity and taught the values of light, dark, and strong. This laid the foundation for Reneson's unmistakable style. For the past fifty years, Reneson’s painting has remained true to his early mentor’s teaching, encompassing many subjects including wildlife, duck hunting, upland bird shooting, big game fishing, fly fishing, and Bahamian scenes. Reneson’s work has graced

the covers of Sporting Classics, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and Sports Afield, among others. He is a past member of the Connecticut Watercolor Association and the Old Lyme Art Association. He was the Ducks Unlimited Artist of the Year in 1982, the Atlantic Salmon Federation Artist of the Year in 1982 and 2001, and the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust Artist of the Year in 2018. There are two books published on Reneson's work, Shadow on the Flats and The Watercolors of Chet Reneson.

19 Chet Reneson (b. 1934)

21 Chet Reneson (b. 1934)

$5,000 - $8,000

$5,000 - $8,000

Fishing Camp signed “Reneson” lower left acrylic on board, 21 by 35 in.

Wagon Wheel Pheasant signed “Reneson” lower left acrylic on board, 21 by 35 in.

20 Chet Reneson (b. 1934) Steelhead On signed “Reneson” lower left acrylic on board, 21 by 35 in.

$5,000 - $8,000

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22

22 Luke Frazier (b. 1970)

Ancient Forest, c. 1998 signed “l. frazier” upper left/center oil on board, 30 by 40 in.

$3,000 - $5,000

23

23 Carl Rungius (1869-1959) Alaskan Wilderness signed “C. Rungius” lower right etching, 7 3⁄4 by 10 3⁄4 in.

LITERATURE: Donald E. Crouch, Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, Missoula, MT, 1989, p. 11, pl. 6, illustrated.

$2,500 - $4,500

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24

24 Vince Valdez (b. 1940)

School Days, 1989 signed and dated “V. Valdez 1989” on mother bear bronze, 11 1⁄2 by 21 by 29 1⁄2 in. on black marble base edition 11 of 50

$1,500 - $2,500

25

25 James Prosek (b. 1975)

Atlantic Salmon, 1999 signed and dated “James Prosek August 28, 1999 Easton, CT” lower right watercolor and ink, 11 1⁄2 by 21 1⁄2 in. inscribed “Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar) specimen from Bonaventure R. Gaspe Peninsula Quebec” lower right

$1,000 - $1,500

35


WILLIAM J. KOELPIN, SR. 1938-1996

26

26 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996)

Bear Country, 1994 signed and dated "Wm. J. Koelpin © '94" on back bronze, 30 by 6 by 12 in. inscribed "Bear Country 11/24" on back edition 11 of 24

William Koelpin was an avid hunter and fisherman from Wisconsin. He went on to become a celebrated sporting artist who excelled in a number of mediums including: bronze, paint, and wood. Throughout his career he displayed his passion for the outdoors through his accurate and detailed works. His first sold-out exhibit was at the Midwest Decoy Collectors' annual show in the mid-1970s.

Koelpin enjoyed many honors in his time, including the "Best in World" award from the Ward Museum in Salisbury, Maryland, and he was also named "One of America's Premier Artists" by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin. $6,000 - $9,000

27

27 William J. Koelpin (1938-1996) Bear, 1995 signed “Wm J Koelpin © 95” on base bronze, 15 by 5 by 10 in. edition 11 of 24

$4,000 - $6,000

36


GRANT HACKING B. 1964

28 Grant Hacking (b. 1964)

28

Cliff Dwellers, 2008 signed "Grant Hacking" lower left oil on canvas, 24 by 30 in. signed, dated, and titled on back

$1,500 - $2,500

29 Grant Hacking (b. 1964)

29

On the Verge - Mountain Goats, 2010 signed "Grant Hacking" lower left oil on canvas, 24 by 30 in. signed, dated, and titled on back inscribed "Thanks to Greg Beecham" on back

$1,500 - $2,500

30 Grant Hacking (b. 1964)

30

Bull Moose - Mt. Washington, 2010 signed "Grant Hacking" lower left oil on canvas, 20 by 40 in. signed, dated, and titled on back inscribed "To the collection of Mark and Karen Collins 2010" on back

$1,500 - $2,500

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OGDEN M. PLEISSNER 1905-1983

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31 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Salmon Fishing signed “Pleissner” lower right watercolor, 16 by 26 1⁄8 in. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Rhode Island

$14,000 - $18,000

“Fishing for wild Atlantic salmon is transformative. Once the rhythm of the drop is in your blood it is hard to shake.” - Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr.

38


OGDEN M. PLEISSNER

1905-1983

32

32 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) At the Point of Rocks signed “Pleissner” lower right watercolor, 17 by 24 1/2 in.

Ogden Minton Pleissner was born in Brooklyn, New York, and studied figure painting and portraiture with Frank DuMond and Frederick J. Boston at the Art Students League of New York. Despite growing up in the city, Pleissner was attracted to the outdoors and as a teen he visited dude ranches in Wyoming, where he sketched from life. In later years, Pleissner and his first wife, Mary, were regular guests at the CM Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Pleissner wanted to be classified primarily as a landscape painter, who also loved to hunt and fish. During World War II, Pleissner painted for the United States Air Force and Life magazine. During his years in the service, he primarily completed watercolors as the portability and immediacy of that medium accommodated working in the field.

Pleissner’s work is included in more than thirty public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and hangs in the offices of the Pentagon, West Point, and the Air Force Academy. Pleissner’s subjects range from the landscapes of Europe to salmon fishing in Quebec and his style is informed by the classical traditions. He is quoted as saying, “A fine painting is not just the subject...It is the feeling conveyed of form, bulk, space, dimensionality, and sensitivity. The mood of the picture, that is most important.” PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Massachusetts, acquired from Christie’s New York, December 5, 2002, Lot 148

$20,000 - $30,000

39


OGDEN M. PLEISSNER 1905-1983

33

33 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983)

Wyoming Trout Fishing, 1937 signed “Pleissner” lower right watercolor, 11 3⁄4 by 17 3⁄4 in. titled on The Sporting Gallery and Bookshop, New York label on back

An early fly-fishing scene, this watercolor captures the artist’s familiarity with high altitude, small stream trout fishing. PROVENANCE: Collection of Alfred Ely, gift from the artist Private Collection, by descent

$5,000 - $8,000

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34

34 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983) Lower Restigouche, c. 1945 signed “Pleissner” lower right watercolor, 7 by 14 1⁄8 in.

This well-executed, small size watercolor is featured in Bergh’s treatise on the artist. Depicting one of North America’s most famous salmon rivers, this serene watercolor shows an angler and guide involved in the rhythm of casting and dropping down through a pool, awaiting the transformative pull.

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Virginia

LITERATURE: Peter Bergh, The Art of Ogden M. Pleissner, Boston, MA, 1984, p. 77, exact painting illustrated.

$7,000 - $10,000

35

35 John Swan (b. 1948)

Canoe on Bank, 1996 signed and dated "John Swan '96" lower left watercolor, 16 1⁄2 by 29 in. signed and dated on back

$2,000 - $4,000

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BRETT JAMES SMITH B. 1958

36

37

36 Brett James Smith (b. 1958)

37 Brett James Smith (b. 1958)

$3,000 - $5,000

$3,000 - $4,000

In Fast Water signed “Brett J Smith” lower right oil on canvas, 14 by 18 in.

42

Making Another Run signed “Brett J Smith” lower right watercolor, 21 by 28 1⁄2 in.


JOHN WHORF 1903-1959

38

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38 John Whorf (1903-1959) Mallards signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 14 1⁄2 by 20 1⁄2 in.

$2,500 - $3,500

39 John Whorf (1903-1959)

Hunter and Bird Dog signed “John Whorf” lower right watercolor, 14 1⁄2 by 20 1⁄2 in. inscribed “To Neeham” lower right

$2,500 - $3,500

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40

40 Harry Smith (19th century) Leaping Brook Trout signed “Harry Smith” lower left oil on canvas, 10 by 16 in.

$600 - $900 41

41 Henry Alexander Ogden (1856-1936) Fishing Camp, 1885 signed and dated “H.A. Ogden ‘85” lower left watercolor, 11 by 15 3⁄4 in.

$300 - $500

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42

42 John Clinton Spencer (1861-1919)

Hanging Game, 1910 signed and dated “J.C. Spencer 1910” lower left oil on canvas, 22 by 16 in.

$1,000 - $1,500

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43 Clarence E. Braley (1854-1927) A Nice Day’s Catch, 1890 signed “C. Braley” lower left oil on canvas, 25 3⁄4 by 18 in.

$800 - $1,200

45


HENRY HINTERMEISTER 1897-1970

44

44 Henry “Hy” Hintermeister (1897-1970) Fly Fishing signed “Hy Hintermeister” lower left oil on canvas, 22 by 33 in. inscribed “Field & Stream” on back

Often working together under the pseudonym “Hy,” Henry Hintermeister and his father John (1869-1945) created narrative works illustrating both major historical events and often-humorous scenes of everyday life. $2,500 - $3,500

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45 Henry “Hy” Hintermeister (1897-1970) Fly Fishing signed “Hy. Hintermeister” lower right oil on canvas, 22 by 33 in. inscribed “Field & Stream” on back

$2,500 - $3,500

46


FRANCIS LEE JAQUES

1887-1969

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46 Francis Lee Jaques (1887-1969) Canada Geese signed “F.L. Jaques” lower left oil on board, 15 by 11 1⁄2 in.

Francis Lee Jaques was born on September 28, 1887, in Geneseo, Illinois. As a boy, he loved duck hunting, and spent many hours hunting with his father. When Jaques was twelve, his family moved to Kansas to farm corn. This background in agriculture and hunting taught him a great deal about birds, which he translated into the stunning realism he was able to capture on canvas. When he returned from serving in World War I, Jaques studied art with Clarence Rosenkranz (1871-1959), a student of early Impressionist William Merritt Chase (1849-1916).

Jaques says, “Geese are different. When they see you, you can keep on coming; as long as you are too far away to be dangerous, they’ll sit tight. But if you hide, they’ll fly. Your disappearance constitutes peril, for they don’t know where you’ve gone or what you’re doing. Geese are great birds.” PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, New Jersey

LITERATURE: Florence Page Jaques, Francis Lee Jaques: Artist of the Wilderness World, Garden City, NY, 1973, p. 308.

$5,000 - $8,000

47


DAVID A. HAGERBAUMER 1921-2014

47

47 David A. Hagerbaumer (1921-2014)

Laid Out Off Whiskey Creek, 1983 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1983” lower left watercolor, 22 by 29 in. includes a story from the artist that inspired this painting in an envelope on the back

48

“Branting is the crown jewel of all water fowling”- David Hagerbaumer LITERATURE: John Orrelle, The Art of a Sporting Life: The Wildlife Art of David Hagerbaumer, LaConner, WA, 2009, p. 141, illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500

48 David A. Hagerbaumer (1921-2014)

Doves at Water, 1960 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1960” lower left watercolor, 14 1⁄2 by 18 1⁄2 in.

$800 - $1,200

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49

49 David A. Hagerbaumer (1921-2014)

Canvasbacks, 1960 signed and dated “David Hagerbaumer 1960” lower left watercolor, 14 1⁄2 by 17 1⁄2 in.

$800 - $1,200

50 Herb Booth (1942-2014) In the Woods signed “Herb Booth” lower left watercolor, 14 by 21 1⁄2 in.

$400 - $600

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51

52

51 Peter Hanks (b. 1951)

52 Henry P. Megargee (1887-1978)

$300 - $500

$1,000 - $2,000

Quail in Flight, 1980 signed and dated “Peter Hanks 80” lower left watercolor, 15 by 22 in.

Ducks Over Marsh signed “Harry Megargee” lower left oil on canvas, 16 1⁄2 by 32 in.

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CHET RENESON B. 1934

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54

53 Chet Reneson (b. 1934)

54 Chet Reneson (b. 1934)

$3,000 - $4,000

$3,000 - $4,000

Trout Fishing, 2013 signed and dated “Reneson 2013” lower left watercolor, 17 1⁄2 by 27 in.

50

Fish On signed “Reneson” lower right watercolor, 17 1⁄4 by 27 1⁄4 in.


DAVID A. MAASS B. 1929

55

55 David A. Maass (b. 1929) Ruffed Grouse in Snow signed “Maass” lower right oil on board, 24 by 36 in.

An avid sportsman and ardent contributor to conservation organizations, David Maass has been actively painting game birds for more than thirty years. In the past twenty years, Maass has designed more than thirty conservation stamps and prints, a distinction few artists can claim. Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and the Minnesota Wildlife Heritage Foundation have each named David Maass their Artist of the Year. Maass’ original paintings and limited edition prints have been exhibited in galleries and shows throughout the country, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin; and the annual Minnesota Wildlife Heritage Foundation Show in Minneapolis, Minnesota. An original Canada goose painting by David Maass is part of the permanent collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

56

$3,000 - $4,000

56 David A. Maass (b. 1929) Woodcock signed "Maass" lower left oil on board, 24 by 18 in.

$3,500 - $4,500

51


S. EDWIN MEGARGEE, JR. 1883-1958

57

57 S. Edwin Megargee, Jr. (1883-1958) Two Pointers signed “Edwin Megargee” lower right oil on board, 8 by 10 in.

This work was a study for a 1944 Derrydale print titled Brace Mates, one of Megargee’s most famous prints published by Frank Lowe, who ran the Derrydale Press in New York after Eugene V. Connett, III. Edwin Megargee was born in Philadelphia in 1883. He studied at Georgetown University, the Drexel Art Institute in Philadelphia, and the Art Students League in New York and specialized in paintings of domestic animals and sporting subjects. Many of his sporting dog scenes appeared in Field & Stream and in his portfolio, Gun Dogs at Work. He is best known as a leading portrayer of prize-winning gun dogs, including pointers, setters, retrievers, and spaniels.

In 1953, Megargee illustrated Julie Campbell Tatham’s World Book of Dogs. In it, he is referred to as “a licensed (and very active) judge of the American Kennel Club and Chairman of its Library Committee. A breeder, judge and owner of first-class sporting and bench show dogs, he brings to his paintings and illustrations a thorough knowledge of animal structure, color and authenticity of atmosphere.” PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Pennsylvania

LITERATURE: Julie Campbell Tatham and Edwin Megargee, illus., World Book of Dogs, Cleveland, OH, 1953, p. 126. John T. Ordeman, The Derrydale Prints, Ringwood, NJ, 2005, p. 82, Brace Mates illustrated.

$3,000 - $4,000

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EDMUND H. OSTHAUS 1858-1928

58

58 Edmund H. Osthaus (1858-1928)

Uncle Sam signed “Edm. H. Osthaus” lower left watercolor, 11 3⁄4 by 16 3⁄4 in.

The 15th annual U.S. Field Trials Club exercises were held in January 1904 at Grand Junction, Tennessee. Uncle Sam, owned by Charles K. Brown, was the first-place winner. This lot is accompanied by copies of the U.S. Field Trials Club’s Trials report for January 25th in Grand Junction, Tennessee. $5,000 - $7,000

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59 Robert K. Abbett (1926-2015)

Shooting At Riverview, 1983 signed and dated “Abbett © 83” lower right oil on board, 24 by 36 in. titled, dated, signed, and inscribed by artist on back

Robert Abbett, born in Indiana in 1926, is best known for his depictions of sporting dogs, flyfishing, and Western life. He began his career as an advertising illustrator, attending night and weekend classes at both the Chicago Academy of Fine Art and the American Academy of Art where he found himself drawn to editorial and advertising art. In 1953 he moved from Chicago to Connecticut to be closer to the editorial markets. He illustrated for Argosy, The Woman’s Home Companion, Sports Afield, Reader’s Digest, and True magazines. He also worked with several West Coast motion picture studios and drew covers for many of the leading paperback publishers. Robert Abbett was commissioned to paint his first animal portrait of Luke in 1970. It was with this

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painting that he transitioned from working as an illustrator to a full-time gallery artist. Abbett is recognized as a master in the field of sporting art. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Dallas, Texas

LITERATURE: Robert K. Abbett, A Season for Painting: The Outdoor Art of Robert K. Abbett, Dallas, TX, 2001, p. 38, illustrated.

$20,000 - $30,000


ROBERT K. ABBETT

1926-2015

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ROBERT K. ABBETT 1926-2015

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60 Robert K. Abbett (1926-2015) A Setter On Point signed “Abbett” lower left oil on masonite, 24 by 30 in.

After the covey is flushed both hunter and dog turn to walking up the singles. Perfectly locked, the setter holds steady as his quarry gets ready to fly. PROVENANCE: Collection of Norman Islieb, friend of the artist Private Collection, by descent in the family

$8,000 - $12,000

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DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON

1851-1938

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61 Dwight W. Huntington (1851-1938) Pointer and Quail, 1902 signed and dated “D.W. Huntington 1902” lower right watercolor, 15 by 21 1⁄2 in.

Dwight Williams Huntington, editor, lawyer, author, and longtime leader in the wild-game conservation movement, was born in 1851 and is remembered as the father of the “More Game” movement in America. According to his New York Times obituary, “A native of Cincinnati, Mr. Huntington wrote the first game breeding law to be enacted in this country. It was adopted by New York State in 1912 with the assistance of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, then chairman of the New York Forest, Fish and Game Committee.” “Mr. Huntington was graduated from Yale University in 1873 and shortly thereafter accompanied the Marsh Expedition to the Yellowstone and the Northwest, collecting specimens for the Smithsonian Institution and Yale. Later he took up the practice of law in Cincinnati and became a member of the Ohio Legislature.” In 1902 he wrote a letter to Theodore Roosevelt asking him to contribute to a volume on big-game hunting. Huntington authored Our Feathered Game: A Handbook of the North American Game Birds, published by Charles Scribner’s Sons in 1903, as well as Our Big Game: A Book for Sportsmen and Nature Lovers in 1904, and Our Wild Fowl and Waders in 1910, among other books.

His obituary continues, “In 1908 Mr. Huntington acquired an interest in The Amateur Sportsman…and was editor of it until 1912, when he founded and was elected first president of the Game Conservation Society.” A 1945 remembrance of Huntington in Game Breeder & Sportsman, the publication of the Game Conservation Society, recalls Huntington emphasizing “the toll of the hunter…was a minor factor in the reduced numbers of many species compared to the many diverse effects of advancing civilization, the outstanding of which was the destruction of its natural habitat…” The remembrance goes on, stating that the More Game Birds in America Foundation’s “greatest accomplishment was the conception and organization of Ducks Unlimited, Inc., the outstanding conservation organization of our time, which has played so splendid a part in the perpetuation and increase of North America’s wild ducks and geese… millions of ducks wing southward every fall that owe their very existence to Dwight Huntington and those who have followed his far sighted counsel to restore.” LITERATURE: “D. W. Huntington, Editor, Dies at 87,” The New York Times, November 27, 1938. “Progress,” Game Breeder & Sportsman, April 1945, p. 42.

$2,000 - $4,000

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62 John James Audubon (1785-1851)

Ruffed Grous[e] (No. 9, Plate 41), 1828 hand-colored engraving and aquatint, sheet size 25 1⁄2 by 38 1⁄2 in. “Drawn from Nature & Published by John J. Audubon F.R.S.E. F.L.S. M.W.S.” lower left “Engraved by R. Havell. Jun. Printed & Coloured by R. Havell. Sen. London. 1828” lower right on J. Whatman Turkey Mill watermarked paper

Audubon writes extensively about the habits and habitats of the Ruffed Grouse, “Although these birds are particularly attached to the craggy sides of mountains and hills, and the rocky borders of rivers and small streams, thickly mantled with evergreen trees and small shrubs of the same nature, they at times remove to low lands, and even enter the thickest cane-brakes, where they also sometimes breed.” “The shooting of Grouse of this species is precarious, and at times very difficult, on account of the nature of the places which they usually prefer. Should, for instance, a covey of these birds be raised from amongst Laurels (Kalmia latifolia) or the largest species of Bay (Rhododendron maximum), these shrubs so intercept the view of them, that, unless the sportsman proves quite an adept in the difficult art of pulling the trigger of his gun at the proper moment, and quickly, his first chance is lost, and the next is very uncertain.” “When our mountains are covered with a profusion of huckleberries and whortleberries, about the beginning of September, then is the time for shooting this species, and enjoying the delicious food which it affords.” Audubon puts forth close observations of their behavior, reporting “The flight of the Ruffed Grouse is straightforward, rather low, unless when the bird has been disturbed, and seldom protracted beyond a few hundred yards at a time…I have said this much respecting the flight of Grouse, because it is a prevalent opinion, both among sportsmen and naturalists, that the whirring sound produced by birds of that genus, is a necessary effect of their usual mode of flight. But that this is an error, I have abundantly satisfied myself by numberless observations.”

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“The Ruffed Grouse, on alighting upon a tree, after being raised from the ground, perches amongst the thickest parts of the foliage, and, assuming at once an erect attitude, stands perfectly still, and remains silent until all appearance of danger has vanished. If discovered when thus perched, it is very easily shot.” Audubon was so enamored of the sporting value of the Ruffed Grouse that he proposed introducing it to the United Kingdom, saying, “The size of these birds, the beauty of their plumage, the excellence of their flesh, and their peculiar mode of flying, would render them valuable, and add greatly to the interest of the already diversified sports of that country.” PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Pennsylvania

LITERATURE: John James Audubon, “Ruffed Grouse,” Audubon Society, accessed December 11, 2018, https://www. audubon.org/birds-of-america/ruffed-grouse

$50,000 - $60,000


JOHN JAMES AUDUBON 1785-1851

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59


EWOUD DE GROOT B. 1969

BONEFISH & TARPON TRUST 2019 ARTIST OF THE YEAR PAINTING 63

63 Ewoud de Groot (b. 1969)

Resting Terns, 2018 signed and dated “Ewoud 18” lower right oil on linen, 29 1⁄2 by 59 in.

Ewoud de Groot is the 2019 Featured Artist for the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust. 50% of the proceeds from the sale of this painting will go directly to BTT, whose mission is to conserve and enhance global bonefish, tarpon, and permit fisheries and their environment through stewardship, research, education, and advocacy. The BTT serves as a repository for information on the life history of these species and works internationally with anglers, guides, scientists, regulators, and the public to nurture and enhance fish populations.

Ewoud de Groot lives and works in Egmond aan Zee, a coastal village in the Northern Netherlands. After receiving a degree in illustration and painting from the Minerva Academy of Art, he began illustrating nature books for a period before pursuing painting full-time in 1999. Today, de Groot is recognized as a rising star in wildlife painting, bringing a truly unique perspective to the genre. His work strives to find both a balance and a tension between the representational and the abstract, the traditional and the contemporary. For de Groot, painting wildlife is not an exercise in rendering all the exact details. Instead, his work is an ongoing experiment of composition, color, and technique, concerned with conveying a sense of mood and atmosphere found in the natural world. $8,000 - $12,000

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WALTER T. MATIA

B. 1953

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64 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953) Curlew Pair signed “Matia” on side of base bronze, 16 1⁄4 by 20 by 7 in. edition 2 of 24

As Tom Davis writes in Sporting Classics, Walter Matia “paid his dues, assembled a remarkable body of work, and established himself as a wildlife and sporting sculptor of uncommon perception, imagination and reach.”

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

LITERATURE: Tom Davis, “Artist’s Hands, Hunter’s Heart,” Sporting Classics, March/April, 2008, pp. 107-111.

$1,000 - $1,500

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WALTER T. MATIA B. 1953

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ANDRÉ HARVEY 1941-2018

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65 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

Egret Pair signed “Matia” on underside of base bronze, 18 3⁄4 by 13 3⁄4 by 8 1⁄2 in. edition 2 of 36 PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

68 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

Reddish Egret In Display, 1987 signed and dated “Matia ‘87” on top of base bronze, 16 1⁄2 by 9 1⁄2 by 10 in. edition 4 of 16 PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$1,000 - $1,500

$1,000 - $1,500

66 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

69 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

Green Heron signed “Matia” on side of base bronze, 9 1⁄4 by 9 1⁄4 by 9 3⁄4 in. edition 14 of 48

California Quail Pair, 1986 signed and dated “Matia © 86” on side of base bronze, 14 3⁄4 by 6 3⁄4 by 5 in. edition 4 of 12

An edition of this bronze resides in the collection of the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin.

This piece was originally commissioned by the State Department as a gift of State in the Reagan Administration.

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$800 - $1,200

$600 - $900

70 André Harvey (1941-2018) 67 Walter T. Matia (b. 1953)

Avocets signed “Matia” on side of base bronze, 9 3⁄4 by 17 by 9 3⁄4 in. edition 3 of 10

This was the artist’s first sculpture. PROVENANCE:

Racing To The Sea, 1992 signed “© Andre Harvey “ on side bronze, 9 by 24 by 4 in. edition 26 of 60 PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$1,000 - $2,000

Private Collection, Florida

$1,000 - $1,500

63


WILLIAM GOADBY LAWRENCE 1913-2002

71

71 William Goadby Lawrence (1913-2002)

Leaping Marlin, 1937 signed and dated “Wm Goadby Lawrence 1937” lower left oil on canvas, 16 1⁄4 by 20 1⁄4 in.

William Goadby Lawrence was born in Rumson, New Jersey, in 1913. He attended the Art Students League in New York City and had his first show at the outfitters Abercrombie and Fitch. During World War II, he served as a Combat Artist and Chief Boatswain’s Mate and experienced action in battles in North Africa and Japan. After the war, Lawrence continued his artistic pursuits. His illustrations appeared in various magazines, including Field and Stream. On February 28, 1942, the cover of The Post featured a marlin painting

64

by Lawrence. His work was also published in Van Campen Heilner’s Salt Water Fishing and Bob Dunn and Peter Goadby’s Saltwater Game Fishing of the World. Lawrence’s paintings have been exhibited in the Library of Congress, the Museum of Natural History, and the U.S. Coast Guard Academy Museum. Along with fellow fish painter, Stanley Meltzoff (1917-2006), Lawrence is considered one of the all time masters of this genre. $3,000 - $4,000


WILLIAM GOADBY LAWRENCE

1913-2002

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72 William Goadby Lawrence (1913-2002)

Storm Signals, 1962 signed “Wm Goadby Lawrence” lower right oil on canvas, 28 1⁄4 by 42 in. inscribed “Wm Goadby Lawrence, Edgecomb, Me. Aug 12, 1962” on stretcher bar on back

The creation of Storm Signals was documented in extensive hand-written letters between William Goadby Lawrence and Robert W. Selle, who commissioned the painting. The process, which stretched over two years, included thorough research and revision. Lawrence painted several watercolors as studies for the work. Dr. John C. Lilly, dolphin researcher and author of the 1961 book Man and Dolphin, consulted on the painting.

PROVENANCE: Robert W. Selle, Brookline, Massachusetts Private Collection, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts by descent from the above Private Collection, Hobe Sound, Florida LITERATURE: The Crossroads of Sport, Inc. Catalog, New York, NY, 1963-1964, p. 30, similar work illustrated. John C. Lilly, M.D., Man and Dolphin, New York, NY, 1961.

$3,500 - $5,500

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MILTON C. WEILER 1910-1974

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73 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) June Run on the Kedgewick, c. 1966 signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 18 by 24 in.

As a conservationist and an outdoorsman, Milton C. Weiler lived the life he painted, and his watercolors have authenticity as a result. According to John T. Ordeman and Bud Weiler, “Milt Weiler was a watercolorist who could recreate in his paintings the look and feel of a winter waterfowl marsh, autumn upland bird cover, a spring trout stream and a summer salmon river in the manner of the tradition established by the artist whose works had inspired him, Winslow Homer. Weiler was also a carver of decoys, ducks of such sculptural beauty that they won him top awards in the most prestigious working decoy and decorative bird carving competitions... Weiler created covers and illustrations for many sporting magazines, and he earned accolades as an illustrator of volumes by many of the foremost authors of sporting books - Eugene Connett...among them.”

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Nelson Bryant of the New York Times, comments, “Weiler was considered one of the most accomplished painters of hunting and fishing scenes in the country, and he was also an expert carver of decoys.” This important Weiler work was chosen for the cover of the book on the artist. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family LITERATURE: John T. Ordeman & M. C. ‘Bud’ Weiler, Jr., The Art of Milton C. Weiler: A Sportsman’s World, Sugar Hill, NH, 2001, illustrated on dust jacket cover and pp. 80-81.

$3,000 - $5,000


MILTON C. WEILER 1910-1974

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75

74 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

75 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

LITERATURE: John T. Ordeman & M. C. ‘Bud’ Weiler, Jr., The Art of Milton C. Weiler: A Sportsman’s World, Sugar Hill, NH, 2001, pp. 8687, illustrated.

LITERATURE: John T. Ordeman & M. C. ‘Bud’ Weiler, Jr., The Art of Milton C. Weiler: A Sportsman’s World, Sugar Hill, NH, 2001, p. 89, illustrated.

$3,000 - $5,000

$3,000 - $5,000

Show Time - Great South Bay, 1963 signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 19 by 27 in.

Woodcock Hunter, c. 1968 signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 21 1⁄2 by 29 1⁄2 in.

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MILTON C. WEILER 1910-1974

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76 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

Two Illustrations of Leaping Deer, 1967 Leaping Deer signed “MC. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 20 1⁄2 by 15 in.

This was the final artwork for the cover of the 1967 Sports Afield Hunting Annual. Leaping Deer Study signed “M.C.Weiler” lower right watercolor and pencil, 6 by 4 in.

This was a rough draft for the cover of the 1967 Sports Afield Hunting Annual with notes. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family LITERATURE: John T. Ordeman & M. C. ‘Bud’ Weiler, Jr., The Art of Milton C. Weiler: A Sportsman’s World, Sugar Hill, NH, 2001, pp. 126-127, illustrated.

$1,500 - $2,500

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77 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Two Leaping Bass Illustrations

Leaping Bass signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor on board, 18 1⁄2 by 15 in. Leaping Bass Cover Study signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor and pencil on board, 5 1⁄2 by 3 3⁄4 in. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$1,000 - $1,500

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MILTON C. WEILER 1910-1974

78.1

78.2

78 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

Two Fishing Studies each watercolor on board, 8 1⁄2 by 6 1⁄4 both signed lower right PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$300 - $500

79.1

79.2

79 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Grouse and Quail, 1964 watercolor, 3 3⁄4 by 2 1⁄2 in. Created as playing card designs. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$100 - $200

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80 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

Hunting Moments of Truth signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right graphite with gouache, 6 1⁄2 by 10 in. inscribed “Used for illustration in “Hunting Moments of Truth,” Rikoff & Pepper, Winchester Press, 1973, and as cover on Sports Afield, July 1974.” on back PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family LITERATURE:

Sports Afield, July 1974, cover.

$300 - $500

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81

81 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

Four of a Kind - Black Duck, 1965 signed “M.C. Weiler” on mat lower right watercolor, 5 1⁄4 by 7 in. titled lower left

This illustration was submitted in 1965 for the Federal Duck Stamp Design contest of 1966-67. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$300 - $500

82 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) 82

Pintail Dropping In signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 5 1⁄4 by 6 1⁄2 in.

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$400 - $600

83 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974)

Family Group - Canada Geese, 1959 signed “M.C. Weiler” on mat lower right watercolor, 5 by 7 in. titled lower left

This illustration was submitted for one of the Federal Duck Stamp Design contests in the 1960’s. 83

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$300 - $500

84 Milton C. Weiler (1910-1974) Maine Coast signed “M.C. Weiler” lower right watercolor, 5 by 16 1⁄4 in.

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$500 - $700

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70


LYNN BOGUE HUNT 1878-1960

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85 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960)

October Woods - Black Ducks, 1955 signed and dated “Lynn Bogue Hunt 55” lower left oil on canvas, 12 by 14 in.

Lynn Bogue Hunt was born in rural Honeoye Falls, New York, into a family that ran a small sawmill operation. He grew up with modest means, but spent hours outside exploring the natural surroundings in the woods near his home. He often collected birds and practiced taxidermy, a hobby that led to his accurate portrayal of his wildlife subjects. Hunt contributed illustrations to his own articles as well as cover illustrations to magazines, such as Field & Stream, Sports Afield, and Free Press. During his lifetime Hunt painted for private collectors and companies, such as

86 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960)

DuPont, illustrated over forty books, and produced roughly two hundred and fifty magazine covers. Though he spent much of his life far from nature in New York City, Hunt had a strong foundation as a knowledgeable outdoorsman, bird hunter, and fisherman, enabling him to accurately capture the essence of the outdoors. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$2,000 - $3,000

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Cooper’s Hawk and Black Ducks signed “Lynn Bogue Hunt” lower right ink on paper, 13 by 18 in. titled lower center and inscribed “For Dale” lower right PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$500 - $800

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LOUIS JOHN RHEAD 1857-1926

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87 Louis John Rhead (1857-1926) A Cool Spot in Leafy June, 1902 signed “Louis Rhead” lower right oil on canvas, 20 by 27 1⁄4 in.

Louis John Rhead was a highly respected illustrator during the Golden Age of Illustration from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century. He was born in England to a family who for generations had been artistically involved in the pottery industry in Stoke-on-Trent. His father, George Woolliscroft Rhead, had a particular gift for pottery design and four of his eleven children entered the field. At the age of thirteen, Louis went to France for three years to study under Gustave Boulanger, with whom contemporary Frank W. Benson also studied. Upon returning to England he apprenticed at Mintons, the china factory, before winning a scholarship to the South Kensington Art School in London. He designed posters and book jackets for the English publisher Cassell. In 1883, an American publishing house called Appleton offered him the position of art director which he accepted and subsequently moved to New York. In addition to his book illustrations, his poster work for periodicals, including Century, Scribner’s, The Bookman, The New York Sun, and The Morning Journal, was highly regarded. He collaborated with his brother George Wooliscroft Rhead to illustrate John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Idylls of the King. In all, Rhead authored seven books on angling; the first of which was The Speckled Brook Trout. Additionally, he illustrated many children’s 72

books, including Swiss Family Robinson, Gulliver’s Travels, and Treasure Island. Rhead was an accomplished painter, designer, and author. He was a member of the New York Watercolor Society and the Architectural League. Rhead’s painting A Cool Spot in Leafy June captures the moment of truth when the trout is brought to net. The artist has masterfully painted a cold water stream in June. Sunlight dapples on the surface and shadows flicker across the rocks. The fisherman is completely focused on his task, oblivious to his rapt audience peering down from the bridge. His pipe is clenched between his teeth as he holds the bent fly rod high in his right hand while a creel is slung over his right shoulder. At the ready, he scoops his net through the water toward the tiring fish. The viewer anticipates the next second when the fish will be safely in the angler’s net. Rhead’s composition, especially his noteworthy use of light and shadow, reflects his talent and training. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family LITERATURE: Louis John Rhead, The Speckled Brook Trout, Lanham, MD, 1902, p. 122, illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000


88.1

88.2

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88 Paul Desmond Brown (1893-1958) Four Equestrian Etchings (two shown) Where Away signed “Paul Brown” lower right etching, 6 by 7 7⁄8 in. The Hunting Party estate stamped on back etching, 6 by 15 3⁄4 in. Horse Trainer (proof) etching with graphite, 7 by 11 in. Two Riders Amongst Birches signed “Paul Brown” lower right etching, 6 1⁄8 by 10 3⁄4 in. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$300 - $500

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89 Paul Desmond Brown (1893-1958)

Steeplechase, 1935 signed and dated “Paul Brown ‘35” lower left watercolor and ink, 8 by 11 1⁄2 in. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$300 - $500

90 Harold Dow Bugbee (1900-1963) Bucking Bronco signed “- H.D. Bugbee - “ lower right pen and ink, 9 by 7 in. inscribed “To Lynn Bogue Hunt” lower left

PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$100 - $200

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91 Thornton Utz (1914-1999) The Old Fishing Hole signed “Thornton Utz” lower left oil on board, 21 1⁄2 by 30 in.

$400 - $600

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92 Donald Teague (1897-1991)

Boats in Harbor signed “Donald Teague N.A.” lower left watercolor, 19 1⁄2 by 29 1⁄2 in.

$500 - $800

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93 Dom Farrell (20th century) The Boxing Match signed “Dom Farrell” lower right watercolor, 13 1⁄2 by 20 in.

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LOUIS AGASSIZ FUERTES 1874-1927

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94 Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874-1927)

Two Wigeon, 1915 signed and dated “Louis Agassiz Fuertes -1915-” lower right watercolor, 14 1⁄2 by 13 3⁄4 in. Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York label on back

Louis Agassiz Fuertes was named after the famous Harvard professor Louis Agassiz by his father, himself a professor at Cornell. Though he studied architecture at Cornell, the words of his namesake “Study nature, not books” prevailed and Fuertes went on to become one of the preeminent American bird artists of all time. The artist was noted for his early talent and eye for detail, joining the American Ornithologists’ Union at the age of seventeen. Through this important group he met ornithologist Elliott Coues, who promoted his work and commissioned the artist to illustrate his 1903 book, Key to North American Birds.

Along with Frank W. Benson, Fuertes provided illustrations for John C. Phillips’ A Natural History of the Ducks, published from 1922-1926. He also painted his stunning bird portraits for Edward Howe Forbush’s Birds of Massachusetts and Other New England States, published between 1925-1929. His works can be found in the Cornell University collection and Chicago’s Field Museum among others, and he has two species of birds named after him: Icterus fuertesi and Hapalopsittaca fuertesi. $1,500 - $2,500

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95 Oliver R. Shattuck (20th century)

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Four Miniature Bird Paintings oil, each 2 1⁄2 by 1 3⁄4 in. overall 9 1⁄2 by 17 in. signed in pencil on matte “O.R. Shattuck” lower right

Shattuck was a member of the Rockport Art Association. $200 - $300 96

96 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Quail Hunting signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right pencil on paper, 6 1⁄2 by 10 in. titled lower left

$200 - $400

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97 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Duck Hunting signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right pencil and charcoal drawing, 8 by 12 in.

$200 - $400

98 Horace Robbins Burdick (1844-1942) (attr.)

Frank B.’s Sketch from Nature, 1917 ink on paper, 5 1⁄2 by 8 3⁄4 in. inscribed “Frank B’s sketch from nature. Jan 28 - 17” lower center

An illustration of Frank W. Benson, seated left. PROVENANCE: Horace Burdick Doris Burdick, by descent Private Collection, Massachusetts

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100

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99 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Quail Shooting signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right color print, 17 3⁄4 by 27 in.

$200 - $300

100 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) A Turkey Drive, 1966 signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right color print, 16 1⁄2 by 27 in. embossed lower left

$200 - $300

101 Ogden M. Pleissner (1905-1983)

The Quail Hunters, 1973 signed “Ogden M. Pleissner” lower right color print, 16 3⁄4 by 25 5⁄8 in. published and copyrighted by the Crossroads of Sport, New York, NY in an edition of 425

102 Five Sporting and Ornithological Prints (one shown) Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Evening (black ducks), 1915 print after wash drawing from American Wildfowl Plate # III edition of 100, 13 by 19 1⁄2 in. Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Grouse Cover, 1949 signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right color print, 15 1/4 by 23 in. Alexander Lawson (1773-1846) Red Owl, 1840 hand-colored engraving, 14 1⁄2 by 10 1⁄2 in. Currier & Ives Woodcock Shooting, 1870 and Partridge Shooting, 1870 color lithographs, 9 1⁄2 by 13 in.

$300 - $500

$200 - $300

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FRANK W. BENSON 1862-1951

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103 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Two Etchings (one shown)

The Start, 1922 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 4 7⁄8 by 3 7⁄8 in. Paff #211, edition of 150 The Visitor, 1918 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching, 3 by 5 in. numbered “141” lower right Paff #145, edition of 150 PROVENANCE:

John T. Ordeman Collection

$600 - $900

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104 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Salmon, 1922 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left drypoint, 3 7⁄8 by 4 7⁄8 in. Paff #212, edition of 67 Gage Gallery, Cleveland, OH label on back

$2,000 - $3,000

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105 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Summer Yellowlegs, 1920 signed “Frank W. Benson.” lower left drypoint, 5 by 3 3⁄4 in. Paff #186, edition of 150

$300 - $500

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FRANK W. BENSON 1862-1951

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106 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Federal Duck Stamp Design, 1935-1936 signed “Frank W. Benson” lower left etching with stamp, 3 by 5 in. Abercrombie & Fitch, New York label on back

$2,000 - $3,000

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107 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Wildfowler, 1923 signed “Frank W. Benson.” lower left etching, 7 7⁄8 by 11 7⁄8 in. Paff #220, edition of 150

$1,000 - $2,000

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108 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

Morning signed “Frank W. Benson.” lower left drypoint, 7 7⁄8 by 9 7⁄8 in. numbered “32/35” lower right Paff #58, edition of 35

$300 - $500

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109.1

109.2

109.3

109 Lynn Bogue Hunt (1878-1960) Three Sporting Silk Screens

Mallard Duck, Baldpate, and Muskie each signed “Lynn Bogue Hunt” each 11 by 8 1⁄2 in.

110

$1,000 - $1,500

110 after George Edwards (British, 1693-1773)

Wood Duck signed and dated “G.Edwards 1746” in plate lower right hand-colored engraving, 10 by 8 in.

111 John James Audubon (1785-1851)

Ring Plover (No. 66, Plate CCCXXX) “Ring Plover Charadrius Semipalmatus” lower center hand-colored engraving, sheet sight size 17 1⁄2 by 25 1⁄4 in. “Drawn from Nature by J.J. Audubon F.R.S. F.L.S.” lower left “Engraved, Printed and Coloured by R. Havell. 1836” lower right

$600 - $900

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112

114

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112 Frank W. Benson (1862-1951) Old Squaws, No. 2 signed “Frank W. Benson.” lower left drypoint, 5 by 10 in. numbered “107” lower right Paff #144, edition of 136

PROVENANCE: Private Collection of Frank W. Benson By descent in the family to his great grandson

$200 - $400

113 Roland Clark (1874-1957)

Three Etchings (one shown) each signed “Roland Clark” lower right The Ring-Neck Field, 1930 etching, 15 by 12 in. edition of 65, trial no. 2 Before The Squall, 1929 etching, 12 by 15 in. edition of 75 Open Water, 1928 etching, 15 by 12 in. edition of 75

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114 Roland Clark (1874-1957)

Before the Squall signed “Roland Clark” lower right etching and aquatint, 12 by 14 3⁄4 in.

$200 - $400

115 Richard E. Bishop (1887-1975) Two Prints (one shown)

Nor’easter, 1940 signed “Richard E Bishop” lower right etching and drypoint, 10 3⁄8 by 9 in. titled lower left edition of 100 From a Battery, 1926 signed “REBishop” lower right etching, 7 1⁄8 by 11 5⁄8 in. titled lower left edition of 64 PROVENANCE:

William B. Webster III Collection

$200 - $400

81


119

116

117

120

118

116 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969) Duck Hunting, 1963 signed “A. Lassell Ripley” lower right color print, 17 1⁄4 by 27 in. published and copyrighted in 1963 by Frost & Reed, Bristol and London, England, and The Sportsman’s Gallery of Art & Books, New York, New York

119 Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928) Two Sporting Prints (one shown) each signed in plate lower left

A Day’s Shooting and Gun Shy each chromolithograph, 10 1⁄2 by 15 1⁄2 in.

121 Print and Book

Owen J. Gromme (1896-1991) Bobwhites, 1983 color print, 17 1⁄2 by 23 1⁄2 in. signed “Owen J. Gromme” lower right edition 27 of 950 published by Wild Wings, Inc.

120 Three 19th Century Prints (one shown)

Mentzer, Michael and Coopey, Judith Redline, The World of Owen Gromme, 1983, no. 27/950, NIB.

Duck Shooting, c. 1930 stamped signature lower right drypoint, 8 3⁄4 by 13 3⁄4 in.

Bottom Fishing, 1831 colored engraving, painted by J. Pollard, published by T. Helme, 15 by 18 in.

Collection

$200 - $300

Clipper Ship “Ocean Express,” 1856 colored lithograph, published by N. Currier, 19 by 26 in.

$300 - $500

117 Aiden Lassell Ripley (1896-1969)

118 Levon West (1900-1968)

Duck Hunting, 1933 signed “Levon West imp.” lower right etching, 13 by 8 7⁄8 in. numbered “26.” and signed and dated in plate “Levon West 1933” lower left

$200 - $300 82

121

Fly Fishing, 1831 colored engraving, painted by J. Pollard, published by T. Helme, 14 by 17 in.

$200 - $300

PROVENANCE:

William B. Webster III


THE WINTER SALE 2019 SESSION II DECOYS AND FOLK ART

83


EDWARD T. PARSONS 1856-1937 | OXFORD, MD

84


Lots 122 - 152 are from the estate of

Seth Shannahan Jewell (1927-2018) Seth was descended from early Chesapeake Bay families,

collectors. She removed the “old” decoys from her rig,

two of her ancestors arriving in Maryland with Lord

and began attending local auctions. Madison Mitchell

Baltimore in 1634. She was very much her own person

was “a kissin’ cousin” and helped her to acquire

and lived life on her own terms.

Upper Bay ducks, while on the Lower Shore she was

She grew up on Morris Street in Oxford, in the home of

befriended by Alvin “Gunner” Meekins and Clarence

her grandfather Oliver Stevens Gallup. Seth accompanied

“Pap” Creighton who helped her to acquire Lower Shore

her grandfather fishing and hunting over his rig of Ed

decoys. She trusted her instincts and aesthetic eye,

Parsons decoys at his nearby “Ashland Farm.” She was

and was not afraid to take a chance on a decoy even if

later given Ashland Farm, which is now owned and

she was not sure who had carved it. In 1971 there were

hunted by one of her sons and his son. They no longer

audible gasps when she paid what at the time seemed a

shoot over Parsons decoys.

high price for a root-head swan. Seth shrugged it off and

Seth was a graduate of the University of Richmond,

commented that she would rather have that swan than

and was twice widowed. She hunted with both of her

spend the money on five or six lesser decoys.

husbands, and was an excellent shot. She was a member of the Talbot Rod and Gun Club and the Talbot Retriever Club. She bred and trained Labrador retrievers and competed in Field Trials. Her life’s passion, however, was promoting humane treatment of animals. For years she served as the president of the Talbot County Humane Society and led numerous cruelty investigations, one of which received national publicity. As a young widow Seth said that she was “not ready to retire to the bridge tables,” and in 1977 founded Shoreline Realty, where she had a productive career that spanned two decades. In the early 1970s, before early carvers were widely recognized as artists, and before there was widespread interest in collecting, Seth began collecting waterfowl decoys. At that time, there were few other female

85


EDWARD T. PARSONS 1856-1937 | OXFORD, MD

122

122 Miniature Canada Goose EDWARD T. PARSONS (1856-1937) OXFORD, MD, C. 1920 5 1⁄4 in. long

A rare miniature high-head goose decoy from Talbot County mounted on a hardwood base. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$1,400 - $1,800

123 Miniature Canvasback Hen EDWARD T. PARSONS (1856-1937) OXFORD, MD, C. 1920 5 1⁄4 in. long

123

A rare miniature high-head canvasback hen decoy from Talbot County mounted on a hardwood base. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$1,400 - $1,800

124 Early Miniature Bluebill Pair EDWARD T. PARSONS (1856-1937) OXFORD, MD, C. 1910 3 1⁄2 in. long

Among the earliest Talbot County miniature decoys to have surfaced, these birds share the same distinct Parsons paint pattern seen on his life-size working decoys. Original paint with some wear, minor cracks, dings, and flaking. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$1,400 - $1,800 124

125 Canvasback Pair

RICHARD L. TILGHMAN (1887-1937) EASTON, MD, C. 1920 15 1⁄2 in. long

This can pair was hunted at the famous Gross Coate Plantation in Easton, Maryland. Originally patented in 1658 to Roger Gross by Lord Baltimore, the farm was later obtained by the carver’s namesake in 1760. These decoys were constructed using copper nails with star-embossed heads. Signed by the maker with his “RT” initials etched into the lead weights of each. In old working paint with heavy gunning wear.

86


125

127

126

128

PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: James L. Trimble, “Richard Lloyd Tilgham: Talbot County Farmer, Sportsman and Decoy Maker,” Decoy Magazine, September/October 1997, p. 36, exact drake illustrated.

$700 - $1,000

126 Bluebill Drake

EDWARD T. PARSONS (1856-1937) OXFORD, MD, C. 1910 13 3⁄4 in. long

A painted-eye decoy with the maker’s signature underside tail cut and poured lead weight. Mix of original and working repaint with even wear, partially taken down. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$700 - $1,000

127 Iron Goldeneye Hen Wing Duck RICHARD L. TILGHMAN (1887-1937) EASTON, MD, C. 1930 14 1⁄4 in. long

Goldeneye sinkbox decoys are a true rarity. Documented examples by named makers in original paint are virtually unheard of, making this historic, iron wing duck one of the rarest to have surfaced. Original paint with gunning wear.

PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: James L. Trimble, “Richard Lloyd Tilgham: Talbot County Farmer, Sportsman and Decoy Maker,” Decoy Magazine, September/October 1997, p. 37, exact decoy illustrated. Robert H. Richardson, ed., Chesapeake Bay Decoys, Burtonsville, MD, 1991, p. 96, related drake illustrated.

$2,000 - $3,000

128 Early Canvasback Pair

EDMUND B. HARDCASTLE (1824-1899) EASTON, MD, C. 1880 14 in. long

A very early pair of Talbot County decoys, these are two of the most animated birds ever to come out of the county. John Sullivan reports in his book Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Decoys and Long Guns: Tales of Carroll’s Island Ducking Club that Edmund B. Hardcastle enjoyed several days of spring shooting in March of 1904 at the Carroll’s Island Ducking Club. Both decoys retain a “TOWNSEND” rig stencil on the bottom of each. In gunning repaint with heavy even wear. PROVENANCE: Townsend Rig Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell LITERATURE: C. John Sullivan, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Decoys and Long Guns: Tales of Carroll’s Island Ducking Club, Charleston, SC, 2008, p. 68.

$1,400 - $1,800

87


129

131

130

132

129 Miniature Hen Canvasback and Canada Goose ROBERT “BOB” MCGAW (1879-1958) HAVRE DE GRACE, MD, C. 1930 7 in. long

Two McGaw miniatures mounted on their original bases. Excellent original paint with minimal wear; canvasback has a hairline neck crack. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$500 - $700

131 Miniature Hissing Goose

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN W. (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, 1962 12 in. long

The Wards’ best grade of miniature, this animated cedar goose carving features a hissing pose, open bill, and raised wing tips. “Canada Goose, Ward Bros., Crisfield, MD. -1962-” is inscribed on the bottom. Original paint with minimal wear, including minor touch-up to reset neck. PROVENANCE:

130 Teal Hen Miniatures

OLIVER “TUTS” LAWSON (B. 1938) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1960 8 in. long

A blue-winged teal hen and a green-winged teal hen that display Lawson’s fine carving and paint. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$600 - $900

132 Two Miniature Decoys DAN BROWN (1930-2010) SALISBURY, MD, 1966 9 1⁄4 in. long

A goldeneye drake and a shoveler drake, both are signed and dated by the maker on the bottom. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE:

88

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell


133

135

134

136

133 Three Miniature Black Ducks

135 Cast-Iron English Setter Doorstop

All three are lightly signed in pencil on the bottom by the maker. Original paint with minimal wear; two have minor puppy chew marks.

As found.

MILES HANCOCK (1888-1974) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1950 6 1⁄4 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

134 Two Miniature Decoys

OLIVER “TUTS” LAWSON (B. 1938) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1967 3 in. and 9 1⁄4 in. long

A tiny Canada goose and a canvasback hen. The canvasback is dated 1967 and the goose is signed by the maker on the underside. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE:

HUBLEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY (1894-1965) LANCASTER, PA, C. 1930 15 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

136 Cast-Iron Boston Terrier Doorstop

HUBLEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY (1894-1965) LANCASTER, PA, C. 1930 10 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

89


137

137 Canada Goose

LOWER EASTERN SHORE, C. 1900 24 1â „2 in. long

This swimming goose by a talented maker features pronounced shoulders, sharp wing-cut carving, and a paddle tail. The back and sides are finished with strong scratch feather paint. Original paint with heavy gunning wear, a crack in back with old fill, and a scar in lower right side. Some restoration to neck and head, including a replaced bill. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$6,000 - $9,000

Seth Shannahan Jewell posing with Steve Ward brothers, circa 1975.

90


138

138 Canada Goose

L. TRAVIS WARD SR. (1863-1926) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1915 22 in. long

A high-head Ward goose with a slightly uplifted head and tail and what appears to be a “DBB” brand in the underside. The decoy retains a thick Havre de Grace gunning repaint. As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$700 - $1,000 139

139 Swimming Black Duck LLOYD J. TYLER (1898-1970) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1930 18 1⁄2 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan

Jewell LITERATURE: Henry Stansbury, Lloyd J. Tyler: Folk Artist, Decoy Maker, Burtonsville, MD, 1995, p. 18, related carving illustrated.

91


LLOYD PARKER

1859-1921 | PARKERTOWN, NJ

140

140 Brant

LLOYD PARKER (1859-1921) PARKERTOWN, NJ, C. 1900 18 in. long

A classic hollow Jersey brant in a swimming pose with carved bill detail, a groove between the wings, a thin paddle tail, and a rectangular inletted weight. The proceeds of the sale of this decoy will benefit the Talbot Humane Society. Original paint with gunning wear, a reset crack in neck, and a reset chip in tail. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 127, similar decoy illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., New Jersey Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, pp. 97-98, similar decoys illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500

92


141 Canvasback Drake

141

NORTH CAROLINA, C. 1920 18 1⁄2 in. long

An oversize decoy that retains a “TOWNSEND” rig stencil on the underside. In gunning paint with even wear, including a tight crack in neck. PROVENANCE: Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell LITERATURE: Kroghie Andresen, Gunnin’ Birds, Charlotte, NC, 2008, pp. 172-176, similar decoys illustrated.

142 Wigeon Drake

142

CHURCH ISLAND, NC, C. 1930 13 3⁄4 in. long

Marked with an incised “FR” on the underside, possibly for Frank Reese of Currituck. Old working paint with wear and gunning repair to a bill chip. PROVENANCE: Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$500 - $800

143 Redhead Drake

143

WAYLAND BAUM (1904-2007) (ATTR.) WANCHESE, NC, C. 1940 17 3⁄4 in. long

In old, possibly original, paint with heavy gunning wear, including neck cracks. PROVENANCE: Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

93


144

144 Preening Canada Goose C. 1900 20 1â „2 in. long

This Southern preener features a dramatically turned roothead that brings to mind the work of Charles Safford (1877-1957), Newburyport, Massachusetts. The underside of the large body is counter weighted with an iron bar. In working repaint with heavy gunning wear, and a check in the back. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, p. 158, decoy with similar neck form.

$10,000 - $15,000

94


LLOYD J. TYLER

1898-1970 | CRISFIELD, MD

145

145 Reaching Swan

LLOYD J. TYLER (1898-1970) (ATTR.) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1930 36 1⁄2 in. long

This is believed to be one of the only Tyler swans ever to come to light. The carving is in an imaginative swimming pose and displays the maker’s sharp uplifted wing tips. In-use repaint with minor flaking, wear, and age lines. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: Robert Bishop, American Folk Sculpture, New York, NY, 1985, p. 295, pl. 543, related example illustrated.

$2,000 - $3,000

95


146

148

147

149

146 Two Upper Bay Decoys A canvasback drake by Taylor Boyd (1856-1944) of Perryville, MD, and a bluebill drake by Robert McGaw (1879-1958) of Havre de Grace, MD. As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

147 Four Decoys

148 Two Mallard Drakes ILLINOIS RIVER

Two hollow decoys, one by Robert Bradbeer (1886-1955), Spring Valley, IL, c. 1920, and one attributed to Michael Vallero (1906-1992), Spring Valley, IL, c. 1930, with Edna Perdew paint. As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

16 ⁄2 in. long 1

Three canvasback drakes, one by Taylor Boyd, one by Charles Birch, and one by John Glenn, along with a redhead by Doug Jester with a “Holland Wrightson” rig stencil on the bottom. As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

149 Pintail Drake C. 1920 17 3⁄4 in. long

The underside has the rig marking “EK.” In old working repaint with even gunning wear, age lines, and a neck crack. PROVENANCE: Ed Keller Rig Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

96


150 Canada Goose

150

CHARLES BIRCH (1867-1956) WILLIS WHARF, VA, C. 1930 21 1⁄2 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

$600 - $900

151 Tip-Up Black Duck

151

C. 1930 13 1⁄2 in. long

Three laminated boards are joined to form this feeding decoy. The carved tail has fine scratch painted feathering. The underside has a dowel with a round lead weight and a wire anchor line bracket. Original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

152 Yellowlegs

152

GEORGE “WATTS” PENN (1866-1956) FORKED RIVER, NJ, C. 1910 9 1⁄2 in. long

A feeding shorebird decoy with an iron bill, raised wing tips, and a ten-inch-long wire stick. Original paint with gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Seth Shannahan Jewell

LITERATURE: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 172, pl. 377, similar decoys illustrated.

97


A. ELMER CROWELL 1862-1952 | EAST HARWICH, MA

153 Important Set of Twenty-Four Waterfowl Miniatures A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, C. 1930 2 1⁄2 to 5 3⁄4 in. long

Crowell created three different sets of miniature birds, twenty-five ducks, twenty-five songbirds, and twenty-five shorebirds, which he sold to not only his decoy buyers and seasonal tourists, but also schools and museums around the nation for species identification purposes. This rare group perfectly matches a Crowell waterfowl setlist, with the exception of a missing wigeon drake. A vast majority of the original Crowell sets have been broken up over the years, making this a rare opportunity to acquire a single flock with remarkable consistency from bird to bird. The group includes the following: Canada goose, brant, black duck, redhead hen and drake, mallard hen and drake, blue-winged teal drake, pintail hen and drake, American merganser drake, red-breasted merganser drake, merganser hen, hooded merganser drake, long-tailed duck drake, bufflehead drake, bluebill hen and drake, green-winged teal drake, ruddy duck drake, canvasback hen and drake, wood duck drake, and goldeneye drake.

The bluebill hen, wood duck, mallard hen, and ruddy duck bear the “A.E. Crowell MAKER East Harwich MASS” circular ink stamp, and all the others bear the maker’s rectangular stamp on the bottom of the bases. All birds are in original paint with minor wear including some chips and flaking, some are loose on their bases which show some discoloration on undersides from mounting residue. Goose and pintail heads and American merganser bill have been reset. Wood duck, redbreasted merganser, and goldeneye are missing parts of bills. PROVENANCE:

Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

LITERATURE: A. E. Crowell, “Cape Cod Memories,” in Duck Shooting along the Atlantic Tidewater, Eugene V. Connett, ed, New York, NY, 1947, pp. 59-60. Brian Cullity, The Songless Aviary, Hyannis, MA, 1992, pp. 90-99, similar birds illustrated. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019.

$18,000 - $24,000

List of Crowell’s miniature waterfowl. Courtesy of Heritage Museums & Gardens, Sandwich, MA.

98


99


Lots 154 - 167 are from a descendant of

L. H. LaMotte (1896-1984) Louis Howell “Red” LaMotte (1896-1984) was born in

Richard H. Moeller, a major early decoy collector.

Morristown, New Jersey, where he attended high school.

Moeller’s significant collection was bequeathed to the

He served as an ambulance driver for the American

Shelburne Museum, where his Cobb, Dudley, English,

Field Service during World War I and studied at Harvard

Holly, and Hudson decoys reside, alongside Barber’s

University from 1918-1919. After a successful career at

decoys, as the core of the museum’s decoy collection.

IBM where he rose to Executive Vice President, LaMotte retired to Casey Key, Florida, where he befriended

154

154 Ruddy Turnstone JOHN HORN OCEANVILLE, NJ, C. 1890 9 1⁄2 in. long

One of approximately seven Horn turnstones known to exist in original paint, this is the first time that this bird has been offered at auction. While the rarity of exceptional ruddy turnstones cannot be overstated, Horn decoys have not escaped the purview of the world’s top shorebird collectors, having resided on the shelves of the Noyes, O’Brien, McCleery, Giberson, and Doherty collections. This decoy displays pronounced cheek carving, a beautifully contoured body, and a delicate thin tail. With impeccable provenance and striking paint, this is not only one of the finest Horn shorebirds to come on the market, but also one of the finer New Jersey ruddy turnstones. Original paint with light gunning wear.

100

PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 175, pl. 388, rigmates illustrated. John M. Levinson and Somers G. Headley, Shorebirds: The Birds, The Hunters, The Decoys, Centreville, MD, 1991, p. 86, pl. 6-25, related decoy illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 220, lot 606, rigmate illustrated.

$7,000 - $10,000


IRA D. HUDSON

1873-1949 | CHINCOTEAGUE, VA

155

155 Dowitcher

IRA D. HUDSON (1873-1949) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1900 11 in. long

A stylish dowitcher with a plump breast and a thin neck and tail. Original paint with even gunning wear, including some flaking. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

LITERATURE: John M. Levinson and Somers G. Headley, Shorebirds, Centreville, MD, 1991, acknowledgments page, p. 102, pl. 7-6, similar decoy illustrated. Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Chincoteague Carvers, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 140, similar decoys illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Southern Decoys of Virginia and the Carolinas, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 73, similar example illustrated.

$3,000 - $5,000

101


156

156 Running Yellowlegs C. 1890 12 in. long

This early Atlantic Coast gunning decoy shows approximately thirty shot holes attesting to its baptism in the field by fire. Appears to be original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$1,200 - $1,800

157 Red Knot

NORTH CAROLINA, C. 1890 9 1⁄4 in. long

157

An exceptional example of one-hundredtwenty-five-year-old Southern sporting folk art. This North Carolina decoy comes out of the L. H. LaMotte Collection and this marks the first time it has been offered at auction. The carving is very likely made by the same hand as lot 253 out of the Ely collection. Both the LaMotte and Ely shorebird offerings were built by past generations and both collections amazingly appear to have ceased to have been added to after the 1960’s. Excellent original paint with even wear. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: Kroghie Andersen and Phillip Harvey, Shorebird Decoys of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, 2015, cover related examples illustrated.

$1,000 - $2,000 158

158 Running Red Knot AVON AREA, NC, C. 1930 7 3⁄4 in. long

A skyward gazing sandpiper. In gunning paint with wear. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: Kroghie Andersen and Phillip Harvey, Shorebird Decoys of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, 2015, pp. 138-140, related examples illustrated.

$500 - $700

102


159

159 Exceedingly Rare Black-Bellied Plover CAPT. JONAS SPRAGUE BEACH HAVEN, NJ, C. 1900 9 1⁄2 in. long

This marks the first time this decoy has ever been offered at auction. Excellent original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 169, pl. 359, related example illustrated.

$500 - $800 160

160 Cardinal MAINE, C. 1930 9 in. long

Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

161 Hollow Curlew

WINSLOW FAMILY (ATTR.) NANTUCKET, MA, C. 1870 14 1⁄2 in. long

Few hollow shorebirds were made beyond those found on Nantucket, lending to the island’s reputation for craftsmanship. Indeed, this early featherweight decoy retains a tight body seam, even without the use of nails or fasteners. In a mix of original and gunning paint with an old whipped bill repair and gunning wear.

161

PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$800 - $1,200

103


DANIEL LAKE LEEDS 1852-1922 | PLEASANTVILLE, NJ

162

162 Curlew

DANIEL LAKE LEEDS (1852-1922) PLEASANTVILLE, NJ, C. 1890 14 1⁄2 in. long

This marks the first time that this curlew has ever been offered at public auction. Of the decoy’s maker, Daniel Lake Leeds, William J. Mackey, Jr. writes that he carved “...bird decoys including sanderling, plover, yellowlegs, turnstones, and curlew. His own rig, numbering over fifty snipe, came to light a few years ago. It was probably the greatest single find of its kind in New Jersey decoy history. The Dan Leeds birds have a stylized exaggeration that has an artistic appeal.” Revealing just how early this decoy was acquired, an original paper collector’s note attached to the underside of this curlew reads “Leeds family curlew- Leeds Pt. NJ. Best Jersey example I have- tail bitten by dog- 35.00.” Original paint with light gunning wear and restoration to tail.

PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: Milton C. Weiler and William J. Mackey, Jr., Classic Shorebird Decoys: A Portfolio of Paintings, New York, NY, 1971, pl. 11, Mackey text. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 176, pl. 392, rigmate illustrated. John M. Levinson and Somers G. Headley, Shorebirds: The Birds, The Hunters, The Decoys, Centreville, MD, 1991, contents page and p. 93, pl. 6-35, rigmate illustrated. Adele Earnest, The Art of The Decoy: American Bird Carvings, New York, NY, 1965, p. 53, pl. 30, rigmate illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000

104


163

165

164

166

163 Curlew

165 Dowitcher

As found.

As found.

PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$600 - $900

$300 - $500

164 Feeding Yellowlegs

166 Two Shorebird Decoys

THORNE RIG JAMAICA BAY, LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1850 14 1⁄2 in. long

RUBEN C. CORLISS (1882-1976) MANAHAWKIN, NJ, C. 1910 9 in. long

A rare shorebird by this maker, who is said to have been a bird hunting guide and friend of Babe Ruth’s. He was also a Chief Petty Officer and surfman for the U.S. Coast Guard. Original paint with gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

CAPT. JONAS SPRAGUE (ATTR.) BEACH HAVEN, NJ, C. 1900 10 1⁄4 in. long

YELLOWLEGS J. N. DODGE DECOY FACTORY (1883-1893) DETROIT, MI, C. 1890 12 in. long ROBIN SNIPE FROM NJ, C. 1900 9 1⁄2 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$300 - $500

167 Four Shorebirds and a Whistle (not shown) C. 1900 8 1⁄4 in. and 11 1⁄4 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE: Richard H. Moeller Collection L. H. LaMotte Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

105


Simeon Borden (1798–1856), Map of Cape Cod, 1844.

106


168

107


168 Early Hollow Running Curlew MASSACHUSETTS, C. 1850 19 1⁄4 in. long

Every so often, the unearthing of a singular decoy captures the imaginations of the decoy and folk art collecting communities. Such is the story of this curlew. In 1997 Decoy Magazine described this one-of-a-kind decoy as “one of the best curlew decoys we’ve seen.” The first major decoy collector to acquire this bird was Thomas K. Figge. The Figge Collection consisted of over one hundred waterfowl decoys and is revered as one of the finest collections ever assembled. Though primarily focused on ducks and geese, Mr. Figge made three important shorebird acquisitions: this reaching decoy, a Phillips rig running curlew, and a rig of Nantucket curlew. During its tenure in the Figge Collection, this bird was selected for the One Hundred Greatest book. Discussing the decoy, Figge recounts: “When Stevie called me about this bird I could tell by his voice that it was worth checking out. Though shorebirds were in no way my primary pursuit, I asked to see some photos. When they arrived in the mail, I was immediately intrigued. The bird was big and bold, not like most shorebirds I had seen. I told him to buy it.” As with many great decoys, this curlew possesses a powerful presence. Fashioned in a running pose, it measures over nineteen inches from the tip of the delicate octagonal bill to the classic “Lincolnesque” split-tail carving.

One of the longest shorebirds known, it reveals a multiple of nuances that engage the viewer. Its glass eyes are set within deep eye grooves that give the sculpture a compelling gaze. The detachable head, when aligned correctly, is not only fully extended, but also slightly turned and cocked. The chine of the throat imparts movement to the decoy’s out-stretched neck. Freely resting on a dowel, the removable head is fashioned for ease of transport, similar to the dovetailed geese and shorebirds. This rare feature speaks to the improbability of the head and body remaining together for over 150 years. Ironically, it was this give in the neck that kept the delicate bill intact over the years. The thoughtful maker went to lengths to create a lighter gunning model, hollowing the two-piece body. The curlew’s plumage is addressed from tip to tail with light-on-dark and dark-on-light stippling; these merge seamlessly in front of the high-contrast wing delineation. Original paint with even gunning wear and minor darkening to flaking. PROVENANCE: Thomas K. Figge Collection, acquired 1997 Grant Nelson Collection LITERATURE: Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, p. 82, exact decoy illustrated. Jackson Parker, “Unknown Curlew Causes Excitement at Massachusetts Americana Auction,” Decoy Magazine, November/December 1997, pp. 3 and 34, exact decoy illustrated twice.

$70,000 - $80,000

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“When I received the postcard announcement of his annual Veterans’ Day Americana auction from Carl R. Nordblom, the Cambridge Massachusetts Auctioneer, my eye was caught by a split-tailed curlew amidst the jumble of chairs, chests, and china. It looked good enough to lure me to the jam-packed viewing room at the Holiday Inn in Dedham, Massachusetts. When I asked to see the curlew it was brought to me in a carton with the head separated from the body, and they ordered me to ‘Handle it with care and don’t try to assemble it!’ I didn’t have to. It was splendid, and in good condition, one of the best curlews I had ever seen.” - Jackson Parker, Decoy Magazine, 1997

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THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

169.1

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BISHOPS HEAD WIGEON PAIR

C. 1932

169.2

“Steve Ward often stated that the widgeon was his favorite bird…this species allowed the Ward brothers to give full expression to their artistry in color and form.” - Rod J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys

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THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD 169 Bishops Head Wigeon Pair

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN W. (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1928 16 1⁄4 in. long

Maryland decoy historian C. John Sullivan recounts that the reputation of Lem and Steve Ward “spread throughout the Chesapeake region, and they produced decoys for gunners in the Upper Bay as well. A few of the gunning clubs ordered Ward decoys, and in some cases a particular Ward style became associated with a specific club.” The Bishops Head style is one such example. Known for their pronounced crowns, paddle tails, detailed body paint, high heads, and full cheeks, this wigeon pair showcase all the traits associated with the Bishops Head style. While this distinct style is most commonly found in geese, it is also seen in a few mallards and black ducks. Of the numerous patterns designed by the Ward brothers, the ones associated with the Bishops Head Club models are among the most coveted. The Bishops Head moniker emanates from the rigs made for Colonel Albanus Phillips (1871-1949). In 1921 Phillips purchased an eight square mile property located just south of Cambridge, Maryland, for use as a gunning club.

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The Bishops Head Club was a two-story lodge with its own man-made tidal pool. The lodge had a large great room with a fireplace, a locker room, and bedrooms on the second level. There was also a caretaker’s house, live decoy pens, and kennels. The boat dock was also used by members of the Cambridge Yacht Club, which Phillips also founded. An avid hunter, this camp provided Phillips, his brother Levi, and W. Grayson Winterbottom, their business partner, with a place of respite from their booming food canning business. Phillips was widely known throughout the Eastern Shore and Presidents Grover Cleveland, Teddy Roosevelt, and Franklin Roosevelt were known to have been guests at his lodge. During its heyday, Bishops Head was considered one of the Eastern Shore’s great hunting clubs. The Ward Brothers’ Decoys authors Gard and McGrath write that “Steve Ward often stated that the widgeon was his favorite bird…this species allowed the Ward brothers to give full expression to their artistry in color and form.” A study of the few gunning Ward wigeon that remain shows


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that Steve’s preference for the baldpate carried into the exceptional and dynamic carvings he made of this species. These wigeon with expressive turned heads impart a strong interplay between the hen and drake rarely seen in decoy pairs. Lem expertly applied paint using a full suite of techniques to capture the likeness of species, while also appealing to his patrons. Each decoy is identified and signed in paint on the underside with “MALE [and FEMALE] WIDGEON WARD’S DECOYS CRISFIELD, M.D.” The undersides also bear markings for the Kirson Collection and the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art. The pair were separated for years until the consignor reunited them in 2010. The drake alone was selected for the “One Hundred Greatest” book. Now with its mate, this pair represents the only two Ward Bishops Head model wigeon carvings known. While Ward Brothers wigeon are among their premier species, few were made and virtually no other early pairs survive in such pristine condition. The form, paint, condition, rarity, age, provenance, and exhibition history of this pair place them among the very best Ward decoys in existence. Not simply among the finest Wards, these carvings embody two of the best of the species by any maker. Original paint with minimal wear, including a very small chip to the drake’s bill tip.

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Connecticut, acquired from the Wards, c. 1928 (drake) Donald Kirson Collection LITERATURE: Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Timeless Treasures: Ward Brothers Decoys, Salisbury, MD, 2007, p. 59, exact drake illustrated. Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, pp. 160-161, exact drake decoy illustrated. Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, pp. 89-90. C. John Sullivan, Waterfowling on the Chesapeake, 1819-1936, Baltimore, MD, 2003. The Ward Museum, Masters of Decoy and Wildfowl Carvings: The Kirson Collection, Salisbury, MD, 2011, p. 3 and back cover, exact pair illustrated. EXHIBITED:

Salisbury, Maryland, Timeless Treasures: Ward Brothers Decoys, The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, August 31 - November 11, 2007, drake exhibited. Salisbury, Maryland, Masters of Decoy and Wildfowl Carvings: The Kirson Collection, The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, July 2011 - February 2012, pair exhibited. $125,000 - $175,000

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JOHN “DADDY” HOLLY OR JAMES T. HOLLY 1818-1892 and 1855-1935 | HAVRE DE GRACE, MD

“The Holly family is best known as the originator of the Havre de Grace Style of decoy carving. Their style of smooth flowing bodies with upswept tails is synonymous with the thousands of decoys that come from the Havre de Grace side of the Susquehanna River Flats as they flow into the Chesapeake Bay. “The most prolific and most artistic of the Holly family was James T. Holly (18551935). He built sinkboxes and bushwhacks boats, painted duck shooting scenes and sailing vessels, and carved most species of waterfowl that frequented the Upper Chesapeake. His decoys exhibit the sleekest and raciest style of any of the carvers from this region. The rarest of his carvings are his magnificent full size swan decoys. The very few known examples exhibit the most fluid sculpted bodies of any of the Chesapeake swans. This well documented Swan decoy presents itself as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for not just dedicated waterfowling historians but connoisseurs as well.” - C. John Sullivan C. John Sullivan is an authority on the history of the Upper Chesapeake Bay and its decoys. He has served as a consultant to the Maryland Historical Society, the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, the Havre de Grace Decoy Museum, and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. As an author, Sullivan has published over a dozen volumes, including Waterfowling: The Upper Chesapeake’s Legacy, Decoys and Stories, and, most recently, Waterfowling on the Chesapeake, 1819-1936. He also co-authored the Havre de Grace Decoy Museum Collection book Captured in Wood and has published numerous articles.

The highly nuanced bill carving seen on the McCleery Holly canvasback pair is nearly identical to that seen on the Gifford and Eshenbaugh (see fig. 1) Holly swans.

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THE GIFFORD HOLLY SWAN C. 1885

Lot115 170


JOHN “DADDY” HOLLY OR JAMES T. HOLLY 1818-1892 and 1855-1935 | HAVRE DE GRACE, MD

170 The Gifford Holly Swan

JOHN “DADDY” HOLLY (1818-1892) OR JAMES T. HOLLY (1855-1935) HAVRE DE GRACE, MD, C. 1885 20 in. tall by 34 3⁄4 in. long

Many consider the form of these early swans from Havre de Grace, Maryland to be the finest from any region. There are only five documented examples of these birds attributed to John “Daddy” Holly, James T. Holly, and Sam Barnes (1857-1926) known to exist. In addition to The Gifford Holly Swan, two of these five are held in distinguished private collections. Of these, one originates from the Thomas Eshenbaugh Collection, and was subsequently acquired by Thomas K. Figge as the number one pick out of the William Butler collection. That decoy now resides in one the world’s top collections, that of Paul Tudor Jones II (see fig.1). The other was collected by a top Southern decoy collector and now resides in the Henry H. Stansbury Collection (see fig. 2). That decoy, illustrated in J. Evans McKinney’s Decoys of the Susquehanna Flats and Their Makers, is the same length as the Gifford swan, measuring 34 ¾ inches long. A fourth comparable example, collected by Joel Barber, is held in the permanent collection of the Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont (see fig. 3). The final example resides in the collection of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Maryland (see fig. 4). Earlier attributions to some of these swan decoys have been given to fellow Havre de Grace decoy maker Sam Barnes (1857-1926). While Barnes was a highly accomplished carver in his own right, a comparison of each maker’s bills, heads, and tails clearly reveals the Gifford, Eshenbaugh, and Stansbury swans to be the work of the Hollys. A close examination of their bill carving shows a level of refinement not found on any Barnes decoy. This important gunning decoy reveals all the carving nuances of the maker as well as the species with a graceful neck that flows to a pronounced breast, creating an “S” curve. The base of the head flares where it meets the slightly raised neck shelf, and the gentle arc of the back dips before sweeping to an uplifted rounded tail. The sides of the bird drop into a V-hull that flattens at the very bottom. Fellow Maryland carver Severn W. Hall (1909-1995) discusses this exact Holly swan in great detail in a threepage letter to Dr. G. Edmund Gifford, dated September 22, 1975. Dr. Gifford had purchased the decoy from Lou Pennock

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(1888-1969) of Greenbank, Maryland. Hall recounts a period from his childhood, from age nine to seventeen (1919-1927), when he played and helped around the wharves of North East Creek. “Some of us would often wander into the old dilapidated shed owned and used by Capt. Frank Jackson (deceased) [1873-1934] for storing the remains (off-season remnants) of his assorted marine equipment, fish nets and his sink-box ducking rig. Never once can I recall Cap’t Frank reprimanding us immatures when we chose to drag out the two old swan decoys and ride on then [sic] as a make-believe hobby horse or for what ever purpose our imagination had to offer at the time. “After I graduated from High School in 1926 until approxiately [sic] 1947, memories of the juvenile pleasures associated with those two swan decoys were passé, mindless personally speaking. “So be it, I was greatly involved from the early 1940’s up until October 1959 in making, repairing and painting duck and geese decoys. Lo and behold, as mention above and being more exacting; September 1947 Lou P. (Pennock) loitered into my little shop at 4 Thomas Avenue, N. East, Md. He had an old swan decoy under one arm and its original wooden head in several pieces. The total of all the image was in a bad state of repair. Lou P. asked for rather inquired of me as to whether I would fix it up and paint it in my spare time for him. Knowing and recognizing him with respect as being an experienced Susquehanna Flats wild gunner and guide, by this he was able to hold my attention on the subject at hand. So in the concordant conversation I ask him where he got decoy. Lou P. informed me that he had gotten it from Cap’t Frank Jackson. As I recall after hearing this my enthusiam [sic] was inspired to a point of visualizing, that this was one of those two swan decoys that highlighted my young attention years ago.” Hall agreed to repair the swan and, several weeks later, returned the decoy to Pennock. From the archives of Dr. G. Edmund Gifford, Jr. (1930-1981), it is known that Gifford purchased this swan directly from Pennock prior to 1969.


THE GIFFORD HOLLY SWAN C. 1885

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Knowing he had something special, Dr. Gifford researched this swan in earnest. A graduate of the University of Maryland, Gifford was an amateur botanist, enthusiastic birdwatcher, and avid historian. He wrote dozens of scholarly essays, many revolving around his fellow naturalists, including “John James Audubon’s Baltimore Physician Patrons” and “John James Audubon and His Charleston Physician Friends.” He also published the book “Cecil County, Maryland, 1608-1850: As Seen By Some Visitors, and Several Essays on Local History.” Always intrigued by Maryland’s rich waterfowling heritage, and this bird in particular, Dr. Gifford contacted the Historical Society of Cecil County in December 1979, sending them a photograph of the swan he had acquired from Pennock. The president of the Society responded excitedly asking: “I wonder if you have considered donating the swan decoy to the Society, or perhaps lending it to us for some specific length of time for display. I’m not sure how many people now living in this area who are decoy buffs have actually seen a Sam Barnes [Holly] swan.”

Dr. Gifford, however, politely declined. The underside retains remnants of a label identifying the decoy as “Property of Dr. George Gifford.” Gifford also learned of the famous Holly swan at the Shelburne Museum from the Barber Collection. The 1961 publication Decoys at Shelburne Museum reports that their iconic decoy “...has been seen by more people, either in photographs or in actuality, than any other American decoy.” The authors continue, “Probably the most photographed decoy in America at this writing, it has been exhibited in countless shows in this country and in 1958 was on display at the Brussels Universal and International Exhibition.” In recounting the discovery of his Holly swan, Barber states, “...I am a collector, and swan decoys are the rarest of them all. It seemed to me that day that I had discovered, to quote Frank Forester: ‘The King of waterfowl—the superb and incomparable Wild Swan.” The beauty of form, provenance, condition, and rarity of this swan place it as a pinnacle carving of the species. In excellent gunning paint with neck reset by Severn Hall in 1947. The bird features a pleasing patina with even craquelure, and gunning wear, including some flaking, mostly to head, back, and tail.

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JOHN “DADDY” HOLLY OR JAMES T. HOLLY 1818-1892 and 1855-1935 | HAVRE DE GRACE, MD

170

Lot 170, The Gifford Swan from the sink box gunning rig of Captain Frank Jackson (1873-1934) of North East, Maryland.

PROVENANCE: Sinkbox gunning rig of Captain Frank Jackson, North East, Maryland Lou Pennock Rig, Greenbank, Maryland, acquired from the above Dr. George Edmund Gifford, Jr. Collection, acquired from the above Private Collection, by descent in the family Private Collection, Pennsylvania, acquired 2009 LITERATURE: Frank Maresca & Roger Ricco, American Vernacular, New York, NY, 2002, p. 37, related example illustrated. C. John Sullivan, “The Hollys of Havre de Grace,” Decoy Magazine, Jan/Feb 1992, pp. 8-13. Joel Barber, Wild Fowl Decoys, Garden City, NY, 1936, p. 134 and pl. 1 and 104, related example illustrated. Linda and Gene Kangas, Decoys, Paducah, KY, 1992, pp. 161 and 262-263, pl. C-2, 481, 485, related examples illustrated. Adele Earnest, The Art of the Decoy: American Bird Carvings, New York, NY, 1965, p. 82. David S. Webster and William Kehoe, Shelburne Museum

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Decoys, Shelburne, VT, 1961, pp. 98-99, related example illustrated. Joe Engers, ed., The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, San Diego, CA, 1990, pp. 138-139, related example illustrated. J. Evans McKinney, Decoys of the Susquehanna Flats and Their Makers, Ocean City, MD, 1990, pp. 14, 21, related example illustrated. Joe Engers, “Chesapeake Bay Gunning Decoys,” Maryland Magazine, Autumn 1991, pp. 18-19, related example illustrated. Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Sporting Sale 2009, July 15-16, 2009, lot 228 and back cover, exact decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, spine and p. 27, related example illustrated. Paul A. Johnsgard, The Bird Decoy: An American Art Form, Lincoln, NE, 1976, title page and p. 24, fig. 2, closely related example illustrated. R. H. Richardson, Chesapeake Bay Decoys, Cambridge, MD, title page, closely related example illustrated. $65,000 - $85,000


fig. 1, This important swan decoy was the first pick out of the Thomas Eshenbaugh Collection, purchased by William Butler, Joe French and Hal Sorensen in the 1960s. The decoy was loaned to the William Penn Memorial Museum in 1967, and was also the first pick out of the William Butler Collection, acquired by Thomas K. Figge in 1995. It now resides in the collection of Paul Tudor Jones II. Image courtesy of Stephen O’Brien Jr. Fine Arts.

The Eshenbaugh Holly Swan Figure 1. This important swan decoy was the first pick out of the Thomas Eshenbaugh collection, purchased by William Butler, Joe French and Hal Sorenson. The decoy was loaned to the William Penn Memorial Museum in 1967.

fig. 2, The Stansbury Holly Swan is featured on the title page of Chesapeake Bay Decoys, as well as on the title page of The Bird Decoy: An American Art Form. Additionally, it was chosen as the swan for the Maryland chapter of The Great Book Wildfowl Decoys.swan It wasdecoy the topwas decoy lotfirst at auction Figure 1. of This important the pick out of the Thomas Eshenbaugh in 1987 besting the Phillips Rig running curlew and Cook collection, purchased by William Butler, Joe French and Hal Sorenson. The decoy was Preening Crowell Goldeneye.Image courtesy of Joe Engers, loaned to the William Penn Memorial Museum in 1967. Decoy Magazine.

The Stansbury Holly Swan

fig. 3, This swan, originally from the collection of Joel Barber, was gifted to the Shelburne Museum by J. Watson Jr., Harry H., and Samuel B. Webb in 1952. in 1961, the museum reported it to be, “Probably the most photographed decoy in America...it has been exhibited in countless shows in this country and in 1958 was on display at the Brussels Universal and International Exhibition.”Image courtesy of a descendent of Dr. G. Edmund Gifford, Jr.

Figure 2. This swan, originally from the collection of Joel Barber, is in the permanent collection of the Shelburne Museum, Vermont.

Figure 2. This swan, originallyThe from the collection of Joel Shelburne Barnes (attr.) SwanBarber, is in the permanent collection of the Shelburne Museum, Vermont.

fig. 4, This important swan decoy was donated to the museum in 1969 by Mrs. Sifford Peare. Image courtesy of The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

Lot 228. The Gifford Swan from the sink box gunning rig of Captain Frank Jackson (1873-1934) of North East, Maryland.

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime 104 Museum Barnes or Holly Swan

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171 Rare Flying Black Duck

IRA D. HUDSON (1873-1949) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, 1947 20 in. long with a 24 1⁄4 in. wingspan

Through sculptures such as this one, Hudson planted his flag as the South’s greatest waterfowl folk artist of the era. In Ira D. Hudson and Family, historian Henry Stansbury writes that “of all of Hudson’s carvings, his flyers, standers and walkers are likely his greatest artistic contribution to the folk art community...Hudson’s decoratives were not bound by function, but were rather whimsical interpretations of waterfowl in nature. It was a world that Ira Hudson knew well.” This resourceful maker carved his decoys from a variety of wood types, including driftwood and old ships’ masts. In this carving he chose balsa for its light weight for use as a wall hanging. In addition to working decoys, Hudson carved miniatures, decoratives, and fish. Always an innovative maker, he portrayed his life-like carvings in a variety of positions. His hissing geese, turning ducks, and spread-wing decoratives exemplify the animation in his carvings. Hudson enlisted the help of his family to fill his numerous carving orders. All nine children learned under his wing and contributed in some capacity to his carving. Like most of his best decoratives, this bird was finished in Delbert Hudson’s finest scratch paint. The underside of the left wing bears the inscription “MAKER IRA HUDSON CHINCOTEAGUE VIRGINIA PAINTING DELBERT HUDSON 1947.”

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This bold flyer is among Hudson’s most successful and dramatic creations. Mounted on a wall or a beam, it holds a commanding presence. The outstretched head is turned and has full cheeks, eye grooves, and carved bill detail. True to Hudson’s distinctive style, the fluted tail echoes the head and is also turned slightly to the left, giving the bird a full arch from tip-to-tail. Hudson fliers have long been held in high esteem, residing in the noted collections of William J. Mackey, Jr., Donal C. O’Brien, Jr., William H. Purnell, Jr., Henry H. Stansbury, and The Ward Museum. This full-size flying black duck is one of Hudson’s rarest and most collectable forms. Original paint with even wear, minor touch-up to wing joints, replaced left wing tip, and some green paint spatter mostly on underside. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Virginia Dr. Samuel “Jack” Marsh Collection LITERATURE: Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Chincoteague Carvers, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 146, similar carving illustrated.

$18,000 - $24,000


IRA D. HUDSON

1873-1949 | CHINCOTEAGUE, VA

171

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LEMUEL T. WARD 1896-1984 | CRISFIELD, MD

172

172 Feeding Hudsonian Curlew LEMUEL T. WARD (1896-1984) CRISFIELD, MD, 1964 9 3⁄4 in. tall, 12 in. long

This important Ward carving was collected by noted author, sportsman, marksman, and philanthropist Russell B. Aitken. Decorative shorebirds are among the rarest carvings executed by the Wards as they focused primarily on waterfowl. This feeding curlew is an exhibition of the talents that enabled Lem to become one of the nation’s premier early decorative bird carvers, along with A. Elmer Crowell. A plaque on the base is marked “HUDSONIAN CURLEW BY L. T. WARD 1964.” Original paint with minimal wear, craquelure to end grain, reset upper mandible, and minor cracks in leg putty. PROVENANCE: Russell B. Aitken Collection Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Christie’s, The Russell B. Aitken Collection of Waterfowl Decoys, New York, NY, 2003, lot 1266, exact carving illustrated.

$16,000 - $24,000

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123


CASSIUS SMITH 1847-1907 | MILFORD, CT

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173 Swimming Gadwall CASSIUS SMITH (1847-1907) MILFORD, CT, C. 1890 17 1⁄4 in. long

The extreme rarity of vintage gadwall decoys cannot be overstated with virtually no significant examples in original paint surfacing, outside of Louisiana and the J. N. Dodge Decoy Factory. In fact, research may find this to be the only Atlantic Coast Gadwall decoy dating back to the nineteenth century. Rarity aside, the form and paint of this hollow swimming decoy make it one of the finest waterfowl carvings produced on either shore of Long Island Sound. Cassius Smith is recorded as a market gunner and skilled carver who supplied wild waterfowl to his brother George, who owned a hotel in Milford, Connecticut, prior to the passing of the Migratory Bird Act of 1918. Displaying crisp lines paired with full features and soft brush work, both the form and the paint bear a strong resemblance to the work of John Blair Sr. (1842-1928) of Philadelphia. The head, in a swimming position, has excellent bill carving and pronounced cheeks. A central chine is seen on the top of the head and again on top of the maker’s signature delicate pointed tail. Additionally, the carver chose to incorporate sculpted wing separation behind the head. The underside is branded “D. A. YOUNG” and retains the museum code “16358” on the left side of the breast. A rigmate merganser bearing a nearly identical “16354” code is featured in the One Hundred Greatest book and resides 124

in the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Haid. The Historic Charleston Foundation’s 2013 exhibition catalog, The Allure of the Decoy, showcasing the Haid collection, notes that these birds “were found in a private museum in Mattituck, Long Island in the 1980’s. All of these decoys were hollow, full bodied, and elegantly painted.” Original paint with minimal gunning wear, minor spot touch-up to screw holes. PROVENANCE: D. A. Young Rig Private Museum, Mattituck, Long Island, New York Rusty and Dianna Johnson Collection LITERATURE: Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys, Paducah, KY, 1992, p. 296, pl. 562, exact decoy illustrated. Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, pp. 74-75, rigmate merganser illustrated. Alan G. Haid and Brandy Culp, The Allure of the Decoy, Charleston, SC, 2013, pp. 30-31, rigmate merganser illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 176, rigmate illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys: A North American Survey, Spanish Fork, UT, 1983, p. 205, pl. 26, related mallard illustrated.

$14,000 - $18,000


CHAUNCEY WHEELER

1888-1945 | ALEXANDRIA BAY, NY

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174 Flying Blue-Winged Teal Pair CHAUNCEY WHEELER (1888-1945) ALEXANDRIA BAY, NY, 1934 15 1⁄2 in. long

A rare pair of flying teal. Regarding this life-size hen, Chance author Harold Rieser III writes, “the only hen known to exist of this size.” Inscriptions on the back of the drake read “Chauncey Wheeler, Alex. Bay, Nov- 24- 1934” and Harold B. Evans’ collecting note “acquired 1/14/67 from Mrs. Jas. Tousant, Chauncey Wheeler’s daughter, HBE.” Evans was a renowned collector from Watertown, New York. Both are in original paint with minimal wear. The hen has touch-up to underside and back of bill, repair to neck, and a restored wing tip. The drake is in excellent original condition.

PROVENANCE: Harold B. Evans Collection (drake) Private Collection LITERATURE: Harold W. Reiser III, Chauncey Wheeler, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 84, exact hen illustrated, and p. 97, related drake illustrated. EXHIBITED:

Salisbury, Maryland, Chance: the Decoys of Chauncey Wheeler, Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, 1999. (hen) $16,000 - $20,000

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A. ELMER CROWELL 1862-1952 | EAST HARWICH, MA

175

175 Pickerel Carving

176 Important Miniature Curlew

An exceedingly rare and well-executed carving by one of the world’s greatest wood carvers. Less than a dozen fish carvings by this maker have ever surfaced.

One of Crowell’s earliest and finest miniature shorebird carvings. The thin mottle-painted base, the style of painted feather application on the bird, and the dropped wing carving date this bird right at the turn of the twentieth century. Very few of the maker’s earliest shorebird miniatures have ever surfaced outside of those made for Dr. John C. Phillips and those collected by William V. Tripp, and two groups owned by a private Maryland Collector. Further attesting to collectors’ proclivity for this miniature species, the only Crowell miniature in the entire McCleery auction was a “Jack Curlew.”

A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, 1936 fish is 17 in. long, board is 21 in. long

Mounted on its original artist designed and painted bevelededge board, Crowell has created the illusion of a live pickerel hovering underwater. Crowell’s fastidious attention to detail is revealed in this pickerel with its perfect proportions and accurate paint. Raised carving to the fish’s mouth, gills, and fins give further life to the piece. The work is proudly signed in ink “AE Crowell, East Harwich Mass Cape Cod July 13, 1936” in the maker’s best script. It also retains Crowell’s rectangular stamp on the back. Original paint with minimal wear, pelvic fin missing, and a minor varnish drip near tail. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Kingston, New York

LITERATURE: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019, exact fish illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000 176

A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, C. 1900 3 1⁄2 in. long

The underside of the base is marked with the maker’s round ink stamp and retains a small paper label on which “Jack Curlew” is written in Crowell’s hand. Hudsonian curlews were referred to as “jack curlews” by nineteenth-century gunners. Original paint with minor wear. LITERATURE: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019, exact bird illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 224, lot 626, related example illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000

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177

179

178

180

177 Miniature Flying Pheasant

179 Miniature Quail

An early, well-executed flushing ring-necked pheasant with the maker’s stamp on the bottom of the driftwood base. Excellent original paint with very minor flaking, one reset wing.

An early carved and painted bobwhite quail with remnant makers tag on bottom. Original paint with wear and a chip to left corner of tail.

PROVENANCE:

$300 - $500

RUSS E. BURR (1887-1955) HINGHAM, MA, C. 1930 4 1⁄2 in. tall

Acquired from RJG Antiques

ALBERT .J. DITMAN (1884-1974) WILLIAMSTOWN, MA, C. 1940 3 in. tall

$500 - $700

180 Miniature Grouse 178 Miniature Flying Pintail Drake GEORGE W. REINBOLD (1885-1946) LANSDOWNE, PA, C. 1940 6 1⁄4 in. long

A stellar flying pintail miniature signed “Reinbold” on the underside of one wing. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE: Collection of Alfred Ely Private Collection by descent

ALBERT .J. DITMAN (1884-1974) NEW YORK, NY, 1940 4 1⁄2 in. tall

Signed with makers conjoined “AJD” initials on the base. Original paint, touch-up to bill, minimal wear. PROVENANCE: Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection Private Collection

$600 - $800

$300 - $500

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“BOSS” HOOVER MALLARD DRAKE

A good day of mallard hunting c. 1930. 128


A. ELMER CROWELL

1862-1952 | EAST HARWICH, MA

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181 “Boss” Hoover Mallard Drake A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, C. 1925 17 3⁄4 in. long

This bold drake with full cheek carving and a pronounced breast is one of Crowell’s best examples of this rare species. When this decoy was made, mallards were not as prevalent along the Atlantic Flyway, as is evidenced by their scarce representation as decoys along the East Coast. Indeed, this large mallard was ordered in 1925 for use at the Toussaint Shooting Club in Port Clinton, Ohio. One of the most important decoys to come out of Ohio, Crowell’s patron for this rare species was William H. “Boss” Hoover (1849-1932), founder of the vacuum cleaner company. The underside bears Crowell’s oval brand and a painted “HOOVER” owners designation. Regarding the industrial giant, Ohio History Central states, “As a young man, he became involved in the leather business, working as a tanner. He remained involved in the tannery business until the first decade of the twentieth century. In 1908, Hoover purchased John Murray Spangler’s patent for the upright vacuum cleaner. Ultimately, Spangler’s invention became known as the Hoover vacuum cleaner... the largest vacuum cleaner manufacturer in the world.”

A world traveler and sportsman, between 1910 and 1920 Hoover opened up factories in Canada and England. A monumental American figure, even today the act of vacuuming in England is often referred to as “hoovering.” Original paint with even gunning wear, minor touch-up around eyes and to a chip at left edge of bill. PROVENANCE: William H. “Boss” Hoover Rig Rusty and Dianna Johnson Collection, acquired from Decoys Unlimited LITERATURE: Ohio History Central, William H. Hoover, www. ohiohistorycentral.org/w/William_H._Hoover, November 27, 2018. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019.

$20,000 - $25,000

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182

184

183

185

182 Chickadee Pair

WENDELL GILLEY (1904-1983) SOUTHWEST HARBOR, ME, C. 1970 5 in. tall

Signed “Gilley” on the side of the base. Original paint with minor wear. $500 - $800

183 Miniature Sandpiper

ALBERT J. DITMAN (1884-1874) WILLIAMSTOWN, MA, C. 1940 2 3⁄8 in. tall

A nicely carved and painted sandpiper. Ditman attended the Hotchkiss School, graduating in 1904, before heading on to Yale. His carvings were sold at Abercrombie and Fitch and Brooks Brothers in New York. It retains its original price sticker for $7.50 on bottom of base. Excellent original paint. $300 - $500

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184 Miniature Yellowlegs Trio CAPE COD, MA 7 in. long

A well-conceived shorebird trio mounted on an intricately designed base. Original paint with minor wear. $600 - $900

185 Bobwhite Quail Carving C. 1940 8 3⁄4 in. tall

A life-size bird carving mounted on a birch tree segment fronted with carved wooden mushrooms. Original paint with minor wear.


186

187

186 White Sperm Whale

187 Sperm Whale

Measuring fifty inches in length, this is the largest size whale the maker has created. Made to hang above a fireplace mantle or on the wall, it features McNair’s fine carving detail with an intricate eye, a row of carved bone teeth, a raised pectoral flipper, and separated flukes.

A wall-mount carving by master whale carver Clark Voorhees. Signed on the back with his stylized “CV” incised signature and stamped “C VOORHEES WESTON, VT.”

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, 2012 50 in. long

Signed and dated with an incised “McNair” and inked “#2 Summer 2012” on the back. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Virginia

$4,000 - $6,000

CLARK VOORHEES (1911-1980) WESTON, VT, C. 1970 34 in. long

Vorhees was the son of Clark Greenwood Voorhees (18711933), who was one of the founders of the Old Lyme Art Colony. After establishing himself in his craft, he moved his carving business to its permanent home in Vermont. His marine mammal carvings were offered through the Four Winds Craft Guild on Nantucket. The majority of his whales were his eighteen-inch models; this carving represents his grandest size. Original paint with wear, and minor touch-up to scratches on head. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Vermont

$4,000 - $6,000

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HERMAN R. TRINOSKY RIG 1874-1956 | KANKAKEE MARSH, IN

“In the early 1800s, the Grand Kankakee Marsh was recognized as the largest fresh water wetland in the Midwest, extending for approximately a million acres mostly through northwest Indiana (600,000 acres) and partially into Eastern Illinois. The fertile, ancient marshland provided a welcomed safe haven for migrating waterfowl. It was once a winding, thriving wetland providing lush habitats for a diverse menagerie of creatures from insects to fish, birds, and buffalo. Ducks that migrated through that area more recently are descendants of millions of transient waterfowl which once frequented the Grand Marsh. “Some prominent notables who regularly visited Kankakee Marsh were Theodore Roosevelt, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, and Civil War General Lew Wallace (author of Ben Hur – 1880). In fact, the original name of the Valley Hunt Club was changed to the White House Hunt Club because of the frequent presidential visits by Grover Cleveland.” - Gene and Linda Kangas with Ron Gard

188 High-Head Pintail Hen

HERMAN R. TRINOSKY (1874-1956) RIG KANKAKEE MARSH, IN, C. 1895 17 in. long, 9 1⁄2 in. tall

Throughout history, decoy carvers often amended or altogether discarded their early patterns in favor of sturdier utilitarian designs. A perfect example of this evolution is Henry Keyes Chadwick (1865-1958) of Martha’s Vineyard whose earliest redheads started out with stylish thin necks, long bodies, and thin sharp paddle tails. Later he modified his designs to have shorter bodies and thicker necks, thus acknowledging the utility flaws of his first carving period. With limited output and easily broken heads and tails, few of these intact redheads exist today. These early “flawed” designs, however, are the ones most coveted by collectors today. While no examples of middle period or late period Kankakee pintails are known to exist, more conventional and less fragile examples of mallards and bluebills from the rig attest to the maker’s more practical side. Since their introduction to the marketplace in 2007, the seven Kankakee pintails have been regarded as one of the most important decoy discoveries of the century. Defined by its elegant, singular form, this decoy showcases long and sweeping lines. The bird’s refined head features subtle cheek carving and a stylish bill that flares toward the tip. The graceful neck is fully extended, accurate for the species, but essentially unseen in other surviving decoys. The body exhibits a smooth humped back that tapers to a long and

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thin uplifted tail. The bird’s current condition is remarkable given the three areas, bill, neck, and tail, that were most prone to damage while being hunted and transported. The body’s surface retains strong swirled paint with appealing craquelure. Original paint, two tight age lines in neck and one in body, minor flaking, and gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Herman R. Trinosky Rig Ronald Gard Collection Private Collection LITERATURE: Gene and Linda Kangas with Ron Gard, “Kankakee Marsh Pintails: The Magnificent Seven,” from Hunting and Fishing Collectibles Magazine, Lawsonville, NC, July-August 2009, pp. 16-26, exact decoy illustrated four times. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 39, exact decoy illustrated. Christie’s, Important American Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Prints and Decoys, New York, NY, January 18-19, 2007, lot 365, exact decoy illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Great Lakes Interpretations, Concord, OH, 2011, front cover, rigmates illustrated, p. 182, rigmates and exact decoy (image reversed) illustrated.

$75,000 - $95,000


KANKAKEE PINTAIL C. 1895 | INDIANA

188

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189

191

190

192

189 Miniature Penguin CHARLES HART (1862-1960) GLOUCESTER, MA, C. 1930 3 in. tall

18 in. long

Original paint with wear.

This is one of Hart’s smallest penguin models, measuring only one and a half inches in width. The bird can be removed from the lead base. Original paint with minor wear.

192 Pair of Hand-Painted Plates with Strawberry Design

$700 - $1,000

Good original condition.

190 Pointer Carving

MILTON E. BRASHER (B. 1905) C. 1950 7 1â „2 in. long

Milton E. Brasher was the nephew and biographer of noted bird artist Rex Brasher (1869-1960). Original paint with minor wear. $500 - $800

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191 Hand-Painted Strawberry Toleware Tray

8 in. diameter


J.W. FISKE & COMPANY C. 1875 | NEW YORK, NY

193

135


193

194

193 Rare Leaping Stag Weathervane

J. W. FISKE & COMPANY (ACTIVE 1870-1893) (ATTR.) NEW YORK, NY, C. 1875 24 in. tall by 28 in. long by 3 in. wide

A copper-bodied weathervane with a cast zinc head. This period design was also made by E. G. Washburne and Company, New York, New York. In good condition with in-use wear. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Connecticut

$7,000 - $10,000

194 Herters Great Horned Owl WASECA, MN, C. 1940 18 1â „2 in. tall

Original paint with even gunning wear. $600 - $900

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JOSEPH W. LINCOLN

1859-1938 | ACCORD, MA

195

195 Canada Goose

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, C. 1910 24 1⁄2 in. long

This Canada goose decoy displays Lincoln’s classic clean lines with an elongated paddle tail. Part of Lincoln’s genius was his reductionism, which enabled him to capture the essence of the species without overworking the pattern. His signature feather paint was executed using a small paintbrush typically used for painting houses. He would cut out a section of the bristles, forming an elongated “C.” Then he would dip the end of the brush into the paint and strike the flanks of the bird in rapid succession, repeating the process the length of the bird.

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

LITERATURE: Cap Vinal, Joseph W. Lincoln, Rockland, MA, 2002, p. 41, similar decoy illustrated. John and Shirley Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, pp. 136-137, similar decoys illustrated.

$4,500 - $6,500

Ever the perfectionist, Lincoln carved elegant high heads for his decoys that give them a stately appearance. In addition to pleasing body forms, Lincoln added just the needed accents, including subtle bill carving. Original paint with gunning wear, craquelure to end grain, and a typical Lincoln check along the bottom.

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JOSEPH W. LINCOLN 1859-1938 | ACCORD, MA

196

196 Early Black Duck

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, C. 1910 22 in. long

A special-order black duck made for a special patron. This decoy approaches Lincoln’s typical twenty-five-inch-long goose pattern in size. In addition to the bird’s grand scale, it also displays scalloped speculum paint, a sharp flared bill, and sculpted shoulder carving. Attesting to the rarity of this unrigged, near-mint example, Cap Vinal illustrates and features a related “EARLY ROUND HIGH HEAD-TACK EYES-NOTCHED BILL TIPSCULPTURED WING SEPARATION-PARTIAL REPAINT” model in his book on the maker. Excellent original paint with minimal wear, typical Lincoln check in the bottom. PROVENANCE: Chester F. Spear Rig, acquired from the maker By descent in the Spear Family LITERATURE: Cap Vinal, Joseph W. Lincoln, Rockland, MA, 2002, p. 29, related decoy illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000

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JOSEPH W. LINCOLN

1859-1938 | ACCORD, MA

Chester and Ernie (on far right). Photo courtesy of Bob Mosher.

“Lincoln was a laconic man, a consummate Yankee craftsman whose solid-bodied decoys are reflections of their maker’s personality—direct and spare, with not a gesture wasted. Their clean, crisp lines and reductively abstract paint patterns capture the essentials of each species’ form and plumage with remarkable integrity and economy of means.” - Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America

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JOSEPH W. LINCOLN 1859-1938 | ACCORD, MA

197 The Spear Family Long-Tailed Hen JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, C. 1910 14 in. long

The clean form of Lincoln’s long-tail duck patterns combined with his exacting and elegant paint application make them one of his most desirable species. Very few Lincoln decoys of this species in original paint have ever surfaced. Highly coveted by acquisitors today, they are tucked away in some of the country’s premier decoy collections.

Having remained in the same family for three generations, it is ranked, along with the O’Brien cover lot example, as the best of its kind. Consigned directly from the Spear family, we are honored to offer this unrigged Lincoln decoy for the first time since it was made over a century ago. Excellent original paint with minimal wear, a chip to bottom of original bill is reset.

Many artists and makers depend on patronage and special relationships. As John C. Phillips was to A. Elmer Crowell and The Bishops Head Gun Club was to the Ward brothers, so the Spear family was to Joseph W. Lincoln. As hunting companions and reliable buyers of his decoys, Lincoln made some of his finest work for the Spears. Chester F. Spear (1888-1956), along with his younger brother, Ernie (b. 1897), and their father, Henry E. Spear (b. 1869), hunted the coastline just south of Boston, where they shot over their Lincoln rigs.

PROVENANCE: Chester F. Spear Rig, acquired from the maker By descent in the Spear Family

Dr. George Ross Starr came to know the Spear family and their exceptional decoys, eventually obtaining some, but not all of them. The most celebrated decoy in Starr’s collection was one that Chester Spear had reserved for the mantle. Starr recounts in his book that, “Many years ago Joe made the beautiful wood duck... for his friend Chester Spear of Scituate Harbor. It is an actual working decoy, but Chet liked it so much that it never left his mantle shelf. After Chet’s death, Mrs. Spear sold it to me for the collection. This is Lincoln at his very best.” The Spear Starr wood duck became the icon of the Starr Collection, even before it set the world record for a decoy at auction in 1986. Another one of Lincoln’s very best is this hen, which Spear also reserved from hunting. It descended through the family and Spear’s daughter kept it on her mantle despite Starr’s attempts to acquire it.

LITERATURE: George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway, Tulsa, OK, 1974, p. 155, fig. 75, rigmate illustrated. Cap Vinal, Joseph W. Lincoln, Rockland, MA, 2002, p. 44, related examples illustrated. David S. Webster and William Kehoe, Decoys at Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, VT, 1961, p. 68, related decoys illustrated. Laurence Sheehan, The Sporting Life, New York, NY, 1992, p. 82, related decoys illustrated. Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Donal C O’Brien, Jr. Collection of Important American Sporting Art and Decoys, Session III, Hingham, MA, July 19, 2018, front cover and lot 39, related example illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, pp. 138-139 and 156, related example illustrated.

$40,000 - $60,000

Detail of brand and signature on underside of lot 197.

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THE SPEAR FAMILY LONG-TAILED HEN

197

141


198

200

199

201

198 Canada Goose

200 Wood Duck Drake

Branded “C.F. SPEAR SCITUATE” on the bottom for Lincoln patron Chester F. Spear (1888-1956). Original paint with gunning wear, a tight crack in neck, and a typical Lincoln check in the bottom.

A well-executed and unsigned copy of a Lincoln wood duck by Byron N. Bruffee. Stamped “Colburn Wood Jr.” on the bottom. Original paint with wear and a slight check in underside.

PROVENANCE: Chester F. Spear Rig, acquired from the maker By descent in the Spear Family

PROVENANCE: Colburn Wood, Jr. Collection Private Collection

$1,000 - $1,500

$300 - $400

199 American Merganser Drake

201 Canada Goose

Branded “C.F. SPEAR” for Chester Spear (1888-1956). Repainted in Lincoln style with light wear and a partially filled age crack in the bottom.

Branded “C.F. SPEAR SCITUATE” on the bottom for Lincoln patron Chester F. Spear (1888-1956). Heavy repaint that has partially been taken down. Typical age split partially filled in the bottom.

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, 1920 24 1⁄4 in. long

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA 18 in. long

PROVENANCE: Chester F. Spear Rig Private Collection

$1,000 - $1,500

BYRON E. BRUFFEE (1942-2013) MIDDLEBORO, MA, C. 1985 16 in. long

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, 1920 24 1⁄4 in. long

PROVENANCE: Chester F. Spear Rig Private Collection

$300 - $500

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THE HUMBRACHT STANDING GOOSE 1854-1924 | PEORIA, IL

The Humbracht Standing Goose on the cover of Decoy Magazine. Image use courtesy of Joe Engers.

Rig of Schoenheider geese, photo courtesy of Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Collectibles.

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202 The Humbracht Standing Goose CHARLES S. SCHOENHEIDER, SR. (1854-1924) PEORIA, IL, C. 1918 20 3⁄4 in. tall and 23 1⁄2 in. long

While Schoenheider produced very few decoys, the carver’s impact on the region’s decoy portfolio was significant. Although he carved many species of floating decoys, mallards, pintails, and Canada geese were the only species represented in his standing carvings which were balanced on one metal foot. His famous goose rig was originally commissioned by Daniel W. Vorhees in 1918 and consisted of only ten standing and two floating goose decoys. This decoy was obtained c. 1967 by major midwest decoy collector William Humbracht, of Bartlett, Illinois. According to Americana collector and decoy specialist Randy Root, Humbracht started collecting as early as the 1940s and had a diverse collection that included American furniture, frackturs, and Kentucky rifles. Ahead of his time, Humbracht focused on quality. A testament to the high standard he set, upon his death, when the collection was sold at Oliver’s auction in 1988, Jackson Parker reported Humbracht’s onehundred-and-thirty Illinois River decoys selling for a (then astonishing) average of over $3,440 per lot. The Humbracht goose, known for its exceptional form, condition, and paint, was one of the top picks from the Schoenheider Rig. It features the maker’s laminated construction, original cast-metal foot, and minimal flaking. “Chas S” is written in pencil twice on the left flank. Adele Earnest was an early champion of this rig and acquired four of the geese. She featured two examples in her 1984 book, Folk Art in America: A Personal View. Two of the Earnest birds were acquired by Donal C. O’Brien, Jr., one of which was subsequently traded to the Shelburne Museum. The Shelburne goose most recently graced the cover of the museum’s 2017 book, Birds of a Feather, where it is described as “one of the crown jewels of the collection.” The other O’Brien goose recently set a world-record price for the maker and for any Midwestern goose decoy at auction. Noted Illinois River decoy collector Thomas K. Figge also acquired two examples, featuring one in Masterworks of the Illinois River. The Humbracht goose relates closely to the O’Brien goose and the Shelburne Museum goose. This exact bird was prominently featured on the cover of the September/ October 1988 issue of Decoy Magazine above the title “Schoenheider Standing Goose Breaks Record Price at

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Auction.” In the same year, it again took center stage in the magazine’s Year In Review issue as the top decoy of the year, surpassing a Caines Brothers mallard, a Crowell Cunningham rig bufflehead, and a Boyd hissing Canada goose. With its grand presence, excellent condition, original foot, and strong provenance, this is one of the finest Schoenheider decoys to ever cross the auction block. Original paint with minimal wear, some minor flaking on back of neck, old touch-up to cheeks, and some green paint rubs on back. Original foot. PROVENANCE: Charles Schoenheider, Jr., by descent in the family Joe Tonelli, acquired from the above Daryl Drennen, acquired from the above William Humbracht Collection, acquired from the above c. 1967 Private Collection, Virginia Private Collection, Midwest LITERATURE:

“The 1988 Year in Review,” Decoy Magazine, 1989, cover, pp. 3 and 5, exact decoy illustrated. Decoy Magazine, September/October 1988, cover, p. 3, exact decoy illustrated. Adele Earnest, Folk Art In America, Exton, PA, 1984, p. 132, rigmates illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, pp. 246-247, rigmate decoys illustrated. Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, pp. 184-185, rigmate illustrated. Kory W. Rogers, Birds of a Feather, Shelburne, VT, 2017, front cover and pp. 132-133, rigmate illustrated. Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Donal C O’Brien, Jr. Collection of Important American Sporting Art and Decoys, Session III, Hingham, MA, July 19, 2018, back cover and lot 20, rigmate illustrated. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 45, rigmate illustrated. Robert Bishop, American Folk Sculpture, New York, NY, 1985, p. 293, pl. 539, related example illustrated. $100,000 - $125,000


CHARLES S. SCHOENHEIDER, SR.

1854-1924 | PEORIA, IL

202 145


“The first Cobb decoys to come to the attention of serious collectors caused some confusion, since all decoys have regional characteristics and the Cobb decoys showed a form of construction that was identified with New England makers. This problem quickly resolves itself when we recall that the Cobbs were Yankees in a new home and simply reverted to the style of decoys made in Massachusetts. Strangely enough the superior construction of the decoys they made was never copied by any other Virginia decoy maker. Perhaps the Cobbs had previous skill in boat-building; at any rate, they were determined to produce the best decoys possible, and their work excellently served the needs of both the nineteenth-century hunter and the modern collector.” - William J. Mackey, Jr. American Bird Decoys

“Sometimes the sky was literally black with them,” The Shore-Birds of Old Virginia, 1903.

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NATHAN F. COBB, JR. 1825-1905 | COBB ISLAND, VA

203/204

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NATHAN F. COBB, JR. 1825-1905 | COBB ISLAND, VA

203

203 Mackey Purnell Cobb Curlew NATHAN F. COBB, JR. (1825-1905) COBB ISLAND, VA, C. 1870 15 in. long

Nathan Cobb Sr. sailed his family south from Cape Cod to the Eastern Shore of Virginia where they settled around 1837. The family brought with them Massachusetts carving concepts, including the refined split-tail carving style adopted by Lothrop Holmes, A. Elmer Crowell, and Joseph Lincoln. Over time, the Cobbs evolved this style into one of their own. A well-balanced decoy, this curlew exhibits pleasing proportions with a gracefully rounded head, full cheeks, and a plump body that resolves with a precise Cobb Island tail-cut. This confident carving, featuring the Cobb’s signature “V” feathering, represents the pinnacle of the Southern standard. Birds from this important Cobb rig were first discovered by William J. Mackey, Jr. Later, they were brought to the broader public’s attention when Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr. featured this exact decoy and a running rigmate both from the Purnell Collection in his seminal book Shore Bird Decoys. Even prior to this, however, rigmates had drawn the attention of “the old guard,” landing in the collections of Lloyd Johnson, Dr. James M. McCleery, and Donal C. O’Brien, Jr.

This stunning curlew, with its original paint, crisp clean lines, and original bill, hits the highest level of craftsmanship seen in the decoys that survived the remote island’s stormwrecked history. The underside bears the Purnell collection “P” brand and also the “NELSON” collection stamp. Strong original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection William H. Purnell, Jr. Collection, acquired from the above Grant Nelson Collection, acquired from the above LITERATURE: Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Shore Bird Decoys, Exton, PA, 1980, p. 130, back dust jacket cover, rigmate illustrated, pl. 145, exact decoy illustrated. Joe Engers, ed., The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, San Diego, CA, 1990, pp. 166-167, rigmate illustrated. Dr. Lloyd Newberry, “The Saga of Cobb Island,” Sporting Classics, Spring/Summer 2018, pp. 140-145, related example illustrated. Robert H. Richardson ed., Chesapeake Bay Decoys, Burtonsville, MD, 1991, p. 184, exact decoy illustrated.

$60,000 - $80,000

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NATHAN F. COBB, JR. 1825-1905 | COBB ISLAND, VA

204

204 Johnson Levinson Running Red Knot NATHAN F. COBB, JR. (1825-1905) COBB ISLAND, VA, C. 1890 10 in. long

This refined decoy was made and painted by the same Cobb Island maker as the previous lot and its famous rigmate, the Cobb Running Curlew, illustrated on the back cover of Fleckenstein’s Shore Bird Decoys. Similar to the Purnell Cobb Running Curlew, this red knot was also fashioned in a rare reaching pose. Alluring to top collectors over the last half century, it has been owned by three of the country’s most respected shorebird decoy collectors. A closely related red knot, also in a running pose, set the world record for this species by the maker, selling for $74,000 in 2000. The underside retains the “NELSON” stamp. Original paint with even gunning wear.

PROVENANCE: Lloyd Johnson Collection John and Elizabeth Levinson Collection Grant Nelson Collection LITERATURE: The Decoy Hunter, Clinton, IN, Nov-Dec 1996, p. 10, exact decoy illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Shore Bird Decoys, Exton, PA, 1980, back cover and p. 130, running rigmate curlew illustrated. Joe Engers, ed., The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, San Diego, CA, 1990, pp. 166-167, rigmate curlew illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 32, lot 33, closely related example illustrated.

$15,000 - $20,000

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Just like his decoys, Herb Wetanson was attracted to one-of-a-kind cars like this 1966 Porsche 906 Roadster. Here, Wetanson sits behind the wheel at Bridgehampton Raceway on Long Island the same year the car debuted.

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The Herb Wetanson Collection

The words “duck decoy” and “racecar” don’t often

now. Now the kids are all on computers.”

appear in the same sentence. However, restaurateur

Although he grew up duck hunting, Wetanson explains

Herb Wetanson has pursued these two interests with

why he focused on collecting decoys for their form and

enthusiasm and determination for decades.

history, rather than their utility: “We hunted whatever

Wetanson recently explained the genesis of his automo-

was flying, but I didn’t like eating ducks. I disliked their

tive passion: “I was a car nut since I was about twelve

gamey taste and I can speak with some authority coming

years old. I just loved to look at cars and appreciate their

from the restaurant industry. So I dropped the hunting

lines and the differences between them. My parents

and kept on collecting the decoys.” Similar to famed

thought I was crazy. There wasn’t anyone else in my

collector and author Joel Barber (1876-1952), Wetan-

family who shared my car interests. I bought three cars

son pursued the decoys that pleased him aesthetically,

by the time I was fifteen, even though you couldn’t get a

describing decoys as “local natural artifacts of water

license until sixteen. I paid $90 for my first one.” These

communities.”

cars were Fords from the 30s and 40s.

Wetanson delved into the decoy collecting world with

In his teens, Wetanson began to visit the stock car

the same determination and enthusiasm that he devoted

track. He explains, “Each county had a dirt track in those

to his interest in cars. Partially driven by his lifelong love

days, a quarter-mile oval where they raced sports cars

of history, Wetanson studied all the makers, went to all

and midgets [smaller cars with smaller engines] in the

the auctions, and bought all the books on decoys that

1950s.” Wetanson would go on to race sports cars all

he could lay his hands on. When asked which carver or

over the world for decades. In 1969 he won the 24 Hours

carvers stood out to him, he replies, “My favorite is the

of Daytona, a sports car endurance race, in a Porsche 911.

Ward brothers from Maryland. I also love the carvers

A testament to his prowess on the race track, Wetan-

from the Illinois River basin.”

son was named Sportscar Vintage Racing Association’s

With hundreds of decoys in his home, Wetanson enjoys

(SVRA) Driver of the Year in 1997. In addition to his

studying the carvings’ lines and differences, just as he

impressive track record, Wetanson is a world renown car

appreciates looking at cars. He concludes, “It’s a love.

collector, with a car count that has climbed from three to

You have to be deeply in love, or crazy.”

sixty-five over the years. Less publicized is Wetanson’s longtime fascination with decoys, and working decoys in particular. He was raised in Woodmere on Long Island, an area with many oceanfed bays. Practically surrounded by water, Wetanson recalls, “Everyone was a hunter back then. You grew up knowing about the fish, the oysters, the birds. You were part of the landscape, the environment. It was a way of life. You shot your food. I fell in love with watching kids and their fathers hunting ducks together. That’s all gone

Wetanson duck hunting on Long Island.

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A. ELMER CROWELL 1862-1952 | EAST HARWICH, MA

205 The Earnest Guennol Dropped-Wing Sandpiper A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, C. 1900 8 in. long

This decoy hails from the extraordinary Guennol Collection, built by Alastair B. Martin. The Guennol Collection, named for the Welsh translation of Martin, was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1969. Martin acquired this decoy directly from Adele Earnest who subsequently cataloged Martin’s decoys for The Met’s two-volume publication on the Guennol Collection. “The aim of the Guennol Collection,” writes Earnest, “has not been to search out representative examples of the many categories of folk art but to hunt for superior objects that captivate the heart as well as the eye. Choices have focused on sculptural, three-dimensional carvings in wood.” She describes this “rare gem” as having come “from Crowell’s best early period. Carved from one piece of wood, each contour conveys the softness of a live bird. The head is raised and gently turned. The wing tips are free, lightly grooved and serrated…” This decoy was made with the features and detail found in Crowell’s rare and coveted “dust jacket” model shorebirds. The maker individually carved the primary feathers, turned and cocked the head, and applied highly intricate blended feather paint. While nearly all of his best shorebirds have lifted wing tips that come to a point, this bird is one of the very few that exhibits the added feature of dropped wings.

Only a handful of life-size decoys in original paint are known to display this delicate addition, as they were time consuming to create and broke with use. One full-size comparable is a rigmate sandpiper that resides in the Alan and Elaine Haid Collection. Another is the incomparable Harry V. Long rig calling yellowlegs, dated 1910, which displays the only open bill seen in his working birds. Original paint with light gunning wear, one wing tip is reset, and minor chips to the wing tips. Old filler in two holes in underside. Reset bill tip with touch-up. PROVENANCE: Adele Earnest Collection Alastair Bradley Martin, The Guennol Collection, acquired from the above Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Guennol Collection: Volume II, New York, NY, 1982, pp. 263-265, exact decoy illustrated. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC, The Harry V. Long Collection of A. Elmer Crowell Decoys, The Sporting Sale, Boston, MA, 2009, lot 64, pp. 24, 73 and cover, related calling yellowlegs illustrated. Alan G. Haid and Brandy S. Culp, The Allure of the Decoy, Charleston, SC, 2013, p. 26, rigmate illustrated. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019, exact bird illustrated.

$50,000 - $70,000

A Crowell open-bill calling yellowlegs, c. 1910, originating from the Harry V. Long Collection. This decoy, along with the Haid snipe, are two of the only other working dropped-wing shorebirds by the maker known to have surfaced.

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THE EARNEST GUENNOL DROPPED-WING SANDPIPER

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“...from Crowell’s best early period. Carved from one piece of wood, each contour conveys the softness of a live bird. The head is raised and gently turned. The wing tips are free, lightly grooved and serrated…” - Adele Earnest, The Geunnol Collection: Volume II

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206 The Guennol Heron MASSACHUSETTS, C. 1900 41 3⁄4 in. tall

This life-size wading bird hails from the extraordinary Guennol Collection, built by Alastair B. Martin. The Guennol Collection was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1969. Adele Earnest cataloged the American birds for The Met’s two-volume publication on the Guennol Collection. “The aim of the Guennol Collection,” writes Earnest, “has not been to search out representative examples of the many categories of folk art but to hunt for superior objects that captivate the heart as well as the eye. Choices have focused on sculptural, three-dimensional carvings in wood.” She discusses this exact heron in great detail, “In the early years of this century it was fashionable to decorate a hall, parlor, or conservatory with a standing crane or heron. Such decor was favored by the Roosevelts, Cabots, and Vanderbilts - the families who hunted, fished, and sailed, and wished to transfer their enthusiasm for the great outdoors to the interiors of their homes. Also, during those first decades many naturalists tried to capture the elusive quality of avian grace in paintings and carvings. American bird painters of this period, such as Louis Agassiz Fuertes and John Chapman, received recognition for their achievements, but bird carvers were mostly unknown partly because many specialized in decoys, and carvers of such functional items were not considered artists. “In Massachusetts, A. Elmer Crowell and another distinguished carver, Joseph Lincoln (1859-1938), made decorative birds, although their reputations were based on their decoys. A splendid blue heron by Crowell is on exhibition at the Heritage Plantation Museum in Sand­wich, Massachusetts. The Guennol heron bears a stronger resemblance to the work of Lincoln, who used a combination of wood and canvas and painted in a more stylized manner than Crowell. However, it is still not possible to attribute the Guennol heron to a specific carver, although the construction reflects the work of Cape Cod carvers in the first quarter of the twentieth century. “The heron stands in a watchful position, ready to move. Tall, delicate legs support a beautifully modeled, hollow body that was fashioned of wood covered with canvas - probably sized before it was stretched over the wood as tightly as a skin and then painted. The inner structure can only be guessed at, but hollow frames were usually constructed of ash strips that bent without splitting when steamed.

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“The famous S-curve of the heron, which has intrigued artists for centuries, is seen in all its elegance when the bird is viewed in profile; the movement begins at the head, with its forceful beak, and continues down the curvaceous neck, along the breast, to the dropped tail. The feathers on the slate gray body are drawn with fine, painted lines that become formalized at the tail in a studied, parallel pattern of dark bands edged with white. The neck is ash white, in contrast to the dark tones of the head and body. “The Guennol great blue heron graced the conservatory of a home in Eastham, Massachusetts, from 1920, when the bird was received as a wedding present. This noble heron combines all the elements of color, form, and attitude that characterize America’s most aristocratic bird.” The “aristocratic” heron has not escaped the interest of collectors; a related Cape Cod carving set the auction record for the species at over $200,000. The underside of the base of this carving is inscribed “M.M.A.” Earnest is correct to address this bird’s relationship and close proximity to the works of Massachusetts masters, namely, Crowell and Lincoln. A close examination of the carving’s feather paint bears a striking resemblance to that seen on the John C. Phillips rig running curlew in the Tieger Collection, making that connection well worth further examination. Original paint with wear, including some flaking and age lines. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Eastham, Massachusetts, acquired as a wedding gift, 1920 Alastair Bradley Martin, The Guennol Collection Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Guennol Collection: Volume II, New York, NY, 1982, pp. 270-272, exact bird illustrated. Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, pp. 64-65, Phillips rig curlew with similar paint illustrated. “Photos from Readers,” Decoy Collector’s Guide, “Burlinton Iowa” 1964, p. 22, related wading bird illustrated. Richard A. Bourne Co., Inc., “Very Rare and Important American Bird Decoys from the Collection of the late William J. Mackey, Jr. of Belford, New Jersey,” Hyannis, MA, Sessions I - III, 1973, front cover, related carving illustrated. $40,000 - $50,000


THE GUENNOL HERON

C. 1900 | MASSACHUSETTS

206

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THE GUENNOL HERON C. 1900 | MASSACHUSETTS

A related sandhill crane carving by “Shang” Wheeler (1872-1949), illustrated in Decoy Collector’s Guide, 1964, p. 22.

A related great blue heron carving by Elmer Crowell (1862-1952) illustrated on the front cover of Session I & II of the Richard A. Bourne Co., Inc. auction catalog, 1973, featuring the William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection.

The Phillips Rig running curlew with stylized feather paint, c. 1890. Image courtesy of Joe Engers, Decoy Magazine.

Detail of the feather paint on the Guennol heron, lot 206.

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CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER 1872-1949 | STRATFORD, CT

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207 Pintail Pair

CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER (1872-1949) STRATFORD, CT, C. 1940 17 1⁄2 in. and 20 1⁄2 in. long

Charles Edward Wheeler is recognized as the most famous bird carver from Connecticut. While his predecessors Albert Laing (1811-1886) and Benjamin Holmes (18431912) made many gunning decoys of exceptional quality, it was Wheeler who took the art form to the next level, producing everything from sandhill cranes to sailfish. Shang, as everyone called him, was an enigmatic figure: oysterman, politician, boxer, cartoonist, public speaker, conservationist, and world-renowned decoy carver. Author Dixon Merkt comments on Wheeler’s life: “Wheeler’s concern with the conservation of nature eventually led him into politics. Over the years he had come to know and admire Teddy Roosevelt, and as a politician he adopted Roosevelt’s brand of progressive Republicanism. Himself a skilled ornithologist, former cowboy, and avid sportsman, Roosevelt had made conservation one cornerstone of his political platform. Wheeler followed in his footsteps. During several terms in the Connecticut General Assembly he led the campaign to pass anti-pollution and wildlife conservation legislation. “Unlike T.R., Wheeler had no driving ambitions. He went into politics because he wanted to clean up Connecticut’s harbors and river. He did much of the hard work and then let other men win the laurels. His ties to Roosevelt and later to Herbert Hoover might have led him to high government office, if that had been his goal. But Wheeler was satisfied with the life he had built for himself around Stratford. He had many good friends; his work kept him outdoors; and each year he had time for hunting and fishing trips.” In 1923 Wheeler arrived on the competition carving scene with a bang. Public concern over the popular and devastating practice of dusking (hunting after dark) had started to take shape. Led by conservationists, including early historian, author, and collector Joel Barber, along with Paul Bigelow and John Boyle, the group started the AntiDuskers Society. The Anti-Duskers sponsored one of the first decoy shows in North America on August 23rd at the

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public library in Bellport, Long Island. A carving competition held at the event was aimed at hunters in attendance to further advance the concept of shooting over decoys. The inaugural event attracted amateur and professional carvers from near and far; however, it was Wheeler who took home top amateur honors with his dynamic turned-head mallard drake. Joel Barber gave the winning decoy the highest praise possible, lauding that it represented “the highest development yet reached in the American art of decoy carving.” As stated by Merkt and Lytle, “Wheeler carted off first prize at Bellport because he had introduced a new style to decoy painting.” Pintail decoys by Wheeler are exceedingly rare. Of the examples that have surfaced, the vast majority are flatbottomed drakes. This sterling balsa pintail pair compares favorably to Wheeler’s famous prize-winning mallards which reside in the Shelburne Museum. The drake showcases a racy swimming form, with the hen slightly more content. The scratch feather paint is uncannily similar to the Shelburne mallard pair with identical treatment to the hens’ heads and the drakes’ bodies. Both drakes also feature metal tails. In the creation of this matched rigmate pair of decoys, Wheeler produced a lasting tribute that ranks as one of the finest sprig pairs to come out of Connecticut. Original paint minimal gunning wear, a tight crack in the drake’s neck, and a minute bill chip. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Dixon MacD. Merkt, Shang. A Biography of Charles E. Wheeler, Spanish Fork, UT, 1984, p. 80, related example illustrated. Henry C. Chitwood, Connecticut Decoys, West Chester, PA, 1987, p. 52, related decoy illustrated. Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 73, pintail pair illustrated.

$30,000 - $40,000


CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER 1872-1949 | STRATFORD, CT

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“...inasmuch as live decoys are tabooed, the next best thing is something that resembles the live bird and it has been the experience of the writer that in actual competition with several rigs of inferior decoys, the ducks chose to come to the bunch of superior decoys. “There must be a very real difference in the eye of an approaching duck between, a flock of nondescript, long-necked, poorly made and painted blocks that jump and pitch, roll and toss in a tideway or a bit of ruffled water, that look scared and actually do scare a wild bird, and a setting of well shaped, properly painted, steady riding, gentle posed decoys that really impress a bunch of birds with the quiet and safety of the situation.” - Charles E. “Shang” Wheeler, Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater, 1947

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CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER 1872-1949 | STRATFORD, CT

207.1

207.2

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ROBERT ELLISTON

1847-1925 | BUREAU, IL

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ROBERT ELLISTON 1847-1925 | BUREAU, IL

208 The G. K. Schmidt Elliston Mallard Pair ROBERT ELLISTON (1847-1925) BUREAU, IL, C. 1920 17 in. long

Widely regarded as the father of the Illinois River decoy carving tradition, Robert Elliston, along with his wife, Catherine, set the standard against which all Illinois River decoys are measured. They made beautifully crafted decoys using the finest cured white pine. Robert’s honed woodworking skills allowed him to produce birds with nearly invisible body seams, many of which are still imperceptible to this day. The unmistakable raised “V” notched bill carving, pointed head crests, and exquisite paint by Catherine Elliston and Edna Perdew give these Elliston decoys their bold and dynamic appearance. Robert Elliston was born in Kentucky in 1849. In his late teens he apprenticed as a carriage-maker at the Studebaker woodworking shop in South Bend, Indiana. He moved on to work for Henry Olds and later the McLaren Hearse and Coach Manufacturing Company. Working as a carriagemaker with shops in New York, Philadelphia, and St. Louis, Elliston became a seasoned woodworker, a skill that would later serve him greatly. It was while working in St. Louis that the young Elliston met Margaret Cumminski. The two enjoyed a brief courtship, were married, and moved to Lacon, Illinois. In Lacon, Robert worked for the Brereton Buggy Shop. A few short years later tragedy hit; an influenza epidemic took the lives of Margaret and their newborn son. Robert, shortly thereafter, began a relationship with Margaret’s sister, Catherine. Robert and Catherine married, staying in Lacon briefly, before moving to the Undercliff Hotel on Lake Senachwine, near Putnam, Illinois. It is likely that while still living in Lacon, Catherine saw the decoys of Steven Lane and the crisp paint applied to his decoys resonated with her. Situated in the heart of the Midwest Flyway, the Ellistons’ legacy began to take shape. Catherine applied graceful paint patterns that are virtually unequalled by any of her contemporaries, with the exception of Edna Perdew. She developed her own techniques of scratch feathering that echo the finest grain-painted chests of Pennsylvania made during the mid-nineteenth century. Implementing a metal grain-comb to help suggest feathering and to give the decoys a more realistic look, her painting techniques were later copied by Millie Graves and other painters up and down the Illinois River. It is no secret among collectors that Catherine Elliston and Edna Perdew used hens to showcase their abilities. While most decoy painters shied away from the difficulties of painting a hen’s plumage, these two women embraced the challenge, defining the paint of the region. Indeed, today

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the world records set for each of the maker’s work stands at over $200,000, with both records set by hens. At the turn of the twentieth century, as more and more gentleman arrived by train from Chicago to partake in the growing sport of duck hunting on Lake Senachwine, word about the decoys made by the talented Ellistons continued to spread. The “sports,” as the local guides and carvers called them, began placing orders with the Ellistons for hunting rigs en masse. The orders quickly blossomed into a full-time business and soon the couple was shipping decoys to sporting goods stores and individuals around the country. Though the Elliston’s likely produced hundreds, if not thousands, of carvings in their lifetime, perhaps none are from a more famous rig than G. K. Schmidt’s. George K. Schmidt (1869-1939), a Chicagoan, was the president of the Prudential State Savings Bank who famously stashed away his decoy rig in a bank basement for over four decades. According to waterfowling historian Donna Tonelli, the Schmidt family “...owned the K.G. Brewery in Chicago which was started during the late 1880’s...As a young man Schmidt graduated as a Brew Master from Brewers Academy at Worms, Germany in 1890 and then served as an apprentice at his father’s K.G Schmidt brewery.” Schmidt would eventually rise to president of the company in 1933, soon after Congress repealed Prohibition. Noted for enjoying the finer things in life, including being a gun collector and hunter, Schmidt purchased some of the best decoys ever produced in the Midwest, with representative carvings by the Mason Decoy Factory, Charles H. Perdew, and Robert Elliston, including this important mallard pair. While several Perdew Schmidt rig pairs are known to exist, this is believed to be the only Elliston Schmidt pair to ever come to market. The hen displays some of the best paint found on any Elliston decoy. Additionally, the drake, shows nice swirl and scratch feather paint. Both decoys are struck with the large “G. K. SCHMIDT” brand, with the drake also featuring Schmidt’s smaller brand. In excellent paint by Catherine Elliston and Edna Perdew with minimal wear. . PROVENANCE: G. K. Schmidt Rig Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Donna Tonelli, Fish and Fowl Decoys of the Great Lakes, Atglen, PA, 2002, p. 113, similar decoys illustrated. Stephen O’Brien and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, pp. 30-32, related decoys illustrated.

$30,000 - $40,000


THE G. K. SCHMIDT ELLISTON MALLARD PAIR

208

Closely related Elliston mallard hen from The Thomas K. Figge Collection, illustrated in Masterworks of the Illinois River.

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VOORHEES RIG STANDING CANADA GOOSE C. 1930 | SPRING VALLEY, IL

209

209 Voorhees Rig Standing Canada Goose MICHAEL VALLERO (1906-1992) (ATTR.) SPRING VALLEY, IL, C. 1930 28 1⁄4 in. long

This iron-headed goose is stamped “DWV” for the rig of Daniel W. Voorhees, a member of the Duck Island Club and president and general manager of the Peru Plow and Wheel Company. It is likely he oversaw the manufacture of this decoy’s iron head. He is credited with employing the talented decoy maker Michael Vallero (1906-1992) of Spring Valley, Illinois. In fact, a Vallero decoy has been found with the “DWV” initials. This connection indicates that Vallero may have been involved with making his employer’s unique field rig. Original paint with wear, including some flaking along back and some movement at neck seam.

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PROVENANCE: Daniel W. Voorhees Rig Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Stephen O’Brien and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, pp. 141-144, rigmate illustrated.

$10,000 - $15,000


LOUIS C. RATHMELL 1898-1974 | DANBURY, CT

210

210 Black Duck

LOUIS C. RATHMELL (1898-1974) DANBURY, CT, 1941 17 3⁄4 in. long

According to Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. “Rathmell was probably the best hunter of those who hunted the Stratford marshes. He not only made beautiful decoys, but stood alone as a wing shot and duck caller. His presence in the marsh was feared by the other hunters.” O’Brien continues, “When I showed Bill Mackey and Adele Earnest these decoys, they thought they were Shang Wheeler’s.” As the two makers’ carvings were virtually indistinguishable, Rathmell’s were often sold as Wheeler’s. O’Brien explains, “Rathmell was the most unappreciated of the Stratford carvers. A shame, because he was a great maker.” The maker’s refined head carving, dynamic poses, and exceptional scratch and feather paint place him in the ranks of Stratford’s finest carvers, alongside Charles E. “Shang” Wheeler.

Rathmell’s 1941 rig of cork black ducks from which this decoy hails from is referred to by Shang author Dixon Merkt as: “...one of the best gunning rigs ever made.” The decoy is signed and dated by the maker with his impressed lead weight. An oval “CHITWOOD” collection stamp is also on the bottom. Second coat of competitiongrade paint on the body with minimal wear. PROVENANCE: Louis Rathmell Rig Henry C. Chitwood Collection Herb Wetanson Collection, acquired from the above LITERATURE: Henry C. Chitwood, Connecticut Decoys, West Chester, PA, 1987, p. 98, related decoy illustrated. Cliff Alexander, “Lou Rathmell: A Decoy Maker Who Lived in a Castle,” Decoy Magazine, November/December 2015, p. 25 and front cover, rigmates illustrated.

$25,000 - $35,000

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HENRY RUGGLES 1830-1897 | HENRY, IL

211

211 Early and Important Mallard Drake HENRY RUGGLES (1830-1897) HENRY, IL, C. 1870 17 in. long

Finding any Ruggles’ decoys in original paint has proven difficult for collectors, making this prime mallard example a highly collectible Illinois River masterwork. An apprentice studio painter in St. Louis, Missouri, Ruggles was a talented portraiture and landscape artist. In Henry, he was also noted locally as a musician; in the summer months, he played violin, mandolin, and guitar for the pleasure of family and friends. Hunting and fishing were Ruggles’ true passions. To aid in his success in luring waterfowl, he carved graceful birds with sleek bodies and elongated heads. Ruggles fashioned hollow, feather-weight decoys that were wide bodied in comparison to other Illinois decoys. Another recognizable Ruggles carving trait is the unusual squared tail with which he finished his decoys, as seen on this mallard. His painting style was well honed with bold, sure-handed brush strokes. Several Ruggles and Robert Elliston decoys migrated north to Wisconsin where affluent Chicago hunters brought them to the prestigious Nee-Pee-Nauk Club. Organized by A. H. Sellers in 1882 and situated by the Horicon Marsh, the Ne-Pee-Nauk Club is on some of the best hunting

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grounds in Wisconsin. The club boasted a distinguished membership, including Civil War General Philip Sheridan (1831-1888) along with numerous Chicago congressmen and doctors who would venture by train up from the city. The club has remained in continuous operation for nearly one-hundred-and-forty years and is the oldest active duck club in Wisconsin. The underside of this early mallard drake is branded “DENTON” and “MORRIS SELLERS” and the lead-strip weight is embossed “CHICAGO ILL.” In original paint with even gunning wear, including a minor chip on left side of neck seam. PROVENANCE: Morris Sellers and Denton Rigs Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 21, similar decoy illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys: A North American Survey, Spanish Fork, UT, 1983, p. 245, pl. 374, related mallard illustrated.

$15,000 - $20,000


“One of the earliest decoy carvers in the Illinois River Valley, Henry Ruggles created very fine and distinctive birds. Very few of his decoys have survived and been found, a fact that has limited recognition of his name. His style, however, influenced a generation of carvers, including Charles Perdew.” - Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River

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CHARLES H. PERDEW 1874-1963 | HENRY, IL

212

212 Green-Winged Teal Drake CHARLES H. PERDEW (1874-1963) HENRY, IL, C. 1930 10 3⁄4 in. long

A charming little Illinois River teal decoy with a Perdew weight on the bottom. Mostly original paint with some gunning and more recent touch-up. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ann Tandy Lacy, Perdew: An Illinois Tradition, Muncie, IN, 1993, p. 152, related example illustrated. Stephen O’Brien and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 74, related example illustrated.

$4,500 - $6,500

213

213 Ring-Necked Hen

CHARLES H. PERDEW (1874-1963) HENRY, IL, C. 1940 13 1⁄4 in. long

Ring-necked decoys by this maker are exceedingly scarce. Four drakes were known to have been made by Perdew for the Gaylord brothers’ rig in the 1940s, along with two hens. The decoy retains a Perdew weight, with “CHAS., H., and HENRY” stamped above the raised letters of the “PERDEW...ILL.” The rarity of this species is reflected by its lack of literature references; none of the books about Perdew’s decoys illustrate this species. Mix of original and restored paint. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$3,000 - $4,000

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CHARLES H. PERDEW 1874-1963 | HENRY, IL

214

214 Rare Wood Duck Pair

CHARLES H. PERDEW (1874-1963) HENRY, IL, C. 1945 12 3⁄4 in. long

An exceptionally rare pair of presentation wood ducks. While the Perdews enjoyed making smaller models of this species, life-size examples to the market have been almost nonexistent. A very closely related pair are held in the Thomas K. Figge Collection and are featured in Masterworks of the Illinois River. Made during the same period, the Figge pair is also featured in Anne Tandy Lacy’s book, Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition. Lacy records that the Figge pair was originally made for Perdew’s good friend Harley J. Hart. Original paint with minimal wear. The drake has a hairline crack and a minor flake in the left side of the neck.

PROVENANCE: Randy Root Collection Herb Wetanson Collection, acquired from the above LITERATURE: Ann Tandy Lacy, Perdew: An Illinois Tradition, Muncie, IN, 1993, p. 232, related pair illustrated. Stephen O’Brien and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 84, related pair illustrated. Bob Odell, “Peter A. Norman,” Decoy Collector’s Guide, 1964, p. 12, related later drake illustrated.

$18,000 -$24,000

Closely related wood duck pair, c. 1945 from The Thomas K. Figge Collection, illustrated in Masterworks of the Illinois River.

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CHARLES WALKER 1873-1954 | PRINCETON, IL

215

215 Mallard Pair

CHARLES WALKER (1873-1954) PRINCETON, IL, C. 1920 16 3⁄4 in. and 17 1⁄4 in. long

Both birds exhibit Walker’s unique lead weights and a stenciled rig designation “6” on the bottom. The members of the prestigious Princeton Fish and Game Club often stenciled and painted rig numbers instead of painting their names on the bottom of Walker’s decoys. Both birds have gunning wear, were successfully taken down to mostly original paint, and have some touch-up, primarily to top of heads and neck filler on hen.

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PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Donna Tonelli, Fish and Fowl Decoys of the Great Lakes, Atglen, PA, 2002, pp. 181-182, similar decoys illustrated. Donna Tonelli, “Charles Walker,” Decoy Magazine, November/December 1992, p. 10, similar examples illustrated.

$5,000 - $6,000


CHARLES S. SCHOENHEIDER, SR.

1854-1924 | PEORIA, IL

216

216 Rare Pintail Drake

CHARLES S. SCHOENHEIDER, SR. (1854-1924) PEORIA, IL, C. 1910 16 3⁄4 in. long

Exhibiting sleek, delicately balanced form rising from an open V-shaped underside. Original paint with gunning wear and a small bill chip. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Donna Tonelli, Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles, Atglen, PA, 1998, p. 160, related decoy illustrated. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, cover p. 49, similar decoys illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000

Related merganser pair from The Thomas K. Figge Collection, featured on the cover of Masterworks of the Illinois River.

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HIRAM “HY” HOTZE 1886-1977 | PEORIA, IL

217

217 Early Mallard Pair

HIRAM “HY” HOTZE (1886-1977) PEORIA, IL, C. 1930 16 1⁄4 in. long

This hollow Illinois River mallard pair displays all of the aspects of the maker’s masterful craftsmanship. These angular birds have wing tips that draw back to a sharp point before dropping abruptly into the tail. As is seen with their stippled paint, especially in the two-tone stippling on the hen, the makers most elaborate detailing is found on his mallard decoys. The hen is in original paint with minor touchup to a shot scar in bill. The drake has some working repaint and restoration to tail.

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LITERATURE: Stephen O’Brien and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 114, similar decoys illustrated. Alan Haid, Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway, Exton, PA, 1981, p. 172, similar bird illustrated.

$5,000 - $7,000


CHARLES H. PERDEW 1874-1963 | HENRY, IL

218

218 Preening Mallard Hen

CHARLES H. PERDEW (1874-1963) HENRY, IL, C. 1940 15 in. long

A finely carved, turned-head decoy painted by Charles Perdew. Made for Peoria architect John N. Ziegele, it bears his “JNZ” rig brand twice on the bottom. Second coat of Perdew paint with minor gunning wear.

PROVENANCE: John N. Ziegele Rig Joseph Tonelli Collection Jim Ceretta Collection Private Collection, North Dakota LITERATURE: Donna Tonelli, Fish and Fowl Decoys of the Great Lakes, Atglen, PA, 2002, p. 142, rigmate illustrated. Ann Tandy Lacy, Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition, Indianapolis, IN, 1993, p. 96, rigmate illustrated.

$8,000 - $12,000

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219

220

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221

219 Folding Hollow Yellowlegs MASSACHUSETTS, C. 1910 11 in. long

220 Golden Plover

CHARLES F. COFFIN (1835-1919) (ATTR.) NANTUCKET, MA, C. 1880 9 1â „2 in. long

An exceptionally rare shorebird decoy with a removable head and bill. The body seam is hinged on the belly and latched on the back. The head and bill can be stored inside the hollow of the body for protection from breakage. Both Adele Earnest and William J. Mackey, Jr. were taken with these birds, each illustrating rigmates in their seminal publications. Original paint with minor gunning wear.

PROVENANCE: Jones Family Rig Private Collection

PROVENANCE:

$1,000 - $1,500

Grant Nelson Collection

Adele Earnest, The Art of the Decoy, West Chester, PA, 1965, p. 105, pl. 94, rigmate decoy illustrated. William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, p. 43, pl. 21, rigmate illustrated. Richard W. Oliver Auction Gallery, An Auction of American Bird Decoys at Easton, Maryland, November 6-7, 1985, lot 344, exact decoy illustrated.

Found in Sandwich, Massachusetts, this decoy is from a group of Nantucket plovers that was hunted by the Jones Family at their camp on Springhill Beach. Strong original paint with gunning wear and a crack in the bill.

LITERATURE:

$2,500 - $3,500

221 Feeding Golden Plover NANTUCKET, MA, C. 1890 9 in. long

An early and exceptionally rare feeding shorebird with an iron bill. While some of the greatest shorebird decoys ever carved came from this small island, very few are found with heads in a feeding position. Original paint with gunning wear, age lines, and a chip near bill. $6,000 - $9,000

175


Hunter with rig of shorebird decoys including “dust jacket” birds set up on Bassing’s Beach with Harry V. Long’s White Head in the background, 1922.

222 Early Golden Plover

A. ELMER CROWELL (1862-1952) EAST HARWICH, MA, C. 1910 10 1⁄2 in. long

Born in East Harwich, Massachusetts, Elmer Crowell possessed an early fascination with ornithology and hunting. These passions led to a career as a market gunner in the late 1800s. In 1898 Dr. John C. Phillips, Jr. (1876-1938), a sportsman who was also a prominent member of Boston society and a prolific author, asked Crowell to manage his Wenham Lake hunting camp. Upon seeing Crowell’s masterful carvings, Phillips and the camp’s affluent guests persuaded Crowell to make decoys for them. The resulting decoys from this early period are some of the most desirable bird carvings ever made.

176

Widely credited with being the father of American bird carving, Elmer Crowell’s influence on all future carvers cannot be overstated and his meticulous workmanship and exquisite painting have never been surpassed. This early Crowell model shows “dust jacket” style wing carving and elaborate paint. The efforts required to make this type of decoy were time consuming and Crowell had pretty much abandoned the model altogether by 1920. This rare example stands out as one of the only golden plover decoys with this wing treatment known to exist. The underside retains the “NELSON” collection stamp. Original paint with even gunning wear, very minor one-third-inch restoration to wing tip, slightly lifted grain line by stick hole, and very minor spot of touch-up to original bill.


A. ELMER CROWELL

1862-1952 | EAST HARWICH, MA

222

PROVENANCE:

Grant Nelson Collection

LITERATURE: William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, p. 64, pl. III, and dust jacket, related decoys illustrated. John and Shirley Delph, New England Decoys, Exton, PA, 1990, dust jacket, related decoys illustrated. Jeff Waingrow, American Waterfowl Decoys, New York, NY, 1985, pp. 90-91 and back cover, related decoy illustrated. Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Chelsie W. Olney, Elmer Crowell: Father of American Bird Carving, Hingham, MA, 2019.

$20,000 - $30,000

177


HARRY V. SHOURDS 1861-1920 | TUCKERTON, NJ

223

223 Curlew

HARRY V. SHOURDS (1861-1920) TUCKERTON, NJ, C. 1890 13 1⁄4 in. long

In addition to being the most well-known decoy maker from New Jersey, Harry Vinuckson Shourds is also one of the earliest. Original paint with touch-up, gunning wear, age lines, and a replaced bill. LITERATURE: John M. Levinson and Somers G. Headley, Shorebirds, Centreville, MD, 1991, title page, p. 82, pl. 6-17, rigmate illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 69, pl. 130A, similar example illustrated.

$3,000 - $4,000

224

224 Early Plover

HARRY V. SHOURDS (1861-1920) TUCKERTON, NJ, 1900 9 1⁄2 in. long

In addition to being one of the few professional carvers of his generation, Shourds hunted ducks for market while his wife used the feathers to make pillows and bedding. In Shourds gunning repaint with light wear. PROVENANCE: Keegan Collection Grant Nelson Collection

$1,000 - $2,000

178


MASON DECOY FACTORY

1896-1924 | DETROIT, MI

225

225 Special-Order Willet

MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1900 15 in. long

An extremely rare special-order decoy modeled after the work of Massachusetts shorebird carver Charles W. Thomas (b. 1875) of Assinnippi. Measuring fifteen inches in length, these grand carvings are almost as large as Mason curlew.

PROVENANCE: Wallace Furman Collection Gordon and Virginia Hayes Collection, acquired from the above, 1961 Mark Smith Collection, acquired 2002

Only five of its type are known to exist. Of these, two have holes drilled through the sides for attachment to a fireplace mantle. Many consider this near-mint example the best among the handful known to have survived.

LITERATURE: Russ J. Goldberger and Alan G. Haid, Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide, Lewes, DE, 2014, p. 117, related example illustrated. Hal Sorenson, Decoy Collector’s Guide, 1977, p. 39, related example illustrated. Guyette and Schmidt, North American Decoys At Auction, July 2002, front cover and lot 543, exact decoy illustrated.

Top flight collectors have long coveted these rare Masons, including William J. Mackey, Jr., William J. Butler, Jr., John Delph, John Lellos, and Dr. James M. McCleery. Original paint with minimal gunning wear.

$25,000 - $35,000

179


JOHN BLAIR, JR.

1881-1953 | PHILADELPHIA, PA

226

226 Swimming Broadbill Drake JOHN BLAIR, JR. (1881-1953) PHILADELPHIA, PA, C. 1920 13 1⁄2 in. long

Birds from this rig have been identified by the maker’s grandson as being the work of John Blair, Jr., who is known to have only produced broadbill, pintails, and black ducks. This rare swimming broadbill decoy displays exceptional form with a pronounced paddle tail, humped back, subtle feather paint, and an upswept bill. It features the talented Delaware maker’s hollow two-piece body construction with his signature beveled-edge pad weight on the underside. Original paint with even gunning wear and some flaking.

180

PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: H. Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, Floating Sculpture, Spanish Fork, UT, 1982, p. 40, rigmates illustrated. Kenneth L. Gosner, Working Decoys of the Jersey Coast and Delaware Valley, Cranbury, NJ, 1985, p. 81, rigmate illustrated.

$14,000 - $16,000


227

228

227 Pintail Drake

228 Hollow Redhead Drake

This decoy displays excellent head, wing-tip, and tail carving, including an inlaid oak tail. A hollow tack-eyed Delaware River decoy, it retains a “J. D. Perkins” brand on the underside. In later repaint with restoration and crack in neck.

A nicely conceived decoy with glass eyes and an inletted weight. Original paint with gunning wear, some flaking, and a bark scar on back.

JOHN ENGLISH (1848-1915) FLORENCE, NJ, C. 1900 16 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LLOYD PARKER (1859-1921) PARKERTOWN, NJ, C. 1900 15 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE: Parrish Rig Brian Hartmann Collection

LITERATURE: Harrison H. Huster and Doug Knight, Floating Sculptures: The Decoys of the Delaware River, Spanish Fork, UT, 1982, p. 61, related example illustrated.

LITERATURE: Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., New Jersey Decoys, Exton, PA, 1983, p. 144, pl. 329 and 330, similar decoys illustrated.

$2,500 - $3,500

$2,500 -$3,500 181


229

229 Merganser Hen

SMITH CLINTON VERITY (1845-1920) SEAFORD, LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1900 15 1⁄2 in. long

A symmetrically crafted decoy with classic Verity lines. A small removable cradle is tacked to the bottom. Original paint with some flaking, even gunning wear, and a very small crack in back of the neck. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Easton,

Maryland $2,000 - $3,000

230 Swimming Redhead Drake SILVERTON, NJ, C. 1880 17 1⁄2 in. long 230

A grand hollow decoy with a Mackey collection stamp on the underside and collector’s notes under the tail. This boldly carved redhead is in a slightly swimming posture and features full cheeks and strong scratch feather painting. Original paint with wear, gunning touch-up to head and tail, and a crack to neck. PROVENANCE: William J. Mackey, Jr. Collection Private Collection LITERATURE: Richard A. Bourne Co., Inc., Very Rare and Important American Bird Decoys from the Collection of the late William J. Mackey, Jr. of Bedford, New Jersey, Hyannis, MA, Session VII, Tuesday, August 20, 1974, lot 232, exact decoy illustrated.

$1,500 - $2,500

182


231 Mallard Hen

231

JOHN ENGLISH (1848-1915) FLORENCE, NJ, C. 1900 15 3⁄4 in. long

A rare mallard from the Delaware River. This hollow decoy showcases English’s refined style and execution. The underside bears a “J. D. PERKINS” brand. In repaint with wear and a tight neck crack. PROVENANCE: J. D. Perkins Rig Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Huster, Harrison H. and Doug Knight, Floating Sculptures: The Decoys of the Delaware River, Spanish Fork, UT, 1982, p. 54, pl. 23, related example illustrated.

$2,500 - $3,500

232 Two Decoys

232

15 3/4 in. and 13 in. long

A black duck by Roswell E. Bliss (18871967), Stratford, CT, c. 1930, and a long-tailed duck by Roger C. Mitchell (b. 1944), Kingston, MA, c. 1980, signed on the bottom. Both are in original paint with gunning wear.

233 Two Decoys

233

CHARLES SUMNER BUNN (1865-1952) SHINNECOCK RESERVATION, NY 15 3⁄4 in. and 16 3⁄4 in. long

Both exhibit the “IVES” rig brand. The larger bird is hollow. As found. PROVENANCE: Ives Rig Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

183


234

234 Preening Black Duck

EDWARD “TED” MULLIKEN (1896-1964) OLD SAYBROOK, CT, C. 1939 13 1⁄2 in. long

One of the finest decoys known by Mulliken, who founded Wildfowler Decoys in Old Saybrook, Connecticut in 1939. This rare decoy was made at the same time as the mallard preener illustrated in Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway by George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Easton,

Maryland

235

LITERATURE: George Ross Starr, Jr., M.D., Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway, New York, NY, 1974, pl. 29, related mallard illustrated. Henry C. Chitwood, Connecticut Decoys, West Chester, PA, 1987, pp. 172-173, related decoys illustrated.

$1,500 - $1,800

235 Preening Mallard Drake

CHARLES RALPH WELLS (1895-1979) (ATTR.) STRATFORD, CT, C. 1940 14 3⁄4 in. long

A turned-head mallard made from balsa and showing the influence of Albert Laing’s early sleepers. Original paint with heavy gunning wear.

236

LITERATURE: Henry C. Chitwood, Connecticut Decoys, West Chester, PA, 1987, pp. 74-75, related decoys illustrated.

$1,500 -$2,500

236 Miniature Mallard

JOEL D. BARBER (1876-1952) (ATTR.) WILTON, CT, 1920 box is 5 in. long

Barber was an early collector, carver, and author of Wildfowl Decoys. This mallard is mounted on a box to hold matches. As found. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$200 - $300 184


DONAL C. O’BRIEN, JR. 1934-2013 | NEW CANAAN, CT

237

237 Green-Winged Teal Pair DONAL C. O’BRIEN, JR. (1934-2013) NEW CANAAN, CT, C. 1970 11 1⁄2 in. long

O’Brien is primarily remembered in the decoy community for the collection he built. In addition to his collection, he made his own decoy rigs and was an award-winning competition carver. A rare teal pair for the maker. O’Brien produced approximately 175 decoys in his lifetime. Original paint with minimal wear. LITERATURE:

Laurence Sheehan, The Sporting Life, New York, NY, 1992, p. 81, related example illustrated.

$4,000 - $6,000

185


238

238 Redhead Pair

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, 1966 14 1⁄2 in. long

A matching pair of hollow cedar shooting stool model redheads. Each is signed and dated 1966, and bear the inscription “EXTRA PAINT JOB FOR OUR FRIEND J. NEWNAM VALLIANT.” Original paint with minimal wear, some crazing on hen and a crack in hen’s back. PROVENANCE:

Richard and Lynn Gove Collection

$2,000 - $3,000

239

239 Canvasback Pair

JAMES “CORB” REED (1897-1987) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1960 12 1⁄2 in. and 15 1⁄2 in. long

The painted feather detail on this pair of decoys represents the maker’s finest effort. Both are signed by the maker on the bottom in ink. The hen also bears the maker’s stamped “J C Reed” signature. Exceptional original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Easton, Maryland LITERATURE: Barry R. and Velma A. Berkey, Chincoteague Carvers and Their Decoys, Gettysburg, PA, 1981, pp. 74-75, similar decoys illustrated.

$2,000 - $2,400 240

240 Shoveler Pair

JAMES WEST (1937-2000) BORDENTOWN, NJ, 1970 15 in. long

The hen is signed and dated by the maker. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Richard and Lynn Gove Collection

$600 - $900

186


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

The Ward Brothers, c. 1966. Photo courtesy of AAubreyBodine.com.

187


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

241 Rare Beavertail Pintail Drake

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1930 20 1/4 in. long

This decoy was found in the home of a Pennsylvania gentleman by Frank Schmidt. The owner was a friend of the Wards and acquired it from the brothers near the time of its creation. This early retirement from hunting may explain the exceptional condition the bird displays. The Ward Brothers captured the likeness of species in their carvings as well as any decoy makers in history, and their early abilities are on full display in this drake. This beavertail model shows Steve’s refinement of the earlier humpback design. Gard and McGrath note that “the pintail was Lem’s favorite bird and he shows this preference in the painting of his pintails.” This decoy has survived as one of the finest examples from the rig. Describing a rigmate from the Brodie M. Henson collection in 1964, John Leavens writes, “One of a set of stool made to order for Senator Elwood Dize of Crisfield, Maryland.”

The underside of this lot is inscribed “L.T. WARD - Bro. CRISFIELD, MD -1930-” and bears a paper tag with typed and hand-written collector’s notes also referring to Senator Dize. Excellent original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Pennsylvania Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, p. 58, photo 32, rigmate illustrated. Guyette and Schmidt, North American Decoys at Auction, November 8 & 9, 2000, Easton Maryland, cover, and lot 258, exact decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, p. 203. John M. Leavens, “The Stylistic Development of Lem Ward,” Decoy Collector’s Guide, Burlington, IA, Oct.-December, 1964, p. 28, rigmate illustrated.

$75,000 - $95,000

188


BEAVERTAIL PINTAIL DRAKE C. 1930

241

“Stephen W. Ward (1895-1976) and his brother Lemuel Travis Ward (1896-1984) of Crisfield, Maryland were by far the most prominent Chesapeake Bay carvers of the twentieth century and among the greatest and most influential bird carvers of all time. The brothers worked closely together throughout their lives, combining the complementary talents of Steve’s hand carving and Lem’s brushwork to create works of extraordinary grace and realism.”

- Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America: Nature, History, and Art

189


241

Collector’s tag tacked to the bottom of lot 241.

190


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

Lot 242

191


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

242

242 Canvasback Hen

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1936 15 3⁄4 in. long

A classic 1936 model, this fine hen displays a high head with a pronounced crown true to the species. The underside bears the “MADE BY L. T. WARD & BRO. CRISFIELD, MD” ink stamp under the pad weight and is signed and dated “L.T. Ward-Bro-1936- Lem Ward- Steve Ward.” This decoy is a rigmate to the drake lot 243; each have matching markings and rigging on the underside. This superb example has a turned head and excellent bill carving. Of the highly coveted 1936 model canvasbacks the Wards produced, it is rare to find a hen with its original bill and tail. The full body, refined head carving, and strong paint combine to make this a highly collectable decoy. Original paint with even gunning wear, a chip to the lower right edge of tail, and neck slightly lifted on right side.

192

PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Wolf City, TX, 1989, p. 18, pl. 15, similar decoys illustrated. Glenn Lawson, The Story of Lem Ward as told by Ida Ward Linton to Glenn Lawson, West Chester, PA, 1984, p. 49, similar decoys illustrated.

$10,000 - $15,000


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

243

243 Canvasback Drake

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1936 16 1⁄4 in. long

A 1936 model canvasback drake with a high, turned head. The underside bears the “MADE BY L. T. WARD & BRO. CRISFIELD, MD” stamp. It is also signed and dated by the Wards. This decoy is a rigmate to the hen in the preceding lot. Each have matching markings and rigging on the underside. Original paint with gunning wear and age lines, some spot touch-up to flaked areas.

PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Wolf City, TX, 1989, p. 18, pl. 15, similar decoys illustrated. Glenn Lawson, The Story of Lem Ward as told by Ida Ward Linton to Glenn Lawson, West Chester, PA, 1984, p. 49, similar decoys illustrated.

$8,000 - $12,000

193


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

Lem Ward, c. 1965. Photo courtesy of AAubreyBodine.com.

194


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

244

244 Fat-Jaw Humpback Beavertail Goldeneye THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1918 15 1⁄4 in. long

This decoy displays all of the features that collectors of early Ward decoys and folk art look for. The fat-jaw style head is turned to the side and gazes skyward. The body has a humped back and a turned beaver-tail. Original paint on a Ward decoy of this age is exceedingly rare. Lem’s original paint here shows a stylish design and appealing surface. With all of these original features, this ranks as one of the best early Ward goldeneye decoys known to exist. In describing a related pair from the Ronald Gard Collection, author Bob Shaw writes, “These early Ward goldeneyes, called ‘fatjaws’ by collectors are an example of Steve Ward’s ability to capture the essence of a species’ form through stylized exaggeration.” Original paint with craquelure and gunning wear.

PROVENANCE: Collectable Old Decoys Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Timeless Treasures: Ward Brothers Decoys, Salisbury, MD, 2007, pp. 17-18, exact decoy illustrated twice. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, pp. 16-17 and 58, related example illustrated. Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, pl. 22 and 23, p. 32, related examples illustrated. Adele Earnest, The Art of the Decoy: American Bird Carvings, New York, NY, 1965, p. 181, pl. 157, related example illustrated. EXHIBITED:

Salisbury, Maryland, Timeless Treasures: Ward Brothers Decoys, The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, August 31 - November 11, 2007. $65,000 - $85,000

195


LEMUEL T. WARD 1896-1984 | CRISFIELD, MD

245

245 Lemuel T. “Lem” Ward (1896-1984) Mallards in Flight, 1948 signed and dated “L.T. Ward 48” lower left oil on canvas, 25 by 30 in.

Depicting seven mallards pitching in on a bluebird day, this stunning effort by Lem Ward is perhaps his finest oil painting. $3,500 - $4,500

196


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

246

246 Mallard Drake

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1948 16 1⁄4 in. long

A classic mallard drake collected by two early West Coast decoy collectors. With a turned head attitude, it features a flared bill, a nicely carved head, and strong paint. The rig mark “G.P.” is painted on the bottom. Original paint with some touchup and even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Roger Moore Collection William Mori Collection, acquired from the above Herb Wetanson Collection, acquired from the above LITERATURE: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys, Wolfe City, TX, 1989, p. 83, pl. 76, related decoy illustrated.

$3,000 - $5,000

Photo of lot 246 while still in the rig, c. 1950, courtesy of Bill Mori.

197


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

247

247 Bluebill Drake

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1932 15 1⁄4 in. long

Finding Ward examples from this early period with their delicate bills and tails intact is difficult. This gunning decoy showcases Lem’s thick stippled feathering along its back and sides. Though earlier and slightly different in form, this bird’s paint shows similarities to Dr. Edgar Burke’s 1936 bellwether example illustrated in his chapter of Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater. Signed and dated 1932 and inscribed “Made ‘ Steve, Painted ‘ Lem, Ward Bros., Crisfield, Md.” on the underside. The bottom also retains two “Davison B. Hawthorne Salisbury, MD,” ink stamps and one Ward Museum exhibition tag. Original paint with even gunning wear.

198

PROVENANCE: Davison Hawthorne Collection Herb Wetanson Collection LITERATURE: Eugene V. Connett, ed., Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater, New York, NY, 1947, p. 128, related decoy illustrated. Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys, Wolfe City, TX, 1989, p. 46, pl. 37, similar decoy illustrated. EXHIBITED: Salisbury, Maryland The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art.

$12,000 - $16,000


THE WARD BROTHERS

1896-1984 and 1895-1976 | CRISFIELD, MD

248

248 Early Turned-Head Canada Goose

THE WARD BROTHERS LEMUEL T. (1896-1984) AND STEPHEN (1895-1976) CRISFIELD, MD, C. 1929 24 in. long

An excellent Ward sculpture, this 1930s Canada goose displays bold clean lines. Inscribed “Ward Bro.1936” on the underside. Original paint worn mostly to bare wood, gunning wear, and a few age lines in the body and neck. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald J. Gard and Brian J. McGrath, The Ward Brothers’ Decoys: A Collector’s Guide, Plano, TX, 1989, pp. 110-111, pl. 94 and 96, similar decoys illustrated.

$10,000 - $14,000

Closely related example featured on the cover of 1968 Bourne auction catalog.

199


MASON DECOY FACTORY 1896-1924 | DETROIT, MI

249 The McCleery Baruch Mallard Pair MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1920 20 1⁄4 in. long

In addition to the famous snakey-neck Caines Brothers mallard drake, Dr. James McCleery owned this grand mallard pair, also from the esteemed Hobcaw Barony Rig. In The McCleery Auction, Alan Haid reflects on the Doctor’s “... Mason Collection, certainly the finest in existence…” which “...encompassed a wide variety of the Company’s offerings, including the most rare.” Indeed, along with McCleery’s premier Mason wood duck drake, these are the only pair of their kind to come to light. The McCleery Auction catalog reports that “This pair of decoys was found on the mantle of the Bernard Baruch family’s ‘Hobcaw Barony’ in South Carolina and are the only ones known to exist. It is believed that Mr. Baruch special ordered these decoys.”

PROVENANCE: Bernard Baruch Rig, Hobcaw Barony, South Carolina Dr. James M. McCleery Collection Herb Wetanson Collection, LITERATURE: Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 117, lot 260, exact decoys illustrated. Robert Shaw, ed., The McCleery Auction, Dallas, TX, 2001, p. 103, exact hen illustrated with Alan Haid and the consignor. Russ J. Goldberger and Alan Haid, Mason Decoys: A Pictorial Guide, Lewes, DE, 1993, no oversize mallards illustrated.

$35,000 - $45,000

One of the rarest and most important Mason pairs to ever come to market. Outstanding original paint with minimal wear, minor touch-up to necks, and a few spots on body of hen.

Mason Premier black ducks, c. 1920, being hunted along with Caines brothers snakey neck mallards in the background at Hobcaw Barony. Image courtesy of Collectable Old Decoys.

200


THE McCLEERY BARUCH MALLARD PAIR

C. 1920

249

201


GEORGE WARIN 1830-1905 | TORONTO, ON

250 Hollow Canada Goose

GEORGE WARIN (1830-1905) TORONTO ISLAND, ONTARIO, CANADA, C. 1880 23 3⁄4 in. long

The Warins created lightweight, hollow decoys that were perfectly suited to the calm waters of southwestern Ontario. The wet-on-wet blended paint applied to this decoy is among the finest seen on any goose carving. George Warin (1830-1905) and his brother James (18321884) first apprenticed to the highly esteemed boatbuilder Robert G. Renardson before taking over his business in 1873. As a testament to their craftsmanship, a Warin-built racing scull won the 1881 and 1882 world championships. George Warin used his exceptional boatbuilding skills to carve decoys which “set a new standard of excellence in

250

202

the region and were imitated by dozens of later Toronto and southwestern Ontario craftsmen,” according to historian Robert Shaw. Warin was also the first president of the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company and his recommendation positioned carver Thomas Chambers (1860-1948) as the club’s keeper. A related example set a new world record at auction for this important Canadian maker in Copley’s Sporting Sale 2017. Original paint with even gunning wear, a professional bill replacement, and repair to tail chip.


250

PROVENANCE: Seregney Collection Herb Wetanson Collection, acquired from the above LITERATURE: Bernie Gates, Ontario Decoys II, Kingston, ON, 1986, p. 65, similar decoy illustrated. Gene and Linda Kangas, Decoys: A North American Survey, Spanish Fork, UT, 1983, p. 211, pl. 38, similar decoy illustrated.

Copley Fine Art Auctions, The Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection of Important American Sporting Art and Decoys, Sessions I-II, July 27, 2017, p. 56, lot 7, closely related decoy illustrated. Robert Shaw, Bird Decoys of North America, New York, NY, 2010, pp. 232-233. Loy S. Harrell, Jr., Decoys: North America’s One Hundred Greatest, Iola, WI, 2000, pp. 56-57, similar decoy illustrated. $18,000 - $22,000

203


251

252

251 Goldeneye Drake

252 Canvasback Hen

Originally purchased by Henry Darling Smith of Elgin, Ontario, in 1919, these unique cross-hatch carved birds have enticed collectors ever since. Original paint with gunning wear, possible working touch-up to white.

A fine hollow Homme decoy with a high, turned head on a raised neck seat. This gunning decoy features extensive detail on the bill, wings, and tail. The rig marking “MIKE” is painted on the underside. Original paint with even gunning wear.

SAMUEL R. HUTCHINGS (1894-1995) JONES FALLS, ONTARIO, CANADA, C. 1919 13 in. long

PROVENANCE: Henry Darling Smith Rig, Chaffey’s Falls, Ontario Bernie Gates Collection Private Collection LITERATURE: Bernie Gates, Ontario Decoys II, Kingston, ON, 1986, pp. 178-180, similar decoys illustrated.

$5,000 - $8,000

FERDINAND L. HOMME (1901-1963) STOUGHTON, WI, C. 1940 16 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Rusty and Dianna Johnson

Collection LITERATURE: Gene and Linda Kangas, Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations, Concord, OH, 2011, p. 205, related decoys illustrated. Donna Tonelli, Fish and Fowl Decoys of the Great Lakes, Atglen, PA, 2002, p. 206, related decoys illustrated.

$2,500 - $3,500 204


Lots 253 - 263 are from a descendant of

Alfred Ely (1884-1959) Alfred Ely (1884-1959) was an attorney from New York and served as the President of the Long Island Retriever Field Trial Club. A consummate sportsman, he was an avid bow hunter and a member of the Boone and Crockett Club. As a shorebird decoy collector, Ely was ahead of his time, starting to collect in the 1940’s and ending in the 1950’s. This marks the first time the carvings from this historic collection have been offered for sale in over sixty years.

256

205


253

253 Outstanding Removable Head Shorebird NORTH CAROLINA, C. 1915 9 1â „2 in. long

A superb example of one-hundred-twenty-fiveyear-old Southern sporting folk art. This decoy was made with a removable pegged head for easy transport. This decoy hails from early shorebird collector Alfred Ely, who began collecting as early as 1940. This marks the first time this historic bird has been offered at auction. The carving is very likely made by the same hand as lot 157 out of the L. H. LaMotte Collection. Excellent original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

254

LITERATURE: Kroghie Andersen and Phillip Harvey, Shorebird Decoys of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, 2015, cover, related examples illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500

254 Root-Head Shorebird NORTH CAROLINA, C. 1880 8 1â „2 in. long

Original paint with gunning wear and broken bill. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$600 - $900

206


255 Important Golden Plover Pair

255

NANTUCKET, MA, C. 1840 10 in. long

A fine pair of Nantucket golden plover. This pair represents two of the most well documented Nantucket shorebirds to come to market. A letter from Nicholas Norcross to Alfred Ely in 1946 states that these birds were hunted over by Sidney Chase, George H. Mackay (18651922), Capt. Wyer (1822-1913), and Norcross himself. At that time Norcross stated, “They must be at least 100 yrs old for I have had them over 50 yrs.� The Ely-Norcross correspondence provides us with a rare glimpse into the age of these Nantucket carvings and gunners who used them. Outstanding dry original paint with even gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Captain Wyer Rig Nicholas G. Norcross Rig, gifted from the above c. 1895 Alfred Ely Collection, purchased from the above in 1946 Private Collection, by descent from the above

256

$3,000 - $4,000

256 Early Paddle-Tail Golden Plover NANTUCKET, MA, C. 1860 10 in. long

A unique island bird with a flared tail and stylish mask. Golden plover and Eskimo curlew coastal migrations had historical stopovers on Nantucket Island. In the early and mid-1800s, they arrived in the tens of thousands and were staples of the early shorebird gunners. A rare opportunity to own a previously undiscovered Nantucket pattern with impeccable provenance. Original paint with light wear; bill is a gunning replacement. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$1,500 - $2,500

207


257

259

258

260

257 “Sickle Bill” Curlew

259 Rare Plover

A rare early decoy by this maker with a bone bill and detailed painted feathering. Designated a “Sickle Bill,” the decoy retains two oaktags with Alfred Ely’s collector’s notes from 1947. Original paint with wear, including tight age cracks along back and breast.

This decoy displays the same dropped head position as the willet featured in Doherty’s Classic New Jersey Decoys. Original paint with gunning wear, a small hole drilled in one side, an area under the tail was left partially unpainted.

EUGENE CUFFEE (1861-1941) SHINNECOCK RESERVATION, LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1890 18 3⁄4 IN. LONG

PROVENANCE:

Captain Mott Smith Rig Roy Voorhees Collection Alfred Ely Collection, acquired from the above 1947 Private Collection, by descent from the above $2,000 - $3,000

258 Running Curlew

EUGENE CUFFEE (1861-1941) (ATTR.) LONG ISLAND, NY, 1920 17 in. long

A nice dry example with carefully applied paint. A tag with Ely’s 1947 collector’s notes accompanies the lot. Original paint with even wear, including a plug missing from bottom. PROVENANCE: Roy Vorhees Collection Alfred Ely Collection, gifted from the above 1947 Private Collection, by descent from the above

$1,000 - $1,500

208

JOEL BARKALOW (EST. 1853-1931) NEW JERSEY, C. 1890 8 in. long

PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above LITERATURE: James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 171, pl. 368, related willet illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 147, lot 371, related willet illustrated.

$500 - $800

260 Curlew

VIRGINIA, C. 1880 11 3⁄4 in. long

Displays a lightly incised “E” on the back. In a mix of original and working paint with an old repair to left side of back, gunning wear, missing bill. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above


261 Curlew

261

THOMAS GELSTON (1850-1924) QUOGUE, LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1895 16 1⁄2 in. long

A grand, full-bodied decoy with raised wings and a reaching pose. Original paint with heavy gunning wear, including one missing eye and age lines. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent

$2,000 - $3,000

262

262 Yellowlegs

JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, 1890 10 1⁄4 in. long

A nice dry example with classic Lincoln lines. Strong original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

$1,000 - $1,500

263 Four Shorebirds

263

As found. PROVENANCE: Alfred Ely Collection Private Collection, by descent from the above

209


CHARLES W. WATERFIELD 1881-1973 | BACK BAY, NC

264

264 Rare Ruddy Duck

CHARLES W. WATERFIELD (1881-1973) BACK BAY, NC, C. 1920 11 1⁄2 in. long

“...the overall importance of Carolina’s bays and sounds in the wildfowl picture almost demands that decoy collections contain some example of Carolina origin.” -William J. Mackey, Jr. American Bird Decoys An important Waterfield decoy, this North Carolina treasure displays the very same pattern and lines of the John Williams ruddy featured on the cover of Gunnin’ Birds. “Charles ‘Charlie’ Whitehouse Waterfield spent his entire life associated with hunting waterfowl in the Back Bay and Knotts Island area” writes Kroghie Andresen. “He was born on the False Cape Club property and while a teenager took his first job on Cedar Island working with John Williams and Ivy Stevens.”

210

This example displays a fat-jaw profile and a slightly upswept tail. The underside is branded “N” for the North Collection. Original paint with gunning wear and a replaced bill. PROVENANCE: D. C. North Collection Private Collection, Massachusetts LITERATURE: Kroghie Andresen, Gunnin’ Birds, Charlotte, NC, 2008, front cover and pp. 60-69, related example illustrated. William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1965, pp. 165-172.

$4,000 - $6,000


LEMUEL A. KEEN

B. 1890 | FENWICK ISLAND, DE

265

265 Hissing Canada Goose LEMUEL A. KEEN (BORN C. 1890) FENWICK ISLAND, DE, 1942 30 in. long

Documentation regarding this decoy reveals that Lemuel Keen brought his unpainted rig down to Ira Hudson to be finished in 1942 for 50 cents apiece. Hudson was a sought-after professional decoy painter who worked on rigs along the entire Delmarva Peninsula. The Keen rig totaled one dozen decoys and held at least one other hisser as evidenced from the photo below. This is believed to be the first time that any Keen decoy has ever been offered for sale at public auction. It also represents one of the best decoys to have survived from the state of Delaware. Original paint by Ira Hudson with even gunning wear, some flaking, and seam separation. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Eastern Shore, Maryland

$8,000 - $10,000

Left to right: Stiles W. Adkins, Earle Tingle, and George Marvel with Jingle and Boots, the last day of quail season 1966-1967. The trio took an impressive 426 quail that season. Note the fine Hudson and Ward carvings on the wall, floor, and mantle. A Keen rigmate hissing goose is seen peeking out lower right.

211


266

266 Wigeon Drake

CALLIE O’NEAL (1910-1970) AYDLETT, CURRITUCK SOUND AREA, NC, C. 1940 17 in. long

Callie O’Neal was an avid sportsman who enjoyed hunting and fishing in the Currituck Sound area where he grew up. This decoy was made for his personal hunting rig. In original paint with gunning wear, age lines to neck and bottom. PROVENANCE: Bob and Elizabeth Reel (the maker’s daughter), by descent Kroghie Andresen Collection, acquired from the above, 2000 LITERATURE: Kroghie Andresen, Gunnin’ Birds, Charlotte, NC, 2008, p. 177, rigmate illustrated.

267

$2,000 - $2,500

267 Pintail Pair

CALLIE O’NEAL (1910-1970) AYDLETT, CURRITUCK SOUND AREA, NC, C. 1940 17 3⁄4 in. and 18 3⁄4 in. long

Pictured in Gunnin’ Birds, the author discusses these exact pintails along with others: “Callie O’Neal carved blackduck, widgeon, mallard, pintail, canvasback, and redhead decoys with consistency. They have great form and were in great demand by hunters during his time. Some of his decoys have been found in pristine original paint and are a great addition to any collection.” In original paint with gunning wear, age line on hen’s neck and on bottoms of each. PROVENANCE: Kroghie Andresen Collection, acquired from Philip Harvey, 1992

268

LITERATURE: Kroghie Andresen, Gunnin’ Birds, Charlotte, NC, 2008, p. 178, exact decoys illustrated.

$3,500 - $4,500

268 High-Head Shorebird NORTH CAROLINA, C. 1890 9 in. long

A chipped carved decoy with highly stylized features, including long neck, dropped tail, and cut-nail bill. Original paint mostly worn to bare wood. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Massachusetts, acquired from Collectible Old Decoys

$1,000 - $1,500 212


ENOCH S. TOLSON

C. 1910 | OCRACOKE, NC

269

269 Exceptionally Rare Eskimo Curlew ENOCH S. TOLSON OCRACOKE, NC, C. 1910 11 1⁄2 in. long

A North Carolina Eskimo curlew decoy with carved eyes, deep “S” carved shoulders, raised wings, and notch-carved tail and wing tip detail. A rigmate by the same maker was offered in 1971 at a Richard Bourne auction. As a testament to the quality of Tolson’s work, in that auction the Tolson curlew was one of only three decoys that carried a reserve. Original paint with minor wear, two wire leg holes on the bottom have been filled. PROVENANCE: Collectable Old Decoys, South Carolina Grant Nelson Collection LITERATURE: Richard A. Bourne Co. Inc., Public Auction, Hyannis, MA, August 1971, lot 210, rigmate illustrated.

$18,000 - $24,000

A rigmate curlew illustrated in a 1971 Bourne auction catalog.

213


270

270 Broadbill Drake

CHURCH ISLAND, NC, C. 1930 13 1⁄2 in. long

Marked with an incised “FR” on the underside, possibly for Frank Reese of Currituck. In working repaint with gunning wear, an age line with stabilizing nails, and tail chips. PROVENANCE:

Krogie Andresen Collection

$500 - $800

271

271 Canvas Canada Goose ELLIE SAUNDERS (1884-1969) CURRITUCK, NC, C. 1925 23 3⁄4 in. long

A classic stretched-canvas North Carolina Canada goose with a turned head in exceptional condition. In original paint with minimal wear and a minor tear under tail. PROVENANCE: Krogie Andresen Collection, acquired from Philip Harvey LITERATURE: Kroghie Andresen, Gunnin’ Birds, Charlotte, NC, 2008, p. 194, (image reversed) exact bird illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500

272

272 Swimming Brant

DELBERT “CIGAR” DAISEY (1928-2017) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, 1971 19 1⁄2 in. long

A cork-bodied decoy with a wooden bottom board which is signed, dated, and branded by the maker. Original paint with light gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$200 - $300

214


IRA D. HUDSON

1873-1949 | CHINCOTEAGUE, VA

273

273 Outstanding Pintail Drake IRA D. HUDSON (1873-1949) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1940 18 1⁄2 in. long

Ira Hudson was born in Maryland and grew up in Delaware. Later he and his wife Eva moved to the island of Chincoteague in Virginia to raise their nine children. A multi-talented craftsman, Hudson designed and built his own home on Chincoteague. He also designed and built boats, including many flat-bottomed scows used for hunting and oyster farming. In 1897, at age twenty-six, Hudson added decoy carving to the several other occupations he would pursue over the years; the 1900 and 1910 census records list Hudson as a “waterman” and “oysterman.” In order to support his family, Hudson also built chicken coops, gunstocks, and even clothespins when there was a demand for these items during World War II.

This grand decoy is among the Hudson’s best pintail carvings. The high head is tilted down, turned to the right, has full cheeks, eye grooves, and carved bill detail. The surface is finished with Delbert Hudson’s lively scratch feather paint. This well-preserved example was never rigged. Excellent original paint with even wear, touch-up to reset neck, repair to end of bill with some touch-up, and the underside has two cracks. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Maryland

LITERATURE: Henry H. Stansbury, Ira D. Hudson and Family, Lewes, DE, 2002, p. 126, related drake illustrated.

$15,000 - $20,000

Hudson enlisted the help of his family to fill his numerous carving orders. All nine children learned under his wing and contributed in some capacity to his carving. Several of his offspring became talented makers in their own right. Most notably, Hudson’s sons Norman and Delbert went on to design, carve, and sell their own decoys.

215


JIM SCHMIEDLIN

1945-2015 | BRADFORD WOODS, PA

274

274 Wood Duck Drake

JIM SCHMIEDLIN (1945-2015) BRADFORD WOODS, PA, 1997 15 1â „2 in. long

Signed, dated, and branded by the maker on the bottom. Schmiedlin, who recently passed away, made very few decoys of this species, making it a rare opportunity to collect one of his most desirable works. Original paint with minor gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$4,500 - $5,500

275

275 Gadwall Drake

JIM SCHMIEDLIN (1945-2015) BRADFORD WOODS, PA, 1992 17 in. long

Signed, inscribed, dated, and branded on the bottom by the maker. Original paint with minor gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$3,000 - $5,000

276

276 Preening Mallard

JIM SCHMIEDLIN (1945-2015) BRADFORD WOODS, PA, 1994 15 in. long

Signed and branded by the maker, with notes written in pencil also on the bottom. Original paint with light gunning wear. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$3,000 - $5,000

216


JIM SCHMIEDLIN

1945-2015 | BRADFORD WOODS, PA

277 Cinnamon Teal Drake

277

JIM SCHMIEDLIN (1945-2015) BRADFORD WOODS, PA, 1984 13 in. long

Branded, signed, and dated on the bottom by the maker. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$2,000 - $3,000

278 Ring-Necked Duck

278

JIM SCHMIEDLIN (1945-2015) BRADFORD WOODS, PA, 1985 13 1â „4 in. long

Branded, inscribed, signed, and dated on the bottom by the maker. Original paint with minimal wear. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, acquired from the maker

$2,000 - $3,000

217


279

279 Canada Goose JAY POLITE NEW CASTLE, DE, 1973 27 1⁄2 in. long

This noted competition carver has been written up in both Sports Illustrated and the New York Times. The Sports Illustrated article states that Polite “won best of show with a black duck at Babylon.” Original paint with minimal wear. LITERATURE: Robert H. Boyle, Fine Feather Help Make Better Birds, Sports Illustrated, November 1. 1976.

$1,500 - $2,500

280

280 Curlew

IAN T. MCNAIR (B. 1981) CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA, 2018 12 1⁄2 in. long

A curlew in the Cobb Island style made from mahogany with an oak bill. Decoy makers on the barrier islands of Virginia are well known for salvaging the materials that washed up on their shores, leading to the occasional application of this exotic wood in their decoys. Original paint with minimal wear. $250 - $350

218


CAMERON T. MCINTYRE B. 1968 | NEW CHURCH, VA

281 Hissing Canada Goose

281

CAMERON T. MCINTYRE (B. 1968) NEW CHURCH, VA, C. 1990 29 in. long

A Cobb-style goose with the maker’s incised “CTM” in the underside. Original paint with gunning wear, including some age lines. PROVENANCE:

Herb Wetanson Collection

$3,000 - $4,000

282 High-Head Canvasback Drake

282

CAMERON T. MCINTYRE (B. 1968) NEW CHURCH, VA, C. 2000 16 3⁄4 in. long

Inspired by the classic Ward Brothers form, this decoy is from the maker’s personal rig and signed with his incised initials on the bottom. Original paint with gunning wear. PROVENANCE: Cameron McIntyre Rig Private Collection

$1,500 - $2,000

283 Wigeon Drake

283

CAMERON T. MCINTYRE (B. 1968) NEW CHURCH, VA, C. 1985 14 in. long

This early McIntyre has raised wings and is signed by the maker with his incised initials “CTM” in the bottom. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Easton,

Maryland $1,000 - $1,400

219


MARK S. MCNAIR

B. 1950 | CRADDOCKVILLE, VA

284

285

284 Sandpiper Trio

285 Preening Wigeon Drake

These three peeps represent the maker’s animated Verity forms including a rare breast preener. Each is signed with maker’s incised signature on the underside. Original paint with minor wear.

A hollow featherlight decoy with an incised “McNair VIRGINIA” on the bottom. Original paint with minor wear.

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, 2018 6 1⁄2 in. long

$1,000 - $1,500

220

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, C. 1980 12 1⁄2 in. long

$2,000 - $2,500


MARK S. MCNAIR

B. 1950 | CRADDOCKVILLE, VA

286

287

286 Banana Bird Pair

287 Hollow Loon

Each is incised “McNAIR” and has Virginiastyle scratch feathering on the back. Original paint with minimal wear.

This exceptional loon decoy by McNair exhibits carved eyes, an inletted neck, raised wings, and an inletted bottom board with his incised signature. Original paint with minor wear and an age line along the bottom.

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, C. 1990 9 3⁄4 in. long

$800 - $1,200

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, C. 1990 24 1⁄4 in. long

$2,500 - $3,500

221


288

290

289

291

288 Yellowlegs Trio

290 Ruddy Turnstone

Each has an incised “McNAIR,” a brief inscription, and one is dated on the underside. These birds were inspired by a trip to the Egyptian wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Original paint with minimal wear.

Signed with the maker’s branded initials on the underside of the bird. Original paint with minor wear.

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, 1982 15 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE: The Barrie and Bernice Stavis Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

$1,200 - $1,400

289 Calling Dowitcher

WILLIAM C. GIBIAN (B. 1946) ONANCOCK, VA, 1999 11 1⁄2 in. long

A refined long-billed dowitcher carving with open bill, raised wings, and one foot atop a carved clamshell. The maker’s signature is incised on the underside of the bird. Original paint with minor wear. $800 - $1,200

222

DAVID B. WARD (B. 1947) ESSEX, CT, C. 2000 10 in. long

$500 - $700

291 Semipalmated Plover GEORGE S. GIBB (1916-1989) ATTLEBORO, MA, 1957 6 1⁄2 in. long

The bird displays excellent paint and proportions. It is signed and dated on the bottom of the base by the maker. Original paint with minor wear, including a small chip to thigh. $300 - $500


292

292 Swan

ROBERT “BOB” WHITE (B. 1939) TULLYTOWN, PA, 1985 25 1⁄2 in. long

A rare swan decoy in a tucked-head pose by the contemporary Delaware River master. The underside of the hollow body is signed, dated, and retains the maker’s signature bobwhite quail weight. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE:

Randall Hobbs Collection

$4,000 - $6,000

293

293 Canada Goose

OLIVER “TUTS” LAWSON (B. 1938) CRISFIELD, MD, 1987 22 in. long

An unrigged life-size goose decoy, signed and dated by the maker on the bottom. Lawson grew up under the wings and tutelage of the famous Ward brothers and he will forever be linked with producing some of the finest decoys to come out of Maryland. Original paint with minor wear. PROVENANCE:

Randall Hobbs Collection

$1,200 - $1,800

294 Preening Black Duck

294

GEORGE STRUNK (B. 1958) GLENDORA, NJ, C. 2000 17 in. long

A boldly carved and hollow decoy with raised primaries, carved tail feathers, and exceptional paint. Stamped “G STRUNK” on weight and signed. Original paint with minimal wear. $300 - $400

223


FRANK S. FINNEY B. 1947 | CAPEVILLE, VA

295

297

296

298

295 Miniature Pheasant

297 Miniature Grouse

This carving has dropped wings with nice feather paint detail. Incised “F” signature under base. Original paint with minor wear.

The body has raised wing and tail carving and blended feathering. Incised “F” signature under base. Original paint with minor wear.

$400 - $600

$400 - $600

296 Miniature Goldeneye

298 Life-Size Hummingbird

The body features incised crossed wing tips. Incised “F” signature under base. Original paint with minor wear.

Incised wing and tail feather carving. Incised “F” signature under base. Original paint with minor wear.

$400 - $600

$400 - $600

FRANK S. FINNEY (B. 1947) CAPEVILLE, VA, C. 2000 7 3⁄4 in. long

FRANK S. FINNEY (B. 1947) CAPEVILLE, VA, C. 2000 5 3⁄4 in. long

224

FRANK S. FINNEY (B. 1947) CAPEVILLE, VA, C. 2000 5 1⁄2 in. long

FRANK S. FINNEY (B. 1947) CAPEVILLE, VA, C. 2000 7 1⁄4 in. long


299

301

300

302

299 Dove

301 Preening Canvasback Drake

A mourning dove decoy with raised wing tips and a long tail. Incised “McNair” on the underside. Original paint with minor wear.

“R. Birch” is incised and ink stamped on the underside. Original paint with minimal wear.

MARK S. MCNAIR (B. 1950) CRADDOCKVILLE, VA, C. 1990 12 1⁄2 in. long

REGGIE BIRCH (B. 1953) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 2015 13 in. long

$300 - $500

$800 - $1,000

302 Bobwhite Quail 300 Red-Breasted Merganser Hen DELBERT “CIGAR” DAISEY (1928-2017) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1990 17 in. long

The underside of this decoy is branded “CIGAR.” Original paint with minor wear. $600 -$900

GEORGE CSEFAI (1936-1973) C. 1960 7 1⁄2 in. tall

Csefai began carving decoys for his own rig and went on to be an influential competition carver. The underside of the bird is signed “Csefai No. 002.” Original paint with minimal wear. $200 - $400

225


DANIEL LAKE LEEDS 1852-1922 | PLEASANTVILLE, NJ

303

303 The Hillman Leeds Plover DANIEL LAKE LEEDS (1852-1922) PLEASANTVILLE, NJ, C. 1890 10 in. long

This black-bellied plover is published in three of the most important New Jersey shorebird publications ever written. As the provenance suggests, this rig was celebrated from the time of its discovery. Describing the Leeds rig in Classic Shorebird Decoys: A Portfolio of Paintings, William J. Mackey, Jr. writes, “...It was probably the greatest single find of its kind in New Jersey decoy history. The Dan Leeds birds have a stylized exaggeration that has an artistic appeal. The black-bellied plover have heads that indicate their local name, ‘bull heads’...Dan used thick oily paint and laid it on instead of brushing it out. This viscous coating made a durable finish, and the rig was found in mint condition. The old gentleman lavished great care on his decoys during their years of service. They stand on their own merit and have little in common with their New Jersey contemporaries.” This top-grade Leeds is nearly indistinguishable from the Doherty example, down to the minor flaking on the head. Original paint with minor flaking and light gunning wear.

PROVENANCE: Somers G. Headley Collection John Hillman Collection Brian Hartmann Collection LITERATURE: John M. Levinson and Somers G. Headley, Shorebirds, Centreville, MD, 1991, p. 92, pl. 6-34, exact decoy illustrated. Guyette and Schmidt, Important Auction of Rare Waterfowl Decoys from the Collection of John Hillman, April 25 & 26, 1996, West Farmington, ME, 1996, lot 48, exact decoy illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Shore Bird Decoys, Exton, PA, 1980, pl. 83, exact decoy illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 178, pl. 400, rigmate illustrated. Milton C. Weiler and William J. Mackey, Jr., Classic Shorebird Decoys: A Portfolio of Paintings, New York, NY, 1971, pl. 11, rigmate illustrated. Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 143, lot 349, rigmate illustrated.

$8,000 - $12,000

226


304

306

305

307

304 Early Plover

306 Minnow-In-Throat Yellowlegs

A plover by one of the earliest known New Jersey decoy makers. Hildreth’s shorebirds are recognized for their original and geometric design with uplifted heads and dropped tails. Hildreth shorebird bills were removable and interchangeable for ease of transport in the field. Original paint with heavy gunning wear.

Original and working paint with gunning wear, some wear to wood, and a three-quarter bill replacement.

EPHRAIM HILDRETH (1835-1915) RIO GRANDE, NJ, C. 1870 10 1⁄2 in. long

HARRY B. BOICE (1880-1966) PLEASANTVILLE, NJ, C. 1910 12 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE: Gary N. Giberson Collection Brian Hartmann Collection

$800 - $1,200

$800 - $1,200

307 Willet 305 Plover

SAMUEL SCHUTE (ATTR.) CAPE MAY, NJ, C. 1880 9 1⁄2 in. long

A fine carving with raised wing and stippled paint. One of the most unique designs in the shorebird carving world, Schute created content-looking birds that when placed in a rig captured the essence of a huddled flock. Original paint with light gunning wear. LITERATURE: Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 221, lot 608, related example illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 183, pl. 413, rigmates illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500

JOHN HORN OCEANVILLE, NJ, C. 1890 11 1⁄4 in. long

This rare willet displays Horn’s pronounced cheek and tail carving, also seen on the turnstone in this sale (lot 154). A rigmate example was collected by John Hillman. Original paint with gunning wear and some touch-up to left front of face. PROVENANCE:

Brian Hartmann Collection

LITERATURE: Sotheby’s and Guyette and Schmidt, American Waterfowl Decoys: The Distinguished Collection of Dr. James M. McCleery, New York, NY, 2000, p. 220, lot 607, related example illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Shore Bird Decoys, Exton, PA, 1980, p. 117, pl. 122, related example illustrated. James R. Doherty, Classic New Jersey Decoys, Louisville, KY, 2011, p. 175, pl. 388, turnstone illustrated.

$1,000 - $1,500 227


308

308 Running Yellowlegs

THOMAS GELSTON (1850-1924) QUOGUE, LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1900 12 1⁄2 in. long

Original and working paint with heavy gunning wear and a replaced bill. $1,000 - $1,500

309

309 Running Golden Plover JOSEPH W. LINCOLN (1859-1938) ACCORD, MA, C. 1880 10 in. long

This early decoy displays superb blended paint. Original paint with light gunning wear. LITERATURE: Cap Vinal, Joseph W. Lincoln, Rockland, MA, 2002, p. 63, similar bird illustrated.

$1,500 - $2,000

310

310 Peep

MASSACHUSETTS, C. 1890 7 1⁄4 in. long

A charming little sandpiper, possibly from Nantucket. Old paint with gunning wear, hairline touch-up to age line in neck, and a small spot under tail. PROVENANCE:

Brian Hartmann Collection

$800 - $1,200

228


311 Rig of Five Yellowlegs

311

LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1890 10 1â „2 in. long

One hundred years after the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, an overwhelming majority of vintage shorebird decoy rigs have been broken up, making this group a disappearing vestige of the past. As found. $1,500 - $2,000

312 Ruddy Turnstone

312

NEW JERSEY, C. 1890 8 3â „8 in. long

A rare decoy species with two stick-up holes. Stamped and written collector inventory numbers are on the underside. From the historic George Bird Evans Collection which included prime New Jersey shorebird examples. Original paint with light gunning wear and a possible bill replacement. PROVENANCE: George Bird Evans Collection Brian Hartmann Collection

$2,000 - $2,500

313 Long-Billed Curlew

313

NEW JERSEY, C. 1900 18 in. long

A large Cape May curlew with a broad head, a thin neck, and strong scratch feather paint. Excellent original paint with minimal wear, including touch-up at base of replaced bill. $800 - $1,200

229


MASON DECOY FACTORY 1896-1924 | DETROIT, MI

314

316

315

317

314 Premier-Grade Black Duck

316 Standard-Grade Pintail Drake

Two screw eyes remain in the back of this decoy from its use attracting customers as a trade sign. In original paint with even gunning wear, some age lines, a loose head, and roughness to tail edge.

An unrigged decoy with a nice long tail. Original paint with some uneven varnish on lower right side, gunning wear, and some missing neck filler.

MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1910 17 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1920 18 5⁄8 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$600 - $900

$500 - $800

317 Two Mason Factory Decoys 315 Premier-Grade Black Duck

MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1910 19 in. long

A special-order solid-bodied decoy. Stamped “STRATER” four times on the bottom. The Strater family, known for their folding tin shorebird decoys, also had a gunning camp on Tuckernuck Island off of Nantucket. In original paint with gunning wear, a check along back, and small cracks at front base of head which is slightly loose. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$300 - $500

230

MASON DECOY FACTORY (1896-1924) DETROIT, MI, C. 1920 14 in. and 16 in. long

A glass-eye mallard hen and a broadbill hen, both are in dry original paint. As found.


KEN HARRIS

1905-1981 | WOODVILLE, NY

318

319

318 Wood Duck Drake

319 Hooded Merganser Drake

An early and rare Ken Harris humpback model that retains an intact bill, crest, and tail. Signed on the bottom with the maker’s ink stamp. Outstanding original paint with minimal wear.

An early and very rare Ken Harris humpback model that retains an intact bill, crest, and tail. Signed on the bottom with the maker’s ink stamp. Oustanding original paint with minimal wear.

KEN HARRIS (1905-1981) WOODVILLE, NY, C. 1945 13 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$300 - $500

KEN HARRIS (1905-1981) WOODVILLE, NY, C. 1945 13 1⁄2 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

LITERATURE: Christie’s, The Russell B. Aitken Collection of Waterfowl Decoys, New York, NY, 2003, lot 1022, related example illustrated.

$500 - $800 231


320

320 Two Plover

LONG ISLAND, NY, C. 1920 11 1⁄2 in. long

Two plover carvings with glass eyes, raised wings, square mortised in bills, and no stick holes. As found. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

$400 - $600

321

321 Davis Rig Plover CAPE COD, MA, C. 1890 11 in. long

This plover was constructed with an applied head. “DAVIS” is incised on underside. The extended Davis family lived in Davisville, an East Falmouth neighborhood. In early gunning paint with flaking, wear, and a repair to bill tip. PROVENANCE: Davis Rig Private Collection, Cape Cod

$800 - $1200 322

322 Pintail Drake

MILES HANCOCK (1888-1974) CHINCOTEAGUE, VA, C. 1930 19 in. long

A long pintail drake in original paint showing the strong influence of fellow islander Ira Hudson. As found. PROVENANCE:

Randall Hobbs Collection

$400 - $600

232


323

325

324

326

323 Pintail Drake

325 Green-Winged Teal Pair

A hollow decoy with a turned head. Original paint, gunning repaint to white has been partially taken down, gunning wear, and a tail chip.

A nicely carved pair of teal, drawing from the works of Charles Perdew. The pair exhibit carved bills, deep eye groves, and raised wings. One is stenciled “62” on the bottom, the other “64,” and both have “MALLET” weights. Original paint with light wear.

HECTOR “HECK” WHITTINGTON (1907-1981) OGLESBY, IL, C. 1940 17 in. long

$500 - $700

ILLINOIS RIVER 11 in. long

$600 - $900

324 High-Head Pintail Hen SETH G. BARRY (1896-1993) BRODERICK, CA, C. 1920 18 1⁄2 in. long

Original paint with gunning wear, a minor tail chip, and the tack eyes are missing.

326 Eider Drake MAINE, C. 1910 17 in. long

This decoy employed an old bronze plumbing fixture as a weight, “D CARTER” is incised in the bottom. In repaint with even wear and a partial bill replacement. $800 - $1,200

233


Ron Swanson Atlantic salmon fishing.

234


Lots 327 - 352 are part of

The Ronald S. Swanson Collection

For over half a century, Ron Swanson has made vast

In 2005 Swanson published Grand Cascapedia Giants, a

contributions to the collective knowledge of the bird

green-clothed, hardbound book with a matching slip-

decoy and fish model communities. His accolades range

case. The beautiful volume documents trophy Atlantic

from being a longtime writer for Decoy Magazine, to

salmon catches on “North America’s grandest salmon

being a curator of the 1997 exhibit entitled Fish Models:

river,” along with the fishing lore connected with that

An Exhibition at the Ward Museum, to being instrumen-

famous stretch of water. In addition to artwork, Swan-

tal in getting contemporary master fish carver Stephen R.

son includes contemporary and historical photographs

Smith started in his art.

of fish mounts and models, as well as the actual fish,

Swanson’s decoy collecting passion began in 1962 when

the anglers, the guides, and the private camps. Famed

his roommate at Brown took him hunting for canvas-

bamboo fly-rod maker and author Hoagy Bix Carmichael

backs, broadbills, and black duck on Long Island. By

(b. 1938) wrote the introduction, a fitting choice as

the mid-1960s, he was spending his weekends picking

Carmichael and Swanson are good friends who fished to-

decoys from the carvers themselves. In 1981 he was part

gether annually on the Grand Cascapedia and in Norway

of an esteemed group of sixteen experts who evaluated

for fifty years.

the Shelburne Museum’s collection, known as one of

Swanson followed the Cascapedia book with Record

the world’s greatest treasuries of wildfowl decoys. In

Atlantic Salmon, which he penned in 2008. Spanning

addition, Swanson extensively researched decoy carver

the immense time period of 1730 through the present,

Albert Davids Laing (1811-1886) and shared his findings

the author catalogs 561 Atlantic salmon, weighing fifty

in the authoritative article on the maker entitled, “Albert

pounds or more, that have been caught on a fly rod

D. Laing: A decoy maker unequaled in his time,” pub-

worldwide. Similar to his first book, Swanson makes deft

lished in Decoy Magazine.

use of photographs and maps to enhance the writing.

In an article entitled “Keepers of the Flame,” John Mundt,

The author’s third book, Fish Models, Plaques, & Effigies,

of the New York Anglers Club, describes Swanson as “a

published in 2009, shares the same mossy green cover

man who has devoted more than four decades of his life

and slipcase as the first two. He wrote an article with the

to the study and collecting of fish models and research-

same title for the July/August 1996 issue of Decoy Maga-

ing the facts behind their origins.” According to Mundt,

zine, demonstrating the many years that Swanson spent

while on a salmon fishing trip to Scotland’s river Spey in

studying the topic. According to Swanson, this was the

1969, Swanson beheld a carved salmon hanging on the

easiest of the three books to write since he had all the

wall of a pub which triggered his initial fascination with

information at his fingertips.

the art form. Over the course of the following decades,

By tirelessly collecting, researching, and writing over the

he pursued high-quality fish models, intent on acquiring

decades, Ron Swanson has preserved important infor-

the finest specimens. In the process, Swanson learned a

mation pertaining to the histories of both decoy and fish

great deal about the art form and its best carvers, and, as

carving which, without his efforts, may otherwise have

a result, he is regarded as the world’s foremost authority

been lost. Copley is honored to present the important

on fish carvings.

collection of this preeminent author and collector.

1

1. John Mundt, “Keepers of the Flame: Ronald S. Swanson: Fish Model Historian, Collector, and Author,” Journal of the American Museum of Fly Fishing, vol. 36, no. 2, Spring 2010, p. 15.

235


JOHN BUCKNELL RUSSELL 1820-1893 | FOCHABERS, SCOTLAND

327

327 Forty-Five Pound Atlantic Salmon Model JOHN BUCKNELL RUSSELL (1820-1893) (ATTR.) FOCHABERS, SCOTLAND, C. 1885 45 in. long

According to Swanson, “It was probably carved and painted by John Russell because there are no Tully fin ray flourishes in evidence. It appears to date around 1885, or it could be later in the 1880s when the 40 lbers. were being made for the ‘Smoking Room.’ From the measurements it would weigh around 45 lbs. and Russell made models for the ‘Smoking Room’ of the Duke of Richmond and Lord Leaconfield’s 45 lbers. that were caught in October 1889. Maybe it’s one of their trophies because it is painted in darkish spawning livery colors that are prevalent in October. From the detail of the mouth it appears that the fish was

236

supposed to be hung above eye level so the upper inside of the mouth could be seen. The pelvic fins are painted as if one were looking at the model from below which might indicate that is was supposed to hang with other models.” Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, pp. 141-142, p. 142, exact carving illustrated.

$4,000 - $5,000


328

328 Brown Trout Model

W. FARREN CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND, C. 1910| plaque is 16 by 33 in. signed “Modelled by W. Farren Cambridge” lower right inscribed on the wood frame “Caught by Captain L. H. Thornton (Late Rifle Brigade) August 27, 1910. Weight 10 Lbs 10 Ozs. Time taken in landing 2 Hours 5 Minutes.”

A plaster relief of a twenty-seven-inch brown trout. According to Swanson, “As an alternative to taxidermy and effigies the British also made plaster of Paris “casts” of fish. A mold was carefully made from the dead fish and then wet plaster was poured into it, forming an exact replica of the fish. When dry, the resulting casting was painted by an artist to replicate the live fish, and then it was mounted on a backboard and framed or put behind glass.” Original paint, as found.

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, pp. 25-26, p. 26, exact carving illustrated.

$3,000 - $4,000

329 Sailfish C. 1940 13 1⁄2 in. long

Carved and painted model of a sailfish, mounted to a wood plaque. Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE:

Ronald S. Swanson Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 106, exact carving illustrated.

329

$400 - $600

237


330

331

332

238


STEPHEN R. SMITH B. 1942 | JAMESTOWN, NY

333

330 Twenty-Five Pound Atlantic Salmon Model

332 Atlantic Salmon Model

Nick was a guide on the Umba River on the Kola Peninsula in Russia. Original paint, as found.

A thirty-five-inch-long, carved and painted salmon model mounted to a rectangular backboard. Original paint, as found.

PROVENANCE:

PROVENANCE:

NICK PODOLSKI (1960-2013) KOLA PENINSULA, RUSSIA, C. 1989 model is 41 in. long, plaque 12 by 45 in. signed “Nick” on small branch tag brass plaque inscribed “Topp Pool, Ekornbo, Laerdal River, Sunday Shadow Tube Fly, July 3, 1989 25 lbs., R.S.S.” inscribed on reverse “Salmon 102 cm”

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

BARRY COULL CASCAPEDIA RIVER, QUEBEC, 2009 plaque is 41 in. long inscribed “16.5 Lbs, Little Camp Pool, July 13, 2003. Angler: Ron Swanson, Guide: Barry Coull.” inscribed in pencil on reverse “Handcrafted for Ron Swanson by Barry Coull, 2009” with attached photographs of the catch

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

$600 - $900

331 Atlantic Salmon Model

EGIL LARSEN OSLO, NORWAY, C. 1988 33 in. long, plaque is 14 1⁄2 by 38 3⁄4 in. inscribed on plaque on front, “Salmon 13 lbs. Angler: Ronald S. Swanson, River Spey September 23, 1988, Model by Egil Larsen”

A model of a thirteen-pound salmon caught on an Arndilly Fancy fly in Upper Tulchan Pool on the river Spey in Scotland. Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE:

Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 41, exact carving illustrated.

333 Atlantic Salmon Model

STEPHEN R. SMITH (B. 1942) JAMESTOWN, NY, C. 1988 model is 40 in. long, board is 16 1⁄2 by 50 in. lower edge is inscribed “24 Lbs Morency Pool Grand Cascapedia, 16 August 1988, R.S.S.”

The carving is mounted to a rectangular oak board. Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

$3,000 - $4,000

$500 - $800

239


334 Carved Model of a Sea Trout

NICK PODOLSKI (1960-2013) KOLA PENINSULA, RUSSIA, 2008 model is 17 in. long, plaque is 7 by 20 1⁄2 in. attached wood tag signed by the maker “Nick” brass tag inscribed “2 3⁄4 LB Sea Trout, Douglas Pool, Cascapedia, August 1996 - H.R.S. Green Pearl #6”

334

A carved and painted model of a sea trout mounted to a wood painted backboard. A photograph of the angler holding the fish is attached to the back. Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 204, exact carving illustrated.

335

$400 - $600

335 Atlantic Salmon C. 1950 26 1⁄2 in. long

A carved and painted fish trophy plaque. Back of plaque has written “Caught by J. A. Campbell.” Original paint, as found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

$700 - $900

336.1

336 Two Carved Salmon

336.2

CHARLES GARDNER NORTH GREAT RIVER, LONG ISLAND, NY, 1977 44 in. long inscribed on back “Atlantic Salmon 35 1/4 lbs, Matapedia River, P.Q. 5th of July 1977, taken by Col. Henry A. Siegel, carved by Charles Gardner, No. Great River”

According to Swanson, “Colonel Henry A. Siegel, a publisher and rare bookseller from New Milford, Connecticut, was an avid salmon fisherman. In July 1977, guided by the famous Richard Adams, he caught a 35.25 lber. in Quebec’s Matapedia River. He chose Charles Gardner to make a model of his fish and sent him the head and tail of the fish as well as a tracing. Presumably, the Colonel ate and enjoyed the rest of his best salmon ever.” Gardner ‘s carvings were sold through the Crossroads of Sport, New York.

ARTHUR LIND (1920-1994) ROCKLAND AND PASSADUMKEAG, ME, 1992 41 in. long pencil notation on back “Made by Arthur Lind, Maine, 1992, 24 1/4 #, Topp Pool, Laerdal River, Norway, 3/7/89, Sunray Shadow Fly”

A model of Swanson’s largest salmon caught on the Laerdal River in Norway. As found PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 104, exact Gardner fish illustrated and p. 85, exact Lind fish illustrated.

$600 - $900 240


337 Brown or Lake Trout TUPPER LAKE, NY, C. 1920 24 1⁄4 in. long

337

A full-bodied carving with metal teeth and fins. Found near Tupper Lake in the middle of the Adirondack Mountains. Swanson writes, “This trout family model is early, perhaps from the 1920s or even earlier, and it’s made like an ice-fishing decoy - full bodied with metal fins - however it is only painted on the left side so it’s defiantly a display piece.” As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 114, exact carving illustrated.

$700 - $900

338 Brook Trout and Salmon LANDLOCKED SALMON, 1879 21 in. long incised on the back “4 1/4” and “1879”

According to Swanson, “This may be the oldest life-size model in the United States.” BROOK TROUT, 1881 MAINE 22 1⁄4 in. long inscribed in pencil on reverse “Taken by H. B. Grayer June 22, 1881”

338.1

As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 65, exact carvings illustrated.

338.2

$1,000 - $2,000

339 Striped Bass

PHILLIPE SIROIS (1893-1980) MAINE, C. 1930 model is 10 in. long, plaque is 5 by 12 in.

One of the maker’s smallest models, carved from wood with attached metal fins, mounted on an oval plaque. As found in original paint. 339

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

$400 - $600

241


340 Brook Trout

CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER (1872-1949) STRATFORD, CT, 1906 watercolor and ink, 6 by 13 in. signed and dated “Shang ‘06” lower right

This ten-and-one-half-inch brook trout is one of the earliest known examples of Shang’s trophy fish drawings. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 97, illustrated.

$1,000 - $2,000

341 Hanging Lake Trout

CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER (1872-1949) (ATTR.) STRATFORD, CT C. 1906 25 in. long

340

341

Carved, painted flat model of a lake trout by Shang Wheeler. The model bears a Swanson paper tag reading “Shang Wheeler, Tunk Lake Togue, ca 1906.” Togue is an alternate name for lake trout. As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 194, exact carving illustrated.

$300 - $500

342 Three Pan Fish SUNFISH, C. 1940 RUNAR G. RODELL (1898-1983) BORN IN SWEDEN, MOVED TO WILMETTE, IL, IN 1935, AND MOVED TO PRESCOTT, AZ, IN 1950 plaque is 7 by 10 in. inscribed on reverse “Painted & Carved by R. G. Rodell” BLACK CRAPPIE, C. 1950 ELMER PENCE (ATTR.) TN AND AZ Carved model mounted to an oval backboard.

342.1

ROACH GREAT BRITAIN CAST MODEL fish is 12 1⁄2 in. long

As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models, Plaques & Effigies, Far Hills, NJ, 2009, p. 26, roach, p. 126, sunfish, and p. 131, black crappie, exact carvings illustrated. Ronald S. Swanson, Fish Models: An Exhibition, Manchester, Vermont, 1992-1993, p. 13, plate XXVI, sunfish illustrated.

342.2

$200 - $300

342.3

242


343

343 Canvasback Drake

344 Cork Black Duck

An early decoy by the maker. In strong Bach paint with even gunning wear and age lines.

In working repaint, with gunning wear including cheeks, the slightly loose head is in original paint.

FERDINAND BACH (1888-1967) DETROIT, MI, C. 1920 15 in. long

PROVENANCE:

CHARLES E. “SHANG” WHEELER (1872-1949) STRATFORD, CT, C. 1945 16 1⁄4 in. long

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE:

Clune Walsh, Jr. and Lowell G. Jackson, Waterfowl Decoys of Michigan and the Lake St. Clair Region, Detroit, MI, 1983, p. 44, pl. 56, similar early style decoy illustrated.

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

$500 - $800

$2,000 - $3,000

344

243


ROBERT ELLISTON 1847-1925 | BUREAU, IL

345

345 Pintail Drake

ROBERT ELLISTON (1847-1925) BUREAU, IL, C. 1890 17 1⁄2 in. long

An elegant Illinois River decoy featuring Catherine Elliston’s finest paint. The underside retains its “THE ELLISTON DECOY” lead-strip weight. Original paint with gunning wear, including a professional repair to tip of bill, two neck cracks, one of which is reset with touch-up. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Stephen B. O’Brien, Jr. and Julie Carlson, Masterworks of the Illinois River, Boston, MA, 2005, p. 34, similar decoy illustrated.

PROVENANCE: Dr. James M. Salmon Rig Private Collection Ronald S. Swanson Collection LITERATURE: Bernard “Barney” W. Crandell, Decoying: St. Clair to the St. Lawrence, Erin, ON, 1988, p. 81, rigmate illustrated.

$400 - $600

$1,500 - $2,500

348 High-Head Canvasback Drake

346 Canvasback Drake

This decoy relates closely to and may be the early work of Charles Nelson Barnard (1876-1958) of Havre de Grace, Maryland. A Barnard example with a similar distinctive weight is seen on page 121 of Decoys of the Mid-Atlantic Region. Original and old working paint with heavy gunning wear, including neck cracks.

HENRY GRANT (1860-1924) BARNEGAT, NJ, C. 1900 16 1⁄2 in. long Branded “E.L.M.” on top and bottom.

As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

347 Early Canvasback Drake DR. SALMON RIG MICHIGAN, C. 1860 15 3⁄4 in. long

244

An early, expertly-crafted, hollow decoy from the rig of Dr. James M. Salmon, who owned land and gunned on Long Point, Ontario. He sold his land to the Long Point Company in 1866, retaining lifetime gunning privileges. In old working repaint with flaking and gunning wear.

UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY, C. 1900 14 1⁄4 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson Collection

LITERATURE: Ronald Swanson, The Decoy as Folk Sculpture, Cranbrook Academy of Art Exhibition Catalog, January 1987, p. 31, fig. 48, exact decoy illustrated. Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., Decoy of the Mid-Atlantic Region,


346

349

347

350

348

351

Exton, PA, 1979, p. 121, related Barnard example illustrated. EXHIBITED:

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, The Decoy as Folk Sculpture, Cranbrook Academy of Art, January 27-February 22, 1987.

350 Two Upper Bay Canvasback Drakes

In working repaint with flaking and gunning wear.

JOHN “DADDY” HOLLY (1819-1892) HAVRE DE GRACE, MD, C. 1880

Collection

15 in. and 16 3⁄4 in. long

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson

HENRY “HEN” DAVIS (1875-1956) PERRYVILLE, MD, C. 1920

$400 - $600

$1,000 - $2,000

As found.

352 Feeding Shadow Plover (not shown)

349 Canvasback Drake

Collection

PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson

JOHN GRAHAM (1822-1912) CHARLESTOWN, MD, C. 1880 14 1⁄4 in. long

$300 - $500

As found.

351 High-Head Canvasback Drake

PROVENANCE:

Collection

Ronald S. Swanson

ROBERT “BOB” MCGAW (1879-1958) HAVRE DE GRACE, MD, C. 1920 15 1⁄4 in. long

C. 1900 9 in. long

A flattie plover with stringing hole. As found. PROVENANCE:

Ronald S. Swanson

Collection

245


353

353 Atlantic Salmon

FRANK J. ADAMO POCASSET, MA, C. 1990 fish is 20 1⁄4 in. long, plaque is 27 7⁄8 in.

A male Atlantic salmon in spawning colors mounted on a painted plaque. Frank resides on Cape Cod and is no longer carving. As found in original paint. $400 - $600

354 H. Kreg Harrison (b. 1963)

The Breath of Life, 1995 signed “H. Kreg Harrison” lower left bronze, 16 3⁄4 by 10 3⁄4 in. edition 7 of 30

Kreg Harrison is a Utah-based sculptor who studied at Utah State University and derives his inspiration from “fly fishing, bird hunting, athletics, bird dogs, trout, upland game, waterfowl, horses, the human figure and landscape.” He is influenced by the work of Grant Speed (1930-2011), Jonathan Kenworthy (b. 1943), and Antoine-Louis Barye (1795-1875). His works can be found in the National Bird Dog Museum in Tennessee, among other public and private collections across the country. $1,200 - $1,800

354

355

355 Three Fishing Creels

LATE 19TH TO EARLY 20TH CENTURY natural finish creel is 7 3⁄4 by 6 3⁄4 by 12 in. black and green open creel is 8 1⁄2 by 8 1⁄2 by 14 in. green creel is 9 by 10 1⁄2 by 7 in.

As found. LITERATURE: Hugh Chatham and Dan McClain, The Art of the Creel, Ennis, MT, 1997, p. 34, similar creel illustrated. 246


356

356 Three Old Bamboo Fishing Rods

357

358

An early bamboo fly rod by “Hardy Bros. Ltd., Makers, Alnwick, England, Makers by Appointment to H M. King George V” with a partial stamped Seal of England. A serial number “B 4019” is also stamped. On the bamboo appears to be written “The Holland 1905 Model, Palakona Royal.” Handle section measures 39 in., mid-section 38 in., and the two tips measure 38 in. Also included are a worn Hardy cloth bag, and a bamboo tip container. The very butt end of the handle is missing. A Hardy Bros. bamboo rod. Written on the bamboo appears to be “Palakona Royal, No. 246936.” The reel clip is stamped “Hardy’s Reg. Universal Reel Holder.” The handle piece measures 41 1⁄2 in., the middle piece 40 in., and the one tip 39 1⁄2 in. Included are a Hardy cloth bag and a bamboo tip container.

359

A bamboo rod probably made for Abbey & Imbrie of NY, with a “Pat. Dec. 13th 1881.” stamp in the middle of the “celluoid” handle and a “Pat’d Jan. 10 88” stamp on the brass reel holder. The handle piece is 40 in. long and the tip piece is 37 3⁄4 in. long. As found. PROVENANCE: Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

360

$200 - $300

358 Handmade Bamboo Fly Rod Information on the tube label “Herb Bostick, 6 foot - 1 pc., 2 1/2 oz.” Maker’s name is barely legible on the bamboo. As found. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

359 Payne Bamboo Fly Rod

E. F. PAYNE ROD CO. (1894-1968) HIGHLAND MILLS, NY, C. 1950 8 FT., 2 / 2

Original tag reads “8 feet, 4 3⁄8 ounces, No. 102-H.” As found. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

360 Handmade Bamboo Fly Rod 2/2 described on the tube “Herb Pfeil - 8 foot.” Handle piece is 48 in., one tip is 48 in., the other is 47 in. No identifying marks on rod or bag. As found. PROVENANCE: Milton C. Weiler Collection Private Collection, by descent in the family

361 Fly Rod

G LOOMIS FR1087IMX 9’ 7 WEIGHT, 2-PIECE.

As found.

357 Two Thomas & Thomas Bamboo Fly Rods THOMAS & THOMAS GREENFIELD, MA, C. 1970

T & T “The Classic,” No. 2038, 7’6”, 3 7⁄8 oz., #6 line fly rod with two matched tips. In a cloth bag and an aluminum tube. 361

T & T “The Classic,” No. 2039, 7’6”, 3 7⁄8 oz., #6 line fly rod with two matched tips. In a cloth bag and an aluminum tube.

As found. PROVENANCE: Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

$300 - $500

247


362 Painted Shield C. 1930 18 by 14 in.

A wooden shield with a painted scene of a Native American preparing to shoot his drawn bow. As found. 362

$600 - $900

363 Bugling Elk Paddle

363

C. 1910 28 3⁄4 in. long

A wooden paddle with a carved bull elk and extensive design detail. As found.

364

364 Two Miniature Red Chests A grain-painted footed chest with “M. E. 1886” inlaid in the raised top. It is joined at the corners with box dovetails and the bottom board has a hand-painted freight address “Ephrata” partially visible. 7 3⁄4 by 11 by 6 3⁄4 in. A miniature footed lift-top blanket chest with dovetail joining at the corners, turned feet, an interior candle box, and applied molding. 11 by 15 1⁄2 by 8 1⁄4 in. As found.

365

365 Green River Whiskey Tin Sign

CHAS. W. SHOCK CO. LITHO. CHICAGO, IL, 1899 26 3⁄4 by 36 1⁄2 in. titled “She Was Bred in Old Kentucky,” imprinted “Copyright 1899. Owned by J. McCulloch, Owensboro, Kentucky” lower left and created by “Chas. W. Shonk Co Litho. Chicago, No. B-118”

As found.

248


366

368

367

369

366 Three Decoys and Three Miniatures A Mason plover, a flattie shorebird, a Long Island corkbodied bluebill, an antique miniature mallard, a miniature harlequin hen by Tom Hunter of Acsherton, Ontario, and a miniature wood duck drake by William H. Cranmer of Beach Haven, NJ. As found.

367 Seven Miniatures 3 1⁄2 to 7 3⁄4 in. long

Flying gull and a spotted sandpiper by Allston “Shorty” Burr, Hingham, MA. Merganser by Martin D. Collins, Wareham, MA. Flying black duck by Alfred Gardner, Accord, MA. Ruddy duck by Stan Sparre, E. Falmouth, MA. Hen mallard by Herb Daisey, Jr., Chincoteague, VA. Mallard by American Fieldcraft Co., Boston, MA. As found.

368 Five Canoe Cups 4 in. to 6 3⁄4 in. long

The smallest handmade wooden cup exhibits incised conjoined initials and an early date. Two are carved from burl and have Nordic-style incised designs on their handles. One has raised carved edges and a raised carved heart on its bottom with a varnish finish. The fifth one has an oval bowl and a simple scroll carved handle drilled for a lanyard. As found.

369 Shooting Implements Includes Bridgeport rosewood handled powder measure, another measure, a couple tampers, a few cap tins, and a small brass spyglass. As found. PROVENANCE:

Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Collection

249


370

372

371

373

370 Two Decoys

13 in. and 12 3⁄4 in. long

A bluebill hen and a Herter’s blue-winged teal drake, Waseca, MN, model “1893” with the maker’s brand on the bottom. As found.

371 Black Duck

ROSWELL E. BLISS (1887-1967) STRATFORD, CT, C. 1930 16 in. long

SAMUEL T. BARNES (1857-1926) HAVRE DE GRACE, MD, C. 1890 13 1⁄4 in. long

A very rare Upper Bay coot decoy. A related example collected by Joel Barber resides in the Shelburne Museum in Vermont. Original paint with gunning wear and a chip out of right base of neck. $600 - $900

Original paint with gunning wear.

373 Three Decoys

LITERATURE:

Includes a bluebill, mallard, and redhead. As found.

Henry C. Chitwood, Connecticut Decoys, West Chester, PA, 1987, p. 59, similar decoy illustrated. $200 - $300

250

372 Rare Coot


374

374 Pair of Decorative Bird Plaques PAUL COMOLERA (1818-1897) each white metal, 15 in. long

Two post-mortem cast-metal sculptures of a bufflehead and a grouse on mahogany plaques with gold paint accents. As found. PROVENANCE:

Private Collection, Florida

375

375 Coin Bank C. 1930 5 1⁄4 in. tall

A cast metal coin bank figure. Original paint with some wear. PROVENANCE: Davison B. Hawthorne Collection Private Collection, New England

376

376 Bobwhite Quail Miniature on Lamp C. 1940 quail is 2 5⁄8 in. high, lamp is 15 1⁄2 in. high

As found.

377 Giant Fork and Spoon

377

fork is 46 in. tall and 8 in. wide spoon is 46 2⁄4 in. tall and 10 1⁄4 in. wide

A very large metal fork and spoon from a restaurant in the Midwest. As found.

251


378

379

380

381

382

378 Cane with Compartments for Fishing Equipment C. 1910 40 in. long

An unusual cane or walking stick with three metal tubular pieces and a removable chamois horn handle. The removable tip is for mounting a three-prong fish spear. The tubular pieces contain other metal tubes with a hand line, a mini wooden bobber, a glass vial, a glass vial with fish hooks, and a Veltic spinner fishing lure. As found. $800 - $1,200

379 Sporting and Farm Life Cane 34 1⁄2 in. long

Exhibits penwork of a sky scene, a heart with “G & T” and “1885,” a fox hunting scene with a gentleman on horseback, a pack of eight dogs, a fox, a hunter with gun, a wild turkey with nine poults, two cows, two pigs, two rabbits, three fish, and a flying duck. As found. $300 - $500

380 “Ladies’ Cane” with Dog Head 27 1⁄4 in. long

This diminutive cane exhibits a miniature carved wooden dog head. As found. 252

381 Head-Handled Snake Cane 29 in. long

Exhibits a carved face and a snake wrapped around the shaft. As found. $300 - $500

382 Black and Gold Diamond Ash Cane 33 3⁄4 in. long

As found.


383

384

383 Eugene V. Connett and Edgar Burke, illus.

Feathered Game From A Sporting Journal, Derrydale Press, New York, NY, 1929, signed by Edgar Burke, M.D. and Eugene Connett.

Smith, Edmund Ware, The Further Adventures of the One-Eyed Poacher, New York, NY, Crown Publishers, 1947, no. 299 of 750, author signed.

PROVENANCE:

Philip C. Duschnes, Rare Books, New York, New York

PROVENANCE:

Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

$1,500 - $2,500

387 Sample Folio of Trout & Grayling Flies

384 Joel Barber

Wild Fowl Decoys, Derrydale Press, New York, 1934, limited edition 38 of 55, signed by the author.

$800 - $1,200

385 Two Decoy Books by Weiler and Mackey

385

Milton C. Weiler and William J. Mackey, Jr., Classic Shore Bird Decoys, New York, NY, 1971 and Milton C. Weiler and Ed Zern, The Classic Decoy Series, New York, NY, 1969.

386 Four Sporting Books, Three by Derrydale Press

386

Smith, Edmund Ware, A Tomato Can Chronicle, New York, NY, The Derrydale Press, 1937, no. 687 of 950. Smith, Edmund Ware, The One-Eyed Poacher Of Privilege, New York, NY, The Derrydale Press, 1941, no. 310 of 750. Smith, Edmund Ware, Tall Tales and Short, New York, NY, The Derrydale Press, 1938, no. 79 of 950.

387

388

A rare folio of W. J. Cummins, Bishop Auckland, fly offerings, containing over 100 handtied flies for trout and grayling. Golden olive fly missing. PROVENANCE: Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

Quackenbos, John D., Geological Ancestors of the Brook Trout, New York, NY, The Angler’s Club of New York, 1916, no. 123 of 300. Griswold, F. Gray and Hume, R. D., The Life History of the Atlantic and Pacific Salmon of Canada, New York, NY, Duttons Inc., 1930, author signed (Griswold). Herbert, Henry William, Frank Forester’s Fish and Fishing, NY, Stringer & Townsend, 1855, third edition with supplement. PROVENANCE: Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

389 Four Angling Books 388 Seven Angling Books Halford, Frederick M., Modern Development of the Dry Fly, London, George Routledge and Sons, 1910. Marbury, Mary Orvis, Favorite Flies and Their Histories, Boston and NY, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1896, third edition. Wertheim, Maurice, Salmon On The Dry Fly, New York, NY, Elm Tree Press, 1948, edition of 500, letter from author included. Hunt, Richard Carley, Salmon in Low Water, NY, The Angler’s Club of New York, 1950, no. 49 of 500, in slip case.

Farrington, Jr., S. Kip, Atlantic Game Fishing, New York, NY, Kennedy Bros., Inc., 1937, author signed. Southard, Charles Zibeon, Trout Fly-Fishing in America, New York, NY, E. P. Dutton & Company, 1914. Atherton, John, The Fly and the Fish, New York, NY, The MacMillan Company, 1951, in slip case for The Anglers’ Club of New York, edition of 222. Hardy, John James, Salmon Fishing, London, Country Life Ltd., 1907. PROVENANCE: Estate of Corrine C. Zimmermann

389

End of sale.

253


INDEX BY LOT

Abbett, Robert K.: 59, 60

Daisey, Delbert “Cigar”: 272, 300

Hutchings, Samuel R.: 251

Adamo, Frank J.: 353

de Groot, Ewoud: 63

Jaques, Francis Lee: 7, 8, 46

Audubon, John James: 62, 111

Ditman, Albert J.: 179, 180, 183

Kankakee: 188

Bach, Ferdinand: 343

Edwards, after George: 110

Keen, Lemuel A.: 265

Barber, Joel D. (attr.): 237

Elliston, Robert: 208, 345

Kirmse, Marguerite: 1, 2

Barkalow, Joel: 259

English, John: 227, 231

Koelpin, William J.: 26, 27

Barnes, Samuel T.: 372

Farrell, Dom: 93

Kuhn, Bob F.: 14

Barry, Seth G.: 324

Farren, W.: 328

Larsen, Egil: 331

Baum, Wayland (attr.): 143

Finney, Frank S.: 295-298

Lawrence, William Goadby: 71, 72

Benson, Frank W.: 103-108, 112

Frazier, Luke: 17, 22

Lawson, Oliver “Tuts”: 130, 134, 293

Birch, Charles: 150

Frost, Arthur Burdett: 119

Leeds, Daniel Lake: 162, 303

Birch, Reggie: 301

Fuertes, Louis Agassiz: 94

Bishop, Richard E.: 115

Gelston, Thomas: 261, 308

Lincoln, Joseph W.: 195-199, 201, 262, 309

Bishops Head: 169

Gibb, George S.: 291

Blair, Jr., John: 226

Gibian, William C.: 289

Bliss, Roswell E.: 37

Gilley, Wendell: 182

Boice, Harry B.: 306

Graham, John: 348

Booth, Herb: 50

Grant, Henry: 346

Braley, Clarence E.: 43

Guennol Collection: 205-206

Brasher, Milton E.: 190

Hacking, Grant: 28-30

Brown, Dan: 132

Hagerbaumer, David A.: 47-49

Brown, Paul Desmond: 88, 89

Hancock, Miles: 133, 322

Bruffee, Byron E.: 200

Hanks, Peter: 51

Bugbee, Harold Dow: 90

Hardcastle, Edmund B.: 128

Burdick, Horace Robbins (attr.): 98

Harris, Ken: 318, 319

Burr, Russ E.: 177

Harrison, H. Kreg: 354

Chas. W. Shock Co. Litho.: 365

Hart, Charles: 189

Clark, Roland: 113, 114

Harvey, Andre: 70

Cobb, Jr., Nathan F.: 203, 204

Hildreth, Ephraim: 304

Coffin, Charles F. (attr.): 220

Hintermeister, Henry “Hy”: 44, 45

Coleman, Nicholas: 15, 16

Homme, Ferdinand L.: 252

Comolera, Paul: 374

Horn, John: 154, 307

Corliss, Ruben C.: 164

Hotze, Hiram “Hy”: 217

Coull, Barry: 332

Hubley Manufacturing Company: 135, 136

Crowell, A. Elmer: 153, 175, 176, 181, 205, 222

254

Maass, David A.: 55, 56 Martin, Alastair: 205-206 Mason Decoy Factory: 225, 249, 314-217 Matthews Rig: 358 Matia, Walter T.: 12, 13, 64-69 McGaw, Robert “Bob”: 129, 351 McIntyre, Cameron T.: 281-83 McNair, Ian T.: 280 McNair, Mark S.: 186, 284-288, 299 Megargee, Henry P.: 52 Megargee, Jr., S. Edwin: 57 Mulliken, Edward “Ted”: 234 O’Brien, Jr., Donal C.: 236 O’Neal, Callie: 266, 267 Ogden, Henry Alexander: 41 Osthaus, Edmund H.: 5, 6, 58 Parker, Lloyd: 140, 228 Parsons, Edward T.: 122-124, 126 Payne: 359 Penn, George “Watts”: 152 Perdew, Charles H.: 212-214, 218 Pleissner, Ogden M.: 31-34, 101

Hudson, Ira D.: 155, 171, 273

Podolski, Nick: 330, 334

Csefai, George: 302

Humbracht, William: 202

Polite, Jay: 279

Cuffee, Eugene (attr.): 258

Hunt, Lynn Bogue: 85, 86, 109

Prosek, James: 25

Cuffee, Eugene: 257

Huntington, Dwight W.: 61

Rathmell, Louis C.: 210


INDEX BY LOT

Reed, James “Corb”: 239

Smith, Harry: 40

Voorhees, Daniel: 209

Reinbold, George W.: 178

Smith, Stephen R.: 333

Walker, Charles: 215

Reneson, Chet: 19-21, 53, 54

Spencer, John Clinton: 42

Rhead, Louis John: 87

Sprague, Capt. Jonas (attr.): 165

Ward Brothers: 131, 169, 238, 241-244, 246-248

Ripley, Aiden Lassell: 9, 10, 11, 96, 97, 99, 100, 116, 117

Sprague, Capt. Jonas: 159

Rosseau, Percival Leonard: 3, 4

Swan, John: 35

Ruggles, Henry: 211

Tait, Arthur Fitzwilliam: 18

Rungius, Carl: 23

Teague, Donald: 92

Russell, John Bucknell (attr.): 327

Thomas & Thomas: 357

Dr. Salmon Rig: 350

Thorne Rig: 163

Saunders, Ellie: 271

Tilghman, Richard L.: 125, 127

Schmiedlin, Jim: 274-278

Tolson, Enoch S.: 269

Schoenheider, Sr., Charles S.: 202, 216

Trinosky, Herman R. Rig: 188

Schute, Samuel (attr.): 305

Tyler, Lloyd J. (attr.): 145

Shattuck, Oliver R.: 95

Tyler, Lloyd J.: 139

Shourds, Harry V.: 223, 224

Utz, Thornton: 91

Sirois, Phillipe: 339

Valdez, Vince: 24

Smith, Brett James: 36, 37

Verity, Smith Clinton: 229

Smith, Cassius: 173

Voorhees, Clark: 187

Strunk, George: 294

Lot 168

Ward, David B.: 290 Ward, Lemuel T.: 245, 172 Ward, Sr., L. Travis: 138 Warin, George: 250 Waterfield, Charles W.: 264 Weiler, Milton C.: 73-84 Wells, Charles Ralph (attr.): 235 West, James: 240 West, Levon: 118 Wheeler, Charles E. “Shang”: 207, 340, 344 Wheeler, Chauncey: 174 White, Robert “Bob”: 292 Whittington, Hector “Heck”: 323 Whorf, John: 38, 39 William Matthews Rig: 358 Winslow Family (attr.): 161

255


TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE 1 Your bidding on items indicates your acceptance of the following Terms and Conditions of sale by Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. These terms are subject to amendment before or during the sale. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC operates as an agent of the seller only, and is not responsible in any way in the event the seller or buyer fails to fulfill their respective agreements. In all instances the auctioneer’s interpretation of these conditions is final and binding on all bidders. 2 All bids are per lot as numbered in the catalog unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer. The sales price shall consist of the final bid price plus the buyer’s premium, plus any applicable sales tax. A buyer’s premium of 20% (23% for online bidding) of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 15% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the buyer as part of the purchase price. 3 The auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid that, in his opinion, is not commensurate with the value of the lot. 4 The auctioneer has the sole right to re-offer a lot and/or settle disputed bids. The record of sale kept by the auction house will be taken as final in the event of dispute. Additionally, items may be withdrawn at any time prior to the offering of each lot. 5 All goods are sold “as is” and all sales are final with no exchanges or refunds. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC and its consignors make no representations or warranties as to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, the correctness of the catalog or other description of physical condition, quality, size, medium, importance, rarity, provenance or historical relevance of any property, and no statement made at the sale, or in the bill of sale, or invoice, or elsewhere shall be deemed such a warranty or representation or an assumption of liability. The purchaser assumes complete responsibility for items at the fall of the hammer. 6 Successful bidders are to pay for their purchases during or immediately after the sale or upon receipt of an invoice, unless other arrangements have been authorized in writing by the auction house. Payment may be made by cash or good check payable to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC. The auction house reserves the right to hold property until checks clear. A monthly service charge of 1.5% will be added to unpaid balances beginning 30 days after the sale date. A $50.00 fee will be added for returned checks. If a check fails to clear after the second deposit, the purchaser will be held responsible for any and all fees incurred until we have collected good funds. Purchases picked up at the auction will be subject to the South Carolina state and local tax of 9%. Buyers claiming exemption from sales tax must have the appropriate documentation on file with Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC prior to the release of property. Purchases delivered to South Carolina after the auction will be subject to the applicable South Carolina state and local taxes and purchases picked up or delivered to Massachusetts after the sale will be subject to the 6.25% Massachusetts sales tax unless exempted by applicable law. 7 If the purchaser breaches any of its obligations under these Conditions of Sale, including its obligation to pay in full the purchase price of all items for which it was the highest successful bidder, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC may exercise all of its rights and remedies under the law including, without limitation, (a) canceling the sale, and applying any payments made by the purchaser to the damages caused by the purchaser’s breach, and/or (b) offering at public auction, without reserve, any lot or item for which the purchaser has failed to pay in full the purchase price, holding the purchaser liable for any deficiency plus all costs of sale. 8 Condition reports are not included in this catalog. It is the responsibility of prospective bidders to examine lots and decide their level of interest. Neither the auctioneer, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC, nor the consignor is responsible for the accuracy of any printed or verbal descriptions. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC strongly encourages clients to attend our previews and auctions so as to best determine condition of lots. Due to the high volume of condition requests, Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC reserves the right to reject requests at its sole discretion. All weights and measurements are approximate. 256

9 Some of the lots in this sale carry reserves or minimum selling prices. This is a confidential figure set by the consignor and the auction house below which a lot will not be sold. The reserve will not exceed the low estimate, and the auction house will execute the reserve bids by bidding for the consignor. Estimates are subject to change at any time prior to the offering of each lot. 10 Absentee and telephone bids will be executed when possible as a convenience to customers: the auction house will not be held responsible for any errors or failures to accurately execute bids. All absentee and telephone bids must be received at least 24 hours before the start of the sale. 11 Buyers wishing to pick up items at the sale must do so by the end of the sale. Buyers wishing to pick up items after the auction at our office may do so only by appointment starting five days after the sale. We kindly ask that all items be removed from our warehouse within 30 days of auction end to avoid a $5 daily storage fee. 12 Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. Upon request, we will provide a list of shippers who deliver within the United States and overseas. Once your payment has cleared, items may be released for shipment. Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC shall have no liability for any loss or damage to such items. Buyers should allow up to four weeks for shipment. 13 Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC may, at its discretion and at the buyer’s request, package and ship sold items as directed by the purchaser. In such instances 1) the buyer shall prepay all related expenses, and 2) the buyer agrees that all packaging, handling and shipment is at the sole risk of the purchaser, and Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC shall have no liability for any loss or damage to such items. Buyer should allow four to five weeks for shipment. 14 Some property sold at auction can be subject to laws governing export from the United States, such as items that include material from some endangered species. Import restrictions from foreign countries are subject to these same governing laws. Granting of licensing for import or export of goods from local authorities is the sole responsibility of the buyer. Denial or delay of licensing will not constitute delay or cancellation in payment for the total purchase price of these lots. 15 Bidding increments will normally follow the pattern below, but may vary at the sole discretion of the auctioneer: Estimate To 950 1,000 – 2,400 2,500 – 4,750 5,000 – 9,500 10,000 – 24,000 25,000 – 47,500 50,000 – 95,000 Over 100,000

Increment 50 100 250 500 1,000 2,500 5,000 at auctioneer’s discretion

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257


ABSENTEE/TELEPHONE BID FORM COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS, LLC 65 Sharp Street | Hingham MA 02043 Tel: 617.536.0030 | Fax: 617.266.4896 | info@copleyart.com please check one of the following:

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258

a Absentee bids: Absentee bids are executed alternately in competition with the bidders in attendance. It is possible, due to the variations in bidding patterns, that a lot may be won by the audience for the same amount authorized by the absentee bidder. A (+) sign to the right of the bid amount will authorize the absentee bidder to bid one additional bid increment. In the event of identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence. b Telephone bids: If bidding by telephone, the bidder accepts the inherent risks associated with bidding over the telephone. 4 Payment: If successful, you will be contacted. Payment is due immediately upon notification unless arrangements have been made with Copley prior to bidding. A buyer’s premium of 20% of the final bid price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 15% of the final bid price over $1,000,000, will be applied to each lot sold, to be paid by the Buyer to Copley Fine Art Auctions, LLC as part of the purchase price.

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259


260


261


COMING SOON

To reserve your copy of this definitive book, please visit copleyart.com or call the gallery at 617.536.0536.

a publication by


O. Pleissner |

WR

$345,000

J. Lincoln |

WR

$360,000

A.E. Crowell | $661,250

selling the world’s finest DECOYS AND SPORTING ART

E. Osthaus |

Dovetailed Goose |

WR

WR

$235,750

J. Graham |

$810,000

WR

$216,000

C. Rungius | $460,000

WR

Denotes world record for the artist


266


Frank W. Benson (1862-1951)

The Coot Shooter, c. 1913 signed and dated “F.W. Benson.” oil on canvas, 40 by 50 in. SOLD

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS, LLC | 617.536.0030 | PRIVATESALE@COPLEYART.COM


THE WINTER SALE 2019 February 16 | Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Boulevard | Charleston, South Carolina

THE WINTER SALE 2019

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS

COPLEY FINE ART AUCTIONS

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The Winter Sale 2019  

Copley Fine Art Auctions, the nation’s premier wildlife, sporting art and decoy auction house, is pleased to announce their partnership with...

The Winter Sale 2019  

Copley Fine Art Auctions, the nation’s premier wildlife, sporting art and decoy auction house, is pleased to announce their partnership with...

Profile for copleyart