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CoperniNews Library Guide

Madagascar Clerkship

23.10.19. - 3rd year

Tinder

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Monika Kołek

Page 20-23 Julie Juvik

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Ian Perera

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Contents 04

The Authors

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Danick’s Speciale

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Read or Fail- A Guide to Libraries

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JRC Tryout

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The Rise and Fall of Tinder

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Student Spotlight: Julie Juvik

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Interview with Monika Kołek

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Copernica FC Logo Contest

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Alumni: Ian Perera

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Madasgascar Clerkship

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5 @ CDK

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The End

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The Editor After a long summer, we’ve finally started a new school year. For some, it’s their first year in Kraków, for others it’s their last. Ne- vertheless, we will be sure to enjoy it! After a successful fadderweek, it’s safe to say that our new first year students are ready for the years to come. With fresh enthusiasm, we are all ready to tackle whatever this year may throw at us. There’s no other place one would like to be at more than Kraków. Dear first year students, We invite you! You are in for an exciting year of learning, partying and new relati- ons. The first year here in Kraków will be a tough one. Don’t forget about all those who did it before you; if they can do it, so can you. Don’t forget to include your fellow classmates. We thrive as a social university. Although school can seem hard at times, don’t miss out on things you enjoy doing. Whether it’s going to parties, eating out, exercising, or going to the cinema, do it with a good conscience! And remember, if you ever feel stuck with school, ask a classmate or someone in the upper years. Everyone wants to help.

Anders Kveldstad

Co-Editor in Chief CoperniNews

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The Authors

ANDERS KVELDSTAD 4th year co-Editor in Chief & Journalist

OYKE DUROGLU 3rd year co-Editor in Chief & Proofreader

SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND 4th year Typographer

KRISTIAN NORDSTAD 4th year Journalist

ELINE ULSTEIN 3rd year Journalist

NORA CHARLOTTE SØNSTEBØ 3rd year Illustrator

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The Authors

ELISABETH FOSSELI 4th year Journalist

MARIE VELAND 3rd year Journalist

AYLING SELJEHAUG 3rd year Social Media

INGA HATOUCHYTS 6th year Illustrator

JULIE GJEISKLID EVENSEN 3rd year Proofreader 10th ISSUE - 5


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The Authors

THIS ISSUE’S GUEST AUTHORS

DANICK LAMBERT 4th year Freelancer

YNGVILD KJUS BRUMOEN 4th year Freelancer

ARE YOU COPERNINEWS’ NEXT FREELANCER? coperninews@gmail.com

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WE’RE LOOKING FOR NEW MEMBERS! JOIN US ON WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 30TH NOVA RESTO BAR 20:00


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Danick’s Speciale

RICE WITH CHICKEN AND MUSHROOMS Rice 1 Cup of rice 40 mls of olive oil 2 Cups of water Parsley *optional* Chicken broth Chicken/Mushroom mix 2 Handfuls of Mushrooms 2 Handfuls of chicken Olive oil Butter 4 cloves of garlic 1 tablespoon of grainy mustard 150 mls of white wine 2 tablespoons of white wine vinegar Salt Pepper *optional* 50 mls of salsa

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Make your rice. Put a saucepan on medium heat. Add olive oil and let it get hot. Add your rice and stir over the heat until you start smelling the rice cook (kinda smells like popcorn). Add water and optional chicken broth. Let the water cook down uncovered until it’s just a little about the level of the rice, stirring occasion-ally. Cover and keep on medium heat for 1 minute. Then take off the heat com-pletely. Let sit, covered for 15 minutes. Uncover, add your parsley and stir with a spoon. Put the cover back on and let sit for another 10 minutes.

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Cut mushrooms into small pieces. Place pan on medium-high heat. Nice and hot. Add a generous amount of olive oil. Get the oil smoking. Add your mush-rooms and sweat them (Get the water out. You’ll notice they shrink in size). Once they have sweated, add I like to use a whole chicken. Take one whole your garlic and a few spoonfuls of butter. Cook chicken, put in a tray. Put about 200 mls of wa- until mushrooms and garlic are nicely browter in your tray. Heat the oven to 170C. Cook ned (more yellow-golden than really brown!). chicken for 1h30. Take out chicken and let rest Deglaze the pan with white wine and white for 40 minutes. Take apart the chicken meat wine vinegar. Reduce by half. While it’s reduand keep the bones. Put bones in a saucepan and cing, chop up your chicken. Add in chicken, cover with water. Add a few bay leaves and ap- mustard, salt, and pepper to taste. Cook until prox. 30 mls of vinegar. Bring to a boil and sim- most of the liquid is gone. mer for 1h00. Strain and now you have your chicken stock. Save your meat in the fridge and you have cheap chicken for the next few days! Serve on top of your rice :)

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Note: If you want to use chicken thighs or chicken breasts, feel free!! The trick is to put the chicken to the side once it’s cooked and use the same pan for the above recipe. Toss your mushrooms straight into it and you don’t have to add the oil/butter!! You’ll get all the chicken goodness! Chicken thighs - Get about 3-4. Get the pan nice and hot on medium-high heat. Add a generous amount of olive oil. Put your chicken in, smooth side down. Salt and pepper the chicken and leave there for about 3-4 minutes. Flip. Add 3 cloves of garlic (don’t even peel them, just give them a smash and toss in with the skin and all). Add 2 tablespoons of butter. Let this cook for about 3 minutes. Flip again. Then tilt your pan to the side, get a spoon and spoon the butter/oil on top of your chicken. Cook another 2-3 minutes and then take them out of the pan and let rest. Now use your pan for the above recipe! Chicken breasts - The same as thighs except put the breast onto some plastic wrap and just start whacking it with your fist until it’s about 3 cm thick and flat. This makes it cook evenly and because chicken breast doesn’t have a lot of fat, it will stay moist :)

- Danick Lambert

TEXT: DANICK LAMBERT LAYOUT: SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND

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Kraków

Read or Fail - your guide to Kraków’s best libraries! TEXT: ELISABETH FOSSELI LAYOUT: SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND

Address: Grzegórzecka 20 Opening hours: Monday-Friday 08-20, Wednesday 08-16, Saturday 09-15 Biblioteka Jagiellońska This is a huge library with multiple reading rooms with different vibes. Some of the reading rooms have big windows so you can enjoy the magnificent view while reading for your exams. During breaks, you can enjoy a nice meal in the cafeteria on the ground floor. You need to register the first time you’re there. For this, you’ll need your student ID BBLIOTEKA MEDYCZNA and an additional ID like a driver’s license or ummer is behind us and it’s time for passport. us all to dive back into our books. For many of us, that means long days Address: Mickiewicza 22, entrance from Olein the fabulous reading room at CDK. andry Street 3 Even though few places can compete with the great air and the interesting smells at CDK, it might be nice escaping to another library occasionally, especially if your weekend at Le Scandale did not go quite as planned.

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Biblioteka Medyczna JUMC The first library on the list is just a short stroll away from CDK. Apart from its convenient location, this library can offer a big reading room with perfect lighting and great ventilation. BIBLIOTEKA JAGIELLONSKA

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Kraków Regional Public Library in Kraków Most of you are familiar with this spectacular library. For the Norwegians it is mostly known as “lillebib” (eng: “little library”), although it is not that little at all. On the first floor, there are two reading rooms – one to the right and one to the left. If you are sporty enough to take the stairs to the third floor, this is where you will find the main reading room. Address: Rajska 1 Opening hours (main reading room): Monday-Wednesday 08-19, Thursday 10-19, Friday and Saturday 8-19, Sunday 08-14

Address: Rajska 12, entrance from Szujskiego street Opening hours: Monday-Friday 10-19, Saturday 11.30-19, Sunday 10-16 Krakowska Akademia Most of the libraries in Kraków are far away for those who live in Kazimierz, but this University lies just across the river from Galeria Kazimierz. The University is modern and contains multiple reading rooms where you can enjoy your books and maybe even meet some new friends outside the Jagiellonian University. Address: Gustawa Herlinga-Grudzińskiego Opening hours (main reading room): Monday-Thursday 08-18, Friday 11-19, Saturday 09-17, Sunday 09-15 Biblioteka Glowna This historical library has a great location for the residents of Kazimierz. Unfortunately, it is currently under renovation. I think it is worth a try when they open their doors again in 2020. Address: Powroźnicza 2

REGIONAL PUBLIC LIBRARY, ”LILLEBIB”

Arteteka Regional Public Library in Kraków Just across the street from “lillebib” you can find this modern treasure. It has an open feel and a comfortable atmosphere. I can also guaranty that you will find a chair for your taste, as they have a varied selection of seating options. On the ground floor, there is a nice café where you can enjoy some coffee, food or even a beer when you need a break from studying. This is the same library as “lillebib”, which means you can use the same library card to enter.

BIBLIOTEKA ARTETEKA

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Krakรณw

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Krakรณw

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JAGIELLONIAN ROWING CLUB TRYOUT

We welcome all medical and dentistry students at JUMC to join the 2019 tryout! Our team consists of people with different ages, personalities, and athletic backgrounds. Don’t worry if you’ve never had any previous rowing experience. None of our members rowed before joining JRC. Being top-trained isn’t a requirement, but team spirit is!

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ALL THERE! For questions, contact: Johannes Zontag or Eirik Unelsrød Hansen


Błonia Park «Trekantparken» Saturday, October 26th 10:00-13:00

LAYOUT: OYKE DUROGLU


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THE RISE

AND FALL OF TINDER TEXT: ANONYMOUS LAYOUT: OYKE DUROGLU

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Tinder got into our pockets in 2013 and has not left them since. The way we swipe and use the app has been through great variations since its debut back then. I will now take you through the ups and downs of Tinder, while also giving you my personal guide on how to navigate through this chaotic jungle. As human species we have great ambitions and dreams for our limited time on earth. However, our main task throughout evolution has always been to reproduce. In the animal kingdom survival of the fittest brings the populations best genes further although it’s hard to believe consi- dering peanut allergies are still with us. Whether or not you reproduce is ultimately up to you. Sadly, asking an attractive person on a date face-to-face has become a rather vintage experience amongst us. We now have to interact with less class and more Tinder. Before you begin, I advise you to think through what you want to achieve with meeting new people. Are you looking for your mating partner, or would you rather mate without any responsibilities? This is of course not up to you only, as it takes two to both date and mate. If you are a girl reading this article, I would like to congratulate you. Being a girl on


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Tinder gives you the main power and this is why: In the animal kingdom and since the beginning of time, males have tried to impress ladies by wearing the brightest colors, having the biggest beak and the strongest smelling urine. When the male interacts, the female level of interest decides whether mating will occur or not. The world of Tinder is also arranged in similar ways, which ultimately gives females the upper hand. This is why girls can get what they want simply by making the first move. This process is way more effective than today´s ongoing method of stalking and staring. This is how: The one- week-expiration Before downloading, be ready to commit to this step. Only download and use the app when you can picture yourself meeting a new person within one week. Don’t see yourself having a coffee with a new guy next Tuesday? Well honey, then you’re simply not ready for the app’s opportunities. Just wait until you feel like meeting another like-minded human. If you feel like it, but can’t find the time, it’s always a fun combo grocery shopping with that cute Italian guy or have your lunch break with the girl from the class above you. The 1:1 Ratio Swipe with caution! With the criteria of actually meeting the person face-to-face within a week your swiping is bound to be more selective. If you can’t picture yourself actually meeting the guy with the tribal tattoo holding a rifle, swipe left. People only in town for a bachelor party would also be excluded and make your list of matches shorter and narrow down the path of mating success. Become the Do-er As well done is better than well said: we need to actually go on da- tes, not just talk about it. Since power lies in female hands, the biggest effects will come if a woman actually makes the first move. You’ve matched with your selected group of guys, and now you’re ready to meet up. Therefore, messages should be informative, short, and straight to the point. What about grabbing a coffee next Tuesday? This is so rare for a guy to experience, so you immediately gain a handful of extra points even before you meet up by being the Doer. If you, especially as a woman, follow these simple tips you will have an exotic fall waiting for you in Kraków with many potential mating partners on the horizon. Welcome to a new era of efficient tindering! 10th ISSUE - 17


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No Strings Attached TEXT: MARIE VELAND LAYOUT: OYKE DUROGLU

You’ve probably seen her while chugging beers, rocking the dancing floor at Le Scandale, or going home from the party at 5 am. Julie “Bøtta” Juvik is known to most of us as the #1 party girl, so there’s no doubt that she’s her own kind of champion. With that in mind, her hidden talent might be surprising. She is actually the winner of the Norwegian championship in violin! She first started to practice the violin in her small hometown, Nord-Odal. From the age of six to when she started high school, Julie and her “Spellemannslag” traveled all over the country participating in contests. The competition is intense, and the championship is widely recognized. Despite that, in 2012, Julie and her Spellemannslag could call themselves the Norwegian champions. 18 - 10th ISSUE


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What inspired you to start playing the violin? It’s quite a funny story! I actually wanted to play the piano but the course was full, so I was put on the waiting list. My mother really wanted me to start something in the meantime, so she signed me up for the violin. Once I started, I didn’t like it too much because my teacher wasn’t that good. I wanted to quit, but my mother persuaded me to play a little longer. Eventually, I got a new teacher who was really inspiring, and then I started enjoying it a lot!  Is the violin a normal instrument to play in your hometown?  No, very few people actually play it. I was the only person I knew who played the violin, and all of my teammates were from different parts of the country. When you play the violin, you’re able to play different genres; in Norway, the typical genres are either “Classic” or “Folk”. I play “Folk”, and it’s a very traditional genre to play in Norway. Fewer people play Folk music compared to Classical, so it’s kind of its own “niche” in the violin-playing world. How did you manage to win the Norwegian championship? It was very time-consuming. My weekends were filled with practices. Since many of my teammates were from other towns, I often had to travel far to meet them. When you play in a Spellemannslag, it’s not only about playing the instrument well; you’re also judged on appearance. In order to do well, you have to show enthusiasm while you play. We had previously competed in the championship many times: so when we finally won in 2012, it felt truly deserved and we were very proud! Do you have any other hidden talents?  Well, I had a lot of hobbies when I was younger. I played the french horn for seven years! I’ve been a mediocre skier, played football for some years, and I’ve been a very bad dancer. Other than that, I’m very good at drinking beer :) 

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Kraków

Monika Kołek - Behind the Office TEXT: ELINE ULSTEIN (EDITED BY MONIKA KOŁEK) LAYOUT: SYNNE B. EKLUND

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he’s a figure at JUMC who we know of from the moment we take our entrance exam. While we don’t know it at the time, Monika plays an integral part of our lives here in Kraków. She deals with everything from approving summer clerkships, to USMLE registration, to making sure the Norwegian students have their beloved Lånekassen funds, and much, much more. Although she’s not a professor, we decided to take look behind the curtains of the school office to see what it really takes to make the wheels turn at JUMC.

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Kraków How long have you been working at this school? Almost 12 years; I started in February 2008. I was supposed to be here for 3 months, substituting for Edyta who was on maternity leave at the time. But life happened, and I’ve been here for almost 12 years.

would come in asking about a professor without referring to them as “Professor”. It took me a minute to understand that Norwegians mean no disrespect by referring to a person by only their last name. Whereas in Poland, it’s considered incredibly rude. But when you learn that it’s because of their culture, you begin to understand. When do you start preparing for the I think that’s the best part of this job: that start of school? you constantly have to broaden your horiThere is so many things that need to be ta- zons, cultural and otherwise. ken care of before the new year, and they are so spread out that it would be difficult And the worst parts? to pinpoint a moment of transition from The worst part is the red tape. Students one year to the next. It flows in a more or- sometimes don’t realize how complex it is, ganic way. Some things, like the schedules and how many steps you have to take to for example, are in preparation for weeks, make something happen. For example, a or months even before the new academic student will bring in a document needing year begins. a signature, but we can’t sign that paper ourselves. There’s a protocol to follow. It Tell us about a typical day at the needs to be processed and signed by approschool office. priate authority, who are in the office only There’s no such thing as a typical day really. on certain days. Some students will get all One thing this job has taught me is that you frustrated with having to wait a couple of never cease to be amazed. You think you’ve days for something they think should only seen and heard everything but then some- take a second. They’ll think that you’re one comes in with something else. Say I’m being difficult when you’re just doing your being naïve and tell myself that today I’m job. That’s sometimes difficult: to have stugoing to focus on a certain task to get ahead dents look at things from our perspective. I of my deadlines; but then someone comes guess this job, as any job with people, will in with some sort of problem that’s urgent teach you the best and worst parts about for them. You have to put your plans aside people, including yourself. for a minute and focus on that person and whatever they need help with. What are the best parts of your job? I guess my favorite part is that it compels you to cultivate an open mind, because you work with people from all over the world. People from different countries will approach things in different ways. For example, at first I was taken aback when people 10th ISSUE - 21


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What has been the strangest thing to happen at the school office? There’s been loads. For strange things, I remember that over my first summer in the office, on a bright warm day, a woman came in looking for remains of her husband. After a moment’s consternation, I referred her to the Anatomy Department. And for funny/ strange requests, I remember a student sent an email one winter asking if I had room to store a guitar because a window in his flat was draughty which made the flat very humid and cold, and so unsuitable for the guitar. It was a very good quality Spanish guitar so he needed a space to store it. I told him I would try to find out about storage options and said that this is probably something he 22 - 10th ISSUE

should ask his landlord, or maybe have the windows fixed. It turned out that because his landlord’s name was also Monika, he thought he was writing to her and not to me, so that was pretty funny. He kept me posted on how the guitar was doing over the winter. What are some of your hobbies? Lots of things, the day is always too short. I love music, so I try to go to as many concerts as I can. At least once a month, sometimes twice. I also enjoy traveling, and I try to combine the two when I can. When planning a trip, I will always check if there are any interesting concerts in the destination. Or the other way around; when I see that a band I like is touring, I will try to go to a concert so-


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Kraków mewhere I haven’t been yet. Climbing is another thing, but I haven’t been active for the past 2 months because I sprained my ankle. Before that, I went to organized training sessions 3 times a week. I’m not very good at it, but I do it because I enjoy it and it keeps me fit. I also like reading and have a severe case of tsundoku. Do you have any favorite places in Kraków? I love Massolit books. It’s an American bookstore/ cafe. It’s a lovely place where you can grab a cup of coffee and a book to read. Right next door, there’s Cafe Szafe which also has a nice vibe. For concerts, I really like Klub Studio because they’ve recently been renovated and they have an excellent sound system. It’s for sure the best in Kraków, maybe even the best in this part of Poland, so you should check that one out. Anything else you would like to tell the students? I’m only a part of a team, a great team at that. It’s like a second family which is probably why I’ve been here for 12 years. Every single lady in this office I can call my friend. I can rely on them and they’ll always have my back. And that also goes for the students; we always have their best interests in mind. They are amazing people and I’m really proud to call myself a part of that team.

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? LAYOUT: SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND


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Alumni

International Ian He’s a familiar face for most of you. Ian Perera is one of the younger and more easy-going teachers at our school. He teaches us clinical skills in LTCS and ICS. But what you didn’t know is that just a few years ago, he was one of us. He has made the transition and is now working as a resident doctor at the University Hospital. His choice of school has taken him half-way around the world, and love has made him stay here in Kraków. TEXT: KRISTIAN NORDSTAD LAYOUT: SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND

What is your current job situation? years go by it becomes easier as I get more I’m an Internal Medicine resident at the familiar with the materials. It also helps University Hospital in Kraków. My de- me to be a better doc-tor. partment is officially called Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. I have been working here for about half a year now. My current plan is to finish my residency here in Kraków, and then specialize in Internal Medicine. I am not too sure about subspecialty yet. Apart from that, I teach all of the LTCS courses in the 6-year program. For the time being, I’m just focusing on surviving, making sure my patients survive, and that my students don’t become bad doctors. Do you enjoy teaching at the university? Teaching is definitely one of the main things I am happy to be able to do here. Regardless of the day I have at the hospital, I can still go to the University and have a good lesson with students. This can really make a difference in my mood. The teaching takes some time, but as the 26 - 10th ISSUE


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Alumni Why did you apply to JUMC? This is a long story. I am Sri Lankan but grew up in Abu Dhabi, and after finishing high school I didn’t want to stay in the Middle East. I wanted to see what the west was all about. I applied and was accepted into a school in Canada and moved to Montreal to study at McGill University. I wanted to study medicine after finishing my undergrad, but it is difficult to get into Medical School in Canada if you are not a citizen. So the options I had were to apply somewhere else. The United States and Caribbean were kind of out of the question, just because of the prices involved for a medical education. I looked into Europe and ended up with choosing Poland. The fact that it’s very affordable to live here was a big thing for me. It allows me to try a lot of new things, for ex-ample skiing which I had never tried before I came to Poland. I had never seen snow before going to Canada, so that was an interesting experience for sure. Thanks to Canada, I can handle anything the Kraków-life throws at me, except for the smog.

How was the transition from being a student to being a doctor in the hospital? I always planned on working in the United States or Canada, so I didn’t study with European guidelines in mind. From that perspective it was difficult, because I had to relearn some of the things I thought I already knew. Another big challenge for me was the language aspect. Sure enough, I had taken some language lessons and stuff. But it doesn’t really prepare you for actual-ly dealing with patients and doctors on a daily basis. I guess I am lucky that I work in the Geriat-rics Department, because older people tend to talk a bit slower. For the most part, I was able to deal with the transition quite well. Overall, I managed to do alright. Not many foreigners stay in Kraków. What made you stay in Kraków after finishing your studies? For the reason why most foreigners stay in Kraków after ending their studies. You know, due to ending up in a relationship. My Polish girlfriend is working in Law, so that made it difficult for her to move. In contrast to medicine, Law varies quite a bit throughout the world. I figured that since I was already in Poland, and kind of knew Polish, I could make that transition. Were you involved in any initiatives or activities during your time as a student? I founded a group called Student Led Education Society (SLEDS) in my second year. It’s similar to what you have with StudyAid in the 6-year program. It is a group where upper years teach the lower year subjects, and prepares them for exams. I joined some 10th ISSUE - 27


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Alumni interest groups as well. Most of the 4-year groups at the time were mainly educational in focus. Apart from that, I was involved in the Student Government and served as class representative for two years, and I was also the president of external affairs. How do you spend your free time here in Kraków? I try to do some hiking and running. Basically I just try to be active. When you see patients with all sorts of diseases on a daily basis, it’s good motivation to stay fit and be healthy. I also try to do some cultural stuff, such as going to concerts and visiting museums.

re, ideally in Podgórze, but I think Kazimierz has the best breakfast options in town. Then after that, go to a park or lie on the grass to read for a bit. Then comes the evening, and you head out to a good bar and spend some time with friends and see where the night takes you.

What would you tell yourself as a first year? Take more chances and be willing to do more things. That would be the most important advice. I was a little too worried about not doing well on exams. Looking back at it now, no one really cares how well you did on your anatomy exam five years after. Do well, but Can you describe a perfect day in don’t stress too much about exam results. Kraków? For me, it has to be a spring day for sure. You wake up in the morning and go for a run, and then head out for a nice breakfast somewhe-

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Alumni

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Clerkship

Madagascar - Not the Movie TEXT: YNGVILD KJUS BRUMOEN LAYOUT: SYNNE BIRKETVEDT EKLUND

This summer Helene, Hanne and I completed our summer clerkship in Madagascar: a country I’m not sure I would’ve even heard about, if not for the animated movie with the same name. From the moment we landed, it was as if we were taken back in time. Most of the national roads are made of dirt, and people often use oxen and carts for transportation. Many homes were built out of straw and bana30 - 10th ISSUE

na-leaves, and the most common occupation consisted of people tending to their fields and animals. People, and especially children, called us vasaha whenever they saw us, which means “white foreign guest”. After a bit of confusion as to what people were always yelling at us, it turned into a word we became very fond of.


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Clerkship

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e had three weeks at the hospital in Antsirabe, a city in the highlands of Madagascar. While it’s only 180 kilometres from the capital, the trip takes about five hours by car due to the winding roads covered with potholes. Antsirabe is the second largest city in the country and it has two hospitals – a public and a private one. Medical students are usually sent to to the private hospital, but this year they also sent students to the public one – us! The main difference between the private and the public hospital is that the public hospital requires you to pay upfront, while the private hospital allows you to pay after the treatment is finished. The students at the private hospital stayed at the surgical department for three weeks and were able to assist in surgeries and practice sutures. At the public hospital, we completed one week at each department before we

moved on to the next. We started at the intensive care unit (ICU), then continued to the emergency department and finished at maternity. The ICU consisted of four beds, and we were told that those were the only beds at the hospital where it was possible to administer extra oxygen. However, we later discovered that they also had oxygen at the emergency room. Furthermore we met patients who suffered anything from strokes to malaria and tuberculosis.

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nly one CT-scanner exists in the country and it’s located in the capital. Most Malagasy people can’t afford an ambulance ride to Antananarivo, and doctors have very limited resources to diagnose different diseases. Often patients were left with symptomatic treatment and most probable diagnosis. Patients who arrived with a stroke often received no treatment since determining the type of stroke was impossible. However, the knowledge and competence of both doctors and nurses was truly impressive. They taught us so many things that will be useful in the 10th ISSUE - 31


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future. The first language in Madagascar is Malagasy and the second is French. Many people do not speak any English. I wish I had practiced a bit more French before going; we often struggled with communication, both with patients and hospital staff. Two times a week a translator was sent to the hospital with us. We tried to utilize those days as well as possible and ask questions that we had been wondering about. However, the hospital staff often spoke more English than they said they did. Once they got used to us, they began to speak more. It also helped that we tried to use the few Malagasy words we had learned, and when we did they always laughed loudly.

their family. Madagascar still struggles with infectious diseases that are no longer a threat in many Western countries due to efficient prophylaxis and modern treatment. It was plague season when we visited Madagascar, and patients often arrived with advanced pulmonary tuberculosis.

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iri Nyen is responsible for nursing and medical students doing their internships in Madagascar. She was always available if we had questions or if we wanted to discuss something we had seen or experienced. We wanted to see as much as possible, so she also arranged for us to go to a prison and to the Tobi village, which Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in is were they send psychiatric patients. the world, and hospitals there are completely different from Western hospitals. Resources are very limited; everything from gloves used for examinations to thread used for suturing, had to be payed for by either the patient or

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The Malagasy people believe patients with psychiatric illnesses are possessed by evil spirits. While we were there, we experienced a three hour long church service where they performed an exorcism to treat the patients. Experiencing the healthcare system in a country like Madagascar is something I think everyone should try. I am full of admiration for the Malagasy people, who are some of the most hard-working and positive people I’ve ever met.

FROM LEFT: YNGVILD BRUMOEN AND HELENE REFVIK VINROUM

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5 @ CDK New school year! Fall is coming, and both new and old students are gathering at CDK. We asked them the following questions: 1. What are you looking forward to the most this school year? 2. What has been your best memory of the summer? 3. What’s your favorite restaurant in Kraków? 4. Best TV series for the coming fall?

SOFIE HERHEIM JUNGE, 3rd year MD 1. 17th of May! And I’m really looking forward to having classes at the hospitals this year. 2. Working at the maternity ward, and helping deliver babies. 3. Hurry Curry! 4. The Office

ODA ELISE HENSTEIN, 2nd year MD 1. Copernicam! And having a more chill year than last year. 2. Vacation in Cannes with my friends from Kraków. 3. Charlottes! 4. Exit

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5 @ CDK ANDREAS KIBSGAARD, 2nd year DDS 1. Zakopane! 2. I had a nice trip to Greece with my family. 3. Pasta Bar 4. The Sinner

MATHIAS STEENSNÆS, 1st year MD 1. Getting through the histology exam. 2. Palmesus, it’s a huge festival in Norway. 3. Taj 4. White Collar

KAROLINE RUGLAND SANNER, 1st year MD 1. I’m looking forward to just start with everything! 2. I went to Tanzania with my family. 3. La Grande Mama 4. Desperate Housewives

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Profile for CoperniNews

CoperniNews 23.10.19  

This is the 10th issue of CoperniNews, a newspaper for the medical students at JUMC.

CoperniNews 23.10.19  

This is the 10th issue of CoperniNews, a newspaper for the medical students at JUMC.