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CONTENT WELCOME THE HUMAN FACTOR CUSTOMISING THE STANDARDISED CO-HABITATION INDEX: DESIGN TO IMPROVE LIFE THE DANISH DESIGN PRIZE BIKES FOR A BETTER WORLD IN-BETWEEN SCALE DESIGNING THE LIFE CYCLE MATERIAL PERFORMANCE CHALLENGE SOCIETY HUMANS AS CO-CREATORS A LOT OF SMALL STEPS DESIGN PERSPECTIVE A WORLD OF PRAGMATIC UTOPIAS PRIMITIVE FUTURE?


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WELCOME A conglomerate of design, culture and commercial life is presented during Copenhagen Design Week, and we invite you to share networks, investigate new urban territories, attend conferences and talks on society challenges – and to check out social life in Copenhagen. Copenhagen Design Week 2011 THINK HUMAN explores and raises awareness of the impact design, architecture and the environment leaves on human life. In a world of constant change, design has the potential to transform ideas and social values, to meet both desires and needs – and not least create good business. We hope you will enjoy living, biking, walking and exploring the many events – and spend some time re-thinking and re-creating in Copenhagen.

Merete Brunander Acting CEO Copenhagen Design Week by The Danish Design Centre

COPENHAGEN HARBOUR  BATH  BY  PLOT  ARCHITECTS.  PHOTO:  CASPER  DALHOFF COPENHAGEN  DESIGN  WEEK  IS  AN  INTERNATIONAL  INITIATIVE   BY  THE  DANISH  MINISTRY  OF  ECONOMIC  AND  BUSINESS   AFFAIRS  DIRECTED  BY  THE  DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE.  


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THE HUMAN FACTOR

’CO-HABITATION DOESN’T  HAVE  TO  MEAN  ...  ’  BY  JOHAN  CARLSSON,  ANETTE  VÆRING  AND  MORTEN  SØRENSEN.  PHOTO:  ANETTE  VÆRING

Setting the future scene for creative societies is more complex than ever. Sharing, co-creation and connectivity are generating new operating systems as we enter the age of the human - the Anthropocene. In a progressive society that recognizes this challenge and the impact human behaviour leaves on the environment, creative platforms are indispensable drivers in developing new mindsets. To escape dogmatic views, an anthropological and holistic approach provides important tools in the process of reformatting the standards of human life.

WIKIPIDIA: “THE  ANTHROPOCENE  IS  A  RECENT  AND  INFORMAL  CHRONOLOGICAL  TERM  THAT  SERVES  TO  MARK  THE  EVIDENCE  AND  

Design, art, architecture and urban planning have always been strong contributors in defining cultural behaviour, not least through the recognition of the interdisciplinary potential between the different domains. In addition to this, the continuous dialogue between theory and practice, combined with the constant urge to explore form and material, adds new dimensions to the future conception of design with a human imprint.

EXTENT OF  HUMAN  ACTIVITIES  THAT  HAVE  HAD  A  SIGNIFICANT   GLOBAL  IMPACT  ON  THE  EARTH’S  ECOSYSTEMS. THE  ANTHROPOCENE  HAS  NO  PRECISE  START  DATE,  BUT   BASED  ON  ATMOSPHERIC  EVIDENCE  MAY  BE  CONSIDERED  TO   START  WITH  THE  INDUSTRIAL  REVOLUTION.”

TINA MIDTGAARD,  INDEPENDENT  CURATOR.   GRADUATED  AS  AN  ARCHITECT  FROM  THE  ROYAL  ACADEMY   IN  COPENHAGEN.  HAS  DEVELOPED  AND  MANAGED  INTERDISCIPLINARY  PROJECTS  AND  EXHIBITIONS  IN  COLLABORATION   WITH  A  NUMBER  OF  INTERNATIONAL  AND  NATIONAL  CULTURAL  

Copenhagen Design Week 2011 challenges standardised practice, exhibiting new urban structures, experiments and idealistic creativity revolving around the idea of up-cycling in all fields of the multifacetted landscape of creative thinking.

INSTITUTIONS AND  MUSEUMS.  SENIOR  LECTURER  IN  ARCHI-

Tina Midtgaard and Karen Kjærgaard Curators

DESIGN AND  ARCHITECTURE,  DEVELOPING  AND  PROCESSING  

TECTURE AND  DESIGN.

KAREN KJÆRGAARD,  INDEPENDANT  CURATOR.   GRADUATED  AS  AN  ARCHITECT  FROM  THE  SCHOOL  OF   ARCHITECTURE  IN  AARHUS.   WORKS  IN  THE  CONCEPTUAL  BORDERLAND  BETWEEN  CRAFT,   PROJECTS  AND  EXHIBITIONS  IN  COLLABORATION  WITH   CULTURAL  INSTITUTIONS  AND  MUSEUMS.


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CUSTOMISING THE STANDARDISED by Claus Randrup, journalist

‘BIG LEGO  BRICKS  FOR  ADULTS’:  MADS  MØLLER  AND  ERIK  JUUL  PLAY  WITH  CONTAINER  STRUCTURES.  PHOTO:  ARCGENCY/  ERIK  JUUL  ARCHITECTS

CHEAP, EASY, STABLE, FLEXIBLE, SUSTAINABLE AND MOBILE. THE SHIPPING CONTAINER HAS BEEN GIVEN NEW LIFE WITH THE THEME ‘THINK HUMAN’. A HOME FOR THE HOMELESS AND A PAVILLION MADE OF CONTAINERS ARE AT THE CORE OF COPENHAGEN DESIGN WEEK.


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CONTAINER PAVILLION  BY  MAPT  ARCHITECTS,  2009.  PHOTO:  LARS  ENGELGAR

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HOMELESSHOME BY  ERIK  JUUL,  DEN  FRIE,  COPENHAGEN  2011.  PHOTO:  ERIK  JUUL

‘ARCHITECTURE SHOULD  BE  TRANSPORTED  AND  EXPORTED’.  THAT’S  THE   MANTRA  OF  ARCHITECT  MADS  MØLLER,   FOUNDER  OF  ARCGENCY.  USING  CONTAINERS  IN  CONSTRUCTION  IS  NOT  NEW   -  IT  BEGAN  IN  THE  70S.  BUT  WHAT  IS   NEW,  IS  THAT  THE  POSSIBILITIES  OF  THE   CONTAINER  AS  A  TRANSPORTABLE  UNIT   HAVE  STARTED  TO  BE  INCORPORATED   INTO  ARCHITECTURE.  SOMETHING   THAT  MAKES  ARCHITECTURE  MORE   DYNAMIC,  BUT  JUST  AS  IMPORTANT MORE  SUSTAINABLE.

ing at  industrialised  products  that  could  be  reused,’   says  Mads  Møller.

A TRAVELLING STRUCTURE

The home  for  the  homeless  is  6x6m2  and  located  at   Højbro  Plads  during  Copenhagen  Design  Week.  The   architect  Erik  Juul  has  been  fascinated  by  the  container  as  a  construction  component  for  years.  The  challenge  here  was  to  see  how  much  architecture  could  be   created  in  such  a  small  space  on  such  a  small  budget:

Six containers  form  the  framework  for  an  exhibition   space  presenting  design  projects  under  the  slogan   ‘Think  Human’  –  just  one  example  of  container   architecture  during  Copenhagen  Design  Week.   Mapt  architects,  Mads  Møller  and  Anders  Lendager,   collaborated  on  the  exhibition  structure: ‘Our  main  focus  has  been  durability  and  sustainability.   We’ve  only  used  sustainable  solutions,  and  what  happens  to  the  containers  after  the  exhibition  is  key.  Our   container  pavilion  can  be  moved  and  travel  to  new   places,’  says  architect  Mads  Møller. The  point  of  using  containers  in  construction  is  that   the  architect  is  forced  to  focus  not  only  on  the  design   and  product,  but  also  think  about  what  will  happen  to   the  building  afterwards.

WASTE FREE ARCHITECTURE Traditional buildings  usually  have  a  life  span  of  15-50   years.  The  container  pavilion  during  Copenhagen   Design  Week  has  a  life  span  of  about  a  month: ‘The  pavilion  is  like  a  speeded  up  version  of  the  life   span  of  a  building,  and  our  goal  was  to  avoid  all  waste   when  the  building  was  dismantled.  So  we  started  look-

)\PSKPUN^P[OJVU[HPULYZPZHJOLHWHUKLMÄJPLU[^H` to create  a  lot  of  space.  After  being  used  in  something   like  the  exhibition  pavilion,  they  can  go  back  to  being   used  as  shipping  containers  again.

LEGO BRICKS FOR THE HOMELESS HomeLessHome is  another  container  project  during   Copenhagen  Design  Week.  Designed  by  the  architect   Erik  Juul,  the  goal  was  to  discover  how  cheaply  and   LMÄJPLU[S`HOVTLJV\SKILJYLH[LKPUJS\KPUNHOVTL for  the  homeless.

º0[»ZKLZPNULKMVYÄ]LWLVWSLI\[P[JV\SKLHZPS`IL made for  more.  The  container  is  a  lot  of  fun,  kind  of   like  a  big  Lego  brick  for  adults.  Plus  it’s  hard  to  imagine  a  global  economy  without  the  container.  It’s  a  symIVSVMNSVIHSHMÅ\LUJL^OPJOHSZVTHRLZP[PU[LYLZ[PUN to  rethink  it  as  a  low-cost  dwelling,’  says  Erik  Juul. HomeLessHome  is  an  architectural  experiment,  but   Erik  Juul  would  like  to  see  container  architecture  really   being  used,  both  by  the  homeless  and  the  rest  of  the   WVW\SH[PVU/LUHTLZJOLHWZ[\KPVZVMÄJLJVTT\UPties  or  urban  camping  for  tourists  as  just  some  of  the   possibilities.

THE CONTAINER IS THE FUTURE Today container  architecture  represents  2%  of   global  architecture,  but  the  architects  Mads  Møller   and  Erik  Juul  see  it  as  having  far  greater  potential.   It’s  energy-saving,  cheap  and  easy  to  move  with  a   crane  or  truck:

‘A CONTAINER  IS  JUST  A  BOX,  BUT  IT  HAS   ENDLESS  POSSIBILITIES.  IN  JAPAN,  EARTHQUAKE-SECURE  BUILDINGS  ARE  CONSTRUCTED   USING  THE  CONTAINER  PRINCIPLES  OF   SPATIAL  MODULARITY.  ON  HAITI  EMERGENCY   CAMPS  ARE  BUILT  USING  STANDARDISED   SHIPPING  CONTAINERS.  CONTAINERS  CAN   ALSO  BE  USED  TO  BUILD  CHEAP  STUDENT   ACCOMMODATION  AND  SUSTAINABLE   HOTELS,’  SAYS  MADS  MØLLER. 0[»ZHSZVHIV\[SPMLZWHUHUK[OLÅL_PIPSP[`[VL_WHUK With  container  construction,  it’s  easy  to  add  more   rooms  or  storeys  if  you  need  more  space.

HEMP HOUSE FRONTS The container  also  opens  up  for  the  possibility  of   customised  architecture.  The  container  is  just  a   skeleton.  You  can  use  any  material  -  steel,  wood,   recycled  hemp  or  glass  -  as  a  façade.  You  can   basically  dress  your  house  in  whatever  shoes,   jacket  and  pants  you  like. For  Erik  Juul  container  architecture  also  challenges   existing  architecture.  The  essence  of  the  container  is   its  mobility.  It  can  be  moved  anywhere  in  the  world.   Something  that  makes  container  architecture  dynamic   rather  than  stationary.

MADS MØLLER,  FORMER  PARTNER  AT  MAPT  ARCHITECTS,   STARTED  THE  ARCHITECTURE  BUREAU  ARCGENCY  IN  COPENHAGEN  TO  FOCUS  ON  RESOURCE  CONSCIOUS  ARCHITECTURE. WWW.ARCGENCY.COM

ERIK JUUL  ARCHITECTS  IS  AN  INTERNATIONAL  ARCHITECTURE  COMPANY  SPECIALISING  IN  CREATING  SOLUTIONS   INSPIRED  BY  ARTICLE  25  OF  THE  UN  DECLARATION  ON  HUMAN   RIGHTS:  ‘EVERYONE  HAS  THE  RIGHT  TO  A  STANDARD  OF   LIVING  ADEQUATE  FOR  HEALTH  AND  WELL-BEING’. WWW.ERIKJUUL.COM  


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YOUR CLOSEST NEIGHBOUR?

CO-HABITATION STATEMENT


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’CO-HABITATION DOESN’T  HAVE  TO  MEAN  …  ’  OPEN  CALL  WINNING  ENTRY  BY  JOHAN  CARLSSON,   ANETTE  VÆRING  AND  MORTEN  SØRENSEN.  PHOTO:  IVAN  MOLINA  CARMONA

CO-HABITATION

72 FILMS ON DENSE DWELLING IN 2010  THE  DANISH  ARTS  AGENCY   LAUNCHED  AN  OPEN  CALL  TO   KICK-START  AN  ARCHITECTURAL   AND  SOCIAL  DEBATE.  TITLED   “CO-HABITATION”,  THE  CALL  WAS   AIMED  AT  RAISING  AWARENESS  OF   THE  ARCHITECTURAL,  SOCIAL  AND   ENVI  RONMENTAL  CONSEQUENCES   OF  THE  WAY  WE  LIVE  TODAY.  THE   GOAL  WAS  TO  GENERATE  IDEAS  FOR   THE  DEVELOPMENT  OF  OPTIMAL,   SUSTAINABLE  HOME  DESIGN  AND   HOMES  AND  TOWNS  THAT  CAN  INSPIRE   PEOPLE  TO  LIVE  AND  WORK  CLOSER   TO  EACH  OTHER  –  TO  ‘CO-HABIT’. The  call  also  focussed  on  the  price  we  as  a  society   pay  for  living  in  homes  that  are  too  big  and  too  far   apart:  our  consumption  of  energy,  natural  resources,   time  and  money.  The  jury  was  looking  for  solutions   where  people  can  live  closer  together  without  surrendering  the  dream  of  having  a  place  of  their  own:   projects  that  highlight  the  human,  social,  economic   and  environmental  advantages  of  living  closer  to  each   other. ;OLJHSS^HZMVYZOVY[ÄSTZ¶TH_TPU\[LZ0[KPKU»[ TH[[LYPM[OLÄSTZ^LYLKVJ\TLU[HY`HUPTH[PVUZ ÄJ[PVUVYHTP_VMHSS[OYLL>OH[TH[[LYLK^HZ[OH[ there  was  a  relationship  between  form  and  content,   HUK[OH[[OLÄSTZOHKZVTL[OPUN[VZH`[OH[WLVWSL could  understand.     There  were  72  entries  from  architects,  artists,  urban   planners,  landscape  architects  and  other  professionals.  The  jury  selected  12  that  challenge  the  ‘the  bigNLY[OLIL[[LY»JYP[LYPHVMPKLHSOVTLZ¶ÄSTZ`V\ can  see  in  the  Co-Habitation  exhibition.

THE BIGGER THE BETTER? The latest  census  of  Denmark  (2010)  reveals  that   Danish  homes  are  getting  bigger.  From  1980-2009   the  average  area  each  person  lives  in  rose  from  42m2   to  almost  52m2.  During  the  same  period  the  average   Danish  home  expanded  from  106m2  to  111m2.  And   P[»ZZ[PSSNYV^PUN¶KLZWP[L[OLÄUHUJPHSJYPZPZHUKYPZPUN energy  prices.   There  are  over  1  million  single-family  homes  in   Denmark,  and  the  number  continues  to  rise.  Seven   out  of  ten  Danes  say  they  want  to  move  out  of  the  city   and  into  their  own  house  in  the  countryside  or  suburbs   when  they  have  a  family.  For  most  Danes,  the  house   of  their  dreams  is  still  detached. Since  70%  of  the  population  actually  live  in  detached   houses,  their  appeal  must  be  based  on  real-life  quali[PLZ7LVWSL[HSRHIV\[[OLMYLLKVT[VPUÅ\LUJL[OLPY physical  surroundings,  a  garden  for  the  kids  to  play  in,   nature  and  decent  sports  facilities  nearby.  They  also   mention  having  a  place  to  call  home  and  to  return  to   –  and  the  garden  gate  they  can  close  behind  them.   According  to  sociologist  Cecilie  Juul  Jørgensen,  researcher  at  Denmark’s  Centre  for  Housing  and  Welfare,   the  single-family,  suburban  home  is  still  an  ideal  –  the   place  to  live  ‘the  good  life’:  “Young  couples  who  have   just  become  parents  or  are  about  to  have  children   really  want  to  move  to  a  house  outside  the  city.  And   once  they’ve  moved  they’re  even  more  positive.  They   OH]LUVKYLHTZVMYL[\YUPUN[V[OLPY[^VYVVTÅH[PU Copenhagen.’

town, work  and  shops.  It  costs  time  and  energy  to   commute  between  home  and  work.  It  costs  money   and  energy  to  heat  single-family  homes.  And  it  creates   mono-cultural  neighbourhoods,  where  everyone  looks   like  you  –  and  might  just  have  enough  in  themselves. Yet  most  Danes,  according  to  the  anthropologist  and   H\[OVYVM.9,(;30=05.:VÄL2`SSLZILJOHYL\UHISL to  conceive  of  living  in  less  space:  “A  lot  of  people  say   they’d  only  move  to  a  smaller  place  if  it  was  absolutely   necessary  –  because  of  money  or  old  age.  We  like   having  space.  It’s  not  something  we’d  give  up  lightly.   Yet  it’s  often  the  small  rooms  and  corners  that  people   talk  about  when  describing  what  they  like  about  their   home:  the  small  eat-in  kitchen,  a  boxroom,  a  favourite   corner  of  the  lounge,  a  cosy  study.” But  even  though  the  relative  density  of  urban  living   can  create  more  architectural,  social  and  environmental  sustainability,  that’s  not  the  only  truth  about   city  living.  Given  how  the  cities  we  live  in  today  are   designed,  people  also  live  with  crowds,  pollution  and   noise  –  and  in  poorly  built  apartments  that  take  a  lot   of  energy  to  heat.  Living  in  the  city  can  mean  living  in   areas  with  a  bad  reputation,  in  a  home  that  cannot  be   adapted  to  the  different  phases  of  your  life,  and  next   to  neighbours  that  you  didn’t  choose,  but  have  to   live  with.

CO-HABITATION –  THE  DANISH  ARTS  AGENCY’S  OPEN  CALL   –  WAS  FOR  PROJECTS  THAT:      CHALLENGE  OUR  CULTURE,  MENTALITY,  WAY  OF  LIFE,  AND              WILLINGNESS  TO  CHANGE.

When it  comes  to  our  homes,  we’re  full  of  paradoxes.   What  we  say  might  be  idealistic,  but  our  actions   don’t  match  our  words.  We  all  know  that  it  doesn’t   make  sense  socially,  environmentally  or  economically  for  everyone  to  live  in  their  own  house  behind  a   well-trimmed  hedge:  to  live  in  standardised  housing   in  sprawling  suburbs,  a  long  way  from  the  centre  of  

   ARE  NATIONWIDE  AND  AIM  AT  IMPROVING  OUR            QUALITY  OF  LIFE  IN  PROXIMITY  TO  EACH  OTHER.      REPRESENT  INNOVATIVE  IDEAS  AND  REAL  ALTERNATIVES              –  A  PARADIGM  SHIFT  IN  HOUSING  IDEALS  THAT            CHALLENGES  THE  ‘DANISH  DREAM’  OF  A  SINGLE-FAMILY          HOME  WITH  ALTERNATIVE  AND  DENSER  HOUSING. WWW.BOTAET.DK


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“DESIGN IS THE HUMAN CAPACITY TO SHAPE AND CREATE OUR ENVIRONMENTS IN WAYS THAT SATISFY OUR NEEDS AND GIVE MEANING TO OUR LIVES.” INDEX: Jury member, Professor John Heskett

W W W. D E S I G N T O I M P R O V E L I F E . C O M


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INDEX: DESIGN TO IMPROVE LIFE INDEX: dreams of a world that is designed to suit the needs and aspirations of mankind. Our ten years of experience have shown, through thousands of conversations and thousands of life-improving designs, that design is a decisive factor in creating a better world.

THE  NEW  INDEX:  EXHIBITION  PAVILLION.  DESIGNED  BY  GREG  LYNN  &  CHRISTIAN  DITLEV  BRUUN  IN  COOPERATION  WITH   VINK  A/S.  PHOTO:  INDEX:

05+,?!PZH+HUPZOIHZLKUVUWYVĂ„[VYNHUPaH[PVU that  was  established  in  2002  and  coined  the  concept   “Design  to  Improve  Lifeâ€?.  We  work  globally  to  promote  and  apply  both  design  and  design  processes   that  have  the  capacity  to  improve  the  lives  of  people   worldwide.   Denmark  has  with  the  investment  in  INDEX:  taken  the   lead  in  a  global  movement  that  will  improve  life  for   future  generations  and  increase  economic  growth  right   now,  and  across  national,  political  and  economic   barriers.  INDEX:  Design  to  Improve  Life  is  deeply   rooted  in  the  Danish  tradition  for  system  design  that   ILULĂ„[ZSHYNLWYVWVY[PVUZVM[OLWVW\SH[PVUÂśMYVT cooperatives  and  credit  unions  to  large  scale  recycling   systems  –  while  at  the  same  time  being  a  central  part   VM[OLZ[VY`[OH[KLĂ„ULZZ[JLU[\Y`+LUTHYR 05+,?!PZ^PKLS`YLJVNUPaLKMVY[OLNSVIHSIPLUUPHS design  award,  the  INDEX:  Award,  which  is  the  largest   JHZOKLZPNUWYPaLPU[OL^VYSK^VY[OĂ JV]LYPUN[OLĂ„]LJH[LNVYPLZ!Body,  Home,  Work,  Play,  and   Community.   INDEX:  promotes  the  application  of  designs  and   design  processes  to  improve  vital  areas  of  people’s   SP]LZ^VYSK^PKLHUK[V\Z[OLILZ[KLĂ„UP[PVUVM

design  has  been  expressed  by  our  jury  member   Professor  John  Heskett,  who  said  that  “Design  is  the   human  capacity  to  shape  and  create  our  environments   in  ways  that  satisfy  our  needs  and  give  meaning  to  our   lives.â€? Design  offers  environmental,  social,  and  economically  sustainable  tools  to  make  the  world  a  safe  and   better  environment  for  people,  and  design  processes   are  ways  of  working  that  identify  solutions  based  on   the  knowledge,  responsiveness,  and  methodology  of   designers.  In  practical  terms,  this  means  that  INDEX:     challenges  the  traditional  concepts  and  stereotypes   of  design  while  highlighting  the  complexity  of  the   KLZPNUĂ„LSKKLTVUZ[YH[PUN]LY`KPMMLYLU[ZVS\[PVUZ to  problems  like  HIV/AIDS,  scarcity  of  potable  water,   lack  of  education  and  carbon  emissions.  We  inspire,   collect,  advocate,  communicate,  evaluate,  connect,   and  discuss  Design  to  Improve  Life  on  a  global  scale.          

INDEX: AWARD 2011 05+,?!(^HYK,_OPIP[PVUMLH[\YLZ[OLÄUHSPZ[ZMVY 05+,?!(^HYK;OLÄUHSPZ[ZOHPSMYVTKPMMLYLU[ countries  and  represent  about  6  percent  of  the  total   number  (966)  of  nominations  for  this,  the  world’s   biggest  design  award,  and  were  selected  in  an  online  

voting  process  by  the  International  INDEX:  Jury. The  exhibition  demonstrates  the  scope  and  vast   WV[LU[PHSVM[OLKLZPNUĂ&#x201E;LSKHUK[OLL_OPIP[PVUKLZPNU for  2011  is  brand  new  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  a  collaboration  between   American  architect  Greg  Lynn  and  Danish  architect   Christian  Ditlev  Bruun.  Before  embarking  on  a  world   tour  including  India,  China  and  several  locations  in   Europe,  INDEX:  Award  Exhibition  will  be  shown  at   KvĂŚsthusmolen  in  Central  Copenhagen  from   September  2nd  to  September  25th. Staged  before  a  black-tie  audience  led  by  INDEX:   Royal  Patron  HRH  the  Crown  Prince  and  HRH  the   Crown  Princess  of  Denmark,  INDEX:  Award  Ceremony   names  the  winners  of  INDEX:  Award  2011,  and  will  be   broadcast  on  both  national  Danish  television  and  to  a   worldwide  audience  in  an  online  live  stream  on   September  2nd  2011. The  coveted  INDEX:  Award  carries  a  total  purse  of   Ă TVYL[OHU<: HUK[HRLZWSHJL in  Copenhagenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  new  breathtaking  Opera  House  in   front  of  an  audience  of  more  than  1,000  Danish  and   international  designers,  politicians,  business  leaders,   students  and  celebrities,  who  are  all  invited  to  the   ceremony  to  celebrate  design  that  makes  a  difference   to  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lives.


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INDEX: Award Finalists 2011 AskNature Biomimicry   Website  

Anti Sleep   Pilot  

21st Century   Nursing  bag  

Adlens Universal   and  the  Vision   for  a  Nation   Program

Ambulight Photodynamic   Therapy  

Aquacube™

Design Seoul

Eating, Design   &  Dementia  

E. chromi  

Earthquake Disaster  +     design

High Line

Easy Latrine  

Edheads.org

Konbit

UN Humani-­ tarian  Aid   Packaging   JANMA   –  The  Clean   Birth  Kit   Hövding Imagination   Playground   in  a  Box

Novacem

OpenIDEO.com

Plumen 001  

PUMA: Clever  Little   Bag  

Pure water   bottle Reclaim— the  Bahrain   national   pavilion

T.27 City  Car

The Cheong-­ gyecheon   Restoration   Project

The Copenhagen   Wheel

The Secret   Life  Series  

The Dream   Ball  Project

Tulip Siphon   Water   Filter


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BioLite HomeStove  

Autarchy

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Bware water   meter   Business   Model   Generation  

Design for   Change  

Autodesk Sustainability   Workshop  

Enviromesh

ELEMENTAL Monterrey  |     70  Incremental   Housing   Complex

Glow Guardian

Embrace Infant   Warmer  

Green School

HackFWD

Lulan Artisans   Business   Strategy   MycoBond™

Lifeplayer Learning Landscape

Shokay

she28

Refugees United

UN Global   Compact   Dilemma   Game

NETRA

Lung-­on-­ a-­Chip

Sana

VerBien: See  Better   to  Learn   Better  

Solio

Dasan Call   Center

WASARA WatAir

X-­Halo Breath   Thermometer  

Yuneec E430

W W W. D E S I G N T O I M P R O V E L I F E . C O M


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THE DANISH DESIGN PRIZE

THE DANISH DESIGN PRIZE HAS EXISTED FOR 45 YEARS, AND REPRESENTS ONE OF THE BEST GUIDES TO THE INNOVATIVENESS OF DANISH COMPANIES AND ONE OF THE LEADING INDICES OF GOOD 21ST CENTURY DESIGN. THE DANISH DESIGN PRIZE CELEBRATES THE BEST DANISH DESIGN ON THE MARKET RIGHT NOW. THE GOAL OF THE PRICE IS TO MAKE THE VALUE OF DANISH DESIGN AS A CREATIVE AND ECONOMIC FORCE VISIBLE. The winning  projects  are  not  only  the  best  in  their   design  category,  they  also  set  new  standards  for  design   as  a  discipline  and  add  new  dimensions  to  the  concept   ‘Danish  Design’.  Ranging  from  visionary  farming  to  an   invisible  drain,  the  projects  demonstrate  the  scope  of   design  in  Denmark  today.   ;OL+HUPZO+LZPNU7YPaLKVLZU»[VUS`YL^HYKHLZ[OL[PJ and  functional  quality.  The  focus  is  broader,  highlighting   [OLWV[LU[PHSVM[OLÄLSKVMKLZPNUHZPU[LNYHS[VHNVVK life  and  good  business. Contemporary  design  goes  way  beyond  traditional   concepts,  entering  into  complex,  multidisciplinary  processes  that  can  transform  society,  change  systems,  and   improve  life.  Design  today  is  a  mindset  and  a  method   [OH[WSH`ZHUPUJYLHZPUNS`ZPNUPÄJHU[YVSLPUJYLH[PUNHU economically,  environmentally  and  socially  sustainable  

future -  something  the  winners  of  the  Danish  Design   7YPaLHYLWYPTLL_HTWSLZVM

DESIGN AND GOOD BUSINESS GO HAND IN HAND Good design  is  inextricably  linked  to  good  business.   Good  design  demands  the  courage  to  take  risks  and   think  out  of  the  box  –  just  like  good  business. 0U[OLZPZ[LYWYPaL+LZPNU4H[[LYZ^HZMV\UKLK[V encourage  Danish  companies  to  become  even  more   H^HYLVM[OLNYV^[OWV[LU[PHSVMKLZPNU;OLWYPaLPZ awarded  to  companies  that  have  invested  consciously   in  design,  with  results  that  can  be  seen  on  the  bottom  line. Working  with  design  is  a  tried  and  tested  route  to  business  success,  something  proven  by  the  11  winners   VM[OL+HUPZO+LZPNU7YPaL(SS[OL^PUULYZ have  created  competitive,  aesthetic  and  functional   solutions  with  strong  international  potential. The  three  winner  projects  presented  here  represent  the   vast  scope  of  Danish  Design  today,  all  of  them  sustainable  solutions  that  can  take  us  into  the  future.

THE DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE  (DDC)  IS  DENMARK’S  KNOWLEDGE  CENTRE  FOR  DESIGN.  DDC  DEVELOPS  AND  DISSEMINATES  KNOWLEDGE  ABOUT  DESIGN  AND  WORKS  TO  PROMOTE   THE  USE  OF  STRATEGIC  DESIGN  IN  DANISH  COMPANIES  AND   PUBLIC  SECTOR  INSTITUTIONS.  WWW.DDC.DK

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NAP DANISH DESIGN  PRIZE  WINNER  2010/11. COMPANY  /  FRITZ  HANSEN DESIGN  /  KASPER  SALTO

JURY MOTIVATION NAP IS A CHAIR THAT PROVES THAT IT IS POSSIBLE TO CREATE A PRODUCT OF HIGH INTERNATIONAL QUALITY WITH ALL THE TRADEMARKS OF ESSENTIAL NORDIC DESIGN: SIMPLICITY, FUNCTIONALITY AND ATTENTION TO DETAIL. FRITZ HANSEN HAS NOT ONLY LAUNCHED A CHAIR THAT REAFFIRMS THE COMPANY’S DEDICATION TO QUALITY DESIGN, BUT IS ALSO PRICED AS A COMPETITIVE ALTERNATIVE TO OTHER SHELL CHAIRS ON THE MARKET. NAP OFFERS INCREDIBLY GOOD AND FLEXIBLE SEATING COMFORT, AND UNIQUE FOR SHELL CHAIRS, THE RIBBED SEAT PREVENTS THE USER FROM SLIDING. NAP CAN BE STACKED. IT IS ALSO STABLE AND ROBUST, BUT AS AN INDIVIDUAL PIECE OF FURNITURE IT ALSO HAS A SCULPTURAL QUALITY THAT MAKES IT A PLEASURE BOTH TO LOOK AT AND SIT IN.

PHOTO: REPUBLIC  OF  FRITZ  HANSEN,  OLE  KONSTANTYNER

PIG CITY VISION AWARD  WINNER  2010/11 COMPANIES  /  FARMER  SØREN  HANSEN,  ALFRED  PEDERSEN  MARKET  

GARDENERS &  FARMS  FOR  THE  FUTURE DESIGN  /  GOTTLIEB  PALUDAN  ARCHITECTS  &  NEE  RENTZ-PETERSEN

PIG CITY IS ONE OF THE SIX WINNING PROJECTS FROM REALDANIA’S 2007 DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE COMPETITION ‘FARMS FOR THE FUTURE’.

JURY MOTIVATION PIG CITY CREATES SUSTAINABLE SYNERGY BETWEEN PIG AND PRODUCE FARMING TO REDUCE CO2 EMISSIONS, SMELL AND WATER POLLUTION. THE PROJECT IS A BRILLIANT COMBINATION OF A VISIONARY AND DOWN-TO-EARTH APPROACH TO INNOVATIVE DESIGN ON A GRAND SCALE, INTEGRATING THE ENVIRONMENT, PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND A BUSINESS PLAN. THE TALENTED COMBINATION OF ALL THREE IN A HOLISTIC AND ORIGINAL PROJECT GENERATES THE POTENTIAL FOR PIG CITY TO MAKE A REAL DIFFERENCE. AND IT’S NOT ONLY A VISION. TWO MANUFACTURERS HAVE ALREADY COMMITTED TO MAKING PIG CITY A REALITY. IMAGE: GOTTLIEB  PALUDAN  ARCHITECTS  &  NEE  RENTZ-PETERSEN  ARCHITECT  PH.D.

REPUBLIQUE DANISH DESIGN  PRIZE  WINNER  2010/11.   COMPANY  /  REPUBLIQUE,  COPENHAGEN’S  NEW  

CONTEMPORARY THEATRE.   DESIGN  /  SCANDINAVIAN  DESIGNLAB

JURY MOTIVATION THE NEW CORPORATE IDENTITY FOR REPUBLIQUE, A NEW CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL THEATRE IN COPENHAGEN, HITS THE MARK SIMPLY AND EFFECTIVELY. A MERE GLIMPSE OF THE COLOR SCHEME OR GRAPHICS GENERATES INSTANT RECOGNITION. IT’S A REVITALIZATION OF POSTER ART ON THE STREET THAT PAYS TRIBUTE TO POSTER CLASSICS AND PHOTOMONTAGE WITHOUT BEING REMOTELY RETRO. THE DESIGN IS USED WITH MERCILESS CONSISTENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS IN EVERYTHING THE THEATRE PUBLISHES. WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT, IT STRIKES A PERFECT BALANCE BETWEEN BRANDING REPUBLIQUE AND PRESENTING EACH INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE. THIS IS GRAPHIC DESIGN THAT REALLY COMMUNICATES, AND IT HAS ESTABLISHED REPUBLIQUE AS A STRONG COPENHAGEN BRAND IN RECORD TIME. PHOTO: SCANDINAVIAN  DESIGNLAB  /  REPUBLIQUE,  COPENHAGEN’S  NEW   CONTEMPORARY  THEATRE.  


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BIKES FOR A BETTER WORLD

PHOTOS: BAISIKELI

BAISIKELI MEANS BICYCLE IN SWAHILI, AND IS THE NAME OF A SOCIAL ENTERPRISE THAT MAKES, SELLS, REPAIRS AND RENTS BIKES IN DENMARK TO FUND PROJECTS IN AFRICA.

the Sahara.  The  quality  and  design  of  Baisikeli  bikes   means  they  can  still  be  used  –  also  after  they’ve  done   a  tour  of  duty  in  Denmark.  

Starting sustainable  companies  in  Africa  can  be  a   challenge,  but  when  it  comes  to  bikes  we’re  proving   that  it  can  be  done.  

BUSINESS FOR DEVELOPMENT

MASANGA, SIERRA LEONE

Imagine a  world  where  even  the  poorest  people  have   access  to  basic  healthcare,  education,  water,  food  and   the  chance  to  earn  a  living.  Baisikeli  might  not  build   schools  or  hospitals  or  provide  food  or  water,  but  we   can  help  people  get  to  them.

Mobility means  access  to  healthcare,  education  and   higher  incomes.  Making  bikes  for  and  in  African   countries  –  starting  local  production  and  repair   stations,  training  staff  and  selling  quality  products  at   affordable  prices  –  not  only  makes  the  population  more   mobile,  it  also  creates  an  industry  with  skill-sharing,   capital  development,  paid  jobs,  growth  and  local  taxes.  

Since December  2007  Baisikeli  has  sent  120  secondhand  Danish  bikes  4  times  a  year  to  their  repair  shop   in  the  grounds  of  Masanga  Leprosy  Hospital.  The   IPRLZHYLÄ_LKHUKZVSKSVJHSS`VM[OLWYVÄ[ZHYL PU]LZ[LKPUY\UUPUN[OLOVZWP[HSHUKPU[OLYLWHPY shop  and  staff.  

Bikes can’t  do  it  alone,  but  cheap  mobility  is  a  key   factor.  And  as  Baisikeli  expands,  more  and  more  jobs   are  created,  generating  resources  that  can  be  invested   in  the  local  community.   A  Baisikeli  bike  is  made  with  built-in  social  innovation.   Take  our  ‘Bikes  for  Businesses’  concept.  Once  the   bikes  we  supply  to  Danish  companies  need  replacing,   they’re  sent  to  one  of  Baisikeli’s  workshops  south  of  

A VISION FOR AFRICA Our vision  is  to  create  a  major  industry,  with  sustainable   development  for  the  people  who  need  it  most.  Through   partnerships  with  people  who  share  our  vision,  comTVUZLUZLHUKHÅHPYMVYJYLH[PUNJ\Z[VTLY]HS\L^L»YL creating  jobs  and  business  on  the  African  continent.  

BAISIKELI IS  A  SOCIAL  ENTERPRISE  THAT  BUYS  USED  DANISH   BIKES,  RESTORES  THEM  AT  THEIR  WORKSHOP  IN  COPENHAGEN,   AND  RENTS  THEM  TO  TOURISTS  AND  COPENHAGENERS.  THE  BIKE   RENTAL  BUSINESS  IN  COPENHAGEN  FINANCES  THE  COLLECTION   AND  TRANSPORTATION  OF  BIKES  TO  BAISIKELI’S  WORKSHOPS  IN   SIERRA  LEONE  AND  MOZAMBIQUE. WWW.BAISIKELI.DK


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CAN YOUR KIDS CYCLE TO SCHOOL?

CO-HABITATION STATEMENT


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IN-BETWEEN SCALE KRISTIAN BYRGE, CO-FOUNDER OF MUUTO, AND DESIGNER AND ARCHITECT JULIEN DE SMEDT TALK TO JANE ROWLEY ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY IN THE CONTEXT OF THEIR COLLABORATION ON CRUSHED BOWLS, WHERE BIG-SCALE ARCHITECTURE AND COMPUTER MODELLING ARE APPLIED TO SMALL-SCALE OBJECTS.

CRUSHED BOWL.  HANDMADE  FINE  BONE  CHINA,  WHITE  GLAZED.  PHOTO:  GILS  FOTOGRAFI

WE TRY  TO  RE-FOCUS  ON  ENJOYMENT   AND  THE  HEDONISTIC,  THE  PERFORMATIVE   AND  THE  ACTIVE,  RATHER  THAN  AESTHETIC   CANONS  AND  DESIGN  DOGMAS. Kristian,  how  does  Muuto’s  design  perspective   address  sustainability  and  ´the  human´? We  always  start  with  the  human  –  with  who  is  going  to   use  and  hopefully  enjoy  the  product.  Design  is  about   understanding  human  needs.  If  we  succeed,  we  can   make  a  product  that  is  durable  because  it  taps  into  a   universal  need  rather  than  a  passing  trend.  This  creates  a  basis  for  long-term  use,  rather  than  perpetuating  throwaway  culture. /V^KVLZ[OH[PUÅ\LUJL`V\YJOVPJLVMHKLZPNULY like  Julien  de  Smedt? Julien  has  the  ability  to  address  human  needs  with   solutions  that  are  thought  through.  He  researches   intensively  before  starting  the  design,  and  we  have  a   good  dialogue  throughout  the  process.  So  far  the  end   results  are  products  that  we  can  be  proud  of  –  in  both   the  short  and  the  long  term. Julien,  you  describe  your  projects  as  being  ‘huTHUS`KLZPNULKWVSP[PJHSS`LUNHNLKÄUHUJPHSS` viable,  and  structurally  realistic’.   We  try  to  re-focus  on  enjoyment  and  the  hedonistic,   the  performative  and  the  active,  rather  than  aesthetic   canons  and  design  dogmas.  When  we  were  asked  to   design  a  1,000  metre-high  building  we  experimented   and  realised  that  what  we  were  designing  not  a  tower   block,  but  a  vertical  city.   At  a  very  down-to-earth  and  practical  level  our  building   had  to  provide  what  a  city  provides.  If  you  live  1,000   meters  above  ground,  are  you  going  to  go  down  to   the  street  to  walk  your  dog  or  take  a  stroll  in  the  park?   The  way  buildings  are  constructed  today,  you  wouldn’t  

OH]LHJOVPJL:V^P[O:OLUaOLU3VNPZ[PJ*P[`^L designed a  tower  that  functions  like  a  city.   Also  because  we  believe  that  any  building  has  some   kind  of  civic  responsibility  to  its  context.  Why  should   a  bank  be  a  pristine  and  inert  block  of  glass  and  concrete?  The  building  might  not  always  be  a  bank,  so   architecturally  it  has  a  responsibility  to  be  in  dialogue   with  its  surroundings. How  do  these  guiding  principles  come  into  play? Change  is  good.  Applying  principles  that  are  tried  and   [LZ[LKPUVULÄLSK[VHUV[OLYJHUILHYLHSL`LVWLULY and  gives  us  a  platform  to  rethink  design  concepts.   With  Crushed  Bowls  we  used  triangulated  structures,   ^OPJOHYL\Z\HSS`\ZLKMVYTH[LYPHSLMÄJPLUJ`PUHYJOP[LJ[\YL4H[LYPHSLMÄJPLUJ`PZUV[ZVTL[OPUN`V\\Z\HSS`[OPURVM^OLU^VYRPUN^P[OÄULIVULJOPUHI\[[OL triangles  were  an  interesting  working  tool.  The  bowl   developed  organically,  but  throughout  the  process  the   intention  remained  clear  due  to  the  geometric  presence  of  the  triangle.  

It was  an  experiment  that  resulted  in  the  bowl.  The   idea  was  to  use  the  geometric  assembly  of  identical   triangles  like  Bucky  Fuller’s  geodesic  domes  in  a  single   form  –  here  the  bowl  –  and  play  with  the  potential  of   the  triangles  to  create  a  spoon  holder,  a  pouring  spout,   etc.  Ergonomics  is  nothing  new.  What’s  interesting  is   the  potential  of  geometric,  structural  methods  to   realise  the  ergonomics  of  a  given  object.   What  role  does  sustainability  play  in  your  work? Sustainability,  understood  as  the  necessary  equilibrium  between  needs,  consumption  and  waste,  is  a   crucial  element  of  our  design  philosophy  and  methods.   We  want  to  go  beyond  the  guilt  complex  that  is  every   designer’s  due,  and  start  thinking  about  production   and  pollution  as  part  of  a  larger  cycle  where  everything   sustains  something  else.  This  starts  with  the  decision   about  whether  to  take  on  a  project  –  whether  it  plays  a   relevant  role  in  co-creating  societies  we  want  to  live  in.

MUUTO’S DESIGN  PHILOSOPHY  IS  INSPIRED  BY  THE  FINNISH   WORD  ‘MUUTOS’,  WHICH  MEANS  NEW  PERSPECTIVE.  THE  

>OH[HYL[OLKPMMLYLUJLZIL[^LLU^VYRPUNVU[OL ]HZ[S`KPMMLYLU[ZJHSLZVM*Y\ZOLK)V^SZHUK Shenzhen Logistic  City?   Everything  is  connected.  The  most  interesting  projects   ZVTL[PTLZLTLYNLPUHUPUIL[^LLUZJHSLaVUL¶VY when  working  on  an  extreme  scale.  Like  the  multiTPSSPVUT]LY[PJHSJP[`VM:OLUaOLUVYHU\YIHUVIQLJ[ that  is  too  big  to  be  furniture  but  too  small  to  be  a   building.  We’re  currently  working  on  a  project  for  an   urban  object  that  has  multiple  social  functions.  It’s  like   working  with  a  non-established  scale  –  an  in-between.

COMPANY IS  FIRMLY  ROOTED  IN  SCANDINAVIAN  DESIGN,   HAND-PICKING  DESIGNERS  FROM  SWEDEN,  NORWAY,  FINLAND   AND  DENMARK,  AND  GIVING  THEM  THE  FREEDOM  TO  EXPRESS   THEIR  PERSONAL  DESIGN  PHILOSOPHY  IN  EVERYDAY   PRODUCTS  FOR  THE  HOME.  WWW.MUUTO.COM

JULIEN DE  SMEDT  IS  FOUNDER  &  DIRECTOR  OF  JDS   ARCHITECTS,  A  MULTIDISCIPLINARY  COMPANY  WORKING   WITH  ARCHITECTURE,  URBAN  PLANNING  AND  PRODUCT   DESIGN.  A  GRADUATE  OF  THE  BARTLETT  SCHOOL  OF   ARCHITECTURE,  BEFORE  FOUNDING  JDS  ARCHITECTS  IN  2006  

@V\»]L[HSRLKHIV\[\ZPUN[OLWYPUJPWSLZVMIPN scale computer  modelling  on  small  objects,  adding   what  you  call  ‘human  ergonomics’.  How? This  is  very  much  what  happened  with  Crushed  Bowls.  

JULIEN CO-FOUNDED  AND  CO-DIRECTED  PLOT  ARCHITECTS   IN  COPENHAGEN.  JDS  ARCHITECTS  HAS  WON  NUMEROUS   PRESTIGIOUS  INTERNATIONAL  AWARDS  AND  COMMISSIONS,   WWW.JDSA.EU


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MICHAEL ANKER,  CEO  LUCEPLAN  DENMARK  AND  MADS  KJØLLER  DAMKJÆR,  CREATIVE  DIRECTOR  AT  GOODMORNING  TECHNOLOGY.  PHOTO:  NICOLAI  PERJESI

DESIGNING THE LIFE CYCLE MADS KJØLLER DAMKJÆR, CREATIVE DIRECTOR AT GOODMORNING TECHNOLOGY, TALKS TO JANE ROWLEY ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIETY AND A HUMAN APPROACH IN THE GLOW OF THE SUCCESS OF THE ARCHETYPE LAMP

60% OF  ALL  NEW  PRODUCTS  FAIL  ON   THE  MARKET.  NONE  OF  US  SHOULD  BE   PRODUCING  MORE  STUFF  WE  CAN’T  OR   WON’T  USE.   There’s lots to talk about, but first things first – why the name Archetype? The  name  Archetype  is  based  on  the  simplicity  we   were  striving  for  using  the  archetypical  shape  of  lampshades.  LED  lamps  often  look  pretty  futuristic,  but   we  wanted  something  that  gave  us  the  80%  energy   ZH]PUNVM3,+I\[JV\SKÄ[PU[VL]LY`OVTL:VL]LU though  the  technology  is  ‘new’  people  feel  comfortable  with  it  because  the  lamp  looks  and  feels  familiar.   We  also  wanted  it  to  be  easy  for  people  to  use  and   understand  –  as  easy  as  changing  an  old-fashioned   light  bulb.   Archetype combines innovation and classical Scandinavian design. How does sustainability come into play? We  always  operate  with  sustainability  guidelines.   For  Archetype  there’s  the  LED,  which  literally  lasts   years.  But  we  also  put  a  lot  of  thought  into  the   manufacturing  process,  into  making  it  easy  to   HZZLTISLHUKKPZHZZLTISLMYVTIHZPJLSLTLU[Z! the  (recycled)  aluminium,  the  plastic  diffuser,  and   the  easily  replaceable  LED  we  developed  with   Phillips.  Archetype  is  designed  and  built  to  last,   but  worst-case  scenario  all  the  components  can  be   easily  separated  and  safely  disposed  of  in  the  right   recycling  bins.  

There’s no individual designer’s name on Archetype. How does Goodmorning Technology’s teamwork influence the final product? Our work  is  multidisciplinary.  We  always  gather  a   team  of  people  with  different  skills  and  approaches  to   develop  our  projects.  We’ve  discovered  that  this  diversity  of  input  –  coming  at  things  from  different  angles   –  is  the  only  way  we  can  really  innovate  and  design  for   the  future.   Archetype’s Italian producer, Luceplan, talk about ‘designing the life cycle’. How does that work for Goodmorning Technology? We  always  think  long-term  –  and  most  importantly   about  whether  the  product  is  needed.  We  turn  down   a  lot  of  design  work  we  don’t  agree  with  or  don’t  think   the  world  needs.  So  the  match  with  Luceplan  was   perfect.  

[OL^OVSLWYVJLZZMHU[HZ[PJHUK3\JLWSHUHTHaPUN They’re really  positive,  professional  people. Describing ‘Archetype’ you use the words ‘humanistic’ and ‘approachable’ to describe the design’… Archetype  is  easy  to  welcome  into  your  home,  easy   to  understand  and  easy  to  use.  It’s  made  for  people. At  a  broader  level  we  think  design  should  tell  a  story   –  be  meaningful  for  the  user  and  for  society  as  a   whole.  60%  of  all  new  products  fail  on  the  market.   None  of  us  should  be  producing  more  stuff  we  can’t   or  won’t  use.  

GOODMORNING TECHNOLOGY  WAS  FOUNDED  IN   *67,5/(.,505(:;9(;,.0*+,:0.5(.,5*@.4;5 HELPS  COMPANIES  STRENGTHEN  THEIR  BRAND,  SERVICES   AND  PRODUCT  RANGE  TO  ACHIEVE  BUSINESS  SUCCESS  

The Archetype story is a designer’s dream come true. How did the collaboration with Luceplan happen? We’ve been  developing  LED  designs  and  concepts   with  Denmark’s  sustainable  energy  lab  RISØ  since   2005.  In  2009  we  developed  and  designed  a  lighting   range,  including  Archetype.  We  showed  it  to  Michael   Anker,  director  of  Luceplan  here  in  Denmark.  He  immediately  sent  it  Luceplan’s  CEO  in  Italy.  The  CEO   JHSSLKTL[VZH`OL^V\SKIVVRHÅPNO[HZZVVUHZ0 had  time  to  come  to  Milan!  Two  years  of  collaboration   later  and  Archetype  was  launched  at  Milan  Furniture   Fair  this  year.  The  interest  has  been  overwhelming,  

THROUGH DESIGN  AND  INNOVATION.  GMTN’S  CLIENTS  RANGE   FROM  LARGE  CORPORATIONS  TO  SMALL  START-UPS. WWW.GMTN.DK

LUCEPLAN WAS  FOUNDED  IN  MILAN  IN  1978  BY  THE  ARCHITECTS  RICCARDO  SARFATTI,  PAOLO  RIZZATTO  AND  SANDRA   SEVERI  TO  CREATE  AND  PRODUCE  LIGHTING  TO  ENHANCE   QUALITY  OF  LIFE.  ENERGY  SAVING  IS  A  TOP  PRIORITY,  AS  IS   THE  ENVIRONMENTAL  IMPACT  OF  THE  ENTIRE  OPERATION  –   FROM  CHOICE  OF  MATERIALS  TO  PRODUCTION,  FROM   PRODUCT  DURABILITY  TO  PRODUCT  MAINTENANCE.   WWW.LUCEPLAN.COM


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CITA | WORKING FOR AND WITH MATERIAL PERFORMANCE BY METTE RAMSGAARD THOMSEN, MMA, PHD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, HEAD OF CITA (CENTRE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ARCHITECTURE), THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS, SCHOOLS OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND CONSERVATION – SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE.

IT IS THROUGH MATERIAL UNDERSTANDING THAT WE COME TO SHAPE THE WORLD OF ARTEFACTS AND STRUCTURES THAT SURROUND US. The understanding  of  materials  as  active,  whether   JVTWYLZZLK\UKLY[LUZPVUVYÅL_LK^OPSLOHUKSLKPZ at  the  root  of  all  craft  traditions.  The  ability  to  work  a   material  –  to  saw  and  chisel  wood,  to  weld  and  hammer  steel  or  to  weave  and  knit  yarn  –  relies  on  a  proMV\UK\UKLYZ[HUKPUNVMP[ZWLYMVYTHUJL;OLZVM[ÅL_ of  wood,  the  sprung  stiffness  of  steel,  and  the  tensile   elasticity  of  yarn  are  inherent  properties  that  inform   and  shape  our  craft  traditions:  

to the  richness  of  ornamentation,  but  rather  a  fundamental  shift  in  our  understanding  of  materials.  Rather   [OHU[OPURPUNVMTH[LYPHSZHZHZL[VMÄUP[LJH[LNVYPLZ -  timber,  steel,  concrete  or  glass  -  materials  need  to   be  seen  through  their  capacity  to  perform;  to  bend,   ÅL_HUKZ[YL[JO0U[OPZ^H`KPNP[HSMHIYPJH[PVUPU]P[LZ architects  to  rethink  the  traditions  of  crafting  and  to   investigate  how  new  processes  of  folding,  twisting  or   pleating  materials  can  lead  to  new  structural  systems.

;OLSHZ[`LHYZOH]LZLLUHUPUJYLHZPUN\ZLVMJVTputer driven  fabrication  technologies.  Computer  control  now  informs  most  western  manufacturing  across   multiple  scales  and  materials.  This  increasing  application  of  digital  fabrication  technologies  has  optimised   today’s  industrialised  building  practice  and  created  a   new  economic  platform  for  our  built  environment.  

The ideal  of  working  with  a  performative  understanding  of  materials  also  holds  a  reverse  challenge  to  our   design  tools.  To  work  well  with  material  performance   and  to  implement  this  in  structural  design  requires   good  simulation  tools  by  which  these  structural  forces   can  be  anticipated  and  calculated.  Existing  design   tools  are  designed  to  calculate  standardised  materials  in  traditional  load-bearing  structures.  As  we  start   working  with  more  complex  structural  performances,   SPRLZLSMIYHJPUNÅL_PUNHUK[LUZPVUPUN^LULLKUL^ tools  by  which  calibrate  these.  Here  we  are  met  with  a   ZL[VMUL^JOHSSLUNLZ;OLÄYZ[WYVISLT[OH[HYPZLZPZ the  sheer  increase  in  complexity.  Material  simulation   and  continual  variegation  require  more  complex  algorithmic  calculations  and  greater  computer  power.  We   therefore  need  better  computational  tools  by  which  to   undertake  these  calculations.  But  a  second,  perhaps   more  fundamental  problem,  lies  with  the  division  of   these  design  tools  into  carefully  segregated  professions  each  with  their  own  culture  of  problem  design   HUKZVS\[PVUÄUKPUN0M^LHYL[V^VYRPU[LSSPNLU[S`^P[O material  performance,  and  thereby  take  full  advantage   of  the  shared  digital  platform  that  forms  the  basis  for   digital  fabrication,  we  need  to  develop  new  tools  that   support  real  collaboration  between  designers,  engineers  and  craftsmen  during  the  early  design  phases.    

But digital  fabrication  is  more  than  an  optimisation   tool.  It  also  allows  us  as  designers  and  architects  to   reconsider  our  conceptual  and  material  practices.   Digital  fabrication  has  direct  consequences  for  the   way  material  is  thought  in  design  by  shifting  material   thinking  to  the  centre  of  design  intention.  If  architecture  has  predominantly  been  understood  as  a  formalist   tradition,  where  formal  concerns  preceded  material   thinking,  designing  for  digital  fabrication  challenges   this  ideal.  Instead,  material,  craft  and  performance   become  core  questions  present  already  at  the  start   of  the  design  phase.   Working  with  digital  fabrication  emphasises  the  presence  of  material  and  necessitates  that  the  design   embodies  a  fundamental  understanding  of  the  craft   traditions  that  are  included.  What  is  at  stake  is  not  only   the  systematic  control  of  variation  or  even  a  return  

Working through  the  digital  towards  the  material  positions  architecture  and  design  in  a  new  challenge  of   TH[LYPHS[OPURPUN0MHZWYHJ[P[PVULYZ^LJHUÄUK^H`Z of  implementing  material  performance  in  the  design  of   our  built  environment  and  use  traditional  materials  in   new  ways,  we  will  be  creating  the  tools  by  which  we   can  develop  a  more  sustainable  and  environmentally   responsive  building  culture.  To  work  intently  with   material  performance  is  to  work  directly  with  an  understanding  of  a  material’s  relation  to  its  environment,  its   production,  and  its  use.  Working  for  and  with  material   performance  is  therefore  to  work  with  a  situated   understanding  of  design.  

THE PROJECTS  ARE  DEVELOPED  WITH  THE  KIND  SUPPORT  OF   THE  REALDANIA  FOUNDATION  AND  LISBON  ARCHITECTURE   TRIENNALE  (THICKET),  THE  VELUX  FOUNDATION,  THE  VILLUM   KANN  RASMUSSEN  FOUNDATION  VISITING  PROFESSOR  PROGRAMME  (DERMOID)  AND  WITH  THE  SUPPORT  AND  COLLABORATION  OF  BITTEN  HEGELUND,THE  ROYAL  DANISH  ACADEMY   OF  FINE  ARTS,  SCHOOLS  OF  ARCHITECTURE,  DESIGN  AND   CONSERVATION  –  SCHOOL  OF  DESIGN  (BLUSH).

CITA (CENTRE  FOR  INFORMATION  TECHNOLOGY  AND  ARCHITECTURE)  IS  A  RESEARCH  CENTRE  AT  THE  ROYAL  DANISH   ACADEMY  OF  FINE  ARTS,  SCHOOL  OF  ARCHITECTURE.  IDENTIFYING  CORE  RESEARCH  QUESTIONS  INTO  HOW  SPACE  AND   TECHNOLOGY  CAN  BE  PROBED,  CITA  INVESTIGATES  HOW  THE   CURRENT  FORMING  OF  A  DIGITAL  CULTURE  IMPACTS  ON  ARCHITECTURAL  THINKING  AND  PRACTICE.  CITA  FOCUSES  ON  IT   AS  A  TOOL  FOR  DESIGN,  PRODUCTION  AND  COMMUNICATION   WITHIN  THREE  KEY  RESEARCH  AREAS:  DIGITAL  FORMATIONS,     BEHAVING  ARCHITECTURES  AND  INTERFACE  ECOLOGIES.   WWW.CITA.KARCH.DK


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IN THE  THREE  RESEARCH  PROBES  THICKET,  DERMOID  AND  BLUSH,  THE  PERFORMATIVE  AND  CRAFTS-BASED  THINKING  OF  DESIGN  CAN  LEAD  TO  NEW  WAYS  OF  THINKING  STRUCTURAL  DESIGN.   PHOTOS:  ANDERS  INGVARTSEN

Thicket explores  the  computation  of  the  soft  bend   of  ash  slats  into  a  woven  structure.  Using  a  bespoke   parametric  design  system,  the  wall  is  a  pleated  structure  that  creates  a  dense  spatial  weave.  

Dermoid, a  collaboration  with  Professor  Mark  Burry   and  the  Australian  research  group  SIAL,  explores  the   PUOLYLU[ÅL_PIPSP[`VM^VVK;OLZ[Y\J[\YLPZTHKLVMSHser  cut  plywood  and  each  member  is  interwoven  with   the  others  in  a  hexagonal  space  frame.

Blush is  a  table  project  that  queries  formal  design  traditions  in  the  context  of  variegated  material  realisation:   the  softness  of  the  draped  silk  satin  and  the  hardness   of  the  CNC  milled  shuttering  plywood.  The  tablecloth   is  developed  as  an  integrated  part  of  the  table,  draping   the  surface  in  rich  folds.    


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COPENHAGEN DESIGN WEEK 11

CAN DESIGN SAVE THE WORLD? NO, BUT IT CAN HELP! CHALLENGE SOCIETY. DESIGNING SIMPLE SOLUTIONS FOR A COMPLEX FUTURE The world  we  live  in  is  changing  at  an  incredible  pace,   creating  complex  societal  challenges.  The  welfare   state  is  under  pressure.  There  are  not  enough  hands   to  take  care  of  the  elderly,  hospitals  make  people  ill,   and  schools  are  getting  lousy  marks.  There’s  a  lot  to   do,  and  we’re  going  to  need  a  lot  of  new,  creative   solutions  to  get  it  done. The  exhibition  CHALLENGE  SOCIETY  shows  how   design  meets  the  challenge,  not  by  designing  new   [OPUNZMVY[OL^VYSKI\[I`ÄUKPUNUL^^H`Z[V design  the  world.  Design  has  the  capacity  to  reinvent   and  create  systems  and  services  that  can  take  the   indivi  dual,  society  and  companies  into  the  future. CHALLENGE  SOCIETY  encourages  us  to  open  our   eyes  to  design  as  a  creative  force  that  can  be  crucial   in  how  we  shape  the  society  of  the  future.  The  exhibition  focuses  on  the  humane  and  holistic  qualities  of   design:  design  that  adapts  and  facilitates  processes,   rejuvenates  society,  and  creates  better  lives.  Design   that  gets  to  grips  with  the  things  that  really  matter:   people,  life  and  the  environment.

porary focus  on  all-embracing  solutions  in  an  environmental,  cultural,  social  and  ethical  context.  Today   design  has  new  relevance  as  an  approach  and   mindset  that  puts  life  before  the  system  and  people   before  method    -  a  way  of  thinking  and  acting  in  the   world  that  generates  meaning  and  creates  real   results  in  social  innovation  and  societal  change. 0UÄSTZ^VYKZHUKPTHNLZ[OLL_OPIP[PVUZOV^Z how  design’s  simple  solutions  to  complex  challenges   can  give  a  welfare  state  under  pressure  a  necessary   boost,  create  better  solutions  for  the  people  who   ILULÄ[MYVTP[HUKPUJYLHZLK]HS\LMVY[OLJVTWHUPLZ who  practice  it. The  exhibition  includes  Danish  prisons,  hospitals  and   nursing  homes  that  have  met  major  challenges  with   ambitious  public-private  partnerships  and  collaborations  with  design  bureaus.   CHALLENGE  SOCIETY  explores  the  potential  and   perspectives  for  designing  a  better  future.

THE EXHIBITION  CHALLENGE  SOCIETY  EXPLORES  THE POSSIBILITIES  OF  DESIGNING  A  NEW  FUTURE  AND  CAN   BE  SEEN  AT  THE  DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE  UNTIL  

The concept  of  design  has  expanded  exponentially,   from  the  creation  of  individual  objects  to  the  contem-

FEBRUARY 19TH  2012 WWW.DDC.DK


COPENHAGEN DESIGN WEEK 11

CASE: DESIGN SOLUTIONS FOR ‘COMPLEX’ PATIENTS The design  company  Hatch  &  Bloom  has  helped   Randers  Hospital  to  improve  the  treatment  of   JVTWSL_WH[PLU[Z^P[OLMÄJPLU[HUKJVVYKPUH[LK treatment  and  better  service  for  both  patients  and   their  relatives.  Using  design  thinking  as  their  starting   point,  the  company  aimed  for  a  holistic,  humancentred  solution.

THE CHALLENGE A complex  patient  is  a  patient  that  has  multiple   diagnoses  and  needs  both  surgical  and  medicinal   treatment.  Complex  diagnoses  demand  a  series  of   simultaneous  examinations  and  treatments.  Many   complex  patients  risk  being  passed  from  unit  to  unit,   without  anyone  taking  any  real  responsibility  for  their   wellbeing.  The  risk  of  confusion  and  counteractive   treatment  is  high,  as  is  the  risk  of  wasting  precious   time  and  expertise.  As  life  expectancy  rises,  the   number  of  complex  (often  elderly)  patients  will   also  rise.

THINK HUMAN

THE PROCESS The design  company  Hatch  &  Bloom  followed  the  staff   at  the  hospital  24/7  for  four  weeks,  mapping  treatmentrelated  procedures  and  processes.  Patients  and  their   relatives  were  asked  about  their  frustrations  and   worries  -  and  what  made  them  happy.  It  soon  emerged   that  it  wasn’t  the  patient  but  the  organisation  that  was   JVTWSL_,MÄJPLUJ`HUKº[OLZ`Z[LT»V]LYY\SLKO\THUP tarian  considerations,  blocking  a  thought-through   process  that  met  the  needs  of  staff  and  patients.   On  the  basis  of  their  observations,  the  ideas  of  the   staff,  and  interviews  with  experts,  Hatch  &  Bloom  proposed  new  procedures  that  were  then  discussed  by   the  staff,  the  patients  and  their  relatives  in  workshops.   All  the  ideas  that  survived  were  incorporated  in  new   solutions.  It  emerged  that  the  best  way  to  ensure  improved  treatment  was  a  better  collaboration  between   the  medicinal  and  surgical  units.

THE RESULT The process  resulted  in  the  creation  of  two  wards  reserved  for  patients  needing  both  surgical  and  medicinal  

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treatment. In  describing  the  patients,  the  problematic   HKQLJ[P]LºJVTWSL_»^HZYLWSHJLKI`ºO`IYPK»YLÅLJ[PUN a  more  positive,  human  focus.  A  coordinating  consultant  and  expert  nurse  were  appointed  to  ensure  that   there  was  always  a  contact  person  with  the  relevant   know  ledge.  An  interdisciplinary  collaboration  PR   campaign  was  launched,  and  physical  products,  like   colour-coded  medical  records,  InfoCard  key  rings,   quick  guides,  manageable  notice  boards,  new  name   badges,  and  a  cosy  day  room  were  also  part  of  the   solution.

THE VALUE The solutions  were  creative  but  cheap  and  simple   –  and  they  work.  Hybrid  patients  are  given  the  right   treatment  and  discharged  much  faster  thanks  to  improved  coordination.   Eight  months  after  imple  men  tation,  the  average  hospital  stay  had  already  been  reduced  by  18%.  And  most   importantly,  being  in  hospital  has  become  a  much   more  positive  experience  for  the  patients.

“SHOULD OUR  SURGICAL  DEPARTMENT  AVOID   CO-OPERATING  WITH  OUR  MEDICAL  DEPARTMENTS?   YES  OR  NO?”  ILLUSTRATION:  HATCH  AND  BLOOM

HATCH &  BLOOM  IS  A  DANISH  IDEA  AND  DESIGN  AGENCY  WHO   OPERATES  WITHIN  THE  FIELDS  OF  INSIGHTS,  INNOVATION  AND   COMMUNICATION.  HATCH  &  BLOOM  WORK  WITH  PRIVATE  CORPORATIONS,  NON-PROFIT  ORGANIZATIONS  AND  PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS  IN  ORDER  TO  IDENTIFY  AND  TRANSFORM  THEIR  BRANDS,   PRODUCTS  AND  SERVICES.  WWW.HATCHANDBLOOM.COM.


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CHALLENGE SOCIETY  EXHIBITION  AT  THE  DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE.  PHOTO:  THE  DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE

NEW TIMES, NEW SOLUTIONS The social,  economic,  technological  and  environmental   forces  that  created  the  industrial  age  of  the  past  250   years  are  being  replaced  by  the  forces  that  will  create   the  socio-ecological  age  of  the  21st  century. ;OPZUL^HNLPZUV[KLÄULKI`THZZWYVK\J[PVUHUK individual  consumption,  but  by  societal  needs  and   social  solutions.  Critical  social  challenges,  like  chronic   disease,  care  of  the  elderly,  education  and  increased   mobility,  place  new  demands  on  the  innovation  of  the   future.  It’s  not  only  the  solutions  that  are  social  –  their   creation  is  increasingly  social  too. New  digital  and  social  media  make  the  hierarchies   of  former  times  redundant:  consumers  have  become   producers,  and  open  network  collaborations  between   consumers,  partners  and  companies  are  replacing   closed,  controlled  systems.   )`KLÄUP[PVUZVJPHSZVS\[PVUZHUKZVJPHSPUUV]H[PVU involve  a  lot  of  people.  They’re  not  created  behind  the   closed  doors  of  corporate  experts,  but  are  by  nature  

inclusive, democratic,  shared,  open  and  creative.  A   ZOPM[[OH[PZOPNOS`ZPNUPÄJHU[MVYKLZPNUHUKPUUV]H[PVU>OPSZ[[OLYL»ZUVKV\I[[OH[^LULLK[VÄUK answers  to  the  challenges  of  our  age,  how  we’ll  do   it  is  still  an  open  question.  The  increasing  focus  on   society,  shared  values  and  social  solutions  increases   the  need  to  break  free  of  traditional  models.  New   times  call  for  new  solutions:  new  methods  and  a  new   mindset.   Design  thinking  is  a  mindset  that  sees  things  anew  and   as  a  whole.  Design  thinking  can  interpret  social  changes,  run  dynamic  processes,  and  embrace  complexity.   Design  thinking  is  human-centred  not  technologycentred,  and  is  perfectly  suited  to  our  age.  People  rule.   Technology  is  what  makes  that  possible. The  new  age  will  be  dominated  by  multidisciplinary   innovation  processes.  The  people  involved  and  investPUNPU[OLZLWYVJLZZLZ^PSSILULÄ[MYVT[OLHIPSP[`VM designers  to  integrate  and  facilitate  a  complex  process,  just  as  the  ability  to  develop  real-life  solutions  to   intangible  issues  will  be  a  key,  strategic  tool.

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ARE DESIGN THINKING AND THE CHALLENGES OF SOCIETY ANY OF MY BUSINESS?

YES. IF YOU INTEND TO STAY IN BUSINESS!

CAN DESIGN SAVE THE WORLD?

NO. BUT IT CAN HELP!

WHAT IS DESIGN THINKING ?

DESIGN THINKING IS THE APPROACH AND ANSWER TO CHALLENGES WITH EVERYTHING IN MIND!

SHOULD WE BID FAREWELL TO BAD WELFARE?

YES. DESIGN THINKING CREATES SOLUTIONS THAT MAKE SENSE TO EVERYONE!

ILLUSTRATION AND  STATEMENT:  THE  DANISH  DESIGN  CENTRE


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COPENHAGEN DESIGN WEEK 11

HUMANS AS CO-CREATORS BY GITTE  JONSDATTER,  PARTNER  AT  CROSSROAD  INNOVATION While  co-creative  design  has  been  developing  under   various  isms  over  the  past  half  century,  recent  changes   in  technology  and  social  life  are  changing  the  terms  of   engagement.  

JVSSHIVYH[PUN^P[OM\[\YLJ\Z[VTLYZ[VYLÄUL[OL design and  message.  

GITTE JONSDATTER,  PARTNER  AT  CROSSROAD   INNOVATION,  HAS  BEEN  BRINGING  A  HUMANCENTRED  

In the  early  20th  century  design  was  mainly  practised   by  specialists.  Philosophies  of  why  and  how  designers decide  to  involve  the  people  who  will  ultimately  use   their  products  or  systems  have  evolved  over  time:   from  studying  humans  as  just  one  factor  in  a  complex   Z`Z[LT[VZLLPUN[OLTHZH\UPVUPaLKSHIV\YMVYJL[V negotiate  with,  to  developing  successful  commercial   products  and  services  through  

Rich media  and  social  media  are  shifting  the  relationship  of  ‘designers’  to  ‘humans’  once  again.  As  people   expand  their  networks  of  collaborators  through  online   social  channels  like  LinkedIn  and  Facebook,  the   lines  between  creator  and  consumer  are  blurring  and   NYV\WZVMLU[YLWYLUL\YZHYLZLSMVYNHUPaPUNPU\UWYLdictable  ways.  Where  is  this  going?  No  one  knows  for   sure.  The  only  guarantee  is  that  it  will  disrupt  business   as  usual  –  on  a  scale  unprecedented  since  the  Industrial  Revolution.  

1940s:

1970s-1980s:

HUMAN AS A UNIONIZED LABOUR FORCE

HUMAN AS COMMERCIAL TESTBED

PHOTO: SCANPIX

PHOTO: SCANPIX

PHOTO: THE DANISH DESIGN CENTRE

USABLE SYSTEMS A  natural  extension  of  Taylorism,  Elias  Porter  and   others  at  the  RAND  Corporation  saw  humans  as  one   element  in  a  system:  any  man-made  system,  such  as   air  defence,  could  be  studied  as  a  single  organism  with   sub-elements  that  could  be  optimised.  Humans  were   just  one  of  many  factors  in  the  design:  physical  and   cognitive  factors  that  interacted  with  other  parts  of  the   system.

DEMOCRATIC WORKPLACE The  introduction  of  technology  into  the  workplace  in   Scandinavia  caused  concern  by  unions  about  potential  negative  impacts  on  their  members  if  the  workers   and  their  representatives  were  not  included  in  design   decisions.  NJMF  in  Norway,  DEMOS  in  Sweden,  and   DUE  in  Denmark  mark  Scandinavia  as  the  birthplace   of  a  democratically  motivated  and  politically  enforced   inclusion  of  people  in  design.  

COMMERCIAL DESIGN Involving  customers  in  the  creation  of  products  and   services  either  to  identify  concepts,  estimate  market   adoption  or  guide  design  development  has  become   standard.  Used  extensively  by  the  majority  of  large   companies,  most  design  and  innovation  consultancies   offer  techniques  to  facilitate  the  involvement  of  end   consumers  in  the  design  process.

HUMAN AS PART OF THE MACHINE

APPROACH TO  DEVELOPMENT  STRATEGY  FOR  OVER  10   @,(9:-69*30,5;:302,4*0;0.96<77,7:0(5+3,.6 FOLLOWING  HER  FREELANCE  CAREER  IN  NYC,  IN  2001  SHE   JOINED  IDEO  AS  A  RESEARCH  SPECIALIST.    SHE  WORKED  HERE   UNTIL  RELOCATING  TO  COPENHAGEN  IN  2007.  GITTE  IS  NOW   A  PARTNER  AT  CROSSROAD  INNOVATION,  FOUNDED  IN  2009   TO  HELP  COMPANIES  INTEGRATE  EMERGING  COLLABORATIVE   TECHNOLOGIES  INTO  INNOVATION  PROCESSES.   WWW.CROSSROADINNOVATION.COM

1980+:


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PHOTO FROM  WWW.MUUSE.COM.  DESIGN:  LAURA  BARUËL’S  DRESS:  “JAPANESE  WARRIOR”.

TOMORROW: HUMAN AS ... ? Widespread access  to  the  Internet  means  that  an   increasing  number  of  people  are  using  rich  media  to   form  new  collaborations,  share  ideas,  and  voice  their   opinions  about  just  about  everything.  As  the  global   conversation  becomes  all-access,  companies  are   becoming  more  porous  in  their  team  structures,  more   transparent  in  their  communication,  and  are  forced  

to work  harder  to  ensure  consumers  “like”  them.  As   the  global  network  offers  entrepreneurs  and  customers  easy  access  to  each  other  and  to  suppliers,  the   competitive  advantages  of  big  companies  are  falling   away.  The  power  of  the  customer,  and  of  individuals   to  ‘co-create’  value  together  in  new  ways,  has  never   been  greater.

MUUSE is  on  a  mission  to  launch  entrepreneurial   designers  and  to  change  the  way  fashion  is  produced   and  sold.  An  online  community  for  emerging  design   talent  from  top  fashion  schools  and  people  who  love   fashion,  www.MUUSE.com  invites  people  to  select,   discuss  and  order  limited  edition  pieces  sewn  in   Copenhagen.  

HOW IS NETWORKED CO-CREATION CHANGING INDUSTRIES? BORDERLESS ORGANIZATIONS Companies  become  dispersed  collaborative  environments  that  form  a  workforce  of  freelancers  and  enthusiasts.  Teams  are  distributed  globally  and  collaborate   to  design  and  produce  without  necessarily  meeting   face-to-face.

21ST-CENTURY COTTAGE  INDUSTRIES Individual  designers  use  web  tools  and  access  to  rapid   production  to  overcome  barriers,  launching  ventures   using  their  social  networks.  Funding,  sales,  promotion   and  production  channels  on  the  Internet  mean  that  they   now  have  the  chance  to  compete  with  big  players.

BOBLR Globally  outsourcing   design  response  to  challenges  by   major  companies  creates  a  global   pool  of  freelancers.

KICKSTARTER Crowd  funding  for   LU[YLWYLUL\YZVMHU`ZPaLMVYWLYsonal  projects.

QUIRKY Self-selecting  dispersed   teams  nominated  by  the  crowd   ^VYRMVYZVJPHSHUKÄUHUJPHSYLward. CUUSOO  Enthusiasts  upload  ideas   for  products.  Popular  ideas  are  produced  by  collaborating  companies.

SELLABAND Fans  invest  in  their   favourite  musicians  for  insider   HJJLZZVYHZOHYLVMWYVÄ[Z MUUSE  Emerging  fashion   designers  launch  collections  using   crowd-sourcing  &  pre-order

CAUSE-BASED BUSINESSES *P[PaLUZHYV\UK[OL^VYSK\ZLNYHZZYVV[ZVYNHUPaHtions  to  create  the  change  they  would  like  to  see  and   JVSSHIVYH[LHJYVZZIVYKLYZHUKV\[ZPKLVMVYNHUPaHtions  to  effect  positive  change  that  is  economically   sustainable. COMMON  A  shared  label  brings   PR/business  talents  together  to   launch  social  enterprises. TOM’S  SHOES  Every  pair  sold   equals  a  donation  of  a  pair  to  the   needy  –  the  promise  of  guilt-free   consumerism. TED  Globally  connected  set  of   conferences  spreading  good   ideas  for  free  to  anyone  with  an   Internet  connection.


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A LOT OF SMALL STEPS

COPENHAGEN DESIGN WEEK 11

“GULLSPIRA”  AND  “PELLE”,   DESIGN  BY  HELLA  JONGERIUS.   PHOTO:  IKEA  OF  SWEDEN

THE IKEA VISION IS TO CREATE A BETTER EVERYDAY LIFE FOR MANY PEOPLE. IT’S NOT ONLY ABOUT MAKING GREAT HOME FURNISHINGS. IT’S ALSO ABOUT TAKING SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR IKEA CUSTOMERS, COWORKERS AND THE PEOPLE WHO PRODUCE OUR MANY PRODUCTS.

Here’s a  little  local  story  from  a  big  global  company. IKEA  has  decided  to  help  create  a  world  where  the   company  can  take  better  care  of  the  environment,  the   earth’s  resources,  and  each  other.  Lena  Gaarde,  Head   of  Communication  at  IKEA  Denmark,  explains: “We  know  that  we’re  sometimes  part  of  the  problem,   but  we  work  hard  to  be  part  of  the  solution  too.  It’s   part  of  our  culture  to  constantly  ask  ourselves  how   what  we’re  doing  today  can  be  done  better  tomorrow.   We  weigh  the  pros  and  cons,  continually  examining   and  changing  things.  Lots  of  small  steps  in  lots  and   lots  of  areas  add  up  to  something  big  and  noticeable!   All  the  improvements  we  make  for  a  better  and  more   sustainable  future  is  a  never-ending  job,  but  we’ve   already  started.”   Several  years  ago  IKEA  and  UNICEF  started  setting   up  workshops  for  women  in  India.  Workshops  that   helped  the  women  set  up  small  sewing  businesses   and  helped  their  children  to  go  to  school.  This  collaboration  was  a  huge  inspiration  for  Dutch  designer   Hella  Jongerius: “When  I  heard  about  the  project  in  India  that  created   work  for  women  in  workshops  while  their  children   could  enter  special  schools  in  the  meantime,  I  was  

very enthusiastic.  It  offered  me  the  opportunity  to  not   only  follow  my  own  fascinations  in  work,  but  to  make   a  contribution  to  a  better  world  as  well,”  says   Hella  Jongerius. Based  on  the  IKEA-UNICEF  programme,  Hella   Jongerius  developed  a  series  of  decorative  wall  hangings.  Inspired  by  the  animals  of  Swedish  fairy  tales   –  drawing  on  the  local  roots  of  this  global  company   –  small-scale  craft  production  in  India  is  combined   with  large-scale  industrial  production  by  IKEA.

to learn  and  share  experiences,  accomplishing  more   than  the  company  could  ever  do  working  alone.   At  Copenhagen  Design  Week  2011  you  can  learn  more   about  IKEA’s  experiences  and  achievements,  and  what   the  future  might  bring  when  it  comes  to  sustainable   design  and  human  thinking.

IKEA ALWAYS  DESIGNS  THE  PRICE  TAG  FIRST.  BUT  THE  PRICES   ARE  NOT  LOW  AT  ANY  COST.  IKEA’S  VISION  ALSO  INCLUDES   TAKING  AN  ACTIVE  RESPONSIBILITY  FOR  PEOPLE  AND  THE  

The result  is  textiles  that  not  only  IKEA  and  Jongerius   ILULÄ[MYVTI\[[OH[HSZVOLSW[OLJYHM[Z^VTLU^OV leave  their  mark  in  the  making.  Each  individual  wall   hanging  is  handbroidered  by  one  single  woman.  And   each  comes  with  a  label  with  the  names  of  IKEA,  Hella   Jongerius  and  the  embroidered  name  of  the  woman   who  made  it.

ENVIRONMENT. ESTIMATES  OF  THE  ENVIRONMENTAL  IMPACT  

IKEA AND  CSR At  a  global  and  national  level  IKEA  co-operates  with   UNICEF,  WWF  and  Save  the  Children.  IKEA  also  cooperates  with  companies,  trade  unions,  NGOs  and   other  organisations  to  develop  and  reinforce  the   impact  of  the  company’s  social  and  environmental   work.  These  collaborations  make  it  possible  for  IKEA  

HELLA JONGERIUS  HAS  BECOME  KNOWN  FOR  HER  UNIQUE  

AND THE  SOCIAL  ASPECTS  OF  PRODUCTION  HAVE  BECOME  A   NATURAL  PART  OF  THE  DESIGN  PROCESS.  THE  RESPECT  FOR   THE  ENVIRONMENT  MEANS  THAT  MATERIALS,  PRODUCTION   METHODS  AND  RECYCLABILITY  ARE  MANDATORY  REQUIREMENTS  IN  IKEA’S  DESIGNS.  DESIGN  FOR  PEOPLE,  CREATED  BY   PEOPLE  WITH  RESPECT  FOR  THE  ENVIRONMENT.  WWW.IKEA.DK

FUSION OF  INDUSTRY  AND  CRAFT,  HIGH  TECH,  LOW  TECH   AND  THE  CONTEMPORARY.  HER  WORK  HAS  BEEN  WIDELY   EXHI  BITED  AT  MUSEUMS  AND  GALLERIES  LIKE  THE  COOPER   HEWITT  NATIONAL  DESIGN  MUSEUM  (NEW  YORK),  MOMA  (NEW   YORK),  THE  DESIGN  MUSEUM  (LONDON),  GALERIE  KREO  (PARIS)   AND  MOSS  GALLERY  (NEW  YORK).  WWW.JONGERIUSLAB.COM


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Design Perspective Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yours? Share your inspiration at the crowdsourced Design Perspectives Exhibition.

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A WORLD OF PRAGMATIC UTOPIAS ANDREAS KLOK PEDERSEN, PARTNER AT BIG ARCHITECTS, TALKS TO JANE ROWLEY ABOUT INJECTING HEDONISM INTO VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE THAT TRANSFORMS TRADITIONAL CONCEPTS OF SUSTAINABILITY.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;BUILDING SUSTAINABLY IS NOT ONLY ABOUT REDUCING THE ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF BUILDINGS, BUT ALSO ABOUT RECHANNELING WASTE PRODUCTS INTO OTHER USESâ&#x20AC;? BIG  is  a  company  that  works  on  a  global  scale.  What   JOHUNLZHUKKL]LSVWTLU[ZHYL`V\J\YYLU[S`WHY[VM& Right  now  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  building  in  Asia,  Europe  and  the  US.   In  New  York  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  working  on  the  W57  building  in   4HUOH[[HU[OLPUP[PHSYLHZVU^LZL[\WHUVMĂ&#x201E;JL[OLYL Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  experiencing  a  lot  of  new  opportunities  in  the   US.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  great  climate  for  innovation,  and  in  the  wake   VM[OLĂ&#x201E;UHUJPHSJYPZPZ[OLYLZLLTZ[VILHUL^MV\UK ambition  to  address  real  urban  challenges.   0U(ZPH^LÂť]LZLLUHZOPM[MYVTWYVĂ&#x201E;[KYP]LUMHZ[ paced  construction  to  the  emergence  of  much  higher   architectural  ambitions.  Maybe  the  2008  Olympics  in   Beijing  was  the  turning  point  for  this  change?  Later  this   `LHY^LZ[HY[[OLJVUZ[Y\J[PVUVM[OL:OLUaOLU,ULYN` Mansion,  a  highly  ambitious  project  in  terms  of  both   architecture  and  sustainability.  We  expect  to  be  working   continuously  in  Asia  in  the  future,  meeting  the  challenges  of  the  still  explosive  urban  growth  in  the  region. BIG  operates  with  the  term  Pragmatic  Utopias.   How  do  you  combine  down-to-earth  practicalities   ^P[OOPNOĂ&#x2026;`PUN]PZPVUZ&

We  developed  the  term  Pragmatic  Utopias  during  a   YLZLHYJOWYVQLJ[PU0[YLĂ&#x2026;LJ[ZV\YHTIP[PVU[V YLVYNHUPaLVYYLKLZPNUZVJPL[`[VKYHZ[PJHSS`PTWYV]L quality  of  life  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  while  taking  all  practical  constraints   into  account.  Being  based  in  Denmark,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  used   to  operating  in  a  pragmatic  and  strongly  consensus   driven  context.  The  importance  of  addressing   collective  and  public  interests,  in  both  design  and   communication,  has  always  fuelled  our  projects.   This  has  been  key  to  our  work  in  the  US,  where  architecture  has  traditionally  been  dominated  by  either   generic,  practical  developments  or  visually  sophisticated  and  expensive  buildings.  Here  the  intersection   of  the  practical  and  the  spectacular  represents  a  radically  new  approach. What  role  does  sustainability  play  in  your   utopias? One  of  the  Pragmatic  Utopias  we  developed  was   called  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Little  Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  -  a  small  self-sustaining  neighbourhood  with  a  broad  range  of  urban  programmes.   We  looked  at  the  technical  requirements  of  a  wide   range  of  city  functions,  and  tried  to  create  small  energy  

loops  by  combining  them.  For  us  building  sustainably   is  not  only  about  reducing  the  energy  consumption  of   buildings,  but  also  about  rechanneling  waste  products   into  other  uses.  We  discovered,  for  example,  that  all   [OLMYLLaLYZPUHZ\WLYTHYRL[WYVK\JLLUV\NOZ\YWS\Z heat  to  heat  the  water  in  a  public  swimming  pool.  By   co-thinking  the  two  functions,  we  created  an  outdoor   heated  pool  on  top  of  the  supermarket  so  people   doing  their  shopping  could  look  up  and  see  people   diving  into  the  water  through  the  ceilings. (Z^LSSHZ[OLZ\WLYTHYRL[^LSVVRLKH[VMĂ&#x201E;JL and  residential  buildings.  Danish  homes  take  a  lot   VMLULYN`[VOLH[^OLYLHZVMĂ&#x201E;JLZ\Z\HSS`NLULYH[L surplus  heat.  By  combining  these  different  functions   PUHZPUNSLI\PSKPUN^LJV\SKTPUPTPaLLULYN`JVUsumption,  and  maybe  have  enough  excess  heat  for   new  recreative  functions. How  do  these  ideas  play  out  in  the   Loop  City  project  BIG  has  developed? Loop  City  is  a  new  growth  model  for  the  cross-border   region  between  Sweden  and  Denmark:  an  infrastruc-


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AMAGER BAKKE  WASTE-TO-ENERGY  PLANT.  IMAGE:  BIG  &  GLESSNER.

tural loop  not  only  for  people,  but  also  for  energy,   waste,  water  and  biodiversity.   While  developing  Loop  City,  we  were  invited  to  participate  in  a  competition  for  the  façade  for  a  new   Waste-to-Energy  plant  in  Copenhagen.  The  director   of  the  plant  wanted  to  create  a  public  attraction  and   integrate  the  plant  in  the  recreational  landscape  of   [OLOHYIV\Y>LÄN\YLK[OLI\PSKPUN^HZ[HSSLUV\NO make  a  500m  ski  slope.   So  the  waste  plant  would  not  only  supply  CopenhaNLU^P[O*6UL\[YHSLULYN`P[^V\SKHSZVIL[OLÄYZ[ ski  slope  on  this  scale  in  Denmark.  

The energy  plant  in  Copenhagen  being  a  ski  slope   represents  a  new  fusion  of  the  functional  and  the   recreational  in  urban  architecture.  Here  industry  is  no   longer  displaced  to  the  periphery  of  the  city,  but  starts   to  blend  with  cultural  and  recreational  areas.  In  Copenhagen  we  have  two  large  waste-to-energy  plants  in  the   heart  of  the  city,  burning  all  our  garbage  and  turning   it  into  green  energy  and  clean  smoke.  Something  that   could  become  the  basis  for  new  landmark  buildings   in  cities  all  over  the  world.  Not  necessarily  ski  slopes,   but  projects  formed  by  the  local  climate  and  context   as  new  utopian  recreational  facilities  for  Hedonistic   Sustainability.  

CAREFUL ANALYSIS  OF  HOW  CONTEMPORARY  LIFE  CONSTANTLY  EVOLVES  AND  CHANGES,  NOT  LEAST  DUE  TO  THE   INFLUENCES  OF  MULTICULTURAL  EXCHANGE,  GLOBAL   ECONOMIC  FLOWS  AND  COMMUNICATION  TECHNOLOGIES.   IN  DEVELOPING  NEW  ARCHITECTURE  AND  URBAN  ORGANIZATION  THE  GROUP  CONSTANTLY  SHIFTS  FOCUS  FROM  THE   LITTLE  DETAILS  TO  THE  BIG  PICTURE.  

ANDREAS KLOK  PEDERSEN,  PARTNER  AT  BIG,  MANAGES   MANY  OF  THE  PARTNERSHIP’S  MASTER  PLANS  AND  LARGESCALE  PROJECTS.  ANDREAS  LED  THE  WINNING  SUBMISSION   FOR  THE  NEW  NATIONAL  ART  GALLERY  IN  GREENLAND,   AS  WELL  AS  THE  1,000,000  M2  CO2  NEUTRAL  ZIRA  ISLAND   MASTER  PLAN  IN  AZERBAIJAN.  HIS  PROJECTS  ALSO  INCLUDE  

This project  is  the  ultimate  symbol  of  what  we  call   Hedonistic  Sustainability.  The  concept  is  that  sustainability  is  not  only  about  reducing  our  consumption   of  resources  by  reverting  to  a  less  modern  lifestyle,   but  actually  about  improving  the  quality  of  modern   SPML0[»ZHSZV[OLÄYZ[YLHSL_HTWSLPU3VVW*P[`VMHU energy  plant  being  truly  integrated  in  the  urban  environment.

BIG –  BJARKE  INGELS  GROUP  –  FOUNDED  IN  2005,  IS  A  

THE NEW  TAMAYO  MUSEUM,  REN  PEOPLE’S  BUILDING,  LEGO  

LEADING INTERNATIONAL  PARTNERSHIP  OF  ARCHITECTS,  

TOWERS, KLØVERMARK,  SCALA  LIBRARY,  ARLANDA  HOTEL  

DESIGNERS, BUILDERS  AND  THINKERS  OPERATING  WITHIN  

AND BIG’S  CONTRIBUTIONS  TO  THE  VENICE  BIENNALE  IN  

THE FIELDS  OF  ARCHITECTURE,  URBANISM,  RESEARCH  AND  

2004 AND  2008.  IN  ADDITION  TO  MANAGING  INTERNATIONAL  

DEVELOPMENT. WITH  OFFICES  IN  COPENHAGEN  AND  NEW  

COMPETITIONS AT  BIG,  ANDREAS  TEACHES  ARCHITECTURE  AT  

YORK, BIG  IS  CURRENTLY  INVOLVED  IN  A  LARGE  NUMBER  OF  

THE ROYAL  DANISH  ACADEMY  OF  FINE  ARTS  AND  LECTURES  

PROJECTS THROUGHOUT  EUROPE,  NORTH  AMERICA  AND  

INTERNATIONALLY ON  BIG’S  RESEARCH  AND  PROJECTS.

ASIA. BIG’S  ARCHITECTURE  EMERGES  OUT  OF  A  

WWW.BIG.DK


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PRIMITIVE FUTURE? BY BENEDICTE BROCKS, CURATORIAL COORDINATOR AT LOUISIANA MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.

CHILDREN´S CENTRE  FOR  PSYCHIATRIC  REHABILITATION,  HOKKAIDO,  JAPAN,  2006.  PHOTO:  HISAO  SUZUKI

A NEW TOPOGRAPHY OF ARCHITECTURE Visiting Louisiana  Museum  of  Modern  Art  in  Denmark   inspired  Sou  Fujimoto  to  conceptualise  three  entirely   new  projects.  As  an  architect,  he  was  inspired  by  the   museum’s  relationship  to  topography,  and  the  wealth   of  experiences  generated  by  what  he  saw  as  the   reciprocal  relationship  between  the  natural  and  the   manmade.  As  he  said  when  visiting  the  museum  at   Louisiana,  you  can  explore  the  natural  landscape,   wandering  across  the  rolling  hills  and  through  a  rich   palette  of  trees,  before  descending  into  the  valley   formed  by  the  museum’s  glass  corridor.  Here  the  height   VM[OLJLPSPUNÅ\J[\H[LZHUK[OLÅVVYSL]LSJOHUNLZ creating  a  pulsating  space  on  the  way  to  alien  landscape  of  the  subterranean.  It  was  these  experiences   and  his  memories  of  them  that  inspired  the  projects   TOWER,  CLOUD  and  GLASS  FOREST.   Fujimoto  doesn’t  consider  architecture  as  distinct  form,   but  sees  architecture,  the  landscape  and  urban  life  as   an  integrated  continuum.  Whereas  architects  often  see   buildings  as  objects  rather  than  elements  in  the  landscape,  Fujimoto  looks  for  forms  where  architecture  and   nature  can  coexist  harmoniously,  combining  the  ‘inside’   with  the  ‘outside’. He  has  developed  his  personal  approach  to  architecture  by  returning  to  what  he  calls  the  primitive  states   of  architecture  in  both  elements  and  materials.  In  his   best-selling  book  Primitive  Future  (2008),  he  develops   his  ideas  about  the  cave  and  nest  as  the  origins  of  our   concepts  of  dwelling,  using  these  primitive  forms  to   YL[OPURHUKYLKLÄULHYJOP[LJ[\YLHZZVTL[OPUNILtween  nature  and  artefact.

Combined with  the  Internet,  smartphones  and  an  increasing  awareness  of  sustainability,  Fujimoto  explores   new  ways  for  us  to  live  our  lives  –  combining  these   ‘primitive’  forms  with  architecture  to  create  something   new  for  the  future.  His  design  philosophy  is  based  on   translating  the  potential  of  a  new  lifestyle  into  architecture.  But,  as  he  says:  “I  don’t  know  if  these  kinds   of  buildings  will  be  widespread  in  a  hundred  years,  or   if  they’ll  just  seem  weird.  Architects  can’t  predict  the   future.” Whilst  the  future  might  be  hard  to  predict,  Fujimoto’s   design  philosophy  is  already  making  a  difference  in   the  present.  At  his  award-winning  Children’s  Center   for  Psychiatric  Rehabilitation  in  Hokkaido,  his  unique   sensitivity  to  ‘the  spaces  in  between’  is  very  clear.  Hospitals  are  usually  planned  with  long  corridors  leading  to   small  rooms  on  either  side:  a  system  clearly  designed   from  the  doctor’s  rather  than  the  patient’s  side  of  the   desk.   Fujimoto  switches  perspective.  Using  a  small  village  as   his  model,  he  spent  a  lot  of  time  thinking  about  people’s   wellbeing,  and  especially  the  wellbeing  of  the  children   who  would  be  patients  at  the  hospital.  He  decided  to   create  small  hiding  places  in  corners,  giving  the  children   the  choice  of  when  to  join  the  group  or  game  –  creating   compatibility  and  connections  between  separation  and   participation. He  wanted  to  make  a  space  of  possibility  instead  of   limiting  the  function  of  the  rooms  to  a  single  activity.   Together  with  the  hospital  authorities,  he  developed  a   multiple  space  that  could  have  many  different  meanings   depending  on  the  situation.

Instead of  the  usual  grid,  the  ground  plan  of  the  hospital   was  conceptualised  as  a  forest.  In  a  forest  trees  grow   randomly,  but  it  is  still  possible  to  navigate  the  terrain.   According  to  Fujimoto,  this  combination  of  randomness   and  orientation  can  generate  positive  expectations.   Maybe  something  exciting  is  waiting  just  around  the   corner?  An  unpredictability  that  can  stimulate  people   to  explore  the  space.  There  are  no  demands  superimposed  by  the  architecture.  Instead,  people  should  be   able  to  inhabit  the  space  in  the  same  way  as  they  would   navigate  the  forest  or  landscape. The  article  is  based  on  the  author’s  interview  with  Sou  Fujimoto,   excerpts  of  which  were  published  in  Louisiana  Magasin  (May  2011).   Other  sources  include:  Sou  Fujimoto,  Primitive  Future  (INAX  Publishing,   2008),  Sou  Fujimoto  2003-2010  (EL  Croquis,  May  2011),  and  Jeanne   Rank  Schelde,  ’Architecture  as  Ritualised  Nature’  (University  of   Copenhagen,  2011).

IN 1994  SOU  FUJIMOTO  GRADUATED  AS  AN  ARCHITECT  FROM   TOKYO  UNIVERSITY,  WHERE  HE  NOW  TEACHES.  IN  2000  HE  FOUNDED SOU  FUJIMOTO  ARCHITECTS,  AND  HAS  SINCE  WON  NUMEROUS   AWARDS  INCLUDING  THE  PRIVATE  HOUSE  AWARD  AT  THE  WORLD   ARCHITECTURE  FESTIVAL,  THE  JAPANESE  INSTITUTE  OF  ARCHITECTURE’S  GRAND  PRIZE  (2008)  AND  THE  WALLPAPER  DESIGN  AWARDS   (2009).  IN  2008  SOU  FUJIMOTO  PUBLISHED  THE  BEST-SELLING  BOOK   ‘PRIMITIVE  FUTURE’.  

LOUISIANA –  THE  WORK  OF  SOU  FUJIMOTO  IS  PART  OF  THE  EXHIBITION  LIVING:  ‘FRONTIERS  OF  ARCHITECTURE  III-IV’  PRESENTING   ARCHITECTURE  THAT  RELATES  TO  SHARED  HUMAN  IDEAS  OF  THE   INDIVIDUAL  AND  SOCIAL  NETWORKS.  LOUISIANA  MUSEUM  OF   MODERN  ART,  JUNE  1ST  -  OCTOBER  2ND,  2011.  WWW.LOUISIANA.DK


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Louisiana TOWER  is  a  tower  of  cells  that  can  be  built   on  multiple,  co-existing  and  interrelated  scales,  ranging   from  furniture  to  buildings  to  public  spaces.  Sometimes   the  space  is  condensed,  and  sometimes  it  is  more  open   HUKÅ\PK;OL[V^LYYLÅLJ[Z-\QPTV[V»ZWOPSVZVWO`[OH[ the  constant  interaction  of  contrasts  can  generate  a   multilayered  and  unifying  experience.

PLAN, CHILDREN´S  CENTRE  FOR  PSYCHIATRIC  REHABILITATION,  HOKKAIDO,  JAPAN,  2006

Louisiana CLOUD  is  an  installation  that  explores  the   ZPNUPÄJHUJLVMºZWHJLZIL[^LLUZWHJLZ»;OL^VYR explores  the  meaning  of  the  space  between  rooms  and   buildings  –  in  the  city  and  the  home.  It  also  explores  the   space  between  people,  representing  an  interpretation  of   new  dwelling  forms  that  connect  people.

GLASS FOREST,  LOUISIANA.  PHOTO:  KIM  HANSEN

Louisiana GLASS  FOREST  consists  of  a  complex   structure  of  glass  cells  piled  like  soap  bubbles.  It   suggests  a  new  architectural  terrain  where  multiple,   JOHUNPUN[YHUZP[PVUaVULZHYLSPURLKHUK\USPURLKPU a  transparent  whole.  The  model  has  potential  for   architecture  on  vastly  different  scales,  from  a  single   apartment  to  the  skyscrapers  of  the  future.


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COLOPHON EDITORS ANNEGRETHE RISE THOMSEN / Marketing Manager / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC KRISTINE ANTHONI PETERSEN / Project Assistant / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC

EDITORIAL CURATORS TINA MIDTGAARD / Curator / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC KAREN KJÆRGAARD / Curator / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC

ENGLISH EDITOR JANE ROWLEY / M.A., M.Res.

GRAPHIC ART DIRECTORS TUSS

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CONTRIBUTORS ERIK JUUL / Architect / Erik Juul Architects MADS MØLLER / Architect / Arcgency KARL MALLING GRANOV / Communications Director / INDEX: Design to improve life HENRIK SMEDEGAARD MORTENSEN / Owner / Baisikeli KRISTIAN BYRGE / Co-founder of Muuto JULIEN DE SMEDT / Designer & Architect / JDSA METTE RAMSGAARD THOMSEN / PHD, Associate Professor / Head of CITA GITTE JONSDATTER / Partner / Crossroad Innovation MICHAEL ANKER / Scandinavian CEO / Luceplan MADS KJØLLER DAMKJÆR / Creative Director & Partner / Goodmorning Technology ANDREAS KLOK PEDERSEN / Partner / BIG BENEDICTE BROCKS / Curatorial Coordinator / Louisiana Museum of Modern Art CLAUS RANDRUP / Journalist SANNE HEDESKOV / Project Manager / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC LENE TANGHØJ / Project Manager / Danish Design Centre SUSANNE SØNDAHL WOLFF / Business Development Officer and PR / Danish Design Centre SOLVEIG THRANE-MØLLER / Project Manager / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC MERETE BRUNANDER / Acting CEO / Danish Design Centre TINA MIDTGAARD / Curator / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC KAREN KJÆRGAARD / Curator / Copenhagen Design Week 2011 by DDC RIKKE HOFF / Executive Secretary / Danish Design Centre CO-HABITATION (VI OS HVORDAN VI SKAL BO TÆT) / The Danish Arts Foundation IKEA NOKIA

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Copenhagen Design Week 2011

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