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AfCoP

African Community of Practice Managing for development Results

A Report on the Fifth AfCoP Annual Meeting In partnership with

December 2012, Tunis


Table of contents An Inclusive Framework for Results in Africa 2 Tunis Declaration on the African Platform for Results 3 Keynote Statements

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MfDR for Better Policy Implementation

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Delivering on the Regional Integration Agenda

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Building Capable and Effective States

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Greater Accountability through Demand for Results

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Putting AfriK4R into Action

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Knowledge Sharing for Results 9 Evaluating Results Capacity and Supporting Action Plans Implementation 10 Advocating for Results 10

Conception & rĂŠalisation : www.belmakett.net

A Nexus for Achieving Sustainable Outcomes 11 A Continental Platform for Results

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A Collaborative Governance for AfriK4R

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Fast-Tracking the Implementation of the 2013 Work Plan

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Annexes 16 AfCoP Annual Meeting Agenda 16 Participants List

AfCoP/MfDR

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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results 11-13 December 2012 – Tunis

In partnership with


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

An Inclusive Framework for Results in Africa From 11 to 13 of December 2012, a hundred delegates from across Africa and beyond met in Tunis to set up an African Platform for Results, as well as launch a new framework for action to mainstream Managing for Development Results (MfDR) across the continent and enhance regional integration, starting with two Regional economic communities (RECs): the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU)

representatives of civil society, the private sector, academia, the media and donors) from 43 African countries have joined the AfCoP since its creation in 2007 to make their organizations more results-oriented and accountable. Since 2007, over a hundred case studies on MfDR have been discussed online. Eight AfCoP National Chapters have been established, with the mission of building capacity in MfDR through sharing experiences, networking and building learning relationships.

During the three days of the fifth annual meeting of the African Community of Practice on MfDR, delegates from African governments, civil society organizations, parliaments, the academia and private sector engaged in candid discussions on the push for results taking shape throughout the continent. They shared information on how their organizations increasingly budget with multi-year plans, use performance information to take decision, as well as how citizens hold governments accountable thanks to open data. An emphasis was also put on the involvement of Regional economic communities (RECs) in using MfDR to enhance regional integration.

This report is an official record of the Tunis event. It begins with the Tunis Declaration on the African Platform for Results and is followed by the main messages delivered at the opening ceremony. This section of the document identifies the three main development themes targeted by the AfCoP that have emerged from the meeting, highlighting some of the most illustrative reflections from speakers, panelists and participants. The second part of this document proposes tools to use that will mainstream MfDR across the continent while the last one summarizes the agreement taken to formally organize the AfCoP so that it achieves its stated objectives.

The Tunis Declaration on the African Platform for Results is the main outcome document of this event. It embodies the commitment of results-related networks and capacity building centers to partner together in exchanging knowledge products and conducting joint work. It also commits networks and countries to fully embrace and implement the Africa Knowledge for Results (AfriK4R) initiative that aims to (i) enhance knowledge sharing on MfDR, (ii) make countries more performance-oriented with the launch of national Communities of Practice (CoP), the assessment of MfDR capacity and the support to implement action plans, and (iii) strengthen regional integration with the establishment of two regional-wide CoPs as well as the monitoring of convergence criteria, primarily with the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). This new endeavor will build on the accomplishments of the African Community of Practice (AfCoP) on Managing for Development Results. Its members are change agents who contribute to empowering societal actors by transforming hands-on shared experience into knowledge in order to effect institutional change to improve results. More than 2,500 members (civil servants, parliamentarians,


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Tunis Declaration on the African Platform for Results

Tunis, Tunisia 13 December 2012 We, participants at the fifth Annual Meeting of the African Community of Practice on Management of Development Results (AfCoP-MfDR) 1 and at the launch of the African Platform for Results created as part of the new Africa Knowledge for Results (AfriK4R) Initiative, gathered in Tunis under the auspices of the African Development Bank; Representing African regional and national institutions and organizations from 43 countries – both Frenchspeaking and English-speaking –, as well as international organizations and entities working to enhance international development in the African continent 2; Considering that MfDR is an effective instrument for promoting and supporting development effectiveness across Africa as well as to improving the quality of life of all Africans; Considering that development effectiveness across Africa has been undermined by low political commitment and goodwill, lack of socio-economic convergence, limited national and regional capacities, inadequate stakeholder participation, lack of integration between national policies and regional programs, and lack of development partners’ alignment with regional organizations’ strategies and cross-border challenges; Considering that MfDR, as a public good, can contribute to overcoming the constraints of regional integration by strengthening regional and national capacities and systems, and engaging non-state actors to hold policy makers accountable for results; Considering that the number of sub-regional and private sector organizations currently involved in the African Platform for Results is likely to grow over time so as to better reflect the richness of experience in the MfDR domain across the African continent; Considering that knowledge exchange networks, as providers of results-oriented solutions, are instrumental to the implementation of the post-Busan agenda towards the achievement of sustainable outcomes (MDG, climate change) at the regional and continental levels; Considering that continued and dedicated support by each and every partner will be needed to attain the envisaged AfriK4R objectives; Considering that the AfricK4R Initiative will only be successful if all the partners involved in it have a shared sense of responsibility and mutual accountability, the willingness to learn from each other through a peaceful dialogue; and the respect for the values of diversity, integrity and equality; Have committed to: • Fully endorse the newly created AfriK4R Initiative as well as the African Platform for Results and the new Governing structure that stem from it; • Support the institutional functions associated with the AfricK4R Initiative and ensuring that the tasks and responsibilities assigned to the African Platform for Results will be successfully carried out; • Establish a partnership among ourselves grounded on a genuine commitment to promote MfDR programs and activities throughout the African Continent, both inspired by the principles of accountability and inclusiveness as well as a strong results orientation; • Cooperate with each other to further enhance the capacities of civil society organizations, governments, regional and national communities of practices and institutions with a vested interest in MfDR; 1 MfDR rests of five main pillars: Leadership for Results, Accountability and Partnership, Results-based Planning and Budgeting, Monitoring and Evaluation as well as Statistical Capacity. 2 The meeting participants who are endorsing this declaration include, among other, several African thematic networks, such AfrEA (Monitoring and Evaluation Network); AFRISTAT (Statistical Capacity Networks); AGDEN (Gender Network); ANSA-Africa (Social Accountability Network); APDEV (Leadership for Results Network); and CABRI (Public Finance Reform Network).


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

• Enhance knowledge sharing and building on MfDR; • Make resources available to allow ourselves to work together in harmony to achieve the following results: 1. Influence national processes so as to contribute to the development of capable and effective states for improved delivery of results; 2. Bridge the gap between the “supply side” (government and RECs) and the “demand side” (citizens, advocacy groups and parliament members); 3. Conduct advocacy for greater accountability through an increased demand for results and an integrated resultsbased management; 4. Advance regional integration centered on people with the establishment of Regional Communities of Practice and the monitoring of convergence criteria for effective results; • Share and use MfDR good practices for sustainable change; • Contribute effectively to the AfriK4R Action Plan by also making sure to provide monitoring data that may inform the AfriK4R governing body’s decision-making; • Hold each other accountable for making progress and regularly reporting towards these commitments that will be implemented through the next AfriK4R Action Plan and Strategy; • Strengthen the capacities of government officials, regional economic communities, and non-state actors to help build solid country systems and institutions and to promote accountability and political leadership for results. The participants also express their gratitude to the African Development Bank and the African Capacity Building Foundation for facilitating the organization of this fifth AfCoP Annual Meeting. The participants further express their gratitude to Mr. Amadou Boubacar Cissé (Minister of State for Planning, Regional Development and Community Development of Niger) and Mr. Peter Kenneth (Assistant Minister of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 of Kenya) for taking the time to take part in our deliberations.

Tunis, 13 December 2012


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Keynote Statements Eminent keynote speakers delivered important messages which are instrumental to the AfCoP development. These were preceded by opening remarks from Mr. Simon Mizrahi, Director of the Quality Assurance and Results Department with the African Development Bank (AfDB), who outlined the objectives of the meeting, followed by Mr. Abdou Karim Lo, former Senegalese Delegate to State Reform and Technical Assistance and AfCoP Co-Chair, who reminded participants of the AfCoP contribution to MfDR for the past five years. Mr. Zondo Sakala, Vice-President of the AfDB, stated that “putting results first in Africa is instrumental to the continent’s transformation agenda based on a vision for a new Africa aspiring to be a stable, integrated and prospering continent of competitive, diversified and sustainably growing economies. He reminded participants that the AfCoP is a concrete example that breathes life into the vision of the2010 Tunis Consensus on Development Effectiveness, which aims at a development driven by strong and inclusive private sectorled growth, effective and accountable states, stronger economic integration and South-South learning. This fifth AfCoP annual meeting would further implement this vision through defining a framework for action to support institutional reforms in Africa with a focus on regional integration. In light of AfCoP’s clear potential for impact, the VicePresident reminded that the AfDBis now granting support to the AfCoP to implement its activities in partnership with the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF). This funding is designed to strengthen African countries’ capacities to manage for development results. This means supporting them to design their strategies, projects and programs in a way that delivers measurable and concrete change for their populations. The grant also supports RECs and their member countries to hasten implementation of results-oriented regional policies. The Vice-President welcomed the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and their member countries, as the first two RECs to commit

themselves to move toward MfDR with the AfCoP. This effort will be led with results-related networks and capacity building centers as the AfCoP is offering to provide partners with an African Platform for Results. He further noted that by drawing on shared experience to reform institutions and improve results, the 2,500 AfCoP members are driving change themselves and empowering others to do so. This is the kind of focused and practical cooperation that African nations need to help them raise governance standards and improve service delivery, he said. Mr. Sakala emphasized the historical significance of the AfCoP meeting. By demonstrating a shared determination to build strong and reliable institutions and create a culture of results that infuses all areas of public affairs, countries have an opportunity to enhance service delivery and overcome the challenges of effectiveness and accountability for inclusive growth. Before officially declaring open the 5thAfCoP, the Vice President concluded his remarks by insisting that the time for results in Africa is now and that development partners and countries must seize it. Mr. Peter Kenneth, Assistant Minister of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 for Kenya, and Member of Parliament, presented his analysis of the value added of knowledge sharing on MfDR. He noted that since he established the Kenyan Community of Practice on MfDR two years ago, a proliferation of collaborative spaces for learning and exchanging development solutions has led to significant improvement in the quality of service delivery. This effort contributed to increasing closer understanding of development challenges and demystifying government operations to the private sector and Civil society organizations (CSOs). The Kenyan CoP has drawn membership from various development stakeholders and involved them in enriching the preparation and validation of policy documents and reports, on issues ranging from budgetary discussions to implementing performance contracts. Mr. Kenneth recalled that Kenya has embarked on results-based management for over a decade now and is closely monitoring the implementation of its Vision 2030 through the National Integrated Monitoring and Evaluation System (NIMES). By choosing to


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

embrace the culture of performance measurement, the government is demonstrating its commitment to greater scrutiny he asserted Dr. Frannie Leautier, Executive Secretary of the Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), reminded participants that her organization is partnering with the AfCoP to manage its knowledge sharing activities. ACBF exists for now twenty-five years and its staff is dedicated to collecting good practices and understanding ways to tackle bottlenecks for the benefit of civil servants. Why is the AfCoP important, she asked. The strategic value of the AfCoP is that once you uncover a success story and map out its DNA, then you can start thinking about scaling it up in other institutions, countries and RECs. ACBF will target strategic learners for the AfCoP, whom are in charge of planning, budgeting, evaluating and taking decisions. Above all, the most important target group will be political leaders. If politicians have stories to tell about policies and the results chain that happened as a result, this gives room for a democratic competition that supports the African transformation agenda, she asserted.

AfCoP/MfDR

Mr. Amadou Boubacar Cisse, State Minister, Minister for Planning, Regional Development, and Community Development, from Niger recalled the strategic role of the AfCoP. Since its launch in 2007, the AfCoP has established a platform for sharing of results experiences and to strengthen capacity. As of December 2012, 43 out the 54 African countries are part of this endeavor which is now made of over 2,500 decisions makers, civil servants as well as development stakeholders from the civil society, the private sector, the media and the academia. He reminded participants that Niger is a role model for the AfCoP. The country launched its CoP in 2008 and has since then considerably raised awareness on the need for MfDR, notably through holding a week-long learning event on results with hundreds of participants. Thanks to the involvement of the influential members of the Niger CoP, this has translated into a real push for results from the government. State Minister Cisse then demonstrated that Niger now returns to planning for results to reconcile the imperatives of economic management and adequate resources. A 2035 long term strategy is being developed and its implementation will be closely monitored to ensure that performance information feeds into development policies and be accountable to the achieved results. The State Minister called on African countries, who own the AfCoP, to fully support and contribute to the AfCoP so as to mainstream MfDR across the continent and enhance regional integration.


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MfDR for Better Policy Implementation Delivering on the Regional Integration Agenda The potential to jumpstart regional integration in Africa through proper use of results-based management practices and bringing about a results culture is high. Africa’s regional integration vision has not been implemented apace with that of other developing regions. The continent still accounts for a fraction of world trade and its intra trade remains low as compared to other continents.

The two RECs serve as pilot organizations before others embark on the MfDR journey to give rise to more effective regional convergence and policies. They will do so through:

The AfCoP chose to help overcome the regional integration challenges by strengthening regional and national capacities and systems, and engaging non-state actors to hold policy makers accountable for results, hence promoting political leadership for regional results. Lamine N’Dongo, AfCoP Secretariat Coordinator, explained how the AfCoP is partnering to that effect with two Regional economic communities (RECs), the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). The partnership will focus on the following limited set of development themes: (i) effective institutions and public financial management systems, (ii) trade facilitation and free movement of factors, (iii) business environment and (iv) sustainable development (MDGs, climate change).

• Establishing regional CoPs to promote knowledge sharing on achieving results among countries of the same region;

• Developing a regional scorecard to fast track convergence around a set of common goals and provide key public offices with coaches in support of improving specific indicators;

• Using regional clusters focusing on parliamentarians and representatives of the civil society, private sector, youth and gender to carry out advocacy actions that will accelerate the implementation of the targeted regional policies; • Implementing regional peer review systems to motivate countries in achieving better performance. This goes in line with how RECs are moving forward. Anne Ndirangu, Monitoring and Evaluation expert with COMESA, states that her REC “needs to have its own strategy so that donors can support its agenda.” She stresses the disconnect between political will, decisions and implementation, and asserts that it is regional and national civil servants’ job to ensure that regional decisions are incorporated into national development policies, along with the involvement of CSOs and parliamentarians. Aly Coulibaly, representing WAEMU, outlines in the same spirit the need for systems that can support and help countries implementing MfDR.

Building Capable and Effective States Improved service delivery is fundamental to manage for development results and yet institutions too often overlook this aspect. A strong public sector that focused on delivering public good and services will be likely to mobilize adequate resources and implement quality regulations and policies. The focus on achieving results requires the public sector to integrate a results focus across its management cycle – planning, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Participants highlighted as one of the key challenges in building results-oriented institutions the need for leadership and drivers of change to bring about meaningful results.

Empowering people and holding them accountable for the desired outcome is needed for change. This thrust for leadership was stressed even before the need to have the right tools and skills readily available. For that to happen, the AfCoP Co-Chair and former Senegalese Delegate for State Reform, Abdou Karim Lo recognizes that “Africa lacks strong leaders which results in hindering development efforts. A leader is someone who inspires and mobilizes in favor of a vision to achieve results.” Incentives can help in that regards he acknowledges


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

Participants noted the specific challenges related to building the basic public sector infrastructure in fragile states. They recalled that each fragile country faces its own challenges and that made-to-measure support needs to be provided. Implementing key actions to build capable and effective states is certainly a good step, but there is a strong need to conduct proper evaluations of these interventions to assess their performance.

AfCoP/MfDR

Nermine Wally, Chair of the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA), mentions the possibility of developing evaluation methodologies that are ‘made in Africa’ and tailored to local needs. She stated that MfDR is useful when contextualized into a national reform agenda.

Greater Accountability through Demand for Results Africa is the continent facing the highest challenges and opportunities in enhancing accountability mechanisms. Valuable accountability practices across countries exist and new locally adapted tools are being deployed that will bring scale and impact. Greater accountability from the power holder and institutions leads to better service delivery, decision making and allocation of resources. A series of tools and practices was listed by participants as effective in improving accountability. This is the case especially for participatory budgeting, public-expenditure, the monitoring of performance and public service delivery as well as the use of citizen advisory boards. It is agreed that many challenges hinder the ability for greater accountability. Assessing the extent to which a country is accountable to its citizens remains too often subjective. Parliaments as well as CSOs too often lack the capacity to hold the government to account. Media proves to have a limited ability to monitor government’s performance and expose its misdeeds.

Peter Kenneth, member of the Kenyan parliament, highlighted a key issue for accountability. He explained that Eastern African countries too often allow parliament members to be both a member of the executive and of the parliament, thus hindering their ability to provide a clear and honest check and balances of the government activities. Eventually, Richard Ssewakiryanga, Executive Director with the Uganda National NGO Forum, reminded participants that accountability is at the heart of the government ability to conduct its activities. Citizens need to trust their government and to have full access to information on how it implements its policies.


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Putting AfriK4R into Action AfriK4R Defined The AfCoP launched the Africa knowledge for results (AfriK4R) initiative to strengthen MfDR country capacity and mainstream MfDR in support of institutional reforms. The continent is replete with good practices in MfDR, but significant disparities exist across countries. Countries would strongly benefit from the sharing of these good practices and ultimately enhance policy performance and regional integration.AfriK4R offers the following main components that apply at the country, institutional and/or regional levels: • assessment tools to define capacity gaps and implement actions with the support of coaches to achieve key objectives; • performance measurement and reporting system of RECs’ member countries against a set of convergence policies, with a space for review, dialogue and accountability; • platform for knowledge sharing and mutual learning on good practices; and • training package on MfDR tools and approach to strengthen the capacity of the stakeholders.

Knowledge Sharing for Results As change agents who contribute to empowering societal actors by transforming hands-on shared experience into knowledge in order to effect institutional change to improve results, AfCoP members have a prime responsibility in contributing to knowledge exchange on MfDR. As a matter of fact, the AfCoP was established with the strong belief that the inputs to sustainable development go well beyond financial co-operation. The 2011 Busan Outcome Document on Development Effectiveness recognized that even more by encouraging the development of networks for knowledge exchange, peer learning and coordination as a means of facilitating access to important knowledge pools by developing countries. This effort exists since 2007 with the AfCoP to help countries engage in the exchange of knowledge so that countries both receive and provide development results solutions that are locally adapted and appropriate to country contexts. This AfCoP activity will be coordinated and managed by a team located at the Africa Capacity Building Foundation in Harare, Zimbabwe. It will focus on the main MfDR pillars, from monitoring and evaluation to planning and budgeting, as well social accountability and leadership, with a focus on regional integration.

Participants in the AfCoP meeting also further identified development areas of focus that will lead to creating thematic teams for effective knowledge exchange and case stories. Three development themes have been identified – youth, gender and climate change. A series of knowledge exchange articles and case stories will identify how MfDR solutions can help achieve results. In addition to national communities of practice on MfDR, regional CoPs will be created among member states of the COMESA and the WAEMU. They will be established in the first semester of 2013 with the goal of sharing regional practices and promoting the convergence of strategic indicators, results-focused regional programs and harmonized performance standards. In line with the work conducted since 2007, high level fora will be held at the continental level to exchange experiences, share good practices and enhance the buyin of senior African decision-makers. This exchange will also be conducted online, focused on regional priorities. Countries that outperform others will provide opportunities for sharing their experience, taking into account contextual differences.


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

Evaluating Results Capacity and Supporting Action Plans Implementation To bring about a results culture and real change with MfDR in countries, AfCoP members demanded that new tools to assess results capacity and help them reinforce tools and skills be developed as part of the new AfCoP project. Building on the successes and challenges of resultsrelated assessment tools used by countries as well as development partners for at least half a decade now, the AfCoP is developing assessment tools that will be applied at regional, country and institutional levels. Following these assessments, a team of coaches will accompany officials in implementing key decisions following the rapid results approach that has already been spearheaded by few African countries. The proposed methodologies were presented and are articulated around three main readiness assessment tools: the Country Readiness Assessment Tool, the Institutional Readiness Assessment Tool, and the Convergence criteria of the performance of RECs’ member states. The methodologies have been designed with the idea that they should: • be evidence-based and focused on the gap between the legal framework and compliance to it, • build consensus on priorities in a participatory approach, • be simple and comprehensive in that it takes into account all elements of the project cycle.

The tools revolve around the assessment of the following five pillars: planning, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, as well as leadership, accountability and partnership. They are based on five-point scales that represent the different stages from none to full implementation of a given MfDR dimension. Assessing the capacity and defining an action plan is vital to understanding the MfDR strengths and weaknesses of a given institutions, but countries have to implement rigorous actions and reforms to reinforce MfDR capacity and deliver concrete development results. This is where the need to skillfully manage change comes. To that effect the Rapid Results Approach (RRA) was presented to delegates. This process is based on three steps: (i) providing the enabling conditions for teams in charge of implementing strategies and action plans, (ii) jump-starting a complex reform and accelerating its implementation, and (iii) institutionalizing effective practices and changes leading to achieving the expected development goals as well as sustaining the momentum for results. The RRA aims to achieve results quickly through creating pressure for outcomes and innovation. It sets up a temporary governance structure with clear roles and mobilizes teams to achieve meaningful and challenging results in 100 days or less, with the support of coaches.

Advocating for Results At the onset, the AfCoP’s role was not only to facilitate the exchange of good practices across the continent, but also to influence policy makers and resource allocation decisions within political and administrative office in favor of managing for development results, a too little known public sector management process. Its members and national chapters advocate in favor of moving toward fully implementing MfDR. This advocacy work will be from now on further developed by regional clusters. Formed essentially from the existing bodies of the RECs, including parliamentarians, civil

society, the private sector, and associations of women and youth, these clusters will carry out follow-up and advocacy actions to accelerate the implementation of the agreed regional policies. Both vertical and horizontal structures will be set up. Five vertical themes will be developed with the support of results-related networks. They will focus on monitoring and evaluation, planning and budgeting, statistical capacity, leadership and partnership and accountability. Key horizontal themes will also be debated with a results focus, among which gender, climate change and youth.


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A Nexus for Achieving Sustainable Outcomes A Continental Platform for Results Given its holistic approach to managing for development results, the AfCoP has an opportunity to build bridges between networks focusing on results and accountability themes. This provides with a chance to draw upon experiences across sectors and thematic areas, to exchange lessons on effective practice, and promote a common understanding on managing for results and greater accountability. Representatives of results-related networks participated in the AfCoP meeting and committed to contribute to the AfCoP through a newly created mechanism: the Continental Platform for Results. This platform stems from the fact that although many knowledge networks already generate information on managing for development results, they focus on specific MfDR areas, such as monitoring and evaluation (African Evaluation Association, Africa Gender and Development Evaluators Network), public financial management (Collaborative Africa Budget Reform Initiative), or accountability (Affiliated Network for Social Accountability). This growing number of networks focusing on specific results and accountability-related themes mirrors the growing interest from countries across the continent to engage in these fields. A body of evidence and theory on these issues has developed, with networks focusing on all or specific parts. These networks accepted the AfCoP offer to act as a knowledge connector for results- and accountability-related networks for more sustainable outcomes given its wider focus.

This will help overcome the issue of seeing networks acting independently from one another ,even when their mandates and geographic area of focus overlap, thus hindering their ability to build from others work and benefit from crossfertilization. In addition, network members themselves, be they individuals or institutions, often do not share the contributions they make on one network with other likeminded networks. The cross-posting of activities would, however, be beneficial to the networks as well as to their members. The African Platform for Results will connect the AfCoP with other networks through: • Posting new materials from the AfCoP online platform to other ones, and vice-versa. • Individuals and organizations working across several communities of practice will function as connectors to help cross-fertilize and exchange knowledge. • Networks working together to achieve economies of scale and avoid duplicating initiatives. • Running joint analyses, developing webinars maintaining online libraries and documenting cases. • Hosting speakers participating in other networks during national chapters events, and then bringing the knowledge back to the AfCoP continental level.

Results Partners’ Main Commitments in the Tunis Declaration A range of results-related networks and capacity building centers committed to: • Endorsing the AfriK4R initiative and the African Platform for Results; • Actively contributing to the African Platform for Results; • Establishing a partnership to promote MfDR programs and activities in Africa; • Cooperating to enhance results capacity of CSOs, governments and RECs; • Enhancing MfDR knowledge sharing; • Making resources available to: e) Influence national processes for the development of capable and effective states and for improved delivery of results; f) Bridge the gap between the “supply side” of results (government and RECs) and the “demand side” (citizens, advocacy groups and parliament members); g) Conduct advocacy activities for greater accountability; h) Enhance regional integration with Regional Communities of Practice and the monitoring of convergence criteria for effective results;


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

A Collaborative Governance for AfriK4R The AfCoP is a member-drive community which defines its own strategy and action plan. A core group of members commit their time and efforts to implement this action plan and bring the AfCoP agenda into another level. Given the new AfCoP scope and because its Core Management Team faced challenges, a new internal management structure was approved at the AfCoP meeting to move forward the agenda. This Core Management Team of the AfCoP moves from a team made of more than twenty-five members in charge of micro-managing tasks to one made of nine members in

charge of setting the strategic direction of the community. The nine members of the new AfCoP Core Management Team were nominated and approved keeping in mind geographical and gender considerations. They represent the five African sub-regions: Western, Northern, Eastern, Central and Southern Africa. In addition, representatives of the RECs from COMESA and WAEMU are also taking part in this to help move forward the AfCoP’s regional integration agenda. Two Co-Chairs have also been nominated.

Composition of the AfCoP Core Management Team Co-Chairs Ledule Bosch, South Africa, Department for Public Service and Administration Monitoring and Evaluation Unit, Chief Director

Seydou Yayé, Niger, Ministry of Planning and Land Management, Planning Department, General Director

Sub-Regional Representatives East Africa Richard Ssewakiryanga, Uganda, Uganda National NGO Forum, Executive Director

Southern Africa Solomon Mhlanga, Zimbabwe, Office of the President and the Cabinet, Modernization

West Africa Maïga Mahamadou Zibo, Mali, Country Capacity Strengthening Plan for Strategic Management of Development, Coordinator, CoP Mali Chair

North Africa Aziz Ould Dahi, Mauritania, National Health Insurance Fund, Director

Central Africa Alexandre Barro Chambrier, Gabon, National Assembly, Member of Parliament

RECs Representatives

COMESA: Anne Ndirangu, Monitoring and Evaluation Expert

WAEMU: Aly Coulibaly, Strategic Planning Department, Strategic Planning and Budget Programming Head


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The Core Management Team may also be involved in spearheading or approving tasks such as: identify a variety of topics for online discussions; Provide guidance and input on AfCoP analytical work; providing guidance in organizing learning events; promote AfCoP membership; and provide technical guidance to National CoP. They will closely work with the AfCoP Secretariat to that effect.

An Advisory Board has also been created with key partners of the Africa Platform for Results, as well as the former AfCoP Core Management Team Co-Chairs. This committee will respond to thematic requests and help validate knowledge sharing work programs. It is expected that this structure will remain flexible so as to avoid over-burdening networks in their partnership with the AfriK4R initiative.


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

Composition of the Advisory Committee Members of the Advisory Committee have been identified to represent key MfDR themes, with the idea that it should be made up of both a partnering network and an AfCoP member, including the two former AfCoP Co-Chairs NETWORKS REPRESENTATIVES

AfCoP REPRESENTATIVES

Monitoring and Evaluation, Statistics

Boureima Gado, AfrEA, Regional representative for West Africa

Oumarou Elhadji Malam Soule, AFRISTAT, Expert

Samson Machuka, Kenya, Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Director, former AfCoP Co-Chair, Kenya CoP Chair

Planning and Budgeting

Neil Cole, CABRI Executive Secretary

William Rukundo, Rwanda, Consultant

Florence Nazare, New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), Capacity Development, African Platform on Development Effectiveness, Head

Abdou Karim Lo, Senegal, former Delegate for State Reform and Technical Assistance, former AfCoP Co-Chair

Jacqueline Nzisabira, Affiliated Network for Social Accountability, Institute for Democracy in Africa (IDASA), Head of Human Right and Democratization Unit

Sheka Bangura, Sierra Leone, PhD candidate

Adeline Sibanda, Zimbabwe, African Gender and Development Evaluators’ Network (AGDEN), Treasurer

Mafing Kone, Mali, Ministry of Environment, German International Cooperation (GIZ), CoP Mali Coordinator

Leadership

Accountability

Gender


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Fast-Tracking the Implementation of the 2013 Work Plan The African Development Bank partnership with the AfCoP The AfDB is a key partner of the AfCoP since its establishment in 2007 and directly contributed to the setting up of its national chapters. To reinforce its contribution to mainstreaming MfDR and enhancing regional integration through the use of results-based management, the AfDB is now providing a thirteen million dollar African Development Fund grant to that effect, which will be fully implemented by end of 2015. This project has three main components: linking MfDR knowledge to regional processes, synergies between regional and national processes, and knowledge sharing; the latter being implemented by the Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF). The 2013 AfCoP work plan that was presented and agreed at the meeting counts a series of key deliverables that will jumpstart the project implementation as well as contribute to mainstreaming MfDR across Africa and enhance regional integration. Half of the scheduled work plan activities are expected to be delivered by June 2013 and the other half by December 2013. The following three main work streams will be implemented with a set of activities: • Enhancing regional integration into WAEMU and COMESA member states through: - Establishing Regional CoPs to share good practices on MfDR and policy convergence, - Finalizing methodologies on readiness assessment and performance standards and training trainers to it, - Setting up regional clusters for advocacy actions, - Strengthening capacity and mutual learning at regional level. • Building MfDR capacity at country level through: - Establishing national CoPs to infuse a results culture in countries, - Conducting readiness assessments and action plans in countries,

- Organizing MfDR training events and implement action plans with coaches, - Running high level seminars to secure government buy-in. • Knowledge sharing through: - Conducting online discussions and publishing their findings, - Preparing guidelines and tools on key MfDR themes and emerging practices, - Establishing regional platforms on trade facilitation and public financial management, - Organizing the first Africa forum.


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African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

AfCoP Annual Meeting Agenda

AfCoP Fifth Annual Meeting Putting Results First in Africa December 11-13, 2012 – Tunis, Tunisia

DAY 1: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2012 Theme 1: MfDR for Improving People’s Lives 8:30

Registration The entire AfCoP annual meeting will be facilitated by Amadou Mahtar Ba.

09:0-9:10

 elcome Address and Meeting Introduction W • Simon Mizrahi, Simon Mizrahi, Director, Quality Assurance and Results Department (ORQR) • Abdou Karim Lo, Senegal, AfCoP Co-Chair, Former Delegate for State Reform and Technical Assistance

09:10-09:50

 eynote Statements K • Peter Kenneth, Kenya, Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Assistant Minister, Member of Parliament • Amadou Boubacar Cissé, Niger, Ministry of State for Planning, Regional Development, and Community Development, Minister • Dr Frannie Léautier, Africa Capacity Building Foundation, Executive Secretary • Zondo Sakala, African Development Bank, Vice-President

09:10-9:50

PANEL DISCUSSION: African Leadership for Results • Peter Kenneth, Kenya, Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Assistant Minister, Member of Parliament • Amadou Boubacar Cissé, Niger, Ministry of State for Planning, Regional Development, and Community Development, Minister • Zondo Sakala, African Development Bank, Vice-President • Abdou Karim Lo, Senegal, AfCoP Co-Chair, Former Delegate for State Reform and Technical Assistance

10:30-10:45

Tea/Coffee Break

10:45-11:00

 friK4R – A Nexus for Achieving Sustainable Outcomes A • AfCoP Secretariat

11:00-13:00

PANEL DISCUSSION: Regional Dimension of Managing for Results President • Amadou Boubacar Cissé, Niger, Ministry of State for Planning, Regional Development, and Community Development, Minister Members • Diomande Kanvaly, Côte d’Ivoire, Prime Minister Office, Economic Adviser • Anne Ndirangu, COMESA, Monitoring and Evaluation Expert • Aly Coulibaly, UEMOA, Strategic Planning and Budget Programming Head • Alex Rugamba, African Development Bank, Regional Integration and Trade Department (ONRI)

13:00-14:00

Lunch Break

14:00-15:30

PANEL DISCUSSION: Building Capable and Effective States for Improved Delivery of Results President • Momar Aly Ndiaye, Senegal, State Reform and Technical Assistance Delegation, Delegate Members • Ledule Bosch, South Africa, Department for Public Service and Administration, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Director • Nermine Wally, African Evaluation Association (AfREA), President • Ndoumbe Lobe, African Development Bank, Governance, Economic and Financial Management Department (OSGE), Director • Neil Cole, Collaborative Africa Budget Reform Initiative, Executive Secretary • Samson Machuka, Kenya, AfCoP Co-Chair, Ministry of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Director


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15:30-15:45

Tea/Coffee Break

15:30-15:45

PANEL DISCUSSION: Greater Accountability through Demand for Results President • Peter Kenneth, Kenya, Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Assistant Minister Members • Richard Ssewakiryanga, Uganda, Uganda National NGO Forum, Executive Director • Alexandre Barro Chambrier, Gabon, National Assembly, Member of Parliament • Jacqueline Nzisabira, South Africa Head of Human Rights and Democratization Unit IDASA (ANSA-Africa) • Gideon Kaunda, Tanzania, Private sector • Ginette Ursule Yoman, African Development Bank, Quality Assurance and Results Department (ORQR), Gender and Social Development, Division Manager

DAY 2: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 09:00-9:10

Overview of Day 2 • AfCoP Secretariat

09:10-10:30

Driving National Results Initiatives with the AfCoP Monitoring Progress of National Plans • Winza Muzyamba Mwauluka, Zambia, Ministry of Finance and National Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Chief M&E Improving Public Sector Performance • Abdel Aziz Ould Dahi, Mauritania, National Health Insurance Fund, Director Integrated Results-Based Management • Munyaradzi Rwakurumbira, Zimbabwe, Office of the President and Cabinet, Modernization Department, Deputy Director Mutual Accountability • Ronald Nkusi, Rwanda, Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning, External Finance Unit, Director

10:00-10:30

Tea/Coffee Break

10:45-12:15

ROUNDTABLES: AfriK4R’s Multi-Layered Approach to Development Results Participants will convene in break-out sessions to discuss the following themes in greater depth: ROUNDTABLE 1: Accountability and Results for Development Effectiveness – A Post-Busan Agenda Facilitator: Richard Ssewakiryanga, Uganda, Uganda National NGO Forum ROUNDTABLE 2: Knowledge Exchange Networks as Providers of Results-Oriented Solutions Facilitator: Ledule Bosch, South Africa, Department for Public Service and Administration, Monitoring and Evaluation Department, Director ROUNDTABLE 3: Strengthening Regional Integration and Convergence through Managing for Results • Facilitator: Seydou Yaye, Niger, Ministry of Planning, Planning Director ROUNDTABLE4 : Achieving Sustainable Outcome (MDGs, Climate Change) with Results-Based Management • Facilitator: Adeline Sibanda, Adeline Sibanda, African Gender and Development Evaluators’ Network

12:15-13:00

Plenary Session: Report Back from Roundtables

13:00-14:00

Lunch Break

14:00-15:30

AfriK4R: A Continental Coalition for Results • Working session to establish solid partnerships among results-related networks to be facilitated by Abdou Karim Lo, Senegal, AfCoP Co-Chair.

15:30-15:45

Tea/Coffee Break


18

African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

15:45-17:00

Collaborative Governance for AfriK4R Working session to agree on internal decision-making processes involving all partners, with the aim of creating a Steering Committee for AfriK4R and thematic working groups, facilitated by Devendra Parsad Ruhee, Mauritius, Former AfCoP Co-Chair.

19:00-21:00

Cocktail

DAY 3: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 08:00-8:10

Welcome and Technical Meeting Objectives • AfCoP Secretariat

08:10-10:00

Discussing the Development of a New African Assessment Tool for Results • Marco Varea, Consultant

10:00-10:15

Tea/Coffee Break

10:15-11:45

Implementing a Country Action Work Plan with the Rapid Results Approach • Benjamina Randrianarivelo, World Bank Institute, Operations Officer

11:45-12:00

Closing Remarks

12:00-13:00

Lunch


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Participants List Benin

Burundi

Adam Bonitessi

Ciza Antonine Batungwanayo

National Assembly Parliament Member Network of Parliamentarians for NEPAD, Head bonitessia@yahoo.fr

Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning Forecasting Department Director cizatony@yahoo.fr

Ernest Comlan Pedro

Emile Nimpaye

Civil Society Organizations in Francophone Africa (OSCAF) Better Aid Assistant Coordinator lpenesco@yahoo.fr

Second Vice-Presidency National Aid Coordination Committee Database and Monitoring & Evaluation Expert nimpaye.emile@yahoo.fr

Joel Darius Eloge Zodjihoue Ministry of Finance Budget Reform Head zodajo@yahoo.fr

Permanent Secretariat for Economic and Social Reform Monitoring Technical Adviser tufrancoise@yahoo.fr

Ministry of Planning External Resource Coordination Director RDC CoP, Chair AfCoP Core Management Team Member theo_kanene@yahoo.fr

Burkina Faso

Cameroon

Egypte

Aly Coulibaly

Serge Eric Yakeu

Nermine Wally

Wester African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA) Strategic Planning Department Strategic Planning and Budget Programming Head gilles.sanou@uemoa.int

African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Board Member seyakeu@yahoo.fr

African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) President nerminewally@gmail.com

Côte d’Ivoire

France

Ezechiel Bah

Michelle Marlard

Ministry of Economy and Finance Budget Reform and Public Spending Modernization Director ezekielbah@yahoo.fr

Ministry of Economy and Finance General Directorate of the Treasury Development Activities Evaluation Unit Michelle.MARLARD@dgtresor.gouv.fr

Kanvaly Diomande

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Development Centre Regional Cooperation Africa Papa-Amadou.SARR@oecd.org

Amadou Diallo Ministry of Economy and Finance Aid Effectiveness Coordinator Director amadouyaya@yahoo.fr

Adiza Lamien Ouando African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Secretary adouando@gmail.com

Evence Eymard Kabre Burkina Faso CoP, Chair AfCoP Core Management Team Member afcop_burkina@yahoo.fr

Halidou Ouedraogo Ministry of Economy and Finance Research and Planning Department Director ouedhali@yahoo.fr

Seglaro Abel Some Ministry of Economy and Finance Technical Secretariat for the Strategy of accelerated growth and sustainable development Executive Secretariat seglaro@netcourrier.com

Francoise Tuyisenge

Prime Minister Office Economic Adviser dkanvaly@yahoo.fr

Youssouf N’Dia Ministry of State, Planning and Development General Directorate Planning and Poverty Reduction Department Technical Adviser ndia_youssouf@yahoo.fr

Democratic Republic of the Congo Benjamin Bonge Ministry of Planning Secrétariat national de renforcement des capacités Coordonnateur adjoint RDC CoP, Secretary AfCoP Core Management Team Member benjaminbonge@yahoo.fr

Théo Kanene

Papa-Amadou SARR

Gabon Alexandre Barro-Chambrier National Assembly Member of Parliament bchambrier@hotmail.com


20

African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

Participants List Ghana Adwoa Yirenkyi-Fianko Regional Center for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration Lecturer asbaah2002@gmail.com

Issah Adam African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Treasurer issadam63@hotmail.com

Italy Maria Soledad Marco International Fund for Agricultural Development Program Management Department Results Analyst m.marco@ifad.org

Kenya Amadou Mahtar Ba AfCoP Annual Meeting Facilitator AllAfrica Global Media Co-Founder, Chairman amaba@allafrica.com

James Bagaka Regional Center for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) Kenya Institute of Management Lecturer obuya.bagaka@ksg.ac.ke

Jennifer Mutua African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Board Member jennicrafke@yahoo.com

Joshua Njagi Mwiranga New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) Kenya Programme Manager jnmwiranga@yahoo.com

Samson Machuka Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 Monitoring and Evaluation Department Director AfCoP Co-Chair smachuka@planning.go.ke

Stephen Wainaina Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Parliament Economic Permanent Secretary swainaina@planning.go.ke

Peter Kenneth Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030, Parliament Assistant Minister Member of Parliament

Vitalice Amakanji Meja Reality of Aid Africa Network Coordinator meja@roaafrica.org

Malawi

Mauritius Devendra Ruhee Public Officers Welfare Council Chairman Former AfCoP Co-Chair AfCoP Core Management Team Member devruh555@yahoo.com

Morocco Ahmed Bencheikh African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Board Member ahmedbencheikh@yahoo.fr

Mohammed Haddad

Dalitso Kubalasa

Public Financial Management Consultant mohammedhaddad2012@gmail.com

Malawi Economic Justice Network Executive Director dkubalasa@gmail.com

Niger

Tayani Vincent Banda Ministry of Finance Debt and Trade Department Economist AfCoP Core Management Team Member tayanibanda@yahoo.co.uk

Amadou Boubacar Cissé Ministry of State, Planning and Land Management Ministre d’Etat

Boureima Gado

Mali

African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Board Member boureima_gado@yahoo.fr

Mafing Kone

Seydou Yaye

Ministry of Environment German International Cooperation (GIZ) CoP Mali Coordinator AfCoP Core Management Team Member mafingkone@yahoo.com

Mahamadou Zibo Maïga Country Capacity Strengthening Plan for Strategic Management of Development Coordinator CoP Mali Chair AfCoP Core Management Team Member mahamadouzibo@yahoo.fr

Oumarou Soule AFRISTAT Statistical System Management Expert oumarou.soule@afristat.org

Mauritania Abdel Aziz Dahi National Health Insurance Fund Director aoulddahi@gmail.com

Ministry of State, Planning and Land Management Planning Department Director AfCoP Core Management Team Member seydou.yaye@yahoo.fr

Sani Mamadou Abdou Gaoh German International Cooperation (GIZ) Planning and M&E Coordinator CoP Niger,Coordinator AfCoP Core Management Team Member mamadou.sani@giz.de

Nigeria Rotimi Olawale Africahub Co-Founder rotimi@youthhubafrica.org


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Participants List Rwanda Ronald Nkusi Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning External Finance Unit Director nkusi@minecofin.gov.rw

William Rukundo Results-Based Management Consultant AfCoP Core Management Team Member rukuwil2002@yahoo.com

Senegal Abdou Karim Lo AfCoP Co-Chair Senegal CoP Chair loabdoukarim@yahoo.fr

El Hadji Gueye Regional Center for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) Centre Africain d’Etudes Supérieures en Gestion Coordinator elhadji.gueye@cesag.sn

Ibrahima Thierno Lo UNICEF West and Central Africa Regional Office Knowledge Management Officer itlo@unicef.org

Momar Aly Ndiaye State Reform and Technical Assistance Delegation Delegate ndiayem02@gmail.com

South Africa Anke Braumann Collaborative Africa Budget Reform Initiative Anke.Braumann@treasury.gov.za

Danny Amenigy Regional Center for Learning on Evaluation and Results (CLEAR) University of the Witwatersrand Graduate School of Public and Development Management Program Management Officer Danny.Amenigy@wits.ac.za

Jacqueline Nzisabira Affiliated Network for Social Accountability Institute for Democracy in Africa (IDASA) Head of Human Right and Democratization Unit jnzisabira@idasa.org.za

Jennifer Bisgard

Lamine N’Dongo

African Evaluation Association (AfrEA) Board Member jbisgard@khulisa.com

African Development Bank Quality Assurance and Results Department Lead Results Adviser AfCoP Secretariat Coordinator m.ndongo@afdb.org

Ledule Bosch Department for Public Service and Administration Monitoring and Evaluation Unit Chief Director AfCoP Core Management Team Member Leduleb@dpsa.gov.za

Stanley Ntakumba Presidency Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Chief Director stanley.ntakumba@po.gov.za

Neil Cole Collaborative Africa Budget Reform Initiative Executive Secretary neil.cole@cabri-sbo.org

Tanzania Julius Birungi East African Community (EAC) Senior Monitoring and Evaluation Officer juliusbirungi@eachq.org

Marco Varea AfCoP Secretariat Consultant marcovarea@gmail.com

Michele Tarsilla AfCoP Secretariat Consultant michele_tarsilla@yahoo.com

Olivier Shingiro African Development Bank Quality Assurance and Results Department Senior Results Officer o.shingiro@afdb.org

Samer Hachem African Development Bank Quality Assurance and Results Department Principal Results Specialist s.hachem@afdb.org

Simon Mizrahi

Gideon Kaunda

African Development Bank Quality Assurance and Results Department Director s.mizrahi@afdb.org

Tanzania Private Sector Foundation Director gideonkaunda@yahoo.co.uk

Uganda

Togo Kango Lare-Lantone Governance Consultant lantone@aol.com

Rachidatou Bawa Ministry of Planning, Development and Land Management Aid Management Platform Officer rachnaty@yahoo.fr

Tunisia Cyril Blet AfCoP Secretariat Consultant c.blet@afdb.org

Richard Ssewakiryanga Uganda National NGO Forum Executive Director r.ssewakiryanga@ngoforum.or.ug

United States of America Benjamina Randrianarivelo World Bank Institute Governance Practice Operations Officer brandrianarivelo@worldbank.org

Roberto Ismael Villarreal Gonda United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Development Cooperation Policy Branch Inter-Regional Advisor rvillarreal@un.org


22

African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results

AfCoP/MfDR

Participants List Zambia

Zimbabwe

Anne Dirangu

Adeline Sibanda

Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa Monitoring and Evaluation Expert andirangu@comesa.int

African Gender and Development Evaluators’ Network (AGDEN) Treasurer Zimbabwe CoP troparg@yahoo.com

Emily Njeri Mburu Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa Trade in Services and Trade Facilitation Unit Coordinator emburu@comesa.int

Esther Tatenda Zulu Ministry of Finance Monitoring and Evaluation Officer ezt06@yahoo.com

Gloria Phiri Ministry of Economy and Finance Knowledge Management Specialist gloriaphiri@ymail.com

Winza Mwauluka Ministry of Finance Chief Monitoring and Evaluation Officer nmwauluka@boz.zm

Kwabena Boakye Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) Monitoring and Evaluation Expert k.boakye@acbf-pact.org J.Kakooza@acbf-pact.org connie.hakuna@gmail.com

Rwakurumbira Munyaradzi

African Development Bank Quality Assurance and Results Department Country Programme Officer c.onugoky@afdb.org

Office of the President and the Cabinet Modernization Department Deputy Director Zimbabwe CoP Coordinator AfCoP Core Management Team Member rm_7451@yahoo.co.uk

James Kakooza

Solomon Mhlanga

Chioma Onugoku

Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) Monitoring and Evaluation Head J.Kakooza@acbf-pact.org

Kobena Hanson Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) Knowledge Management Department Head k.hanson@acbf-pact.org

Office of the President and the Cabinet Modernization Department Principal Director Zimbabwe CoP Chair AfCoP Core Management Team Member mhlangasolomon@yahoo.com


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AfCoP

African Community of Practice Managing for development Results

In partnership with


Fifth AfCoP Annual Meeting