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VO LU M E TW E LVE

VOLU M E TH I R TE E N

2015

2016

A C O O P E R CAR RY MAGA Z I N E


We  aspire  to wake up every morning energized by the belief that we can change the world by designing a better environmental experience for its people. ASPIRE IS A PUBLICATION OF COOPER CARRY. ITS INTENT IS TO CELEBRATE THE PROJECTS AND THE PEOPLE WHO COLLABORATE TO MAKE THEM BECOME A REALITY.

EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PRATT FARMER ASSISTANT EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . AMANDA D’LUHY DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JULIE ARGO YOUNG CONTRIBUTING EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . YEN DINH COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHRISTINA BAILEY CONTRIBUTORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JORGE ABAD STEPHANIE ALLEN JONATHAN CAKERT ROBERT EDSALL LAYTON GOLDING MICHELLE HANNA MARK KILL DAVID KITCHENS ABBEY OKLAK KATIE PETERSCHMIDT KIM ROUSSEAU LAUREN FOWLER THOMAS DOUGLAS WEBSTER


FROM THE EDITOR

Welcome to this edition of Aspire Happy Spring! Welcome to our 13th edition of Aspire Magazine. In this issue we introduce you to The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. In January Bill Johnson and his team of talented restaurant designers joined forces with Cooper Carry. We sat down with Bill to get a small glimpse into his firm’s history. We hope you will find his story as fascinating as we do. This new studio broadens Cooper Carry’s expertise and creates unique synergistic opportunities for not only our hospitality studio, but also mixeduse, retail, and higher education. In a separate article, we profile the leaders of The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. Michelle Hanna, one of our interior designers, shares her love for art and talks about those who have influenced her passion for architectural illustration. Her story is refreshing and exhilarating. Also in this issue, we spotlight several of our athletic facility projects. In that story you will enjoy learning more about the Berry College eaglets and the live webcam that provides real time video feeds on their progress. The Valhalla Stadium site was relocated so that the nest would not be destroyed.

We brought together a number of designers from across the firm to discuss what driverless cars will mean to future design projects and what challenges might arise. Maybe you have begun to think about this subject and will be interested to read what some of our people have to say. We also examine the idea that shareable experiences have become status symbols which shape the way we are designing buildings, in particular retail and mixed-use developments. People tend to see their online presence as an extension of themselves and there is a desire to share photos and videos of daily activities and not just large, momentous events. It’s a thought provoking story! Our first quarter has been extremely active, and we are so pleased to be able to continue to share with you through our magazine.

All the best,

Pratt Farmer Associate Principal Director of Marketing


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CONTENTS Cover Story: The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 It Begins with Great Leaders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 What Inspires You?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Cooper Carry Expands Design Portfolio in 2015, Strong Outlook for 2016 ����������������������������� 21 A History of Architecture: Shigeru Ban (Part II) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 The Art of Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Cooper Carry Scores Big With Fan Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Envisoning a Carbon Neutral Future-Cooper Carry and the AIA 2030 Commitment. . . . . . . . 43 Fight For Air: Cooper Carry in the Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Creating Sharable Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Driverless Cars and What They Mean For the Design of Our Cities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Open Office and What You Need to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Cooper Carry Employee Hobbies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Anniversaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Cooper Carry in the News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 On the Boards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Contributors + Sneak Peak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70


E DITOR’S NOTE On January 1 of this year, The Johnson Studio joined forces with Cooper Carry and is now The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. In the past thirty years, Bill Johnson, AIA, and his talented team of hospitality designers have designed over 600 projects, and along the way became recognized as one of the foremost restaurant and club designers in the country. The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry adds a whole new dimension to our design capabilities and we welcome them into the family. We sat down with founder, Bill Johnson, to get a glimpse into the studio. AS P I R E

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W

hen Bill Johnson was majoring in chemistry in college he had no idea just how similar his chosen field of study was to the design industry he would later embrace. His interest in composition, structure and how properties change matter served as a great foundation for when he decided to take a detour to explore something else that interested him – building construction. “I guess one might say that I took a rather unconventional approach to getting into the design business,” Johnson said. At age 26, in his fourth year of the five year

program of architecture studies at Georgia Tech, he decided to take a short-cut to a degree in building construction, with the intention of joining his father-in-law’s general contracting firm. After returning to his hometown of Charleston, S.C., Johnson worked in the construction business for a while, only to realize that it wasn’t for him. “It occurred to me that for some unknown reason I enjoyed the design aspect of what I had been doing. I was more challenged by arriving at solutions for how things fit together, looked and worked than I was in actually building it,” he said.

DEL FRISCO’S GRILLE DINING ROOM ATLANTA, GEORGIA


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Johnson came back to Atlanta and went to work for a small architectural firm, designing houses and doing small remodeling jobs. It was, however, his attention to detail and natural ability to sort through issues to arrive at creative solutions that ultimately led him to the commercial interior design firm, Where the Chair Goes. “I was fascinated by light, color and fabrics and because Where the Chair Goes was a commercial interior design firm, it was nirvana to me,” Johnson said. His first restaurant project came when he was asked to design a new space for a café in Buckhead, Atlanta. Peachtree Café was moving across the street to a larger space and the restaurant’s owner wanted something more than a counter, tables and chairs. Thirty years later when Johnson was honored in 2012 with the Silver Spoon Award by Food Arts, they said of the Peachtree Café, “…a casual dining spot that became a neighborhood sensation, thanks to its bristling energy.” And as they say, “the rest is history.” Johnson continued to design more and more restaurants, became a registered architect, and in 1987 started The Johnson Studio, hiring as his first designer, Anita Summers, who is still with the studio today. As the firm grew in numbers its team developed a fierce loyalty to each other, embracing the philosophy of restaurant design that Johnson was espousing.

icacies, delivering them to a table where people can enjoy life,” Summers said. The studio’s first major restaurant came in 1992 when The Cheesecake Factory approached the team about designing a new 16,000 square foot restaurant in Buckhead, just north of downtown Atlanta. “It was a very complicated project because we took an existing bank building, using only the slabs and roof, and managed to fit everything else in between. The two level restaurant had just about every imaginable fit and finish one would expect. Needless to say, it was a trying experience,” Johnson said.

WE ARE A TEAM WHO UNDERSTANDS THAT RESTAURANTS ARE WHERE MEMORIES ARE MADE.

“We are a combination of interior designers, architects and lighting specialists. But more importantly, we are a team who understands that restaurants are where memories are made. It’s our job to take the creative vision of an incredible chef and translate that into a space that parlays his artistic ability to transform food into del-

Johnson likes to think of the studio as a combination of architecture and interior design orchestrated with the passion and finesse of a conductor. “Restaurant design is much like music,” Johnson said. “It has structure, rhythm and multiple layers.” This coming from an avid guitar player himself. Restaurants in particular are very complicated and there are numerous components that must be placed in very specific areas. Simply put, restaurants are in many cases very glamorous manufacturing facilities and the back of house requires just as much attention to detail as the front. When the nationally acclaimed restaurant group, Del Frisco’s, opted for restaurant space at Rockefeller Center, they turned to Johnson and his team. In 2010, the studio was asked to design a 14,000 square foot space occupying two levels – the main dining on the plaza level near the famous ice rink at 30 Rock and the food prep and storage one level below. Because the space was not originally designed for a restaurant, plumbing became one of the biggest challenges, requir-

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DEL FRISCO’S GRILLE HOUSTON, TEXAS CIBO MATTO, THE WIT HOTEL CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

BOTTOM LEFT:

ATLAS, THE ST. REGIS ATLANTA, GEORGIA

BOTTOM RIGHT:


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ing the designers to elevate the floor in the lower level to allow for plumbing and electrical. To date, the studio has designed 17 restaurants for Del Frisco’s. The studio has also completed a number of projects for the hotelier, The Ritz-Carlton. One of Johnson’s fondest designs for The Ritz is the restaurant, Fearing’s, in the Ritz-Carlton, Dallas. Their website best explains why. “Welcome to Fearing’s Restaurant – home of the bold flavors, no borders cuisine of celebrity chef, country recording artist, guitar connoisseur and best-selling cookbook author Dean Fearing. Fearing’s invites you to experience one of the liveliest, most popular restaurants in Texas — where travelers, celebrities, sports stars, local diners, heads of state and people who love great food come to enjoy the best of the Southwest. Join us in one of our seven indoor and outdoor settings, ranging from casual to elegant, including the legendary

Rattlesnake Bar.” Since its opening in 2007, Fearing’s has been named “Restaurant of the Year” and “Table of the Year” by Esquire Magazine, and number one in Hotel Dining in the U.S. by the Zagat Survey. The restaurant was nominated by the James Beard Foundation as Best New Restaurant and it is currently included on top national lists by TheDailyMeal.com, Gayot.com and many other influential food media. Today, Fearing’s is the highest grossing restaurant in the Ritz portfolio. It’s no wonder that The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry clients keep coming back. For instance, Buckhead Life Restaurant Group in Atlanta has turned to the studio on 10 occasions to design restaurants in Georgia and Florida. Oddly enough, Johnson began working for the wellknown restauranteur Pano Karatassos on his birthday. “I got a call from Pano asking if I was interested in designing Nava, a new

restaurant the company was opening in Buckhead. It turned out to be the best birthday present I’ve ever received!” According to Johnson, it was Buckhead Life’s Blue Point restaurant that put the studio on the map. The odd shape of the space and its expansive glass walls were huge challenges for the design team. The design however helped to position Blue Point as one of Atlanta’s most inspiring restaurants. Johnson has developed a unique approach to working with high-profile chefs. He has developed a gift for translating their larger-than-life personalities into places and spaces that serve to connect the chef to his or her guests. “We love to collaborate,” Johnson said. “Chefs are very creative people who make our job more fun. As an example, Fearing’s in The Ritz-Carlton, Dallas gives the gregarious chef, Dean Fearing, room to roam (as he often does) through an astounding variety of formal and casual spaces.

FEARING’S THE RITZ-CARLTON DALLAS, TEXAS

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At Tru in Chicago, clean lines and sharp use of color underscore the precision and playfulness of food. And then there’s Rathbun’s and KR Steak in Atlanta, which are as boisterous, friendly and as rollicking as Kevin Rathbun’s cooking.” While restaurants have been the mainstay for the studio, they are not all The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry does. Recently the studio completed an interior makeover of 18 units at The Ritz Carlton, Grand Cayman. The re-design resulted in converting those 18 rooms into just four luxury suites with the largest boasting a nightly room rate of $20,000. In designing the spacious suites which overlook the emerald green waters of the Caribbean, the designers used the same sensibilities for creating luxurious residences as they do when creating restaurant space. “Whatever the space, we believe that light, color and texture will inform the design. It was a given that the suites had to be luxurious. The challenge was to combine elements in an understated fashion,” says Anna McGrady, who led the design team for the project. “Everyone at Cooper Carry is excited about The Johnson Studio joining us. Because my world revolves around hotels I have had the pleasure of working with them on many occasions over the years,” said Bob Neal, AIA, a Principal in Cooper Carry’s hospitality studio. “Their passion for creating restaurant spaces that reflect the chef, hotel flag or the marketplace is evident in every project. That we now can drift into their studio in just a few steps is

something I look forward to.” Again, turning to the April 2012 Silver Spoon Award, the magazine said, “Food Arts presents the April 2012 Silver Spoon Award for sterling performance to the Atlanta-based architect Bill Johnson, whose urbane, kinetic restaurant designs—numbering more than 400 nationwide—prominently promenade their panache at such diverse settings as the Eiffel Tower Restaurant in Las Vegas’ Paris Hotel, the new waterfront outlet of Legal Sea Foods in Boston and the Roof Lounge atop the Wit Hotel in Chicago. Although the Johnson Studio made its name by designing dozens of restaurants in its hometown (Canoe, Two Urban Licks, Pano’s and Paul’s, among many others), Johnson’s high-energy style and sense of urban place are now in hot demand coast to coast.” Johnson puts it a little more plainly. “Our designers immerse themselves in every project because they know that our design will have a big impact on the dining experience. Guests come to the restaurant to be tantalized not only by the food but the atmosphere as well. It’s the composition, structure and properties which together stimulate the diners. After all, that’s why they go out to eat. They could stay home to be bored.”

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THE BUREAU AT KR STEAK BAR ATLANTA, GEORGIA

BOTTOM: HIGHBALL & HARVEST, THE RITZ-CARLTON GRANDE LAKES ORLANDO, FLORIDA


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ANITA SUMMERS, AIA

Associate Principal, The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry Anita’s genuine warmth is felt by clients and suppliers alike as she builds trusted relationships across the hospitality, building and design industries. She orchestrates a natural harmony between interiors and architecture and oversees lighting design for the studio. Anita grasps the powerful emotional appeal of a well-lit space. Often partnering with artisans to create exceptional custom pieces, she transforms a status quo restaurant into a warm and intimate dinner party, causing hushed admiration for the love on the plate and the company at the table. She can equally set a room aflame with bright bursts of sparkly energy that make the possibilities of one evening seem endless. It’s all about the drama. The trick is subtlety, and at this, Anita excels. Anita has spent her 25 year career working with Bill, where she began her journey as an architect. She holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture from North Carolina State University.

BRIAN FINKEL, AIA

Associate Principal, The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry Brian joined the Studio in 1992 after spending the first 10 years of his career in hospitality, historic renovations, commercial and retail centers. An Atlanta native, Brian earned his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology. With registrations currently in 25 states as well as the District of Columbia and the Federal Registration, Brian reviews the architecture and production of all projects. His skills are very helpful in the conceptual design phase, but on many projects he is involved from conceptual design through construction documents, construction, and closeout. In addition to leading the architecture group, he manages allocation of resources.


BILL JOHNSON, AIA

Director of Design, Associate Principal, The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry Bill believes a great space gives something back to the person who enters it. It should feel as comfortable as a home, but add that intangible “more” to make a guest feel welcome, alive, and unburdened. Each of his concepts is unique to the client. The measure of success lies in marrying the concept to the personality of the chef, the quality of the food, the type of clientele, and above all, creating the “wow” factor that sets a restaurant above its competitors.

KEITH SCHUTZ, AIA

KAREN TESKE BLUE, NCIDQ

Keith joined the Studio in 1995 with a background in hospitality, corporate and educational design. In addition to his role as a project architect, Keith handles studio workflow and manages the architectural staff. With more than 25 years of experience and a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Tennessee, Keith contributes his strong technical detailing expertise to maintaining the quality work the studio is known for.

Karen joined the Studio with 5 years’ experience designing boutique and nationally known hotels, including brands such as Hyatt Regency, Hilton, and Crown Plaza. She also created interiors for riverboats and cruise ships.

Associate Principal, The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry

Director of Interior Design, The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry

As Director of Interior Design, Karen manages the daily operations of the Studio. She provides leadership and guidance to each design team and supervises all phases of a project, from conceptual design through construction. Karen believes that the best spaces are created when architects and interior designers collaborate. As an alumna of AIU, formerly the American College for the Applied Arts, Karen was placed on the Alumni Wall of Fame for her achievements as an interior designer. She continues to give back to the design community by participating in career seminars about restaurant and hospitality design for colleges, universities, and trade shows.

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?

“Travel, fashion and observing people enjoying bars and restaurants.” -ANNA MCGRADY WHITE,

NCIDQ

“I’m inspired by combining the client’s aspirations and the program requirements and bringing them together with a unique design concept.”

“Growing up overseas, I had the opportunity to travel and experience other cultures. I have been inspired by all that I have seen on my travels.”

-BRIAN FINKEL , AIA

-KAREN TESKE BLUE , NCIDQ


“Everyday sights and sounds – sensing nature, the built environment, people, music and food. Each morning and evening, I traverse through historic neighborhoods and beautiful green spaces. I walk by one of the finest old buildings in Atlanta, a Marcel Breuer classic modern design and through a Philip Johnson designed building. I am also constantly inspired by the many talented people from all disciplines I get to work and interact with here.

“Inspiration can come from many places for me. Traveling to new places and trying out the latest and greatest new restaurants are some of my favorite ways to get inspiration. I am also inspired by art, fashion and design publications.” -JULIANA KERSCHEN , NCIDQ

“I’m inspired to create spaces and places for people to meet, congregate, celebrate, experience, eat, drink, breath and live. I’m inspired every day by the environment around me. I try to rethink and reimagine the things that make me feel good and put them into the spaces that we create so that others can feel the same way.” -BO ARNER

Oh, yeah, and whiskey!” -KEITH SCHUTZ , AIA AS P I R E

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C O OP E R CAR RY E X PAN DS

I N 20 1 5, STRONG OUTLO OK FOR 20 1 6

F

ollowing the announcement of The Johnson Studio joining forces with Cooper Carry, the firm announced that it completed 37 projects, or 4.3 million square feet, in seven states in 2015 with an additional 51 new projects having been awarded. For 2016, Kevin Cantley, AIA, President and CEO of Cooper Carry, predicts new design demand for office buildings and dual-branded hotels. Referencing Urban Land Institute’s (ULI) emerging trends, Cantley, who is Chair of Urban Land Institute (ULI) Atlanta, also expects secondary markets such as Austin; Portland, Ore.; Nashville, Tenn. and Charlotte, N.C., to attract investments across all sectors as Millennials continue to seek hip, urban and walkable communities. “In 2016, we expect to see growth in the development of office buildings

in cities such as Atlanta where there’s only one major multitenant office project under construction,” said Cantley. “We also expect to see increased demand in dual-branded hotels in high-barrier to entry markets where land prices continue to rise. Happily we’re at the forefront of the dual-brand trend with projects such as the AC Hotel by Marriott/Moxy hotel in Midtown Atlanta in the pipeline.”

National Convention.

In addition to the six hotels completed last year, the hospitality studio was awarded eight new projects in 2015, totaling more than 1,300 hotel rooms. Of significance was the opening of Hyatt Place Baltimore/Inner Harbor and Sea Pines Resort, which won Golf Inc.’s Clubhouse of the Year. In 2016, the Cooper Carry-designed Hilton Downtown Cleveland Hotel will open in time to host the Republican

Activity in the design of retail and mixed-use developments continues to expand as well, with the delivery of projects such as Emory Point Phase II and the upscale mall, Phipps Plaza, renovation in Atlanta. Cooper Carry’s work reflects developers’ continued desire to create pedestrian-friendly, walkable spaces that offer a variety of experiences for consumers. In addition, the firm continues to grow


its international practice with several projects in the Middle East, including a luxury shopping mall in Dubai and an eco hotel in Nicaragua. Residential remains strong with 774 new units awarded in 2015. The team completed The High Rise at Post Alexander in Buckhead (Atlanta), which is a 26-story high-rise apartment building and an adaptive reuse project, dubbed The Mill at 515, in Old Town Alexandria, Va. The office studio at Cooper Carry

is also experiencing growth with companies growing and expanding in various markets. The team has noted that companies take a special interest in transit-oriented communities. In 2016, Cooper Carry will continue work on the new office and mixed-used complex that will be anchored by State Farm in Dunwoody, Ga. In addition, the team was awarded nearly two million square feet in new corporate and office projects. Along with Cooper Carry’s private

HYATT PLACE BALTIMORE/ INNER HARBOR BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

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sector business, the firm’s higher education, science + technology and K-12 design work has also increased. In 2015, the firm completed six K-12 schools including an adaptive reuse of a five-story office building, which was converted to an elementary school in Arlington, Va. Cooper Carry’s higher education studio completed five projects. In addition, to meet greater demand in the STEM fields, Cooper Carry’s

science + technology studio completed four projects in 2015, including The Georgia BioScience Training Center, which supports research and provides critical workforce training to bioscience and biomanufacturing operations. Of particular interest is the completion of the new 218,800-square-foot Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB) at Georgia Tech as well as a renovation and expansion of the Atwood Chemistry Building at Emory

University, both in Atlanta. With offices in Atlanta, New York and Washington, D.C., Cooper Carry promoted more than 50 employees to accommodate the substantial growth across many of its studios. Additionally, the recently announced combination of Cooper Carry and The Johnson Studio will enhance both firms’ ability to provide an expanded menu of services for hospitality and restaurant projects in 2016.


“Last year was an active year for new awards,” said Cantley. “The 51 projects we were awarded total approximately 7.1 million square feet. We believe this is a strong indication for greater opportunities in 2016. In looking at our year-overyear comparison of 2014 vs. 2015, the firm’s revenue was up by some 30 percent. We feel this portends to a bright outlook across the firm for at least the next twelve months. ”

GEORGIA BIOSCIENCE TRAINING CENTER SOCIAL CIRCLE, GEORGIA

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A HISTORY OF

Installment Two of a Series of Articles


An Eastern Vision of Western Modernism

part two

By Robert Edsall Architectural Designer

T

he Finnish architect Alvar Aalto, who practiced in the early to mid 20th century, had a style that was defined by a dominant Finnish vernacular with Japanese and French influences. While he was considerably younger than many of the great Western architects of his time – Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe – he still contributed greatly to the overall evolution of Modernism, and in his case, it was a distinctly humanistic modernism. Aalto was considered to be a Regional Modernist who contributed to the evolution of the “International Style,” but his own style showed influences from the architecture of nomadic tribes in East Asia, as well as the Western Arts and Crafts movement. Aalto

was defined by his ability “to fuse together [a] multiplicity of opposite requirements [thus giving] his own work its unique, inexhaustible richness and layered sensibility.” While Aalto was focused on his own cultural identity as an architect, he drew much of his inspiration from Eastern concepts, such as the harmony and synergy that not only included people and the natural environment but also the architectural environment in which they lived. Aalto believed that the “most profound property of architecture is a variety and growth reminiscent of natural organic life… this is the only real architectural style.” Within Aalto’s body of work, “there are many explicit stylistic references to traditional Japanese architecture and gardens.”

Essentially, it was through his conscious study of East Asian concepts, architecture and nomadic tribes combined with his interests in Modernism that brought forth a profound level of “functionalism that [was] grounded in humanist priorities.” His work exhibits certain “complex and seemingly irrational details that appear inherently biological and natural in their forms, and in some ways, his architecture expresses his keen understanding of the relationship between nature and the human condition” – a keen understanding that can be seen in two of his seminal works: Villa Mairea and the 1939 Finnish Pavilion. Aalto’s first seminal work, Villa Mairea in Noormarkku, Finland, AS P I R E

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was constructed between 1938 and 1939. One of Aalto’s most profound innovations was his method of wood construction that represented a departure from his inherently Finnish architectural vernacular, as well as an adoption of various Japanese and nomadic construction methods that came to define his style. While logs were the primary structural material in Finnish architectural tradition, they were typically used in a predominately horizontal capacity and Aalto sought to redefine Finnish architecture – redefine the rational vernacular - by turning timber vertically to create curving curtain walls of wood serving both as interior and exterior conditions within his works. Aalto believed that “objects that properly can be given the label rational often suffer from a noticeable lack of human qualities.” Aalto’s architectural innovation ultimately became part of his style that can be seen in his masterpiece works the Villa Mairea and the Finnish Pavilion. Villa Mairea displays Aalto’s most crucial architectural explorations in his career– the exploration of local materials, lighting and the human condition. The outcome of these explorations can be seen in the exterior treatment of Aalto’s work, as well as the main spaces and staircase within, all of which are articulated by specific arrangements of vertical wooden pillars that work in conjunction with the internal structural columns to create an intense forest condition. The house references “imagery of rustic Finnish farm constructions, traditional Japanese architecture and

VILLA MAIREA EXTERIOR ALVAR AALTO |PHOTO CREDIT: trueman photography

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continental Modernism to create a uniquely emotional and inspirational domestic setting.” Aalto’s stunning innovations, critical explorations and improvisations that came as a result of designing Villa Mairea would also define his next masterpiece, the 1939 Finnish Pavilion. Aalto’s second seminal work, the Finnish Pavilion for the New York World’s Fair, not only marked the beginning of his international exposure but also marked his maiden voyage to the United States in 1939. The Pavilion was a “highly successful demonstration of a new, regionallytuned, humanistic architecture, whilst simultaneously


acting as a presentation of Finnish culture.” The Pavilion was located within an architecturally simple exhibition hall that consisted of only a single interior. Essentially, Aalto conceived the design as a dramatic space defined by layers of undulating walls that would ultimately integrate the “architectural space with [various] exhibits of photographs, objects and industrial products, forming a single symphonic entity that evoked the spatial flow and dense rhythms of a Nordic forest.” The Pavilion was marked by intuitively conceived imagery of a natural environment within a plastically formed architectural space. The practice of arranging wooden logs vertically in order to articulate the dense rhythms of a Nordic forest in conjunction with expressing a design logic centered on the simple, functional and seemingly temporary nature of nomadic dwellings ultimately defined Aalto’s true style in the eyes of Shigeru Ban. Despite Aalto’s status as a distinctly regional architect focused on his own cultural identity, his seminal works represented an approach to architecture that resonated well with Shigeru Ban – a self-proclaimed nomadic architect. Ban was intrigued by the key design element of Aalto’s work – the vertical wooden log. According to Ban, both of Aalto’s major works displayed only a fraction of the potential that this design element possessed to the extent to which he wanted to emulate it within his own work. Ban took the idea one sustainable step further by replacing wooden logs with reconstituted paper tubes and he became “convinced that they would be a new building type for the future.” Ban’s response to the Villa Mairea and the 1939 Finnish Pavilion was the Odawara Pavilion in Odawara, Kanagawa, Japan that was commissioned and constructed in 1990 to celebrate

the 50th anniversary of the Odawara municipal government. As a temporary multipurpose structure, the Odawara Pavilion was designed to host a variety of events and celebrations and was, initially, projected to be constructed from wood. Limited by a tight budget and construction schedule, Ban suggested that the entire pavilion should be “structured with paper tubes as kind of [an] ‘evolved wood.’” While steel columns were required to support the roof due to complications regarding permit approval, the paper tubes still formed the selfsupporting exterior and interior walls. Composed of 330 paper tubes, the 4,265 square foot Odawara Pavilion marks the humble beginnings of Ban’s success in employing a new architectural medium inspired by

a more modern and sustainable alternative to Aalto’s style. From the undulating walls of paper pillars to the lighting conditions created within the interstitial spaces, the Odawara Pavilion serves as an architectural exploration and interpretation of Aalto’s style that can be seen as a preliminary critique of his seminal works, as well as a physical manifestation of Ban’s critical eye regarding the work of his Western counterparts. TOP LEFT:

FINNISH PAVILION EXTERIOR ALVAR AALTO PHOTO CREDIT | EZRA STOLLER

BOTTOM LEFT:

FINNISH PAVILION INTERIOR MOCKUP, ALVAR AALTO

TOP RIGHT:

ODAWARA PAVILION EXTERIOR SHIGERU BAN PHOTO CREDIT | LA TIMES

BOTTOM RIGHT:

ODAWARA PAVILION INTERIOR SHIGERU BAN

PHOTO CREDIT | LA TIMES

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By Michelle Hanna Interior Designer Growing up, it was hard not to fall in love with art, design, and architecture in my house. My mother was an international interior designer for Sheraton Hotels and an artist and sculptor, and my father was a general contractor who built restaurants. I also experienced what it was like to be in the restaurant business firsthand at my grandmother’s restaurant, the Dream Away Lodge in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. My passion for art and design were fueled by the eclectic mix of artists and musicians that were frequent patrons of her free-spirited restaurant. I knew I was destined to become a restaurant designer.


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MY GREATEST DESIGN INSPIRATIONS COME TO ME AS I RENDER. As I went through design school, I became increasingly intrigued with the art of architectural illustration. I found it fascinating how you could create moods and energy in a space simply by drawing lines and playing with color and texture—I was hooked! My instructor and mentor Tomotsu ‘Tommy’ Yamamoto once told me that, “If you want to be a designer, don’t tell them that you can render.” There are times when I wish I had taken his advice but there are also times when I think that he couldn’t have been more wrong. Typically, my greatest design inspirations come to me as I render. Today, I have the best of both worlds: designing and rendering. I continue to experiment and introduce different mediums into each rendering. As Antoni Gaudí said, “Color in certain places has the great value of making the outlines and structural planes seem more energetic.”


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Cooper Carry with fan experience


Over the past few years, designers at Cooper Carry have been engaged to create meaningful spaces and places to accentuate the experience of fans as they attend various athletic events. Both public and private institutions have turned to the firm with truly unique challenges.

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BERRY COLLEGE FOOTBALL STADIUM MOU NT B E R RY, G EORG IA

In 2012, Cooper Carry was selected to design a new 2,400-seat stadium complex for Berry College’s lacrosse, track and field programs and the newly formed football team. Berry had planned to build the stadium close to the Steven J. Cage Athletic and Recreation Center with convenient parking and access to the campus entrance. Once a site had been selected and the design was proceeding, a pair of American bald eagles was discovered nesting in close proximity to the site. In the spring of 2012, the bald eagle couple had chosen to build their nest in a tall pine tree just off the major parking lot. Given the very public location of the nest, officials were not sure whether the eagles would return and actually use the nest. But they returned in fall 2012 and successfully produced two eaglets in 2013. A third eaglet hatched in February 2014 and took its inaugural flight later that year. Given the unusual location of the nest, the college applied for a permit from the U.S, Fish and Wildlife Service, agreeing to shift the stadium to the south, provide additional plantings to serve as buffers and limit construction to the summer and early fall months when the nest was not in use. In the spring however, Berry officials had second thoughts and elected to move the stadium to another part of the campus, near its main entrance. The eagles continue to return to their home at Berry every year and so far they are producing more eaglets. Just last year, they returned and hatched two more eaglets and they are back again. You can follow their activity via live webcams. With a revised vision and an even greater respect for the college after its decision about the eagle’s nest, the design team set about to create a space on the new site which would provide a wonderful

gateway into the stadium. “Close attention was paid to how the students, fans and athletes might enter the stadium through a gateway portal reminiscent of Berry’s rich history. The winding walk into the stadium provides attendees with a beautiful vista that is unique to the Berry experience,” said Tim Fish, AIA, Principal in Cooper Carry’s higher education studio. A significant part of the initial design plan was that the existing Richards Memorial Gymnasium be renovated in support of Berry athletics. With the opening of the Steven J. Cage Athletic and Recreation Center in 2008, the future of the then 70-year-old Richards Gymnasium became uncertain. Although there was a strong desire to find a replacement role, the structure itself did not readily allow for repurposing. In 2010, however, after several studies concluded that Richards Gymnasium could not reasonably be converted into a classroom or residential facility, a plan was approved to replace it, preserving its marble columns for reuse and repurposing the land for a residential student village. Then in 2011, with the decision to add football, a new possibility emerged: This historic gymnasium might be renovated to serve as a field house to meet the needs of Berry’s lacrosse and tennis teams, as well as the new football program. This would also allow for a refurbished dance studio, a priority for the dance program since the opening of the Cage Center. In the end, it was determined that such a restoration would be a good fit for the facility and would also provide an excellent return on investment, creating 20,000 square feet of high-quality space that would otherwise be unaffordable.


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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SANFORD STADIUM SKY CLUB ATH E N S, G EORG IA In football stadiums today it’s all about the fan experience. The more positive that experience, the greater the chance they will return time and again. Cooper Carry was enlisted by the University of Georgia (UGA) to create a design to refurbish the Sky Club, a 10,000 square foot premium hospitality space comprised of a spirited central serving area, two adjacent dining areas and a small serving space, along with ample restrooms. The design includes a stately portal façade, elegant entry vestibule and updated elevator lobby and vastly improved spaces for catering.

Fans coming to the Sky Box enter the space via an elevator lobby where the design team placed a special emphasis on the use of school colors and bold graphics to energize the space. Upon arrival at the space some 30+ feet up, fans debark the elevator into a programmed space incorporating interactive digital video playing either game highlights or the day’s game itself. Further down the hall fans are reminded of previous Bulldogs and their accomplishments on the gridiron.

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA SANFORD STADIUM REED PLAZA ATH E N S, G EORG IA When fans decide to congregate before a game, they look for just about any convenient, open space. The Reed Plaza project added much needed amenities and circulation space along the entire north side of the University of Georgia’s (UGA) Sanford Stadium. The area was been transformed from a narrow dark alley into a spacious and inviting gathering place. Cooper Carry designed the amenity buildings and architectural features working in collaboration with landscape architects, HGOR and UGA’s Office of University Architects. The UGA Athletic Association funded the project and defined the program, operational and maintenance requirements.

Major excavation and site utility work allowed for the addition of 24 concession kiosks, 96 restroom fixtures and extensive hardscaping. The new Reed Plaza greatly improves public safety and facilitates easy access to the central campus location. The fast-track project was designed and built over a short four month span and opened in time for UGA’s season opening football game that year. It now serves as a vibrant game day destination. Due to its overwhelming success, Reed Plaza promises to continue to be a place for students to gather throughout the year for special events and formal activities.


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WOLF PLAZA UNIVERSITY OF WEST GEORGIA CAR ROLLTON, G EORG IA

In 2014, the University of West Georgia (UWG) opened its first football season to the delight of students, faculty, administrators and alumni alike. Not surprisingly, interest in the Division II football team grew quickly and the ever-popular tailgating ritual was quickly adopted. Recognizing that the university’s athletic program had become a major draw for the campus, school officials embarked on a program that would highlight the fan experience. Cooper Carry was selected to enhance the fans’ game day experience with the design of “Wolf Plaza,” an approximate three acre site, which would serve as the center of new athletic traditions for the fans and athletes and a point of welcome for those coming to a UWG athletic event. The university has an incredible alumni following and Wolf Plaza was envisioned to be a welldesigned space that could accommodate a large number of fans. Both landscape and hardscape would play a role in helping to establish the space as to not only meet up with old friends but allow for those visiting to enjoy the rich heritage of the university by recalling various elements. As an example, the university enlisted a campus professor to design and cast in bronze the wolf mascot. This became the focal point of the plaza. Not lost on the designers was that the entire area sat atop a vast rock outcropping. In fact, the football stadium had been re-sited due to the rock formations. Using the sculpture as a focal point, the designers etched the final verse from the school’s fight song into a circular concrete band that surrounds the large sculpture. “We saw this highlight of a school tradition to be most fitting encircling the mascot,” said Meg Robie, a member of the four-person design team at Cooper Carry.

Because the plaza was envisioned to become a space that allowed for gatherings for other events, including soccer, softball and baseball, at a future new stadium, the designers elected to create six points of entry, based upon the six tenets of the “Wolves Creed”: a student athlete, a proud student of the university, a dedicated professional, an alumnae or alumnus, a member of the surrounding community, a leader who understands the strength of the pack. Future phases of the project will connect all six sidewalks to other aspects of the school and community to further highlight that the university is about more than athletics and those who graduate affect many outcomes in life experiences. Wolf Plaza has become the center of the university’s gameday traditions and special events.


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Cooper Carry and the AIA 2030 Commitment

A

s designers of the built environment, architects, landscape architects, interior designers and planners are in unique positions to make significant, positive impacts on the world’s energy consumption. We believe that it is our responsibility to design buildings and cities that not only serve the needs of our clients, but also enhance their surrounding communities and the planet as a whole. Since 2010, Cooper Carry has participated in the American Institute of Architect’s (AIA) 2030 Commitment initiative, which aims “to quantify and report the progress AIA members are making as vanguards in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the built environment, and ultimately help turn the tide against climate change.” The AIA Commitment is a partner to the Architecture 2030 Challenge to achieve a carbon neutral built environment by the year 2030. By providing a reporting structure, analyzing composite results and raising the bar for energy efficiency, the 2030 Commitment empowers architects to make design decisions that reduce energy consumption. Increased energy efficiencies of buildings can mean increased returns for both the environment and the building owners and users. Lower energy consumption has been shown


P L AT I N U M

to be good for business. Benefits can include reduced maintenance costs and increased asset value, as well as increased employee recruitment and retention. Through our participation in the 2030 Commitment, Cooper Carry has made great strides in improving the energy efficiency of the buildings that we design. We have established an in-house team of project sustainability integrators whose responsibilities are to guide project teams toward making sustainable design choices within the client’s project parameters. We have learned that the earlier we start thinking about the energy use of a project, the more significant impact we can have. As a result, we have implemented base-line processes including formulating and analyzing energy performance models during the early stages of our projects,

GOLD

S I LV E R

CERTIFIED

resulting in increased energy efficiencies and projects that even exceed their original energy goals. It is Cooper Carry’s mission to be stewards of the environment and to be designers of memorable places. Our participation in the 2030 Commitment has allowed us to advance these goals and to play a small part in progressing toward a more sustainable future. AIA 2030 COMMITMENT RESOURCES •

AIA 203 0 C OM M ITM E NT OVE RVI EW

AIA 203 0 P RO G R E S S R E P ORT

ARCH ITECTU R E 203 0

203 0 CHALLE NG E

C O OP E R CAR RY’S S USTAI NAB LE ACTION P LAN

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FIGHTCOOPER FOR CARRY IN THE AIR COMMUNITY Cooper Carry has a long history of supporting charitable organizations. One of those organizations is the American Lung Association and its “Fight for Air Climb,” which takes place across the country. In April, Atlanta teams competed in a stair climb which began in the lobby of our building (191 Peachtree Street) and ascends up 50 floors - over 500 feet! Lauren Thomas, a designer in Cooper Carry’s retail studio was drafted back in 2014 to be part of the team. “I had been living a pretty sedentary lifestyle until then, so I signed up as a way to spark more physical activity in my life. It’s kind of funny that I decided to become more ‘active’ by climbing to the top of this building, because it’s really not easy to get up there,” she said. To put this into perspective, the winning times typically range between six to eight minutes for males and eight to 10 minutes for females. Our own

Christopher Bivins, AIA, has typically finished in the top three (out of 300) climbers. Last year, Thomas was tapped to be the team co-captain with Tyler Blazer, AIA, a designer in Cooper Carry’s residential studio. She is now busy recruiting SOM E OF TH E MANY COOPE R CAR RY PARTICI PANTS AFTE R TH E CLI M B. FROM LE FT TO R IG HT: LAU R E N FOWLE R THOMAS, GWE N KOVAR, H E E J I N CHO, climbers who each TOR I AUG UST, TYLE R B LAZ E R have a goal of raising Association, and the firefighters $100 to contribute to the overall around Atlanta - who put so much team entry cost of $1200. “What time and effort into making the I discovered was a very inspiring event happen.” Oh yes, firefighters event – from fundraising to training, climb too, in full gear. A special to the race day itself. Not only did I find it gratifying just to make it to the thanks to Thomas and her cochair Blazer, and the whole team top of the tower, but also witnessing for participating in this worthwhile the amount of people in this city – cause. particularly the American Lung


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CREATING

SHARABLE EXPERIENCES

LIVING THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA

BUYING STATUS SYMBOLS

Photos used to be taken at events and gatherings primarily to be developed, printed and placed into albums for memory and keepsake. Nowadays, taking pictures is synchronous with real-time events and images are instantly posted on social media. We have become a culture where we let people know what we are doing, when we are doing it and where we are doing it. As we often hear, “If it’s not on Facebook then it didn’t happen.”

Material possessions have long served as status symbols. Part of the reason that you purchase that luxury designer watch or pay an exorbitant amount of money on a nice set of rims for your car is having the ability to share it with others – you want to have an audience. What fun is it to drop $500 on a pair of shoes that you can only wear around the house? In today’s digital age, with the AS P I R E

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advanced use of technology and social media, experiences themselves have become status symbols. Consumers are increasingly placing more value on purchasing experiences in addition to things. Not only are you able to tell people about eating at a five-star restaurant or going to the new invite-only club, you also have photographic proof of it that can be shared instantly. As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. #HumbleBrag

OFFERING SHAREABLE EXPERIENCES The idea that experiences have become status symbols has shaped the way that we are designing buildings, in particular retail and mixed-use developments. People tend to see their online presence as an extension of themselves and there is a desire to share photos and videos of daily activities and not just large, momentous events. Consumers want unique experiences that are worthy of broadcasting to their social circles. Developers have taken note. Cooper Carry Principal David Kitchens, AIA, explains, “Retailers are offering experiential shopping such as cooking demonstrations, wine tasting and product samples. Developers are embracing the idea of

novelty and performancebased interactive elements both as a draw for customers and also as a way to advertise. Examples include interactive fountain and light features, customizable music and other digitally shareable elements.” In addition, the “DIY/ Maker” movement offers customizable opportunities for the retail customer to build and learn on top of

making a purchase. “This unique experience along with the purchase of something that your family can make or build together is both meaningful and educational,” Kitchens said.

PUTTING YOURSELF ON THE GRID Today’s consumers are also looking for a sense of authenticity. Anything

that can add credibility is a value-add. A large component of various social media platforms is tagging and geotagging. It allows users to add exact time, date and location to a picture. For example, if you are on vacation in Boca Raton, Florida, you could be walking around Mizner Park after dinner and decide to take photos to post to Snapchat with the fountain and palm trees in the background. With the Snapchat app, you have the option to place a geofilter with graphics that display your location or a time and date stamp. If you are using Facebook or Instagram, you can tag your location to a specific restaurant or the shopping center itself. This feature not only serves to help “authenticate” your geographical location, it also allows you to find friends who are close by. Cooper Carry’s Brandon Lenk, AIA, an architect in the mixed-use studio, explains, “When I use geotagging, my main goal is connecting with friends unexpectedly.” Furthermore, it serves as a word-of-mouth marketing tool— consumers are introduced to new destinations that they may not have considered before. “When browsing on social media, I think it’s amazing to see the world through someone else’s eyes and ultimately aspire to maybe go to where they are one day,” Lenk said.


BLENDING SPACES & RESHAPING THE FAMILIAR In order to “put yourself on the map,” however, you need to be a place that people desire to be. This goes beyond retail, entertainment and food and beverage offerings. At Cooper Carry, we believe that the spaces in between buildings are as important as the buildings themselves. Retail environments used to be designed in a way to encourage customers to walk in front of shops. While this is still true, the draw to retail developments is just as much about the areas that connect them as they are about the shops. These public areas add to and are a large part of the experience offered by the businesses themselves. We are blurring the line between what is the retail lease space and the public realm. In line with this, Kitchens believes that it is important to design spaces based on lasting contextual elements that influence the design. In Cooper Carry’s most recent design opportunity at Crystal City Parks in Arlington, Va., we are transforming an environment that was established in the early 1960s that was both internal and auto dominantfocused. In transforming this environment into a mixed-used Main Street, the primary idea is the insertion of retail pavilion buildings that will turn the new Crystal Drive into a two-sided retail Main Street environment. The design solution includes canopy components that connect the new development with the existing office building environment. Because this new development is being inserted into existing park space, there is a need to preserve and recreate great urban plaza spaces that reinforce gathering and event spaces that complement the retail pavilion buildings. The old meets the new.  

CONNECTING PEOPLE TO PLACE

“At the end of the day, people come together to socialize. Consumers are drawn toward brands and environments in which they feel they have an emotional connection,” Kitchens said. “The best way to draw customers on site and keep them there is to create a unique experience that they can identify with. An authentic place is somewhere that has memories and where memories can be made.” With every aspect of life documented nowadays, we want to create environments that are enjoyable, memorable and shareable. AS P I R E

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DRIVERLESS CARS And what they mean for the design of our cities

Today’s towns and cities were shaped by the invention of the automobile. Street widths, driveways and parking layouts have been dictated by the need to accommodate cars. Driverless car technology has the potential to revolutionize the way we travel, but it will also have a profound effect on infrastructure, landscape and the built environment. We recently convened a group of forward-thinking design experts from across the firm to discuss the impact driverless cars will have on the design of our cities. Here is a look at the future through their eyes. PARTICI PANTS David Kitchens, AIA, Principal Layton Golding, AIA, CSI, LEED AP, Associate Principal / Project Manager Jonathan Cakert, AIA, Associate / Project Architect Douglas Webster, RA, Associate Principal / Design Architect Jorge Abad, AIA, Project Manager Abbey Oklak, AICP, LEED AP, Planner Lauren Fowler Thomas, Architectural Designer POTE NTIAL CHALLE NG E S • Where to begin? The denser an environment, the more difficult it will be to integrate driverless cars because of existing building stock, infrastructure and populations. Ideally, the transition might begin in rural areas. • Parking is still a problem: A self-driving car is still a car that will need to be parked. While the proximity of parking to destinations will be less important, the cost of providing AS P I R E

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RINSPEED BUDII CONCEPT AUTONOMOUS CAR BASED ON ALL-ELECTRIC BMW I3 PRESENTED AT THE 85TH GENEVA INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SHOW. PHOTO OF THE INTERIOR. SHUTTERSTOCK. COPYRIGHT YAUHEN_D

parking will need to be shouldered by developers and governments. Public transportation: Subway and bus usage, as we know it, could decline but new layers of transit will need to be added to take advantage of new technology. This shift would require significant investment on the part of cities. Growing pains: The transition from traditional cars to driverless vehicles will be a bumpy road. Everything from street widths to below-grade parking will need to be rethought. Local scale + regional scale: The experience (and potential benefits of driverless cars) would vary depending on the density of your location. Street grids might need to expand or contract. What will this do to the car parts aftermarket? There is currently a huge aftermarket for car parts, kits and restorations. With the shift to driverless cars, this consumer base will certainly be impacted. Effects on various industries: We may see a reduction in air travel and other industries. If you could sit in a private car with your family and friends and not have to drive, would you rather do this than fly?

OPPORTU N ITI E S • Cultural shift: Cars and car-ownership has become part of our individual identity. With driverless cars, people might no longer own a car, but rather they would co-own access to a car. • Walkable cities: The potential reliability of driverless cars would make neighborhoods and cities safer for pedestrians. Neighborhoods will develop around popular destinations. • Sustainability. No longer would a car need to sit idle because no one is using it. Vehicle sharing will increase resulting in less cars and more space. • Increased productivity: People would be able to use the freed up commute time as a chance to do work. • Impact on living choices: Revolutionized commutes could nudge people’s decisions on how and where they want to live. • Greater geographical access: It would be easier for people to live out in the suburbs and travel into the city, and it would be easier for people in the city to go out into the suburbs. This would be beneficial for businesses to have greater reach. • Better buildings / better cities: No longer will design be “driven” by the proximity and accessibility of parking.


TIMELINE LONG TERM (10-30 YEARS)

NEAR TERM

APPEARANCE OF AUTOMATED PARKING ALLOWING MORE PARKING PER SQUARE FOOT

APPLICATION OF DRIVERLESS CAR TECHNOLOGY TO BUSES AND OTHER MASS TRANSIT

(N EXT 10 YEARS) •

INCREASES IN VEHICLE SHARING AND RIDESHARING

DECREASE IN PARKING REQUIREMENTS

INTEGRATION OF RELATED TECHNOLOGY INTO BUILDINGS

IMPROVEMENTS IN ACCESSIBILITY OF BRICK AND MORTAR RETAIL

INCREASES IN VERTICAL PARKING

MORE NARROW STREETS

EXPANDED RINGS OF TRAVEL MODES

INCREASED IMPORTANCE OF SIDEWALKS “SIDEWALKS ARE THE NEW HIGHWAY”

DECREASE IN TRAVEL TIME AS VEHICLE SAFETY AND SPEED IMPROVES

REPURPOSED EXISTING SPACES (SUCH AS BELOW-GRADE GARAGES)

FAR OUT (30+ YEARS) •

MORE CONGESTED AND/ OR MORE SPRAWLING CITIES SINCE TRADITIONAL FORMULAS FOR GEOGRAPHIC PROXIMITY WILL NO LONGER APPLY

HIGH SPEED TRAVEL BECOMES THE NORM AS TECHNOLOGY INCREASES VEHICLE SAFETY

PARKING BECOMES CONSOLIDATED AND PUSHED TO THE OUTER RINGS

BRAND NEW CITIES AND URBAN CENTERS MAY BE ESTABLISHED, CENTERED AROUND SELF-DRIVING VEHICLES

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OPEN

OFFICE AND WHAT YOU NEED TO THINK ABOUT

Kim Rousseau, IIDA Stephanie Allen, IIDA Principal Interior Designer Director of Interior Design

T

he workplace of the future? Or the workplace of today? According to a 2010 study, nearly 70 percent of Americans are working in open offices. This layout that first appeared in the 1990s is now ubiquitous. Among the long list of benefits which it can provide, an open office can create a culture that breaks down hierarchal standards leading to a more flexible environment, which can ebb and flow with the company. No wonder the percentage of users is so overwhelming. But does this mean that you can walk into any office with this layout and expect to see the same thing? Definitely not. When making plans to give your office space a makeover, it is important to first research and think about what best fits your employees’ needs rather than just follow the latest trends. What may be a good fit for one organization may not be a good fit for yours. Once you have completed this key initial step and identified a base for what your company needs, you can then move on to the design of your new space.


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KEY THINGS TO CONSIDER: • Take a holistic approach: Recognize that workplace design is only one element of a holistic solution and consider upgrading policies and technology along with it. • Build in choice: Add variety into the workplace to supplement the immediate workspace. Health and performance increases when employees are given choice and control over where, when and how they conduct their work. Invest in work tools, seating and furnishing features that increase individual control within primary workspaces. • Organize: Create a communication plan that includes the project goals and rationale, project logistics and audience. • Evaluate employees’ work styles: This is not a one size fits all approach. Look at what your employees need and design a workplace which suits it. • Implement change management: Communicate your intentions to your employees and actively address their concerns throughout the process. • Understand that change is an evolution: Once the new space has been implemented, you will continue to adjust. Often times, the decision to move into an open office layout is financially driven – the more efficient use of space reduces real estate costs which affects the bottom line. However, it is critical to recognize that the design solution should meet employee needs, in addition to business needs. Transitioning to this type of office space can be challenging but working closely with your design firm to address any needs or concerns can make this a smooth process.

PREVIOUS PAGE, TOP, BOTTOM LEFT:

Cooper Carry Atlanta Office BOTTOM RIGHT:

Cooper Carry New York Office


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HOBBIES of Cooper Carry employees


OUR PASSIONS Cooper Carry employees are a talented bunch. We are creative, collaborative, and inspired both inside and outside the office. When we aren’t busy in our ‘day jobs,’ many of us enjoy unique and interesting hobbies. Here are just a few of our favorite pastimes.

SCUBA DIVING Matthew Nickel, RA Architectural Designer

“When I get a chance to get away, one of my favorite hobbies is scuba diving. I have been doing it for 15 years. I have an Advanced Open Water certification and have been fortunate to dive on several wrecks and reefs in the Caribbean. For anyone who is interested in scuba diving, I definitely recommend it.“

ORIGAMI

Robert Edsall Architectural Designer “On my sixth birthday, my grandmother gave me a book on the ancient art of origami, or Japanese paper folding. Using this book, I managed to teach myself various folding techniques, and after having mastered the basics within a few months, I became obsessed with origami. In college, I married my two fields of study – architecture and structural design – by taking inspiration from my origami designs that I ultimately re-purposed into rapidly deployable trusses, adaptive building envelopes, tent structures, portable research labs, and temporary structures. Today, while I still fold for fun, I like to design tessellated fold patterns in order to investigate the structural implications of the system that is created when these patterns are folded.”

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PHOTOGRAPHY Assad Abboud Architectural Designer

“Photography has been one of my hobbies for as long as I can remember. In the past year or so I’ve started taking it more seriously and seeking out freelance work. Photography is a great way for me to get my creative energy out when I’m in bouts of non-creative architecture work. It’s safe to assume that when I’m not at work, I’m typically out exploring/taking pictures of anything I can possibly photograph. I am also constantly researching new techniques and methods that other photographers use to better my own work. My favorite type of photography is portraiture because I love capturing fleeting moments and people’s expressions and emotions. My favorite thing about photography is that once you hit that shutter, that moment in time will never repeat, and no one will ever capture it again.”

DIGITAL FABRICATION Stephanie Smid Architectural Designer

“I’ve loved using digital fabrication tools to make things ever since being introduced to the process in college a few years ago. After graduating, I’ve switched from making studio models to attempting more useful, everybody objects. I really enjoy how the fast-paced nature of tools like laser cutters and 3D printers lets me produce multiple physical prototypes in as little as one day. I’m particularly interested in pairing the fabrications process with parametric modeling, giving me the option of easily making customized objects from a single base model. Being able to create something that I end up using on a daily basis is pretty awesome.”

BOXING

Yen Dinh Marketing Coordinator “Growing up, martial arts was my extracurricular activity. I was a student of Kung Fu for more than a decade. A few years ago, I wanted to switch it up a bit and try something new so I picked up boxing. I desired the faster pace and the high energy; it delivered. Whether I’m working on a heavy bag or training in the ring, all of my focus and attention is on my target. When I need to be on my guard but simultaneously seek the offense, it’s difficult to think of anything else. My adrenaline is pumping and I get lost in this single activity. It’s very therapeutic and allows me to ‘escape’ from the busyness of life. I always leave the boxing gym feeling more energized and leveled.”


VOLUNTEERING Mikki Cash Marketing Coordinator

I volunteer because I find something incredibly satisfying about being able to give to others that are less fortunate. Being able to potentially impact someone’s life gives meaning to me beyond simply just looking after myself. I volunteer with different homeless shelters in the Atlanta area. Whether it is reading to small children or helping teenagers with homework, I come away with the sense of peace that I might make a positive impact on an individual’s life. The greatest gift I receive that puts a big smile on my face is the gratitude that I receive. When I leave and a child thanks me for spending time with him/her and then give me a ginormous hug, it is in that moment that I truly believe “life is good!”

FINE SCALE MODELING Patrick Finucan Architectural Designer

“For as long as I can remember, I’ve always been drawn to military scale model building. I remember my first model was a 1/48 scale Monogram P-61 Black Widow that my mom bought me and that my dad taught me how to build. It was my first build so things didn’t turn out the way I had envisioned them in my head… or what was on the box. I would hang that World War II fighter, along with others, from my ceiling in my room with fishing line like a diorama in the sky. In high school and since then I have moved onto 1/35 scale military ground vehicles with my focus being World War II. I take great pride in the “work” that I do with the models and a satisfaction seeing them take their final form from the tiny plastic pieces in the box. Over the last 30 years I have built around 50 some kits, and some I still have to this day as they remind me of the times I spent with my dad.”

COOKING

Richard Berrios Architectural Designer

“I’ve always enjoyed cooking, partly because it has a strange correlation to architecture but, mostly because I enjoy yummy food. The past couple of years, I’ve learned to enjoy it for a different reason. Being a transplant to Washington, D.C. with my entire family in Houston, I started to miss those traditional Chilean dishes my mom and grandma would construct and the time I spent with them while preparing those meals. Now, I use cooking as an excuse to call my mom and grandma about recipes and techniques to craft some of my favorite meals, like empanadas.”

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Congrats! get to Don’t for late them u t a r g n o c

A heartfelt “Thank You” to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the 4th Quarter of 2015.

In

on Linked

lifers

10 35 to

years

Kevin Cantley Chief Executive Officer 35 Years

Pope Bullock Principal 34 Years

Angelo Carusi Principal 32 Years

Anita Summers Associate Principal 28 Years

Lee Ayers Senior Associate 22 Years

Juliana Kerschen Interior Designer 9 Years

Randy Miller Project Manager 9 Years

tweeners

49 to

years

Brandon Danke Senior Associate 11 Years

Khrysti Uhrin Associate 11 Years

Jason Albers Associate 10 Years

newbies

13

to years

Mikki Cash Marketing Coordinator 5 Years

Alysha Buck Architect 5 Years

Ben Gholson Architectural Designer 5 Years

Gwen Kovar Associate 5 Years

Lynette McKissic Studio Administrator 3 Years


4Q 2015 Allen Dedels Associate Principal 22 Years

Kevin Bailey Senior Architect 19 Years

Bo Arner Project Manager 17 Years

Lauren Perry Ford Associate Principal 16 Years

Jun Li Architectural Designer 16 Years

Richard Lee Architectural Designer 9 Years

Anna McGrady White Interior Designer 8 Years

Manny Dominguez Principal 8 Years

Brandon Lenk Associate 8 Years

Abbey Oklak Planner 6 Years

Kenny Syverson 3D Graphic Artist 3 Years

Ty Shinaberry Project Manager 3 Years

Emilia Delsol Receptionist 3 Years

Joseph Almeida Architect 2 Years

Samantha Yeh Student 2 Years

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Congrats!

4Q 2015

A heartfelt “Thank You” to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the 4th Quarter of 2015.

newbies

13

to years cont’d

Heba Elamin Architectural Designer 1 Year

Robert Edsall Architectural Designer 1 Year

Mourad Kicha Architectural Designer 1 Year

Stephanie Allen Interior Designer 1 Year

Bill Garcia Senior Associate 1 Year

Rebeka Flamenco Interior Designer

Architectural Designer

just getting started

EW Nhires Adriana Acosta Interior Designer 1 Year

Sasha Orr Office Assistant

William Collar Architectural Designer 1 Year

Sibel Anderson Studio Administrator

Emily Stenz Interior Designer

Elizabeth Madden


New Looks for Staten Island’s $200M Mixed-Use Complex Lighthouse Point

Inside the lavish Caribbean holiday penthouses that boast stunning sea views, outdoor terraces and a private cinema

Luxury Condos Proposed for 115 S. Union Street Building

Talley Student Union Team Recognized for Outstanding Facility Design

A new ‘Main Street’ is part of Pill Hill mixed-use plan

Timeline: Mill Suited

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WHAT’S NEW?

at Cooper Carry

Our University of Georgia (UGA) Sky Club project officially opened.

We celebrated the topping out of the The Main development in No rfolk, VA.

Cooper Carry-designed Edward Andrews Homes Design Center received a gold award for “Best New Design Center” from the National Association of Home Builders.

The Cooper Carry-designed Intergraph Headquarters was named the number one Workplace Project of 2015 by Work Design Magazine.


e ngs ar i h t g n Exciti ening at happ y! Carr ot of r e p sh Co o k snap at the c i u q a n Here’s en going o onths. e m b what’s the last few ver firm o Cooper Car ry’s Alexa ndria office of our 900 1 went on a si 6th Street p te tour roject in Wa shington, D .C.

hnson Bill Jo olinas rC A Car Coope t the CMA t a io a n Stud ant design n, S.C. r ohnso The J d on restau op in Blufto h e t k n wor s prese ’s arry

We got Super Bowl ready with a pizza party!

Having a “summer in the winter” party is the way to beat the cold.


Check out some of Cooper Carry’s ongoing projects.


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Aspire - Volume XIII Contributors JORGE ABAD, AIA Project Manager

DAVID KITCHENS, AIA, NCARB Principal

STEPHANIE ALLEN, NCIDQ, IIDA Interior Designer

ABBEY OKLAK, AICP, LEED AP Planner

JONATHAN CAKERT, AIA Associate

KATIE PETERSCHMIDT, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP Associate Principal

ROBERT EDSALL Architectural Designer

KIM ROUSSEAU, NCIDQ, IIDA, LEED AP ID+C Principal, Director of Interior Design

LAYTON GOLDING, AIA, LEED AP Associate Principal

LAUREN FOWLER THOMAS, AIA, LEED AP Archirectural Designer

MICHELLE HANNA Interior Designer

Douglas Webster, AIA Senior Associate

MARK KILL, AIA, LEED AP, CDT Chief Operating Officer, Principal

Aspire - Volume XIII Mentions Assad Abboud Bo Arner Richard Berrios Karen Teske Blue, NCIDQ Mikki Cash Yen Dinh Brian Finkel, AIA, NCARB

Patrick Finucan Juliana Kerschen, NCIDQ Matthew Nickel, RA, NCARB, LEED AP Anna McGrady White, NCIDQ Keith Schutz, AIA Stephanie Smid


CONTRIBUTORS

SNEAK PEEK Westgate Elementary School Falls Church, Virginia

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atlanta 

new york 

washington

Aspire | Volume 13  

© Cooper Carry