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VO LU M E TW E LVE

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2015

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A C O O P E R CAR RY MAGA Z I N E


We  aspire  to wake up every morning energized by the belief that we can change the world by designing a better environmental experience for its people. ASPIRE IS A PUBLICATION OF COOPER CARRY. ITS INTENT IS TO CELEBRATE THE PROJECTS AND THE PEOPLE WHO COLLABORATE TO MAKE THEM BECOME A REALITY.

EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PRATT FARMER ASSISTANT EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . AMANDA D’LUHY DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JULIE ARGO YOUNG CONTRIBUTING EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . YEN DINH COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHRISTINA BAILEY CONTRIBUTORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ELIAS DARHAM ROBERT EDSALL BRIAN GONGAWARE BILL JOHNSON JORDAN KLINE GWEN KOVAR BRANDON LENK KASEY LIM BRIAN PARKER MARCO PIERI ALYSSA ROGUT HILLARY ROTH SOPHIA TARKHAN NICOLE ZACCACK


FROM THE EDITOR

Welcome to this edition of Aspire As another year comes to a close, we would be remiss if we did not thank our employees, consultants and friends of the firm for your continued support. Most of you have worked with us for many years and you understand that we are very passionate about what we do. On the following pages you will see many examples of our varied passions. Several of our interior designers give insight on the changing landscape of law firm office design and detail the resulting benefits that go beyond space efficiency and cost savings. Keith Simmel, AIA and Sean McLendon, AIA share their thoughts about a recent mixed-use project, Lake Nona which includes a dualbrand hotel, office building, two out parcel restaurants and a very interesting parking garage that has people visiting every evening to see a light show. The design of the deck is unique and is featured on the cover of this issue. Several folks from our Interiors Studio got together to collaborate and design a dress for the Georgia Chapter of the International Interior Design Association’s “DRESSED” event. Most interesting are the materials that were used to make the dress. Bill Johnson, AIA Associate Principal and the founder of The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry talks about

the impact millennials are having on private club restaurants and what his team are finding attracts that age group the most. We also introduce you to Ray Chung who recently joined us to lead restaurant design in the Northeast market. Ray has an impressive resume and has worked on many high-profile hospitality projects all around the world. In his continuing series of the History of Architecture, Robert Edsall, discusses Frank Lloyd Wright and his impact on design. All in all, we hope these and other stories in this issue will educate, inspire and even motivate you to greater things. Happy Holidays!

All the best,

Pratt Farmer Associate Principal Director of Marketing


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CONTENTS COVER STORY: Design Collaboration Results in Unique Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Without Objection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 400 Feet Above: Drone Aerial Photography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry Welcomes Ray Chung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 History of Architecture, Part Four. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Atlanta Bike Challenge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 The Changing Face of Restaurants in Country Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Principal for a Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Dressed to Skill.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Cooper Carry Employees Share Their Senior Thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Anniversaries & New Employees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Cooper Carry in the News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 What’s New at Cooper Carry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 On the Boards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Contributors + Sneak Peak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74


When Tavistock, the developer of Lake Nona, loacted just outside Orlando engaged Cooper Carry to design a mixed-use project within a section of its 7,000 acre development, the team realized just what a special place this part of the development would have. Working with Principal Greg Miller, AIA, and his original master plan, principals Keith Simmel, AIA, and Sean McLendon, AIA, led the efforts to design a 200-key dual-brand hotel and a four story, 88,000 sf office building. Simmel selected Kathy Logan, AIA, to work with him as the Project Architect for the Court-

yard and Residence Inn component of the project. “Our goal from the beginning was to design a building that would complement much of the surrounding architecture, which had all been built in the past five years. Realizing that the hotel would support three nearby hospitals, including the Orlando Veterans Affairs hospital which is on a 65 acre campus, Nemours Children’s Hospital and Florida Hospital, the design team felt it vitally important to create an environment that was tranquil in setting so as to reduce the stress many guests

Focused on the overall health and wellness of those working and visiting the Lake Nona complex, a bike share is included to encourage patrons to explore the area.

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would experience visiting family and friends in one of those medical facilities,” said Simmel. The dual-brand hotel has one entrance and registration zone where all guests are greeted. From there, guests are directed to lobby areas, which were designed to express each brand’s identity. The architectural design of the building supports this idea of “linked but separate,” with each brand registering on the exterior façade as a unique design expression. The punched windows and cornice lines of the more traditional Residence Inn portion of the building merged with the more modern, sleek expression

of the Courtyard half of the building at a central knuckle, which houses the main vertical circulation elements of the building. The guestroom designs for each brand are based on their own standards, but have been enhanced to take advantage of certain architectural features like the glass corner overlooking the plaza area. The design of the overall floor plan on the guest floors allows for the seamless movement between brands. Of particular interest is the client’s desire to create a wellness floor, which incorporates a number of design features to promote health and well-being. For example, the designers

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consulted with a lighting specialist to incorporate circadian lighting in each room on that floor. This specialized light source helps the brain to essentially “reboot.” Studies have shown that use of dynamic circadian lighting can improve health, well-being, human performance, rest and sleep. Changing light is the primary trigger for keeping our circadian rhythms on track. In addition, the use of materials that have low or no volatile organic compounds (VOC) adds to the health equation. The hotel has been a huge success with occupancy levels above 85 percent since its opening earlier this year.

a four-story 60,000 sf steel framed building, which includes ground level space (8,800 sf) for up to three restaurants or other retail or service uses. The façade is a mix of architectural precast skin and curtain wall with high performance glass and sunshades. “The hotel and office design teams met frequently to review concepts because our desire was to have a unified appearance for the two structures while still providing some degree of independence,” said McLendon. The building lobby, designed by our Interiors Studio, features marble, and is intended to provide a relaxed environment.

Sean McLendon led the design effort for the Class A office building,

Recognizing that the two buildings would require ample parking for tenants

LEFT: Palm trees line the drive up to the hotel. Colored glass

casts pops of vibrant color onto the parking garage during the day.

BELOW: “The Icon” during the day stands as a large white sculptural piece, but erupts with a colorful projection after dark.

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and hotel guests, the office design team was charged with designing a parking structure that would accommodate more than 500 cars. “The client is very attuned to design features and was sensitive to just how large a deck was needed and what that might do to the overall aesthetic of the project,” said McLendon. Tavistock hired designer/ immersive theatre director Michael Counts to assist. A few weeks later, the public artist JEFRË was brought into the team. The idea was to create something interactive, which would make the town center stand out. Beyond that, little direction was given and Counts was left to his own creative devices. Counts and JEFRË joined together to transform the deck with the addition of not only a 264-foot-long “Code Wall,” but also a 60-foot-tall steel structure called The Beacon. At night people come to specifically watch the light show on The Beacon and parking garage walls. The Lake Nona project is a great example of the collaboration often required to take a project to a higherthan-expected level of design.

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ABOVE: The office building included in the

Lake Nona complex.

RIGHT: The striped design on the pavement

is designed to resemble a barcode to those flying overhead.

BELOW: The hotel features design elements that promote health and wellness to visitors.


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A

s with many corporations today, larger law firms are beginning to understand that in order to remain competitive, attract new talent, and keep existing clients, they will need to re-think their real estate needs. This epiphany did not just happen. Back in 2012, an internationally recognized real estate consulting agency published its annual Global Law Firm Perspective in which it stated, “With pressure on firms to improve the efficiency and utilization of their office space, and a growing number of firms exploring more open plan workplaces with a less cellular structure, many law firms are finding that today’s demands are testing their existing buildings.” For just shy of a decade, Cooper Carry has been working closely with Kilpatrick Townsend, an international law firm that can trace its roots back to 1860, growing through mergers and acquisitions to establish 18 offices in four countries. The firm has been on the forefront of proactive initiatives to consider their offices and how those offices relate to their attorneys, staff and clients, alike. “Our initial foray into office efficiency and functionality came more as a result of the rising cost of real estate than anything else,” said Ashley Luke, the Director of Operations at Kilpatrick 12

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Townsend. As an example, the firm’s San Francisco office has seen downtown real estate run as high as $86 per square foot in 2016, a 14 percent increase from the year before. Realizing that leasing costs highly affected their bottom line performance, and thus employee compensation in a direct way, J. Henry Walker, the Chair of Kilpatrick Townsend, looked to Cooper Carry as a partner to provide solutions that might reduce their real estate footprint through greater efficiency. In doing so, the long-term cost of that space would be reduced, without resulting in a diminished cultural identity, productive work environment or perception of the firm. Law firms are very conscious of how they are perceived. Conventional thinking has been “one size does not fit all.” Brian Parker, AIA, Gweneth Kovar, NCIDQ, and Douglas Webster, RA, with Cooper Carry’s Interiors Studio, were assigned to work on the San Francisco office project as they had previously led design efforts for the law firm’s Atlanta, Charlotte, Walnut Creek, New York and Washington, D.C. offices. “Nearly seven years ago we began to think about how law firms designed their offices because of the changing landscape of technology in corporate America” said Parker. “We had already begun to see the affect technology was having on our corporate 14

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clients. Office hoteling, telecommuting, video conferencing, and even coffee shop style spaces with Wi-Fi services were having a huge impact on workplaces.” In the redesign of the Kilpatrick Townsend’s New York office, which overlooks Bryant Park in Midtown Manhattan, attorneys’ offices became smaller because technology provided access to reference materials that no longer needed to occupy

space. The law library was reduced in size, or even eliminated, for the same reason and support staff spaces became more intentional, often serving as a place for a quick stand-up meeting in addition to providing ample workspace for paralegals. “While we didn’t sacrifice the traditional office organization for partners, then associates and so forth, we did convince the firm that there was value in designing smaller offices which ultimately resulted


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in about a 33 percent reduction in overall space needs in that office. By reducing the office space requirements by some 21,500 sf, the firm instantly recognized a savings of around $1.7M per annum because real estate costs placed most Class A buildings rentable square foot price at close to $80 per square foot. For close to a decade, the Interiors Studio has taken its experience with corporate users and begun to extrapolate some of the findings and use them in their law firm office designs. Kovar said, “There are five key factors which we have

found universally affect the office of today: (1) the built environment; (2) a generational shift; (3) changing business model; (4) the human factor and (5) technology. When individually considered, these factors don’t jump off the page at us, but when combined to make a whole, they are quite the body of influencers.” As an example, the generational shift is huge. Boomers and Traditionals are retiring at a pretty fast pace now, leaving Gen X in leadership positions hiring Millennials over the past 10 years. Interestingly, while basically all we hear about today are Millennials, their younger Gen Z brothers and sisters are beginning to matriculate into the workplace. This shift is having an enormous impact on law firms, in particular, because they have been the least open to the changing workplace. “What we have seen in our own situation is the firm’s concern that by adapting to what is arguably on the surface a very non-traditional workplace, that we would lose the stature and client confidence law firms are expected to exude,” said Luke. In other words, the firm was not open to bring your dog to work day or skateboarding from the office to the break room. “Our task from the outset of the Kilpatrick Townsend office designs was to demonstrate that today’s workplace can be open, collaborative and even still a bit formal, but it no longer has to be stuffy, stodgy and stilted,” said Kim Rousseau, NCIDQ, Principal and Director of the Interiors Studio at Cooper Carry. Rousseau, prior to coming to Cooper Carry, had AS P I R E

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been a thought leader in law firm office interiors at another design firm. “I saw clients in my previous role searching for a better mousetrap, so to speak. They knew that real estate costs were eating their lunch, yet they had not quite come to terms with how to reduce space needs without creating turmoil in the ranks. The by-product of that was convincing a law firm to allow us to utilize some of our corporate findings in interior design to create a new type of space for them.” Kilpatrick Townsend was a logical opportunity

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given Cooper Carry was already embarking on an interior design program across the Kilpatrick Townsend enterprise nationwide. As each project has progressed, more design elements have come into play. The latest project in San Francisco is the most far-reaching in the new view of law office interiors. “Their existing office interiors were typical for what we commonly see in law firms: office space hierarchy, lots of shelves for books, windows for partners and associates,

and dark day-light devoid interior space for paralegals and support staff. Couple that with a large unused law library, an internal after-thought for a kitchen, and average greeting and meeting spaces and you have a law firm office that could be practically anywhere in the world” said Webster, the project lead designer. “Our San Francisco office is probably one of our most unique because of our client base in that area. Representing some of the world’s most well-known technology companies


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in intellectual property, the firm’s lawyers were in and out of offices that yelled creativity. It was not uncommon for an attorney to pet the client’s dog or grab a latte at a coffee bar down the hall from a conference room full of easy chairs and sofas,” one of the San Francisco attorneys said. In other words, the clients had hip, cool spaces not at all like the Kilpatrick Townsend offices. “It was never the intention of the law firm to become a space of vivid colors, ragtag furniture and coffee bars around every corner,” Kovar said. However, the senior leadership in both the main office of Kilpatrick Townsend in Atlanta and the San Francisco office charged the Cooper Carry design team with designing an office that embraced the changing paradigms of the today’s offices. Even if it meant doing away with beautifully bound volumes of legalese on massive shelves viewed through a glass wall. Harkening back to the Five Factors Influencing Today’s Corporate Offices paper developed by Cooper Carry, the team dissected each one and put them back

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together, viewing them through the lens of the attorneys, paralegals and support staff who work there. “We came to know the design tenets inside and out. Our challenge was proving they worked in an environment where views on law firm offices had not changed in over a hundred years,” Parker said. Of the five, technology’s influence was the one element easiest to see. Workers of all types are mobile today. They collaborate more and they compete in a “real time” environment. Taking those factors into consideration when designing the new Kilpatrick Townsend offices in San Francisco was really a no-brainer. However, the most obvious outcome

from the technology influence is the effect it has on office space requirements. With office hoteling, telecommuting and collaboration topping the list of influencers within the technology tenet, one can begin to see the paradigm shift. “Attorneys are out of the office more. They are either with the client, traveling for the client, working from home to maximize efficiency or collaborating with others. They are no longer locked up in their office with the door closed. At least not 10-12 hours a day, six days a week. That’s not to say they aren’t working that many hours (or more). They just aren’t working in the office. That was our first major observation when

we visited the Kilpatrick Townsend San Francisco office,” Kovar said. “In fact, we spent a number of hours in the firm’s office just observing. We wanted to see how their people worked, note their route to the copy machine or the amount of time their door was closed. How they took breaks and where. How they met and with whom. All these items affect the office environment,” Rousseau said. Much of what was observed was a result of shifting generations, but business is also transacted differently today. Fax machines are almost a relic. The cloud hosts hundreds of millions of pages of material which


traditional, extreme and balanced. After lots of deliberation across the entire office, the firm’s leadership selected the “balanced” approach.

are accessible at the touch of a button and people work differently for the most part. Even partners did not see it as a negative when presented with an office plan that placed partners’ and associates’ offices along the windows, but with one significant change: they were all the

same size. Attitudes shifted. Before the design team moved forward with even more creative space ideas, they conducted focus groups and oneon-one interviews with employees and then married that with their field observations. They then presented three schemes and labeled them as:

“Due to the interesting footprint of the building, there were immediate challenges in designing spaces to accommodate the firm’s needs because our goal was to use every single square foot in a meaningful way. Creating typical square or rectangular spaces was not always an option in the uniquely shaped John Portman-designed Embarcadero building,” said Parker. The design team began by looking at casual spaces and their importance to employees and visitors. Creating small, intimate spaces for client consultation was vital to the design AS P I R E

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goals. Likewise, having a large conference room in which the firm could conduct business around the table or around the world also came into play. We took every opportunity available to delineate what a space’s potential might be. As an example, the stairs connecting the two floors occupied by Kilpatrick Townsend provided for a very unique space to create a “stopping point” for a quick meeting. Out in the open is a comfortable arrangement of chairs and a table to afford a brief visit or a place to grab a tablet to check email or the latest news feed. Throughout the office, spaces are efficient, vibrant and inviting. Using glass in interior spaces as much as possible, and thereby reducing drywall, resulted in a more open and airy environment with views for everyone to the bay and San Francisco skyline. It is truly amazing the effect sunlight has on productivity. In a 2014 report on CNN we read: “Since we spend a lot of our lives in our offices, we thought understanding the impact of light was important,” said Ivy Cheung, co-author of a study published this summer in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Cheung is a doctoral candidate working in Dr. Phyllis Zee’s laboratory at Northwestern University 22

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Feinberg School of Medicine. “We already study circadian rhythm in sleep labs and find that ... light is the most important synchronizing agent for the brain and the body.”

“Exposure to natural light during the workweek tended to inspire people to exercise more. Workers with a window were also better rested: Those with windows got 46 more minutes of sleep a night on average and the ones without windows had more sleep disturbances. The inclusion of glass on the perimeter attorney office fronts allows sunlight to filter through more interior spaces, thus improving the workplace for everyone; not just those with offices on the exterior.”

group than individually. Therefore, younger lawyers at the firm went about their workday in the same manner. The Cooper Carry designers created gathering spaces that actually celebrated and encouraged collaboration. Rooms of varying size can accommodate from two to 49 individuals. Of note in all of these rooms is that the designers selected furniture that might be found just as easily in a coffee shop down the street or a board room in a corporate office. Color, texture, comfort and functionality of the furniture were huge drivers in the design process. The team met often with Kilpatrick Townsend’s San Francisco employees to gauge interest in all of the design components. “We are obsessive about buy-in across the spectrum of employees because we fully understand they will be working in the environment we design for years to come. Their ultimate satisfaction is something we live with day and night throughout the project and well beyond the completion date” said Webster. This design and construction project spanned a short nine months from start to finish.

Millennials and now Gen Z’ers grew up learning the art of collaboration. They are more at ease solving a problem in a

From the outset the Cooper Carry designers insisted on a strong workplace strategy process which had a mission to build

“Cheung and Zee’s most recent study found that workers who had a window in their office had a much better sense of health. They examined the lives of 49 people—27 who worked in windowless offices and 22 who worked near windows. These were people who worked a typical day shift. Participants were not told about the objectives of the study so they wouldn’t be overly aware of windows in their offices.”

ABOVE:

Communal and collaborative space in the Kilpatrick Townsend office in San Francisco.


consensus and drive change management – the two most important factors when creating a totally new and not necessarily familiar office environment. “We were reducing and standardizing office sizes, altering routine workplace functions and designing a space that was no longer dark, stuffy, stodgy and traditional,” said Kovar. That’s a tall order, especially for lawyers. Yet, the end result was hugely accepted by an overwhelming majority of the more than 170 employees in Kilpatrick Townsend’s San Francisco office.

As furniture selection and color palates were being worked out, the design team turned to Cooper Carry’s Environmental Graphics Studio to create a wayfinding program that would match the now bold office design. Taking their cue from the city’s most notable icons, Bobbi Sweeney, a graphic designer on the Evironmental Graphic Design team, used graphical images of the Golden Gate Bridge, streetcars and city skyline to highlight areas within the office. “These are all strong images that everyone in the office would immediately recognize. I

took these as cues to bring familiarity to what might be considered by some to be new and unfamiliar spaces. Matching colors from the palate and blending them into the graphics was an interesting way to define spaces,” Sweeney said. Now wayfinding signs all have the firm’s logo appropriately merged into the sign’s message, which helps to strengthen and reinforce the firm’s brand. Gone are the huge private offices, ornate millwork and overstuffed leather chairs which for centuries have served to say to the visitor “you have arrived at your law firm, so be aware of its august surroundings.”

When visitors walk into this new law office in San Francisco, it’s welcoming, bright, energetic and interesting which is totally unexpected. It is not quite what they thought, yet familiar in an odd sort of way. People can be seen huddled around a table in a small conference room or casually carrying on a conversation in a booth in the firm’s community hub with tablet in hand. One thing is for sure—it’s not your grandfather’s law office. Welcome to the 21st century!

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DRONE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARCO PIERI, RA Staff Architect

Last April, I decided to pick up a new hobby of drone aerial photography. After seeing a surge of spectacular aerial images and videos emerge, I took the plunge and purchased a DJI Phantom 3 Quadcopter. At first, it seemed like a questionable purchase considering D.C. has a strict 15 mile radius “No Drone Zone” surrounding Reagan National Airport. However, the drone has proven itself a worthy sidekick during weekend trips, inspiring even more aerial excursions. Due to a series of technological advances over the past ten years, quadcopter drones have become more prevalent and hi-tech. Remarkably cheaper accelerometers and gyroscopes used for electrical flight stabilization, along with lighter and more efficient lithium polymer batteries have contributed substantially to their

Long 7 p.m. summer shadows fall onto Lake Michigan from the lighthouse. AS P I R E

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capabilities, affordability capabilities, affordability, and popularity. A typical flight can now range from 20-30 minutes per battery with speeds up to 45 miles per hour. Quadcopters can easily reach heights over 1,000 feet above ground; although, the FAA currently prohibits flights above 400 feet. Many middle-class drones ranging in price from $400-1,500, such as DJI’s quadcopters, are surprisingly easy to fly. The Phantom 3 uses GPS technology and connects to a smartphone app allowing features such as automatic takeoff and landing. Once in the air, the drone hovers in place, using precise GPS coordinates to maintain a constant XYZ location until directed to move by the radio controller. The drone will automatically counteract the wind in order to maintain its positioning. If connection is lost to the drone midflight, it will automatically return to an established start point at a predestinated altitude, in order to avoid trees and buildings.

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There are numerous applications for quadcopter drones in a quickly evolving market. Many drones rely on GPS to provide information on height, location and stabilization from wind. This GPS, along with sonar and various software applications, can be used to survey topographies and map out terrain. Some drones have been fitted with hooks and claws that enable them to carry and deliver packages from one location to the next. There is even a YouTube video of a group of guys who used their drone catch a 40 pound tuna from the shore by flying a baited line out over a school of fish using their drone. Architecturally, drone photography quickly and efficiently captures new perspectives. Drones can easily be used to shoot background context for renderings, as a tool during construction administration to examine progress, for photographing completed projects and to preview building view corridors.


Left: Left Photo - Marco Pieri flying his drone

For renovation and adaptive reuse projects, drones can be an extremely useful additional resource used to understand and document current building and site conditions. Recently, a friend and I photographed his house for a potential addition. We quickly shot some aerial photos which allowed

us to understand the building and to sketch addition options. We also flew above the roof a few feet to see if there were any advantages or views to capture by building an additional level.

Left: Right Photo - Auburn Alabama’s Skyline from left to right: Jordan Hare Stadium, The Haley Center, Samford Hall and the Auburn Water Tower. Above: Kenosha Suburbs, shot at Twilight 400 feet above the ground.

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Online shopping, such as Amazon Prime, has already played a role in the design of residential amenity spaces. Many new buildings now include package rooms or package lockers that notify residents of package deliveries. Existing 28

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automatic parking, the prevalence of ride sharing such as Uber and the future of autonomous parking have enormous design implications on the sizing and layouts of parking garages, which often make or break pro formats and development

potential. With the very likely widespread use of drones for aerial shipping, we need to consider how we design rooftop amenity spaces to receive packages and other products. Aside from all of the


pragmatic applications, drones are quite simply a lot of fun to fly—they also shoot great photos. Shown above and on the previous pages are some photos shot across the United States with a Phantom 3 Standard Quadcopter.

Above: Kenosha Harbor and breakwater, Kenosha WI

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T H E JOH NSON ST U DIO AT COOPE R CAR RY W E LCOM ES

The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry is expanding with the opening of a new restaurant, hospitality interiors and club design studio in New York City. Hospitality design veteran, Ray Chung will lead the new studio in Cooper Carry’s office, located in downtown Manhattan. “The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry’s expansion into the Northeast market further equips our firm with unmatched expertise and capabilities,” said Kevin Cantley, AIA, Cooper Carry’s President and CEO. “We expect 2017 to be a great year of growth for our hospitality portfolio across the country, but especially in the Northeast market.” The expansion of the practice will better position The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry to design projects in the Northeast, including restaurants, clubhouses, hotel 30

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interiors and other hospitality-related venues. The studio has previously designed Northeast-based projects, including the Del Frisco’s Grille in Rockefeller Center and several Legal Sea Food restaurants including the recently opened Legal Crossing in Boston. Cooper Carry’s New York office, which opened in 1998, is known for designing office, retail, hotel and mixed-use projects, including The Lodge at Woodloch, an award-winning destination spa in Hawley, Penn.; Lighthouse Point, the landmark mixed-use community on Staten Island; and a new Hilton hotel proposed for the banks of the Hudson River in Hoboken, N.J.. “Our New York office has seen great demand for hospitality projects, and our decision to open the new studio, helmed by Ray, will better prepare our team to design iconic projects across the Northeast,” said Bill Johnson, Associate Principal of The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. “We are confident that Ray’s extensive hospitality background and familiarity with New York City will allow him to strategically grow the hospitalityfocused practice.”


RIGHT: LX in Boston exterior. Chung has also designed spaces within the hotel. BELOW: Ray Chung and Bill Johnson, founder of the Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry

At New York City-based Tihany Design and before that, Rockwell Group, Chung led the design of restaurants, bars, theaters, spas, hotels, luxury cruise ships and casinos. He earned his Bachelor of Arts at Yale University, and his Master in Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. “I’m thrilled to join a team of designers who have an especially great reputation for transforming complex projects into memorable places that connect ideas, people and spaces.” said Chung.

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TOP & TOP LEFT: Del Frisco’s at Rockefeller Center designed by the Johnson Studio at

Cooper Carry

LEFT: LX in Boston, Massachussets designed by the Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry.

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A HISTORY OF

Installment Four of a Series of Articles

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An Eastern Vision of Western Modernism

part four

By Robert Edsall Architectural Designer

The American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, who practiced in the late 19th to mid 20th century, had a style that stemmed from his initial Prairie House concept, “defined by a low-pitched roof, central chimney, open floor plan, cantilevers, clerestory windows and, most importantly, horizontal lines.” Frank Lloyd Wright was a Regional modernist who was the major contributor to the overall foundation of Modernism, but his own style also showed strong influences from traditional Japanese architecture, as well as the Arts and Crafts movement. Wright “used the devices of Japanese architecture to achieve [certain] poetic effects… [such as] a sort of ‘turned up’ roof edge that

gave [a] roof a broken silhouette very similar to that found in traditional Japanese houses.” Wright also used a “device of stratification that… [divides his buildings] into distinctly different horizontal bands,” and his application of this device is apparent in many of his works through his mature organic period, as well as his Usonian period. Early in his career, Wright began “to feel that there was some affinity between nature and architecture… and that a horizontal architecture tended to suggest harmony with nature, rather than opposition to nature.” While these architectural elements are not present in all of his works, Frank Lloyd Wright’s style, nevertheless, was born through the

Prairie House, which served as his stylistic and architectural vehicle for future projects. Essentially, “this style, developed and fully realized by Wright, is founded on the principles of craftsmanship, beauty, function, and simplicity.” As his style and career progressed, Wright was offered many prominent projects for various countries, businesses and organizations, which required him to adjust the scale and scope of his style to the extent to which the Prairie style was not necessarily applicable, but the design elements that defined the Prairie style were still present in other of his works, such as the Johnson Wax Headquarters.

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LEFT: Haesley Nine-Bridges Golf Clubhouse, Shigeru Ban

The Johnson Wax Headquarters in Racine, Wisconsin was constructed between 1936 and 1939 and served as the world headquarters and administration building of S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. The design was, in essence, a streamlined version of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Japaneseinspired style characterized by a dominantly horizontal scheme subverted by the presence of curved walls rather than corners. The design also included various cylindrical and columnar vertical elements in order to reconcile the overall horizontality of the structure. Additionally, these elements were used not only to reconcile the overall horizontality of the structure’s exterior but also as an experiential vehicle for spatial compression within the entire compound. There is a recurring column motif that begins in the parking lot and interior court of the building and it is marked by a low clearance that creates the illusion of compression. While these “dendriform,” or tree-like, columns are initially small in stature, they are also found within the building as large twostory columns that not only support the roof of Wright’s Great Workroom but also

establish an experience of spatial compression that begins with compression and ends with release. Wright’s Great Workroom - the true focal point of the Johnson Wax Building - is characterized by a field of dendriform columns complimented by the distinct absence of internal walls. With a base of only nine inches in diameter and a rounded “lily pad” capital of 18 feet in diameter, these steel reinforced concrete columns were able to hold five times the amount of weight required by the then current building codes. Essentially, the strength of these columns was a testament to Wright’s intention to make them the focal point and presiding motif of his work and, combined with a glass roof and surrounding clerestories all unobstructed by internal walls, the overall effect is an open forest-like atmosphere – an arboreal condition that resonated with Shigeru Ban. Ban was intrigued by the arboreal nature of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Great Workroom within the Johnson Wax Headquarters to the extent that he decided to emulate it and critique it by taking it a few modern and sustainable steps

further with his Haesley Nine Bridges Golf Club House in South Korea. Constructed between 2006 and 2009, the Haesley Club House exhibits a fusion of Frank Lloyd Wright’s vision of his Great Workroom with a distinctly literal translation of wooden trees channeling the art and craftsmanship of Asian woodworking. In true Ban fashion, instead of using steel reinforced concrete columns to support his work, he decided to recall Wright’s dendriform columns by using something more literal – treated wood. While it can be seen as a distinct departure from Ban’s paper tube architecture, it also seems to be a direct critique of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the original design while simultaneously reviving the Asian influences of Wright’s style. Shigeru Ban’s design serves as an architectural critique of Wright’s Great Workroom in many capacities: light, space and atmosphere. While Wright’s design created the sense of an arboreal atmosphere, the dense lily pad capitals of the concrete columns prevented additional sunlight from entering the space through the glass roof and, although this AS P I R E

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ABOVE: Haesley NineBridges Golf Clubhouse, Shigeru Ban LEFT: Johnson Wax Headquarters, Frank Lloyd Wright RIGHT: Parking Structure, Frank Lloyd Wright

lighting condition was mitigated by surrounding clerestories, the overall effect did not provide a true canopy condition. Ban’s construction method of the primary structural system allowed for a true tree canopy condition through the geometrically diaphanous nature of the treated wood that works intandem with skylights that represent the exact inverse of the Johnson Wax Building’s lighting condition. The skylights are situated directly above the diaphanous supports such that they spread light as well as direct it through the columns whereas Wright’s columns acted as solid figures that allowed light to enter through the interstitial voids. Additionally, Ban decided to make a major portion of the exterior walls glass in order to establish a profound connection to the outside world and to nature. The structure is “attuned to its natural surroundings and, through its transparency and horizontality, becomes a part of the

surrounding nature.” While Ban’s work serves an architectural critique to Wright’s Great Workroom, it also represents architecture’s reversion back to nature - its mimetic potential - and, most importantly, it celebrates Wright’s distinctly Japanese values within his Prairie style period that were devoted to the representation of the horizontal line associated with integrating the structure with the landscape. The Haesley Nine Bridges Golf Club House serves not only as an effective architectural critique of Wright’s Great Workroom but also as a testament to Wright’s conception of architecture’s structural connection to nature “where the building and the components of the building display a definitive relationship with the surrounding landscape, thus not dominating the site but, rather, relating to it and allowing nature to enter the structure.”

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This fall, Cooper Carry joined more than 200 organizations as a participant in the 2016 Atlanta Bike Challenge; a fun and free competition to encourage people to experience the joys of riding a bike. Atlanta businesses competed against one another to see who could get the most staff to ride a bike between September 25 and October 23. Torrance Wong, an architectural designer in Cooper Carry’s Corporate Studio, organized the competition not expecting there would be such 40

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high participation. “I initiated the competition because I thought it would be a fun way to compete against other companies in Atlanta,” says Wong. “I only expected a handful of people to sign up, but we had a 30 person roster by the end of the challenge.”

distance for the team to maintain a steady lead. Participants ranged from individuals who biked a few miles a week to those who averaged 30 miles a day. No bike? No problem. Those without a ride of their own used Atlanta’s new bike share service, Relay.

During the four-week challenge, the group had a weekly ride where everyone would gather after work and bike five to seven miles around Atlanta. Members would make a weekly goal to cycle a certain

Cooper Carry finished the challenge in first place for the designated staffing category. The group biked a collective 2,581 miles – the equivalent of cycling from Atlanta to the Golden Gate Bridge.


#lovetoride

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Many team members used their bike to commute to work, for fun and fitness, or to visit restaurants and shops. “My favorite part of the challenge was seeing people in the office ditch their cars and ride a bike to work!” added Wong. “It is in line with our vision of being a sustainable, design-oriented firm that connects people to place.”

Multiple: Cooper Carry employees took to the streets for the 2016 Atlanta Bike Challenge. Those featured in the photos include: Blake Rambo, Uranus Shojachaghervand, Torrance Wong. Meg Robie, Allison Clark, Zach Wilson, Elias Darham, William Callahan, and Andrew Miller

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There was a time when restaurants and bars in country clubs were seen as the means to an end. Members attended functio was then. Nowadays, restaurants in clubs are more and more becoming seen as a place to gather, to renew friendships, enjo of the community or down the street from the club. Restaurants are fast becoming places that are full of energy, visually app transferring our vast experience in Main Street restaurant design over to club restaurants because the club member today ex

F O E C A F G N I G N N I A S H T C N THE RESTAURA

Recently, two projects designed by The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry won “Golden Fork” awards from Golf Inc. magazine. L and North Carolina. Both were recognized for the dramatic results in the areas of design and economic performance.

Located near the 9th hole of the Tom Fazio­designed 27-hole course, The Tavern at The National Golf Course is the newest re porch for casual dining with scenic views. When entering the restaurant, the focal point quickly shifts to the steel over-bar str

“The result is a timeless and classic zinc bar - a perfect gathering place,” said Johnson. A “settling” room provides a zone for traditional restaurants into club restaurants. Johnson said that the idea came naturally to the design team because it is used the guests to peek into what’s happening in the kitchen draws them further into the dining experience,” said Karen Teske-Blu design, with most kitchens being tucked away with only an occasional porthole in a swinging door for kitchen-gazing. “The fa a big win for the chef and customers alike.” With slate-color concrete floors, red brick columns and walls, steel and glass windows and the occasional deer head looking style.

The second award-winner was at the Carmel Country Club in Charlotte, Nc. The dining options at Carmel Country Club were m There wasknown a timeaswhen restaurants and bars vary from smart casual to formal. “Revitalization of the Carmel G facilities. Collectively The Restaurants, the options in country seenofasthe the means clearly recognized that clubs a true were reflection many waystoto enjoy the Carmel lifestyle includes providing a daily slate of mult end. Members in them, and kitchenan upgrades. Capital attended also wentfunctions toward new menus, china, staff uniforms and more. stopped by for a burger after a round of golf or reserved private room for a business or figure jumped to $46,979, with daily average spending increased In 2011, weekly averageasales were $16,908. In 2015, that social meeting. That increase in the check averages. Thewas Oak then. Room Nowadays, sees a $52 check average, and the Restaurant Grill sees a $26 check averag restaurants clubs are more and more beinghas heightened. On a busy night, the facilities will accommodate m customers for cocktails, in and demand for outdoor seating seen as a place to gather, to renew friendships, enjoy aprovide delectable meal or grab a quick mealand that was our intent as we sought to create multiple spaces tha “The Restaurants a wide variety of dining options with sought a friendtoatcapitalize the bar. on They are competing the design team their knowledge of what today’s diner wants when dining out. Of course, expectation against thepreferences heart of theand apply them to our design philosophy, understanding that every research findings to other betterrestaurants understand in diner community the street club. Club,” saidJohnson. “As or andown example, we talkfrom a lotthe about the need for a restaurant to have ‘energy’ because it is the common are fast becoming places that experiences)Restaurants will be the same. While the club restaurant design might not be as dramatic as a Main Street restaurant, we ca full atofCooper energy, visually The Johnsonare Studio Carry brings appealing a fresh eyeand to club restaurants because they have thrown out the old restaurant d very transparent. Bill Johnson, AIA, isAssociate committee appointed by the club’s Board. “This somewhat different from our traditional restaurant design client where the Principal of The Johnson Studio at C ooper Carry building consensus. The process might take longer but the end re because after all, our job is to design great spaces through said, “We are transferring our vast experience in Main Street restaurant design over to club restaurants because the club member today expects the same type of restaurant at the club as they do on Main Street.” Recently, two projects designed by The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry won “Golden Fork” awards from Golf Inc. magazine. Long recognized as one of the premier restaurant

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ons in them, stopped by for a burger after a round of golf or reserved a private room for a business or social meeting. That oy a delectable meal or grab a quick meal with a friend at the bar. They are competing against other restaurants in the heart pealing and very transparent. Bill Johnson, AIA, Associate Principal of The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry said, “We are expects the same type of restaurant at the club as they do on Main Street.”

Long recognized as one of the premier restaurant design firms, the studio was asked to design new restaurants in Georgia

estaurant at Reynolds Lake Oconee. The most visible exterior feature of the $4.5 million restaurant is the large wrap-around ructure, custom designed by the team.

r groups to socialize with two communal tables and views into the chef’s expo kitchen, another concept brought from d so often in other type restaurants. “We see the whole restaurant experience as being somewhat theatrical and allowing ue, NCIDQ, Director of Interior Design in The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. This aspect was very contra to club restaurant act that the guests can now actually see what is happening because of the openness was a huge design win, and, we think, out over the restaurant, the restaurant’s design aesthetic is a cross between industrial and farm­house-inspired craftsman

multiplied. Taking the existing restaurant, the Carmel Grille, the design team sought to turn it into four diverse dining Grill was inspired by the requests of our membership for a diverse dining experience,” said President Eric Sayman. “It was tiple dining options.” The club spent $3.5 million to renovate the facility and an additional $150,000 in restaurant additions

d by more than $5,000 since 2011. In the first five months after opening, revenues were up 115 percent. There was also an ge compared to a $21 average in the former restaurant. Since the renovation, The Lamplighter Pub has had more walk-in more than 400 people.

at served to attract a diverse population of members,” said Johnson. Not unlike the studio’s typical restaurant challenges, ns vary according to demographics. Age is one of the most significant. “We have spent countless hours studying market y restaurant is somewhat unique and gears itself to its market. It was no different for these restaurants at Carmel Country n ingredient we find in every successful restaurant. It’s exciting, ever-changing and offers the idea that no two days (or an assure that they are no less interesting!” The increase in revenue speaks for itself and best illustrates this point. design playbook and established a new one. Typically, the team will interact with the club manager, F&B director and a e chef or CEO makes the final decision on design attributes, but we have been able to successfully manage the process esult is no less important,” said Johnson.

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design firms, the studio was asked to design new restaurants in Georgia and North Carolina. Both were recognized for the dramatic results in the areas of design and economic performance. Located near the 9th hole of the Tom Fazio­ designed 27-hole course, The Tavern at The National Golf Course is the newest restaurant at Reynolds Lake Oconee, Georgia. The most visible exterior feature of the $4.5 million restaurant is the large wrap-around porch for casual dining with scenic views. When entering the restaurant, the focal point quickly shifts to the steel over-bar structure, custom designed by the team. “The result is a timeless and classic zinc bar - a 46

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perfect gathering place,” said Johnson. A “settling” room provides a zone for groups to socialize with two communal tables and views into the chef’s expo kitchen, another concept brought from traditional restaurants into club restaurants. Johnson said that the idea came naturally to the design team because it is used so often in other types of restaurants. “We see the whole restaurant experience as being somewhat theatrical and allowing the guests to peek into what’s happening in the kitchen to draw them further into the dining experience,” said Karen Teske-Blue, NCIDQ, Director of Interior Design in The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry. This aspect was very contra to club restaurant

ABOVE + RIGHT: Carmel Country Club, Charlotte, North Carolina


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design, with most kitchens being tucked away with only an occasional porthole in a swinging door for kitchen-gazing. “The fact that the guests can now actually see what is happening because of the openness was a huge design win, and, we think, a big win for the chef and customers alike.” With slate-colored concrete floors, red brick columns and walls, steel and glass windows, and the occasional deer head looking out over the restaurant,

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the restaurant’s design aesthetic is a cross between industrial and farm­houseinspired craftsman style. The second award-winner was the Carmel Country Club in Charlotte, North Carolina. The dining options at Carmel Country Club were multiplied. Taking the existing restaurant, the Carmel Grille, the design team sought to turn it into four diverse dining facilities. Collectively known as “The Restaurants,” the options

RIGHT + BELOW: Sea Pines Plantation Golf Clubhouse, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Interiors by Kent Interior Design.


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The Peninsula Club, Cornelius, North Carolina

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vary from smart casual to formal. “Revitalization of the Carmel Grill was inspired by the requests of our membership for a diverse dining experience,” said Club President Eric Sayman. “It was clearly recognized that a true reflection of the many ways to enjoy the Carmel lifestyle includes providing a daily slate of multiple dining options.” The club spent $3.5 million to renovate the facility and an additional $150,000 in restaurant additions and kitchen upgrades. Capital also went toward new menus, china, staff uniforms and more. In 2011, weekly average sales were $16,908. In 2015, that figure jumped to $46,979, with daily average spending increasing by more than $5,000 since 2011. In the first five months after opening, revenues were up 115 percent. There was also an increase in the check averages. The Oak Room sees a $52 check average, and the Restaurant Grill sees a $26 check average compared to a $21 average in the former restaurant. Since the renovation, The Lamplighter Pub has had more walk-in customers for cocktails, and demand for outdoor seating has heightened. On a busy night, the facilities will accommodate more than 400 people. “The Restaurants provide a wide variety of dining options and that was our intent as we sought to create multiple spaces that served to attract a diverse population of members,” said Johnson. Not unlike the studio’s typical restaurant challenges, the design team sought to capitalize on their

knowledge of what today’s diner wants when dining out. Of course, expectations vary according to demographics. Age is one of the most significant. “We have spent countless studying hours market research findings to better understand diner preferences and apply them to our design philosophy, understanding that every restaurant is somewhat unique and gears itself to its market. It was no different for these restaurants at Carmel Country Club,” said Johnson. “As an example, we talk a lot about the need for a restaurant to have ‘energy’ because it is the common ingredient we find in every successful restaurant. It’s exciting, ever-changing and offers the idea that no two days (or experiences) will be the same. While the club restaurant design might not be as dramatic as a Main Street restaurant, we can assure that it is no less interesting!” The increase in revenue speaks for itself and best illustrates this point. The Johnson Studio at Cooper Carry brings a fresh eye to club restaurants because they have thrown out the old restaurant design playbook and established a new one. Typically, the team will interact with the club manager, F&B director and a committee appointed by the club’s board. “This is somewhat different from our traditional restaurant design client where the chef or CEO makes the final decision on design attributes, but we have been able to successfully manage the process because after all, our job is to design great spaces through consensus. The process might take longer but the end result is no less AS P I R E

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BY SOPHIA TARKHAN, AIA Associate

Each year, Fulton County Schools hosts a program titled “Principal for a Day” where professionals working with the county have the opportunity to shadow a principal to better understand the workings of a school. Sophia Tarkhan, AIA, a designer in our K-12 Education Studio, recently had the chance to participate in this program at Ronald E. McNair Middle School.

I was invited by Fulton County School System to serve as “Principal for a Day” at McNair Middle School, one of the schools in Fulton County. It was great to see first-hand the regular duties, which school leaders face every day, while learning how rewarding – and demanding – it is to be an educator. With my invitation, I was told to bring my comfortable shoes because a lot of walking would be involved. Principal Madden’s day began at 7:15 a.m. I met him as the students arrived for the day. As he greeted each student, it was apparent to see that he made himself very accessible and approachable. Principal Madden suggested an ice cream party, DJ included, to the grade level that received the least disciplinary incidents for the week. 52

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It reminded me of my upbringing where if one of my siblings got rewarded we would all get rewarded. This system forced us to work together and keep each other out of trouble so we would all be rewarded. During the morning announcements and after the pledge of allegiance, Principal Madden informed the students of the “ice cream” challenge. McNair Middle School is a brand new facility, which opened in January 2016. When you enter the school you are greeted by a high volume lobby space, which is filled with an abundance of natural light. The floors are covered with durable terrazzo, which leads to polished concrete in the hallways and classrooms. The school design incorporates the 21st Century

Learning pedagogy of open classrooms, break-out spaces, huddle rooms, learning on display spaces, encounter spaces and an open meeting auditorium. The impetus for the district is to give the best opportunity for learning with this new facility. I explained to Principal Madden that as a K-12 architect my passion is that a school building convey the value of the student and the expectations of the district. We talked about how he felt this school assisted in their day-to-day self-awareness. Our conversation affirmed Cooper Carry’s belief in the importance of creating a school that embodies “Pride of Place.” Principal Madden loves the school and is proud to be in the new facility. The new 21st century classroom layout


will take some time to adjust to and will require continual training of faculty and staff to maximize the use of the facility. Right now, many staff members are working to adjust from the traditional lecture classroom setting to the collaborative, projectbased and individual learning environment. Principal Madden believes that in two years they will be able to fully maximize the opportunity, which the new facility offers students and teachers.

confident it will positively inform the sensitivity of our designs. To round out my day, I got the pleasure of seeing how positive reinforcement works. One young man stepped in and stopped his brother from getting into a fight in the cafeteria. It was great to end the day with some brotherly love.

It is Cooper Carry’s vision to create connective architecture: connecting ideas and people to the places where they work, relax, live and learn. This on the ground, deep in the trenches, experience as “Principal for a Day” allowed me to better understand the needs and challenges of the educator. I am AS P I R E

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DRESSED TO SKILL This year, team members from Cooper Carry’s Interiors Studio participated in the Georgia Chapter of the International Interior Design Association’s “DRESSED.” This is one

of their largest annual events, which pairs Atlanta’s most talented interior designers and architects with the architectural and design (A&D) industry manufacturers to

create one-of-a-kind, wearable garments out of non-traditional materials. It was a runway extravaganza like no other. Design teams were challenged to construct a highly unique garment made almost entirely from their sponsoring manufacturer’s products including: wallcoverings, flooring materials, deconstructed contract furniture, paint and more. The sky was the limit as designers tested their imagination to create articles of clothing from materials traditionally used to create buildings. According to the Cooper Carry team leader, Gweneth Kovar, NCIDQ, a designer in Cooper Carry’s Interiors Studio, the team spent nearly three months designing a dress made from materials provided by team sponsors (manufacturers) Daltile, Main Solutions and HermanMiller. In addition to materials, the sponsors also provided

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monetary support to purchase accessories such as, shoes, jewelry, hair, makeup and other necessary accoutrements to round out the project. “Teams selected a fashion house and music artist from which to draw inspiration for their design. It’s vital that the influences of fashion and music merge to aptly define the style envisioned,” said Kovar. Through a random drawing, Cooper Carry selected Coco Chanel as the fashion house and the punk rock band, Paramore, for inspiration. With their selections in hand, Kovar and four designers from the Interiors Studio, Hannah Patel, IIDA, Jessica Been, Adriana Acosta and Ali Gagliardo, IIDA, set out to design, sew, embellish and produce a dress, which would encourage and inspire the audience.

captured the essence of the evening in her runway debut. “As this was our first year participating, the entire process was new and exciting. It was also beneficial to us individually, and as a team,” said Kovar. “From ideation through presentation, all of us improved our creative, communication and design skills working together as a team with a single focus. Many of us learned new creative skills and all of us were challenged in a unique way.” Portions of the proceeds from the event benefited Dress for Success, an international not-for-profit organization that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools to help them thrive in work and in life.

Rebeka Flamenco from the Interiors Studio modeled the dress and

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Cooper Carry Employees Share Their

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Thesis Title:

SENSING THE THRESHOLD Hillary Roth Architectural Designer The sacred and the profane: a dichotomy which can only exist through the thresholds within. In a world that’s drowning in the profane, we yearn for the ephemeral, in which our mind, body and soul emerge out of the mundane of day-to-day life and into something beyond. Yet, some of the most sacred spaces in the world have become mere subjects behind the lens of a camera. Technology has empowered our ability to reach marvels, yet it has provided layers now inherently filtered onto our experiences. This project, located on a manmade island, a part of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, which connects southeastern Virginia to the Delmarva Peninsula, is inherently utilitarian in program, yet it is positioned in a remarkable location in the middle of the bay. By proposing an architectural addition to the utilitarian spaces, like a restaurant, hotel guestrooms and even a small chapel, the design explores the movement through this dichotomy. Promoting sensational wayfinding through the diverse spaces allows us to truly feel, free from obstructions. Instead of looking for the sacred, we journey through the profane. Celebrate the threshold.

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Thesis Title:

THE MARKETPLACE Jordan Kline Staff Interior Designer

Thesis Title:

A Local Mobility:

STITCHING TOGETHER THE POST-APARTHEID CITY Alyssa Rogut Architectural Designer 58

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The Marketplace is a unique shop situated in the urban setting of Portland, Ore., heavily influenced by the atmosphere of a European street market. On the first level sits a curated selection of imported goods and fresh produce showcased in custom freestanding carts. A custom flower bar with flowers sold by the stem features a large work surface where patrons can create their own arrangements. The second level of The Marketplace features an expansive wine-bar mezzanine where

customers can pick up a glass of wine to enjoy as they shop or sit and have a drink while overlooking the market below. Rounding out The Marketplace is a large workshop room, which offers a variety of classes to the public, including cooking and wine. This supports local artisans in the area. With a mixture of European details and modern urban architecture, the interior of The Marketplace provides an experience unlike any other found in Portland.

A city dictated by barriers lacks the means for progression, as it is met with issues of mobility and social integration. The divisive city planning and urban fabric of apartheid in Cape Town, South Africa has prevented social and economic growth for much of the population, and although the types of places invented by human cultures have the potential to be altered by sociopolitical events, little has been accomplished in Cape

Town in regards to breaking the patterns of segregation in the built environment. New systemic development may aid in the transcendence of borders for the city, linking neighborhoods through new transport networks and a new, central marketplace aimed at mobilizing goods and people, which will in turn catalyze an increase in physical movement, social progress and economic growth.


Thesis Title:

(RE)ENVISIONING INFRASTRUCTURE Brian Gongaware Architectural Designer Plagued by the post-industrial planning of the I-376 highway system, the Monongahela Riverfront in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, commonly known as the Mon Wharf, has been a space used for nothing but parking for decades. With (re)urbanization and sustainable/ smart planning on the rise, an adaptable space that focuses its attention on people rather than the vehicle becomes a priority. The Mon Wharf Riverfront Park seeks to (re)connect people to the Monongahela River, both visually and physically. The existing highway system is (re)located to below city level, allowing for new public space above. An artificial landscape plane extends outward towards the edge, ramping and terracing down towards the water. A hierarchy of spatial moments are formed to support both large public functions, as well as single user experiences. A series of pavilions, both programmed and flexible, are scattered throughout the park, acting as navigational nodes. The river-walk level becomes a new promenade opportunity, connecting people to Point State Park and the other riverfront spaces, becoming the missing link along the water that Pittsburgh will use for years to come.

Thesis Title:

THE RETREAT AT CARMEL MEADOWS Kasey Lim Architectural Designer

A retreat, located in Carmel-by-the-Sea, Calif., is intended to serve as a place for guests to not only connect with nature but also learn more about green living and design. The complex includes a restaurant, a learning center (where visitors can learn about sustainability and the environment; i.e. the local ecosystems), indoor and outdoor event spaces, accommodations and gardens. Special care was taken to create transparency between the interior spaces and exterior landscaping, reinforc-

ing the connection with nature. The design of the complex incorporates sustainable design and practices, including the use of sunscreen systems, solar panels, recycled materials, geothermal systems for heating and cooling and gardens designed to supply the produce for the retreat’s restaurant. It will not only accommodate the teaching of sustainable living, the retreat will also teach its guests through its construction and maintenance. AS P I R E

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The building is not only a homeless shelter but, also houses all refugees within in a community, including a boutique hotel for those traveling on business, social housing for the low income population, a hostel for young solo travelers and an emergency shelter for the homeless; all co-inhabiting in one space.

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Thesis Title:

SITE CONTEXT

A CASE STUDY OF CROSS SOCIOECONOMIC CLASS LIVING IN DESERTED SPACES WITHIN CITY CENTERS Nicole Zaccack Architectural Designer Walking through Charlottesville, Virginia’s downtown mall, homeless people can be seen panhandling on every street corner. All the while, the abandoned Landmark Hotel lies on the corner of 2nd St. and Main St. This scene is

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a familiar one in almost every city. Re-adapting abandoned buildings for cross socio-economic living of communities’ displaced people creates a stronger connection between the local population and migrants within the community.

In plan, the residences are pushed to the protected east facade with catwalks connecting it to the porches on the west. Using the existing infrastructure of the Landmark Hotel, the programmatic blocks are plugged into the building and screened by masks that at times hide the infrastructure and at other times expose it. The mesh screen on the north and west façade allow passersby to look into this co-inhabitation. While the opaque east facade gives privacy to the residents, the color coded south façade advertises the different social services going on through the building. The design of this space could be taken apart and placed in any abandoned building in any city providing resources for their displaced people whether it be the homeless, refugees, business people or families.


Thesis Title:

PARKER-ASHE DISTRICT CREATION/ STADIUM PLAN Brandon Lenk, AIA Associate

In 2008, the Richmond Braves finally broke down and moved the team after residing in Richmond, Va. since 1966. For the better part of a decade, the team struggled in their attempts to build a new ballpark in the heart of the city. Aside from the now common arguments

against public funding, Richmond has not found a suitable location for a stadium. Often undervaluing its own land, the city has toyed with moving its stadium for almost 20 years, often with strong opposition. Today, eight years later, nothing has substantially changed.

Thesis Title:

within local and global space. These investigations resulted in three ruralized animations projected upon 360 degree screens at the CRAIVE Lab, a part of the Center for Communication, Cognition and Culture. Audio-visual soundscapes were generated to present suppressed events within the field. The first animation produced a flocking algorithm paired with bio-acoustical inputs. The second field investigated the thresholds of our perception, where the inaudible sounds of machines align with pronounced visual stimuli. A third animation blurred between perceptible

DIGITAL PROMETHEUS Elias Darham Architectural Designer This research project seeks to understand the potential for immersive environments as a visual and aural construct to infect and generate desires

In 2007, I drafted a proposal to replace the “The Diamond” on its current/original site, land already owned and maintained by the City of Richmond. Contrary to popular developer plans to relocate and create an entertainment district on private land in the Shockoe Slip, this plan developed a new mixed-use district on 60 acres of cityowned property. Property, which to this day, sits either largely vacant or is woefully underutilized. The site offered existing traffic strategies and more than two million square feet of land to craft a new and usable sports/ entertainment district just to the north of Richmond’s famous Fan District and Monument Avenue. The proposal included rebuilding and improving upon the city’s Arthur Ashe Center, improving urban connections to the existing Richmond Strikers soccer facilities, and replacing “The Diamond” adjacent to its current location. Infilling a drive-by area with an updated urban core was the main goal to create a 12-month environment tightly knit around buildings with more temporal uses.

and incoherent events with a Turing diffusion system. These animations were treated as an exploratory mode of research that paralleled the development of the biological event that an airport may become. In a storm of invisible biological events, Digital Prometheus asserts the potential for imperceptible bodies to elucidate and bring resolution to viral epidemics and respond indeterminable biological risks, in so doing, shed light onto an architecture of truly global consequence. AS P I R E

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Congrats! A heartfelt “Thank You� to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the second half of 2016.

lifers

10 years or more

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Roger Miller Principal 37 Years

Kevin Cantley Chief Executive Officer, Principal 36 Years

Rick Fredlund Associate Principal 35 Years

Pope Bullock Principal 35 Years

Rich Cogburn Principal 34 Years

Tim Fish Principal 28 Years

Sheila Jones Accounting Manager 28 Years

Gar Muse Principal 26 Years

Lee Ayers Senior Associate 22 Years

Allen Dedels Associate Principal 22 Years

Rick Kinkade Senior Associate 21 Years

Bob Just Principal 16 Years

Rose Pollion Studio Administrator 12 Years

Brian Campa Associate Principal 12 Years

Brandon Danke Senior Associate 12 Years

Khrysti Uhrin Associate 12 Years

Don Reszel Senior Associate 11 Years

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get to Don’t for late them congratu In

on Linked

Angelo Carusi Principal 33 Years

David Kitchens Principal 32 Years

Jane Matthews Payroll Manager 31 Years

Judy Ferguson Associate 30 Years

Steve Smith Principal 30 Years

Bob Neal Principal 28 Years

Mike Service Associate Principal 21 Years

Sean McLendon Principal 21 Years

Lane Chapman Senior Associate 19 Years

Carol Alexander Studio Administrator 16 Years

Lauren Perry Ford Associate Principal 17 Years

Nicolia Robinson Senior Associate 16 Years

tweeners

49 to

Allison Bickers Associate 11 Years

Jason Albers Associate 11 Years

Andrea Smith Associate Principal 10 Years

Richard Lee Architectural Designer 10 Years

years

AS P I R E

Manny Dominguez Principal 9 Years

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Congrats! A heartfelt “Thank You� to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the second half of 2016.

64

Brandon Lenk Associate 9 Years

Mark Kill Chief Operating Officer, Principal 9 Years

Patrick Finucan Architect 8 Years

Abbey Oklak Planner 7 Years

Leisa Bedingfield Controller 6 Years

Mikki Cash Marketing Coordinator 6 Years

Tyler Blazer Architect 5 Years

Gary Warner Associate Principal, Director of Planning & Landscape Architecture | 5 Years

Allison Miles Architect 5 Years

Pratt Farmer Director of Marketing, Associate Principal 5 Years

Assad Abboud Architectural Designer 4 Years

Beth Anne Redmond Receptionist 4 Years

Hillary Roth Architectural Designer 3 Years

Joseph Almeida Architectural Designer 3 Years

Samantha Yeh Student 3 Years

Heba Elamin Architectural Designer 2 Years

Tori August Architectural Designer 2 Years

Alanna Conner Architectural Designer 2 Years

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get to Don’t for late them u t a r g n o c In

on Linked

Bill Halter Principal 6 Years

Flo Lavaran Office Manager 6 Years

Lesley Braxton Associate Principal 6 Years

Alysha Buck Architect 6 Years

Gwen Kovar Associate 6 Years

Ben Gholson Architectural Designer 6 Years

newbies

13 to

years

Lynette McKissic Studio Administrator 4 Years

Emilia Delsol Receptionist 4 Years

Ty Shinaberry Project Manager 4 Years

T. Jack Bagby Senior Associate 4 Years

Maria Greenawalt Associate 2 Years

Christine Gregory Architectural Designer 2 Years

Andrew Lakatosh Architect 2 Years

Megan Fagge Architectural Designer 2 Years

Marco Pieri Architect 3 Years

John Goebel Architect 2 Years

Clarence Browne Architect 2 Years

AS P I R E

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V O LU M E X V  65


Congrats! A heartfelt “Thank You� to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the second half of 2016.

Ashley Hernandez Architect 2 Years

Andrew Miller Architectural Designer 2 Years

Blake Rambo Architectural Designer 2 Years

Zach Carnegie Architectural Designer 2 Years

Hee Jin Cho Architectural Designer 2 Years

Trey Howard Architectural Designer 2 Years

Safi Bello Studio Administrator 1 Year

Allison Clark Architectural Designer 1 Year

Faranak Farahani Architect 1 Year

Danielle Ferguson Office Assistant 1 Year

Julie Argo Young Graphic Designer, Marketing Coordinator 1 Year

Frank Rogg Architectural Designer 1 Year

Brad Mann Architectural Designer 1 Year

Jeffrey Squire Architect 1 Year

Jenny Williams Architect 1 Year

Aadaam Kelly Systems Engineer 1 Year

Emily Stenz Interior Designer 1 Year

Rebeka Flamenco Interior Designer 1 Year

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Qiongwen Kong Architectural Designer 2 Years

Stephanie Allen Interior Designer 2 Years

Bill Garcia Project Manager 2 Years

Adriana Acosta Interior Designer 2 Years

William Collar Architectural Designer 2 Years

Jorge Abad Project Manager 1 Year

Ryan Smith Architect 1 Year

Torrance Wong Architectural Designer 1 Year

Zhen Feng Landscape Architect 1 Year

Yen Dinh Marketing Coordinator 1 Year

Patricia Brown Architectural Designer 1 Year

Emily Lysek Architectural Designer 1 Year

Elizabeth Madden

Sasha Orr Office Assistant 1 Year

Sibel Anderson Studio Administrator 1 Year

Hongying Tan Architectural Designer 1 Year

Mahnaz Asemi Esfahani Architectural Designer 1 Year

Jonathan Asiimwe Architectural Designer 1 Year

Architectural Designer

1 Year

AS P I R E

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V O LU M E X V  67


Congrats! A heartfelt “Thank You� to those celebrating an employment anniversary in the second half of 2016.

just getting started

NEW HIRES Andrew Haney Project Architect 1 Year

India Smith Human Resource Generalist

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Ray Chung Director of Design

Peter Kim Architectural Designer

James Spencer Architect

Bo Zhao Architectural Designer

Elias Darham Architectural Designer

Jordan Kline Interior Designer


Retail/Office/Mixed-Use, Award of Merit - Lake Nona Town Center

Bailey’s Upper Elementary, Receives Wilson Library get design award

USG Breaks New Ground in Higher Education, Prepares to Power Regional Workforce

CRL Glass Railing Systems for Expansive Cliff House Resort Renovation

AS P I R E

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V O LU M E X V  69


WHAT’S NEW at Cooper Carry

Exciting things are happening at Cooper Carry! Here’s a quick snapshot of what’s been going on at the firm over the past few months.

Cooper Carry sponsored the “Designing a Bigger and Equitable Atlanta” NomaAtlanta panel. Nicolia Robinson, AICP, from our Planning Studio was a comoderator for the event.

Our D.C. office ran in the Race for Every Child to benefit Children’s National Hospital.

We participated in the “Speed for a Need,” event which raised more than $4,000 dollars for the Ronald McDonald House Charities.

We took a site tour of the recently completed 50 M Street Homewood Suites.

On October 1, our Atlanta office participated in the Winship 5K Race to benefit the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. 70

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Cooper Carry

A Cooper Carry holiday tradition, the “Giving Tree” offers the names and wishlists of local Atlanta children in need. The Atlanta office provided enough gifts for every child on the tree.


C o op e r C ar ry won the People’s Choice Award for the ATL CANstruction competition.

We got creative with our charity fundraising efforts and held a bake-off: Donations in exchange for an all-you-can-eat dessert bar! Co-founder Jerry Cooper, FAIA, gave a “History of the Firm” presentation.

Our 1522 K Street Hotel received the “Best Hospitality Project” award at the NAIOP DC/ MD Awards Gala.

AS P I R E

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ON BOARDS THE

CHECK OUT SOME OF COOPER CARRY’S CURRENT PROJECTS:

SOLIS PARKVIEW Atlanta, GA CLIENT: Terwilliger Pappas with Spruce Street Partners SCOPE: 303 Units 397,560 GSF 42,000 SF Retail 728 Precast Structured Parking Spaces

ONE DAYTONA Daytona Beach, FL CLIENT: Daytona Beach Properties Retail International Speedway Corporation SCOPE: 1.1 Million SF Mixed-Use Center

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Cooper Carry


BUZZARD POINT MASTER PLANNING/URBAN DESIGN Washington D.C. CLIENT: Akridge STADIUM DESIGN: Gensler SCOPE: 1,500,000 SF Residential 15,000 SF Retail

HOBOKEN HILTON HOTEL Hoboken, NJ CLIENT: KMS Development Partners SCOPE: 283 Keys 270,000 SF Hotel 27,000 SF Post Office Reno 20,000 SF Post Office Addition

GEORGIA TECH DINING HALL Atlanta, GA ASSOCIATE ARCHITECT: Lake|Flato CLIENT: Georgia Institute of Technology SCOPE: 50,000 SF

AS P I R E

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V O LU M E X V  73


Aspire - Volume XV Contributors

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Cooper Carry

ELIAS DARHAM

KASEY LIM

Architectural Designer

Architectural Designer

ROBERT EDSALL

BRIAN PARKER, AIA, LEED AP

Contributing Writer

Associate Principal

BRIAN GONGAWARE

MARCO PIERI, NCARB

Architectural Designer

Architect

BILL JOHNSON, AIA

ALYSSA ROGUT

Associate Principal, Director of Design

Architectural Designer

JORDAN KLINE

HILLARY ROTH

Staff Interior Designer

Architectural Designer

GWENETH KOVAR, NCIDQ, LEED AP

SOPHIA TARKHAN, AIA, LEED AP

Associate

Associate

BRANDON LENK, AIA, LEED AP

NICOLE ZACCACK

Associate

Architectural Designer


CONTRIBUTORS

SNEAK PEEK One Park Center StateFarm Regional Hub Dunwoody, Georgia


atlanta 

new york 

washington

Aspire Volume XV  

| Cooper Carry

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