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Whales Students: Paul Janet Jorge Mauricio


Introduccion 

Whale (origin Old English hƿæl) is the common name for various marine mammals of the orderCetacea

The term whale sometimes refers to all cetaceans, but more often it excludes dolphinsand porpoises, which belong to suborder Odontoceti (toothed whales).


Introduccion ď Ž

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Whales range in size from the blue whale, the largest animal known to have ever existed[3] at 35 m (115 ft) and 136 tonnes (134 long tons; 150 short tons), to various pygmy species, such as thepygmy sperm whale at 3.5 m (11 ft).


Killer Whale or orca ď Ž

The killer whale (Orcinus orca), commonly referred to as the orca, and less commonly as theblackfish, is a toothed whale belonging to the oceanic dolphin family.


Killer Whale or orca ď Ž

Killer whales are highly social; some populations are composed of matrilineal family groups which are the most stable of any animal species


Killer Whale or orca ď Ž

Wild killer whales are not considered a threat to humans,[7] although there have been cases of captives killing or injuring their handlers at marine theme parks. Killer whales feature strongly in the mythologies of indigenous cultures, with their reputation ranging from being the souls of humans to merciless killers.


The blue whale ď Ž

The blue whale is the largest animal that ever lived on Earth. It is also the loudest animal on Earth. These enormous mammals eat tiny organisms, like plankton and krill, which they sieve through baleen. They live in pods (small groups). These grayblue whales have 2 blowholes and a 2-14 inch (5-30 cm) thick layer of blubber.


The blue whale SIZE Blue whales grow to be about 80 feet (25 m) long on average, weighing about 120 tons (109 tonnes)  SKIN, SHAPE AND FINS  The blue whale's skin is usually blue-gray with whitegray spots. The underbelly has brown, yellow, or gray specks. 


The blue whale  

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DIET AND BALEEN Blue whales (like all baleen whales) are seasonal feeders and carnivores that filter feed tiny crustaceans (krill, copepods, etc.), plankton, and small fish from the water. SOCIAL GROUPS Blue whales live individually or in very small pods (groups). They frequently swim in pairs SPEED Blue whales are very fast swimmers; they normally swim 3-20 mph (4.8-32 kph), but can go up to 24-30 mph (38-48 kph) in bursts when in danger. Feeding speeds are slower, about 1-4 mph (1.6-6.2 kph).


The blue whale  

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DIET AND BALEEN Blue whales (like all baleen whales) are seasonal feeders and carnivores that filter feed tiny crustaceans (krill, copepods, etc.), plankton, and small fish from the water. SOCIAL GROUPS Blue whales live individually or in very small pods (groups). They frequently swim in pairs SPEED Blue whales are very fast swimmers; they normally swim 3-20 mph (4.8-32 kph), but can go up to 24-30 mph (38-48 kph) in bursts when in danger. Feeding speeds are slower, about 1-4 mph (1.6-6.2 kph).


The blue whale HABITAT AND RANGE  Blue whales live at the surface of the ocean and are found in all the oceans of the world 

LIFE SPAN  Blue whales have a life expectancy of 35-40 years. ). 


The Fin whale ď Ž

The fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), also called the finback whale, razorback, is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales. It is the second longest whale and the sixth largest living animal after the blue whale


The Fin whale SIZE ď Ž its great length and slender build. The average size of males and females is 19 and 20 metres (62 and 66 ft), respectively ď Ž


The Fin whale DIET ď Ž he fin whale is a filter-feeder, feeding on small schooling fish, squid, and crustaceans including mysids and krill.[21] In the North Pacific, they feed on the krill species ď Ž


The Fin whale Behavior ď Ž The fin whale is one of the fastest cetaceans and can sustain speeds of 37 kilometres per hour (23 mph)[21] and bursts in excess of 40 kilometres per hour (25 mph) have been recorded, earning the fin whale the nickname ď Ž


The Fin whale Behavior ď Ž The fin whale is one of the fastest cetaceans and can sustain speeds of 37 kilometres per hour (23 mph)[21] and bursts in excess of 40 kilometres per hour (25 mph) have been recorded, earning the fin whale the nickname ď Ž


The Fin whale Behavior ď Ž The fin whale is one of the fastest cetaceans and can sustain speeds of 37 kilometres per hour (23 mph)[21] and bursts in excess of 40 kilometres per hour (25 mph) have been recorded, earning the fin whale the nickname ď Ž


The Fin whale Vocalizations  See also: Whale song and List of whale songs  Multimedia relating to the fin whale  Note that the whale calls have been sped up 10x from their original speed 


SPERM WHALE ď Ž

Sperm whales are easily recognized by their massive heads and prominent rounded foreheads. They have the largest brain of any creature known to have lived on Earth. Their heads also hold large quantities of a substance called spermaceti. Whalers once believed that the oily fluid was sperm, but scientists still do not understand the function of spermaceti


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