Issuu on Google+

I NSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN  Create your own e‐course! 

Bert Coolen


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons  Attribution 3.0 Unported License 

This E‐booklet was created by the Partnership for valorisation of the  best e‐learning practices among teachers and trainers in Europe. 2 | E ‐ B o o k l e t   T i t l e 


Contents  1. 

Why this guide was created........................................................ 5 

2. 

Who it is aimed at ...................................................................... 5 

3. 

Structure of the guide ................................................................ 5 

4. 

Introduction in Instructional Design............................................ 5 

5. 

ADDIE Model.............................................................................. 6 

6. 

Analysis ...................................................................................... 6  What is Analysis phase? ................................................................. 6  Analysis phase step by step ............................................................ 7  Conclusions.................................................................................... 9 

7. 

Design ........................................................................................ 9  Introduction ................................................................................... 9  Structure ...................................................................................... 10  Scenario ....................................................................................... 11  Conclusion ................................................................................... 12 

8. 

Development............................................................................ 12  Introduction ................................................................................. 12  Learning objects ........................................................................... 13  Steps to take ................................................................................ 13  Things to consider ........................................................................ 14 

9. 

Implementation........................................................................ 15  Internal Marketing ....................................................................... 15  Delivery........................................................................................ 16  Use & Assistance .......................................................................... 17 Instructional Design  | 3 


Things to consider ........................................................................18  10. 

Evaluation.............................................................................20 

Formative Evaluation....................................................................20  Summative Evaluation..................................................................21  The ADDIE‐model .........................................................................22  11. 

General recommendations ...................................................23

4 | Instructional Design 


1.  Why this guide was created  Over the last ten years digital learning was growing heavily on the  private market. With the advent of open source software, many  schools started with the introduction of digital teaching materials in  their courses.  The production of digital content remains a labor‐intensive activity.  Non‐professional developers often feel insecure when producting  digital learning materials and the quality often remains lamentably  low. The last few years the market launched more easy‐to‐handle and  cheaper tools and services, which affect the growing interest of the  educational world to invest in digital learning.  This guide will help you in an efficient way to develop new digital  materials, without being an IT expert. 

2.  Who it is aimed at  This guide is meant for the teaching profession, trainers, coaches, –  anyone who wants to develop electronic teaching materials in a  creative way without the need to call on IT expertise. 

3.  Structure of the guide  The focus of this small guide is  to explain how you can properly  develop good digital learning materials. We pay attention to each of  the steps important for the development of digital learning material  and enrich the guide with several tips and tricks. 

4.  Introduction in Instructional Design  Instructional design (ID) is a process to help determine the needs of  learners, what the final goal will be of the course, what the course will  look like and how to make the created course available to the learner. Instructional Design  | 5 


It is based on a pedagogical approach and aims to serve all learners by  using different learning styles throughout the course. There are many  models but most models are based on the ADDIE model which stands  for Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation.  In this booklet you will get more information about how to work with  this ADDIE model. 

5.  ADDIE Model  In the ADDIE model you can distinguish five steps. Each step plays an  important role in the creation of a good course.  · 

·  ·  ·  · 

Analysis: In this phase you ask yourself several questions in  order to determine the components necessary for the next  phases of development.  Design: In the design phase you create a structure and a  scenario.  Development: Here you start to put all content elements  together.  Implementation: How to deliver the course to the learner?  Evaluation: You evaluate the created product and the use of  it. 

6.  Analysis  What is Analysis phase?  The first phase is one of the most important phases in the creating of  e‐learning content. This is where the lifecycle of your project begins.  In this phase you think about the set up of your course and this will  have implications on all other phases. Courses do not appear by  accident, they need good planning and analysis. 6 | Instructional Design 


The analysis phase consists of five important questions. Each answer  will have consequences for your future steps.  These are the five questions:  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

What is the goal of your course?  Who is your target group?  What content do you (want to) have?  Which environment will you use?  What are your resources? 

These questions are open‐ended questions and will have personal  answers that only relate to your organization and your course. They  form the basis for the subsequent development activities.  Carpenters utilize the old proverb, "measure twice; cut once."  Although carpenters are talking about wood, and we're talking about  training, we share a common goal—do it right the first time. So, we  could change the carpenter's old saying to fit the ADDIE methodology.  "Analyze fully; design once." 1 

Analysis phase step by step  Good analysis will create a right level of expectation and can prevent  many problems. When developing e‐learning content it helps to use  the following checklist.  Goal: What do you want to achieve? What learning goals are you  aiming at?  ·  What knowledge? What skills? What attitudes?  ·  How deep? Knowing or knowing how?  ·  Achievable? Realistic? Neither too high nor too low? 

http://www.intulogy.com/addie/analysis.html

Instructional Design  | 7 


Target group: Who do you want to reach? What are the  characteristics of your target group?  ·  How big is your target group? Where are they geographically?  Where and when are they available?  ·  What motivates them? Learning opportunities? Prior  knowledge required? Familiarity with ICT?  ·  What infrastructure does your target group have?  ·  Course may not be too basic (boring) nor too specialised  (drop‐out). Take time to analyse your target group!  Content: What content do you already have? In which format?  ·  Can you process the content yourself or do you need more  expertise?  ·  Does the content (text, visual material, etc.) already exist ? On  paper or in digital format?  ·  To what degree is this content readily available (copyright)?  Environment: Management support? Learning culture? Obligatory or  voluntary? Blended or stand‐alone?  Resources: And, last but not least. This element, will define your limits  to a large degree.  ·  How much money is available? Is there a budget for  outsourcing development?  ·  How much time is available for this project (creation,  implementation)? Days, months?  ·  How many people can be put to work on it? Internal, external  ? Experience with e‐learning content?  ·  What infrastructure do you have access to for development  and delivery? Computer, peripheral equipment and software?

8 | Instructional Design 


·  Are support services available or possible (helpdesk,  coaching)? 

Conclusions  ·  · 

· 

All these questions will help you describe the course's  learning objectives.  If you do not create clear objectives the designer will have to  guess the course's goals and objectives and the needs of your  learners may not be satisfied.  It is important to pay a serious attention to all these  questions. They will help you to build up the e‐course faster  and better. 

7.  Design  Introduction  E‐learning content is designed using a structure and a scenario. The  structure acts as a stepping stone for moving to the learning content  later on. The scenario refers to the story, the way you present the  learning content.  Structure = split up the content into smaller units and divide into a  tree structure.  Scenario = integrate various exercises (texts, images, animation,  interaction, exercises)  The main question that the concept has to answer is “What  experiences are you providing and in which order? so that course  participants are able to process the learning content as quickly and  accurately as possible ”. Think about the different learning styles and  a few basic principles from the ‘Instructional Design’. Instructional  design is a discipline in which a systematic approach is taken to Instructional Design  | 9 


designing and developing effective learning material based on  learning theories and models.  At the start of this phase, you should have a good idea of prior  acquired knowledge of the learners. You should also know what  learners will need to learn during the course. Normally you will have  dealt with this in the first phase of the ADDIE model.  Basic questions in the design phase are:  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

How should content be organized?  How should you present the course to learners?  How the course will be delivered to learners?  What types of activities and exercises will best help learners?  (learningstyles)  How should the course measure learners' accomplishments? 

Structure  Structure is clear and strict:  How do you structure the content in a logical and concise manner?  How do you make a pedagogically sound structure?  ·  · 

· 

Limit the number of levels in the structure of the content,  preferably to a maximum three.  First the core, then the details. Explain the basic concepts and  structures first and only then go into the further details. Avoid  explaining everything in one go. You can provide details more  easily by using the Web rather than in a book (for example via  hyperlinks, mouse‐overs, pop‐ups).  Global ‐ analytical ‐ summarised.  o  Global: First provide a global explanation of what will  be covered.  o  Analytical: Then explain one element at a time. 10 | Instructional Design 


o  Summarised: Finally, provide a clear and complete  · 

summary.  Pedagogic order: for this use a taxonomy of learning goals in  order to create an order for the content.  o  What will the target group learn?  Facts, concepts,  relationships, structures, methods, attitudes.  o  To what depth? Knowing, understanding, doing,  integrating 

You can explain the content to learners in several ways. It is up to you  to choose the most convenient way for your learners and use this  method consistently during the whole course.  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Step‐by‐step  Part‐to‐whole  Whole‐to‐part  Known‐to‐unknown  General‐to‐specific 

Scenario  Build up an interesting and learner‐friendly story. Introduce each part  of the structure and each piece of content, by using a variety of  exercises. Ensure that you use different learning styles : (inter)active  experience, observation, reflection, conceptualization,  experimentation, application.  Put these different learning styles to practice by using texts, tables,  stories, images, sounds, videos, animations, simulations, tests,  interactive animation, exercises, role playing etc.  ·  · 

Cut the content into small pieces (which can stand on their  own), to present on one screen.  Create an overview of learning units (chunks) and determine  which chunks need prior acquired knowledge. Instructional Design  | 11 


·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Select for each chunk which examples are available or have to  be created.  Create a timetable for each chunk.  Select the experts who can help you with the creation and the  delivery of the content and the examples.  Put a deadline on each action.  Check the progress of all actions on a regular basis. 

Conclusion 

It is important that your keep your structure on a maximum of 3 levels  so the users of your e‐course don’t lose the overview of the course. If  you work with a variation of learning methods, all learners will benefit  from it. 

8.  Development  Introduction  If you want to develop successfully it all depends on what you decided  in the first phase (Analysis) and the decisions made in the second  phase (Design). If you paid enough attention to these two phases your  development process will run smoothly and quickly. Major decisions  have been made, i.e. purpose of the course, structure, and content.  Once this is clear it is rather easy to start developing and writing the  appropriate materials.  Starting the development of your course implicates that you have to  create learning objects.  Learning objects are pieces of learning content that explain a subject  in one single way. They may comprise text, images, hyperlinks and  also audio, video or animation with or without interaction. When we 12 | Instructional Design 


combine the learning objects into one single structure, we end up  with an e‐course. 

Learning objects  Each piece of text, each photo, video or animation, but also pages  with a combination of these elements can be considered as learning  objects. As long as they each only explain one single subject in one  single way. You can make learning objects yourself or use existing  material. To create your own learning objects  you need appropriate  software for each different type, when (re)using existing materials  you need to be aware of copyright.  Once all learning objects are created, you put them together to create  an E‐course  Link the learning objects to the structure and choose a suitable  navigation interface. For this you will need an authoring tool. Test  early prototypes of your e‐course or learning objects with a pilot  group. 

Steps to take  Before you start with creating learning objects, keep the following  steps in mind:  1.  Develop a prototype. With this prototype you can decide on  which aspects you still want to change. A good look and feel is  important as well as different ways of explaining the content.  This is to diversify in learning styles. Some students like to  have a lot of text, others are more graphic oriented or like to  practice a lot.  2.  Develop all learning objects relevant to the subject.  3.  Review the developed course to assure that the content is  accurate and complete.

Instructional Design  | 13 


4.  Run a pilot session. Select a small number of users who can  test the course.  ·  Does your course work on all devices  ·  Are users satisfied about the approach  ·  Do they meet your learning goals  5.  Carry out a survey among the pilot users:  ·  Can they point out the more difficult/easy parts of the  course?  ·  Do they understand the way of working?  ·  Do they like the navigation?  ·  Do they like the look and feel?  ·  Do they need more diversification?  ·  Which parts should be revised?  When needed, you can organise follow‐up interviews in order to  understand the issues encountered by the pilot users. 

Things to consider  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Set up a good communication structure between the design  and the development team.  Gather a capable development team that meets the needs of  the designers.  Be clear to the design team about time related expectations.  Be clear to the design team about resource related  expectations.  Make sure the development team has the appropriate skills  and capacity to meet the deadline.  Make a clear and irreversible choice on the authoring tool  that will be used.  Consider that the course may need to operate on a number of  different devices.  Explore all available options before you start developing your  prototype. 14 | Instructional Design 


9.  Implementation  When following the ADDIE‐model you will overcome most of the  problems as you have been planning, developing and testing before  you launch your course for the bigger audience.  The implementation needs to be well prepared as this is crucial for  the success of your course. 

Internal Marketing  Target Group: Don't assume that students will use your course  because you made it. You need to inform them in several ways:  · 

·  · 

· 

Before you launch your course, make some promotion and  continue this promotion after the launch as well or they will  forget the existence of your course.  Inform your users, by explaining them what they can expect  from the new course you made.  Inform their team leaders, to avoid wasting time answering  always the same questions of the end users. Use the team  leaders as a buffer, but also to enthuse them by showing  them the advantages of the new course, the new method you  introduce.  Make them curious, by showing them small parts of your  course, attractive elements you integrate in the course. 

Management: Explain to your management  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

What they can expect from the course;  the goals;  what the course will look like;  the release date;  how it will be implemented.

Instructional Design  | 15 


Delivery  CD‐ROM: If some users have difficulties to go online (internet  connection), it might be a good solution for distribute your course on  CD‐ROM. When using a CD‐ROM assure that all required software is  installed on the CD‐ROM.  Internet: Students can access the course at any time, from every  place. As a teacher, instructor you will not know who is consulting  your course online, how often and how long. In some cases you may  not need a follow‐up. For example: in the case of additional learning  materials.  Learning Management System (LMS): A learning Management  System is like a digital library that structures all your online courses  and gives you a good overview of the frequency of use. Implementing  a LMS may require a serious investment, even with an open source  LMS. You may need the help of a technical expert to manage the  software and adapt it to your needs.  Mobile learning: Learning on mobile devices such as cell phones, is a  recent development that looks very promising. The implementation  on mobile devices raises questions like:  · 

·  · 

Is the student obliged to stay online all the time or is  synchronising before and after the course more than enough?  (connection cost)  Is your course compatible with all mobile devices?  Is your course adapted for small screens? 

Of course more questions will raise, but these give you already a good  start.

16 | Instructional Design 


Use & Assistance  When launching your course we recommend you to engage specialists  on specific fields:  ·  ·  ·  · 

on content level;  on technical level;  on motivation level;  on follow‐up level. 

On content level: A content expert can help you out with all the small  questions students come up with during the online course. The  content expert can adjust the course in order to clarify difficult  elements of the course and to update the course on a regular basis.  Assisting students with their questions is a very time‐consuming job.  Allow enough time for this.  On technical level: A technical expert is needed for recurring issues  like:  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

login and password problems;  platform failures;  assistence for updating the courses;  changes in look and feel;  navigation problems. 

Once the instruction is launched it needs to perform impeccably in  support of the learners. Web technology, as any technology, needs  support. All links must function, servers must perform appropriately  and timely, Internet access needs to be reliable, etc. Plan  appropriately so in the event of a failure the system can be restored  or a backup put in its place.  Be aware that not all technical support is the same. The difference  between and excellent technical support service and a mediocre one  is not that the latter cannot correct the problem. The difference is the Instructional Design  | 17 


timeliness of that correction. Downtime can truly hurt your  instruction. Look for good support; it is not expensive these days to  find Internet Service Providers that guarantee 99% up time. If your  institution is running its own ICT‐support, ask about the response  time as well as the frequency of backups.  On motivational level: Students may start very enthusiastically with  the online course, but as they have to study most of the things on  their own, some will get bored or demotivated. A good coach can  motivate the students to continue their online study. Sometimes only  some small talks are sufficient enough to set the student back on  track.  On follow‐up level: As you spent a lot of time in the creation of your  course, you would like to know if the course is successful. Point out a  person who can deliver you some figures on  ·  ·  ·  · 

how frequent your course is used;  how many student are online every hour, day, week;  how many student accomplish the course;  the difficult parts in your course. 

Of course several roles can be combined. Assure that your cover all  fields to succeed.  The implementation phase is a crucial step in the whole process. If  you allocate enough time, money and personnel during the  implementation phase the success rate will be much higher. 

Things to consider  Introduce your course to your target audience

18 | Instructional Design 


It is important that you inform your target audience about what they  can expect, especially when it is the first time you launch an e‐course.  Set up some promotional activities in order to reach a large part of  your target audience. Continue your promotion after the course has  started. Keep informing the target group about the goals and the  benefits of the course. Involve your HR‐department.  Introduce your course to your management  As training is not the core‐business of the management it is important  that you inform them in order to gain confidence and support. If you  inform your management from the beginning they will be aware  about the goals of this course and this way of training. Informing  them will avoid to high expectations. If you create a good project  plan, communicate on a regular basis with your management and  show them preliminary results,  they will respond positive to the  results of your course. You may encounter resistance to your  innovations, butif you are well prepared you will overcome these  barriers.  Deliver your course on a CD/DVD or through the Web.  An e‐course does not necessarily need an internet connection. If your  target audience is situated on a single location, you can deliver it on a  CD or DVD. If you target audience is spread over different locations,  the use of the internet may be a good solution. Make sure that all  links are working well. If you are using a Learning Management  System (LMS) you will have the possibility to invite, to manage and to  follow your learners.  Directions for use and assistance  When launching your course you need to provide some assistance on  technical and content level. Even when the pilot users did well, the  target audience may not be ready for an e‐course and need to get Instructional Design  | 19 


used to this way of training. You will need to motivate your learners  from continuously.  Maintenance  Make sure that you can rely on a team to maintain, to update and to  adjust the e‐course when needed. If your course is very successful you  need to think about availability and bandwidth needed for a larger  group.

10. 

Evaluation 

The last step of the ADDIE model consists of evaluating the whole  process. In this phase we distinguish two possibilities: a formative and  a summative evaluation.  Here you will learn more about those two ways of evaluation. 

Formative Evaluation  When evaluating your new course you want to know how your  material was liked/disliked and if the process of the course fits the  needs of the users.  Material evaluation:  This you can do in several ways:  ·  Pilot tests; with a small group of users to see if your course is  well understood and where the users are struggling with the  content.  ·  Expert review; to assure that the content fits the needs.  ·  Development try‐out; to find out if all elements work well in  the different environments you want to use.  Process evaluation: 20 | Instructional Design 


Here you look at your product/course.  Pay attention to the following aspects:  · 

·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Language: No spelling mistakes? Do you use easy to  understand words, not too technical? Take into account the  level of your learners.  Content: Is all content up to date, complete and correct.?  Graphical: Does your course look nice. Pay attention to the  look and feel of your course. Be consistent!  Interface: Is your course easy to use, easy to navigate.  Didactical: Do you respect the didactical principles (Global,  Analytic, Summarised).  Target group; Is your course directed to your target group. 

Summative Evaluation  Based on the model of Kirk Patrick we distinguish four levels  1. Response: Learners reactions: Did the learner enjoy the course?  Create a small survey asking questions like:  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Were all instructions clear?  Was the navigation clear?  Did the content have a logical structure?  Was the content of good quality?  Was the instructor (if applicable) effective?  Was it easy to use the LMS? 

2. Learning: Learners achievements: new knowledge & ideas  ·  What did they learn? Carry out a small test at the end of the  course. Instructional Design  | 21 


3. Behaviour: Applying the learning  ·  Are the learners implementing the learned elements?  ·  Do they put the new skills to practice?  4. Results: Benefits for the organisation: Effect on results?  ·  Does the course generate more turnover?  ·  Does the course generate more profit?  ·  Does the course improve the effectiveness and results of the  learners? 

The ADDIE‐model  When we look at most applications of the ADDIE‐model we notice  that the evaluation phase is the forgotten element. Most  organisations skip this step. They are focused on launching the course  and once the course has been launched, they are already focusing on  the next course. In this case it may happen that the created course is  of bad quality and delivers a wrong attitude to the learners which  affect the company’s results and position.  The cost for evaluation is relatively low and the organisation only has  to invest a limited amount of time. It is important that the time for  evaluation has been planned before the course is launched.  First evaluate the course and what the people have learned. After a  few months measure if the course has had an influence on the  workplace and on the company’s growth.  If you set clear objectives in the Analysis phase you are more likely to  carry out a good evaluation phase.

22 | Instructional Design 


“I forget what I was taught; I only remember what I have learnt.”2 

11. 

General recommendations 

·  Always think from a learner’s perspective. This determines if  your course becomes a success or a failure.  ·  Do not create a course that is too basic or too specialised.  Learner will get bored or drop out.  ·  Try to think bottom‐up instead of top‐down.  ·  Involve your learners: devise the solution together with your  learners, implement the solution together with the people  concerned.  ·  Determine the success of your solution by how performance  has improved or how well it addressed the problem and not  by the number of people who passed the test or completed  the course  ·  Do not block social media, learners will still find access to  their favorite social media sites.  "The new sigarette break is the social media break where  employees stand outside with their mobile phone and check in  on their social networks."3  ·  Try to let them learn as they work.  ·  Evolve towards a dynamic learning mindset which is rapid,  adaptive, collaborative and self‐directed learning at the  moment of need.  ·  Learners  o  have short attention spans;  o  are very social and love to share;  2 

Patrick White, 1912‐90, Australian novelist and 1973 Nobel Prize winner for  Literature, from The Solid Mandala, 1966  3  http://internettime.posterous.com/the‐social‐media‐cigarette‐break

Instructional Design  | 23 


o  enjoy working in teams, interaction is key to their  o  o  o  o 

learning;  prefer to learn just in time; immediate access to  information they can apply instantly;  need immediate feedback;  are independent learners;  prefer to construct their own learning from different  sources.

24 | Instructional Design 


Wyższa Szkoła Biznesu ‐ National Louis  University has been well known among the best  Polish universities for years. Practical approach  to education combined with a solid educational  backround and modern technological facilities  makes WSB‐NLU one of the pioneers in many  fields of science and business. WSB‐NLU ‐ a  place for people with passion.  Vilnius Business College is a non‐profit private  training organization providing higher education  as well as formal and informal education in the  fields of business administration, finances,  languages and ICT.  The Belgian Network for Open and Digital  Learning is a non‐profit making organization. It  aims at establishing cooperation between  statutory organizations and private companies  with a view to a growing implementation of e‐  learning in training programmes for employees  in Belgium.  Stockholm School of Economics in Riga (SSE  Riga) is one of the leading business schools in  Baltic countries, which offers quality education  in economics and business administration. SSE  Riga has been involved in a number of research  projects related to business development in  Baltic Rim.  RayCom BV in Utrecht, The Netherlands is a  software development company that specializes  in web‐based solutions for knowledge  development, knowledge exchange and  business.


Instructional design