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Fruitful Love -


Plant-Based Food and Culture. Recipes For Your Wellness.

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FEATURES YOUR HEALTH & WELLNESS | SARA MODY Sara Mody is a Wellness Advocate, Cancer Survivor and Author of the book Wide Awake. In the issue Sara shows us DIY’s using essential oils. IN FITNESS | KRYSTA MARIE Certified Personal Trainer and Holistic Nutrition Coach Krysta Marie writes ‘How to Begin Healthy Habits.’ IN FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY | SOPHIE MUSOKI As seen on CNN’s African Voices, Sophie explores food from an African perspective. Sophie’s beautiful prints are available for purchase. BREAKFAST IN BED | SHANIKA GRAHAM-WHITE It’s sweet times with Shanika, creator of the blog Orchids and Sweet Tea. WIDE AWAKE WITH GRATITUDE Sara Mody celebrates the healing power of food and the power of being grateful through her journal entries.

COCONUT GRANOLA PARFAIT Prepare a sweet recipe for your special someone!

IN FOOD And DRINK: RECIPES Celebrate Citrus Season with Natural Juices!

TWO SPOONS OF LOVE | HANNAH SUNDERANI We continue breakfast in bed recipes with Hannah, a plant-based food blogger. From breakfast in bed granola parfaits to homemade peanut butter truffles, these recipes will start and end your day with a spoonful of love. WE TRAVEL TO FRANCE | SABINE ALPHONSINE Sabine is a food stylist, blogger, and travel photographer who wins our heart with purple potatoes.

Fluffy Vegan Oatmeal Whole Wheat Pancakes

Your

Breakfast In Bed Granola Parfait No-Bake Peanut Butter Truffles Purple Potatoes Pie with Thai Basil and Coconut Winning Side Dishes! Don’t miss Grilled Jamaican Jerk Eggplant, page 36

HEALTH And WELLNESS Getting to Know Herbs & Spices (two-part series)

Learn How to Cook Vegetable Stock Veggie Fun Facts & Recipe for a Creamy Chayote Squash (Cho-Cho) Winter Soup Learn Jamaican Food Words & Phrases

In Art FOOD IN POETRY Fruitful Love

What if by being your most authentic, perfectly imperfect self, you can transform your health and your life while having an extraordinary impact on the world?’ Read more, page 18.

IN EVERY ISSUE 18 Editor’s Notes | 17 Food In Poetry Photography by Sophie Musoki, akitcheninuganda.com


DIY’s are becoming more and more popular everywhere I look. They are flooding the magazines, the internet, book stores and restaurants are even offering spaces for interactive social workshops. There are many reasons why I believe that DIY’s are something to get excited about and to explore further. I have composed my top 5 reasons why it is time to roll up your sleeves and dive into a fun and interactive world of creating your own products. 1) DIY’s put more money in your pocket. Yes it is true. You save money by spending less on brand name products and fancy packaging. You can also buy your simplest ingredients in bulk and you can use them for other DIY projects. 2) DIY’s are therapeutic. Statistics have proven that by allowing yourself time to create can actually reduce anxiety and depression. You forget about your stressors and begin to amerce your thoughts and energy into something positive. When you are focused on one thing, you can reap the same benefits as meditation.

As a recent graduate from Yoga Teaching Training, I thought it only appropriate to share this recipe for my homemade yoga spray used to disinfect my yoga mat and keep it smelling fresh. The yoga mat can contain bacteria, fungi, and viruses that can cause many skin infections. As you sweat on your mat, you begin to manifest a breeding ground for bacteria to grow and seep back into your skin. You should be cleaning and wiping your sacred mat after every use. Mix together: · ¾ cup of distilled water · ¼ cup alcohol free witch hazel · 10 drops of Lavender or Lemon Essential Oil from Doterra · 3- drops of Tea Tree Essential Oil from Doterra I pour it into my blue glass spray bottle and I am good to lie down into Shavasana.

3) DIY’s build confidence. The best feeling is when you are done and using your finished product. It boosts your mood and confidence. You have a sense of accomplishment. When others notice how great your smell or ask you questions like, “how did you make that?” You feel proud to share your findings with others. Caring is sharing after all. 4) DIY’s are simple. Yes it is true. DIY’s are usually very simple to create and usually don’t require too many ingredients or materials to make. They are usually created so that they are accessible to many people and easy to remake over and over again. 5) DIY’s help our planet. This is one of my favourite reasons why I love experimenting with DIY’s because they do not contain harsh chemicals that are bad for the planet or for my own health. It’s also fun being resourceful with materials around my home that I can reuse or recycle so I am in control of my waste. Purchase the book WIDE AWAKE by Sara Mody now on Amazon!


GETTING TO KNOW HERBS & SPICES Part 1


'The use of medicinal plants, referred to as herbalism, has as many traditions and theories as there are cultures on earth.' In the book Alchemy of Herbs, it speaks of plants being a major source of healing for people all over the world, long before the internet or even books existed. There was a shift in thinking in the early 1900s when the American Medical Association (AMA) proclaimed what was "science" and what was "quackery." Furthermore, with the creation of antibiotics in the 1930's, people began to turn more readily to "better living through science" and used pharmaceutical pills for their illnesses rather than plants. Herbs were revitalized in the 1960's with the back-to-earth movement it's here that we see the beginnings of our current herbal resurgence. So how do we know what herbs can do? When learning about plants, it is important to realize there is no one way of knowing. There are historical records of plant use going back thousands of years. Many modern-day herbalists use herbs in their lives and in their practices and share their personal experiences. There's also a growing number of scientific studies on plants. Herbs support natural energy, provide essential nutrients, promote healthy aging, aid in the repair of vital processes, and strengthen healthy bodily functions.

TASTE THE HERBS PUNGENT Black Pepper, Cayenne, Cinnamon, Fennel, Garlic, Ginger, Holy Basil, Lavender, Mustard, Nutmeg, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Turmeric Most common culinary herbs are classified as pungent. Pungent herbs awaken the senses and get things moving. They are warming, spicy, and have become part of culinary tradition because they not only taste good but also support one's health. Chinese Five-Spice Blend, a recipe that calls for a blend of peppercorns, cinnamon chips, whole star anise, whole cloves, and fennel seeds, is commonly used to flavour many popular Chinese dishes.

SALTY In herbalism, "salty" refers to

herbs that are high in micronutrients. Salty herbs like Nettle, have a mineral taste rather than an overly salty taste.

The Energetics of Plants

Plants have hot/cold and damp/dry qualities, just like humans. You might already recognize energetics in common foods. Take a cucumber for example. Is a cucumber hot or cold? Is watermelon dry or damp? What about a habanero pepper? Think of a cracker. Energetic qualities can vary depending on where or how the plants grew and how they have been prepared for consumption. Let's use fresh ginger as another example. Fresh ginger is considered to be warm, while dried ginger is considered hot. This isn't an observation measured with a thermometer, which would likely display the same temperature for each variety of ginger. Instead, it comes from how the herbs act and feel in the body. As you experience herbs and spices in your life, remember that herbalism seeks to find balance in the four qualities of hot and cold and dry and damp. Keeping track of how you are feeling in those areas is a good way to judge if the foods, herbs, and spices you are choosing are working for you. Read part 2 of this series on herbs in the April 16 issue of Cooking Green Goodness Magazine. Part 2 will focus more on the taste of herbs, specific herbs and their healing properties.

SOUR Elder, Hawthorn, Lemon Balm, Rose Just as with salty, the sour taste in herbalism tends to be more subtle. Many sour herbs have an important herbal action: they are astringent. Think of astringency as a mouthfeel rather than a taste. If you've ever bitten into an unripe banana or drunk a strong cup of black tea, then you've felt the astringent action often described as a dry sensation in the mouth. Astringent herbs tighten the mucosal tissues they come in contact with. Sour herbs are said to stimulate digestion, build strength, and reduce inflammation.

SWEET Sweet herbs like Ashwagandha nourish and build. Some Sweet herbs might be slightly warming or slightly moistening, but most have fairly neutral energetics.

BITTER Artichoke, Cacao, Chamomile, Coffee, Dandelion A bitter taste causes you to salivate, which is one of the first steps in the digestive process.


SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE

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Sophie Musoki is the food writer, photographer and food stylist behind the blog A kitchen in Uganda. The blog was shortlisted for the 2018 Saveur Magazine Blog Award. Sophie is passionate about exploring food from an African perspective. She believes food has the power to bring people of all walks together. In her free time, you can find her reading African food history, developing recipes and polishing up her food photography skills. She is currently based in Jamaica. In this issue Sophie shares her photography of the land’s bounty. PRINTS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

Shop: akitcheninuganda.com


“Starting out in my blogging journey, I realized that there was a lack of quality photography accompanying African, particularly Ugandan, food stories online.” “So from the beginning I made a promise to myself that I was going to commit to writing an elaborate and well-photographed blog. The truth is I didn’t even know how I was going to do that. I was not aware that it required specific equipment and a unique skill set to craft the photos. I had a simple family point and shoot camera. I would scroll through Pinterest for inspiration and would try to recreate some of the photos I really liked. It is important to me to have a well-photographed blog because photography tells a story and evokes emotions. More than anything I need my fellow Ugandans to believe that we are one of the most blessed countries when it comes to fresh local and organic produce.

I also want us to realize that the possibilities are endless with our dishes, and in order to do so, I have to deliver quality visuals. Food photography to me is as important as the dish itself, especially in this highly visual era where you can have a great dish and recipe but if the visuals are not appealing then its potential is reduced by half.


I have always been drawn to dark and moody photography because it makes it possible for the vibrant and complex colors in food to fully shine. Shooting dark and moody photos also helps me understand light and how to manipulate it to get the best shots.�


PRINTS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE SHOP:

akitcheninuganda.com


Food Styling BY Eartha Lowe

Photography BY Lauren Elizabeth Fong Innovative Photography & Videography


Fruitful

Love in all its forms Transforms the rules of a beating heart Stacked tall with expectations Blind to its fruitful imperfections. The mood is, Love sits waiting Watching for that passerby To heal with its true nature Unforgiven circumstances rotted by man’s pleasure To meet you, on the inside. The mood is still. Who picks the card to cut right through A flame stacked low as hope through eyes never forward Thinking on it. The mood is, Love is forever An unchanged legacy Seeds sewn in the fabric of every life From which it is named. The mood is, Love.


Cho-Cho, also referred to as Chayote Squash (see Veggie Fun Facts, page 46), is an amazing source of dietary fiber. Cho-Cho is a bland slate giving you the power to transform its mild flavour to your liking. This pear-shaped fruit is a popular ingredient cooked with care in all types of Jamaican soup recipes. ‘Perfect Imperfections’ is that glimmer of authenticity reflected deep in our eyes that is to be celebrated. Hello food lovers, healthy living enthusiasts, home cooks, and chefs at heart! Welcome, OR, welcome back to Cooking Green Goodness Magazine. Let's get inspired with foods to make you flourish, feel happy, motivated and full of energy! You see being healthy is our decision to feed our happiness with good, fabulous-tasting food, it’s choosing to be active, it’s choosing to always look on the bright side of life. We’re happy to feature Sophie Musoki, a food writer, photographer and food stylist behind the blog A Kitchen In Uganda. Sophie’s beautiful photography graces our cover once again. Sophie is also the first person to be featured in this magazine’s In Food Photography segment (page 11). Her photography in this segment is inspired by a land’s bounty. That land is Jamaica. What makes this issue even more special are the talented contributors from different parts of the globe: Canada; USA; Jamaica and France.

EARTHA LOWE

Lover

‘What if by being your most authentic, perfectly imperfect self, you can transform your health and your life while having an extraordinary impact on the world?’ These are words spoken by Andrea Pennington during one of her episodes on TEDx Talks. Andrea Pennington is a Physician, Author, Mentor, Visionary and Host of Liberate Your Authentic Self. We are reminded by Andrea that when we embrace the ideals of others in an attempt to fit in - to be accepted - that glimmer reflected deep in our eyes takes a back seat to self. We then begin to masquerade as a half-baked version of ourselves.

This issue of Cooking Green Goodness Magazine is titled 'Fruitful Love, Cho-Cho, Perfect Imperfections.' Fruitful Love (see Food In Poetry, page 17) is nature's energy. Fruitful Love uplifts one's condition. Fruitful Love speaks to actions we take to nourish ourselves and powerfully support our health. Know that you have far more power over your well-being and impact in life than you might give yourself credit for. It is also important to know that to transform what you are on the outside, you have to transform who you are on the inside.

Hannah Sunderani, a plant-based food blogger, shares with us recipes to express love and gratitude for your special someone (see feature on page 27). Hannah’s passion for plant-based cooking comes from its benefits to health, humanity, and the environment. Hannah is Canadian-born - living in France. Her recipes are intended for everyone, vegan or not, to introduce more plantbased foods into your life. She shows just how delicious and satiating clean eating can be. Sabine Alphonsine is a food stylist, blogger, and photographer also contributing from France. Sabine’s recipe for Purple Potatoes Pies with Thai Basil and Coconut (page 32) will win your heart! Shanika Graham-White is all kinds of super sweet! Shanika is a lover of all things creative and simple with a heavy sprinkle of elegance and sparkle. Shanika, a self-taught cook, baker, and aspiring author, is the creative eye behind the website Orchids and Sweet Tea. Shanika contributes a recipe for the most delicious Fluffy Vegan Pancakes (page 22). This magazine's first In Fitness segment is not be missed! Krysta Marie, Certified Personal Trainer and Holistic Nutrition Coach shows us ‘How to Begin Healthy Habits (page 8). At some point, many of us have been at that place where new lifestyle patterns are so far from our original goal, we may wonder where the drive went and if we will ever find it again. Having survived breast, cervical cancer and the end of her marriage, Sara Mody lives on the bright side of life wide awake with gratitude (page 26). Sara is a Wellness Advocate, Yoga Instructor and Author of the book Wide Awake, now available for purchase on Amazon. In case you missed it, you can also read Sara’s DIY article on uses for essential oils (page 5).

Huge thanks to all contributors! One Love. Enjoy the read. Next issue: April 16


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Bonus Recipe!

Breakfast In Bed -

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Wide Awake With Gratitude ORDER YOUR COPY!

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WIDE AWAKE IS AVAILABLE NOW FOR PURCHASE ON AMAZON


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There's not only Thai basil here ! These pies are gluten free, lactose free, sugar free and fully vegan! Thai basil gives an agreeable freshness to this pie and tastes delicious with coconut milk.

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Vegan Pie Crust:

Vegan dates and nuts crust:

- 14 fresh Dates

In a pan without oil, roast pecan nuts and almonds. Set aside.

- Mix of 150g almonds and pecans nuts - 50 g sesame seeds - 1 tablespoon coconut oil Purple potatoes and coconut filling:

In the same pan roast sesames seeds. Set aside. Blend almonds, pecans and sesames in mixer on small pieces. Set aside. Blend dates until smooth.

- 350g purple potatoes

Mix dates and nuts together. Set aside.

- 150 ml unsweetened coconut milk

Here, you can choose one 22-24 cm pie plate or three smalls pie plates. Use an with removable

- 1 teaspoon Agar Agar powder - 1 vanilla pod

bottoms pie plate to remove the pie easily for serving. Melt the coconut oil, brush the pie plate and flour a bit the pie plate.

Topping:

Divide the dough into 3 pieces and line them with the dough. Leave the crust in fridge

- Fresh Thai basil leaves

until tart filling is ready.

- Coconut flakes - Toasted sesame seeds

Purple potatoes and coconut filling: Boil or steam the potatoes. Then, mash potatoes with a fork until smooth. Cut the vanilla stick open and scrape the seeds out, with the point of a sharp knife. In a pan, mix potatoes mash, coconut milk, vanilla seeds and agar-agar. Cook the mixture on low heat for a few minutes (4-5 minutes). Stir constantly.

Remove from the heat, add rum and mix well. Let cool and then, fill it into the pies plates. Chill the purple potatoes-coconut-tart for at least 2 hours in the fridge. Just before serving decorate with coconut flakes, grilled sesame seeds and a few Thai basil leaves. SERVINGS: 3 PIES


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PHOTO PRINT AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

SHOP: akitcheninuganda.com


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"Jerk" is a type of cooking native to Jamaica. The cooking technique of jerking, as well as the results it produces, have evolved over time from using pit fires to old barrel halves as container of choice. Street-side jerk stands are frequently found in Jamaica. Jerk seasoning principally relies upon two items: allspice (also called "pimento" in Jamaica) and scotch bonnet peppers. Other ingredients may include cloves, cinnamon, scallions, nutmeg, thyme, garlic, brown sugar, ginger and salt. Modern recipes also apply jerk seasoning to not only meat and seafood but to vegetables or tofu. You can grill the most delicious eggplants by brushing them with extra-virgin olive oil infused with jerk marinade or jerk seasoning. Grill with onion, garlic, bell pepper, and other vegetables of your choice for a delicious side dish! Finish off with course sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, or drizzle with a light vinaigrette for some good eating.

Few vegetables are as meaty as eggplant. Choose ones that are firm (like cucumber) and heavy for their size. Long, narrow eggplants tend to contain few seeds. Big, fleshy eggplants usually contain more seeds and become softer more readily. The skin of the eggplant should be smooth and shiny - their color, whether it be purple, white or green, should be vivid. They should be free of discoloration, scars, and bruises, which usually indicate that the flesh beneath has become damaged and possibly decayed. The stem and cap, on either end of the eggplant, should be bright green in color. To test for the ripeness of an eggplant, gently press the skin with the pad of your thumb. If it springs back, the eggplant is ripe, while if an indentation remains, it is not. Store eggplant in the refrigerator. Use as soon as you can; although the outside will not look much different, the inside will become soft and bitter within a few days.


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Read How to Cook Vegetable Stock, page 44 You should smell these colourful vegetables as they roast: onion, carrot, celery, white turnip, parsnip, and garlic, drizzled with olive oil and roasted to cook a rich, nutrient-dense vegetable stock. Stock need not be expensive. The best tasting, most useful stock can be made from ingredients you might otherwise have thrown away. You can start with scraps of vegetables, bearing in mind that trimmings from strong vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, green pepper, etc., will lend a distinct flavour to the stock, one that you might not always want.


How to Cook


and Mirepoix: a sautéed mixture of diced vegetables (such as carrots, celery, and onions) and herbs used especially as a basis for soups, stews, and sauces. Stock is a liquid in which solids have been cooked and then strained out, with the goal of transferring the flavour from the solids to the liquid. Then it is used to enhance ready-to-serve soup broths, as well as for sauces and other recipes. Homemade vegetable stocks are much more nutrient-dense and tastes so much better than store bought. Best of all, you know exactly what’s in it! You can play around with the ingredients in a number of ways; substituting freely among the vegetables. Only leeks or onions, carrots, and celery are truly essential. Fresh herbs add a lovely flavour. Parsley, thyme, rosemary, oregano, curry leaves, and bay leaves are often used in recipes for stock. If you want to cook stocks in which one or more flavours shine, add one or more of these ingredients: Whole spices, fresh or dried, such as allspice, peppercorn, cloves and ginger (in small amounts), juniper berries, and so on. Garlic. I like the scent of garlic in many savory soups and dishes. A whole head of garlic left intact will lend a mellow flavour. Dried mushrooms, or the stems of fresh mushrooms. The distinctive flavour of mushrooms is almost always a fine addition.

VEGETABLE STOCK

METHOD Preheat the oven to 400°F. Place the onions, carrots, parsnips, turnips, celery, garlic, shallots in a large roasting pan. Drizzle with the olive oil.

INGREDIENTS 2 large onions, quartered and unpeeled

Roast for approximately 45 minutes until vegetables are nicely browned. Shaking the pan occasionally and turn the ingredients once or twice.

Prep and cook time: 2 hours Servings 8 – 10 cups Difficulty: Easy

4 carrots, peeled and cut in half 2 parsnips, peeled and cut in half 2 white turnips, peeled and quartered 2 celery stalks, cut in half 8 cloves garlic, unpeeled 1 shallot, unpeeled 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 10 sprigs fresh parsley

5 sprigs fresh thyme 2 - 3 bay leaves 12 peppercorns 1 cup white wine Sea salt to taste

Use a slotted spoon to scoop all the ingredients into a stockpot; add the remaining ingredients and the 8 cups of water. Turn the heat to high. Place the roasting pan over a burner set to high. Add 2 to 4 cups of water, depending on the depth of the pan. Bring the water to a boil, scraping off any bits of food stuck to the bottom of the roasting pan. Pour this mixture into the stockpot along with any remaining water not used for deglazing.

Bring the contents of the stockpot to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover and let simmer for 45 minutes. Cook until the vegetables are very soft and the stock is highly flavoured. Remove the stock from the heat and strain, pressing the vegetables to extract all their juices. Taste and add salt if necessary.

TIPS FOR SERVING

Pour into storage containers for the fridge or freezer. This stock can be refrigerated for 4 - 5 days or frozen for up to 3 months. Refrigerate, then skim any hardened fat from the surface if you like.


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JAMAICAN Food Words & Phrases

Chuo-cho

Hungry have mi

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Nyam Tayse

Everything cook an curry Cho

Run a boat


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