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CAPTURING EVERY WOMAN’S HEART AND E V E R Y M A N ’ S PA L AT E

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Tête-À-Tête

Main Course

British cuisine: Jolly Good Stuff Australian and Moroccan recipes Sehri and Iftaar Salads and Smoothies: Perfect for Summer Eid-Ul-Fitr: The Feast to End all Fasts

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Cooking with Reverence - Vikas Khanna talks about his spiritual connection with food

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A FourPlus Publication

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CAPTURING EVERY WOMAN’S HEART AND E V E R Y M A N ’ S PA L AT E

ARABIC EDITION ALSO AVAILABLE

Tête-À-Tête

Main Course

British cuisine: Jolly Good Stuff Australian and Moroccan recipes Sehri and Iftaar Salads and Smoothies: Perfect for Summer Eid-Ul-Fitr: The Feast to End all Fasts

HAVE A GREAT ORIGINAL RECIPE TO SHARE?

Cooking with Reverence - Vikas Khanna talks about his spiritual connection with food

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Inside » Recipes to celebrate Eid-Ul-Fitr

In this issue

Vol 1 | Issue 4

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VIKAS KHANNA COOKS WITH HIS HEART AND HAS A SPIRITUAL CONNECTION WITH FOOD AND HIS GUESTS

Jolly Good Stuff!

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PAGE

Zen...and the Art of Cooking with Reverence

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Eid-Ul-Fitr: The Feast to End all Fasts

40 Also

WHEN MUSLIMS EVERYWHERE REJOICE WITH A BANQUET OF DELECTABLE SWEET AND SAVOURY DISHES

Creamy Coleslaw Australian Barbecue Macadamia-Crusted Barramundi Pavlova Zaalouk Vegetable Couscous Chicken and Olive Tagine Spiced Oranges with Yoghurt 4

FOOD FOR THOUGHT THE ‘FOOD’ STUFF TIDBITS CHOPPING BOARD

Recipe Corner

PAGE 44 PAGE 46 PAGE 49 PAGE 50

AUSTRALIAN AND MOROCCAN RECIPES

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Issue Special

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ASK ANY TRUE BRIT TO DEFINE ENGLISH FOOD. CHANCES ARE HE WILL SUM IT AS SIMPLE, WHOLESOME AND DELICIOUS

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amadan is always a special time. After 30 days of prayer and fasting, the celebration on Eid-Ul-Fitr is a special occasion for everyone. Be it something as simple as a date to break one’s fast or an elaborate biryani to celebrate Eid, food plays a very important role during this period. In this issue, we take a look at how different communities celebrate Eid and how their cuisine dictates their food habits. In this issue you can also read about Vikas Khanna, the Michelin-starred chef at Junoon, the only Indian restaurant in New York to be listed in New York Magazine’s Plat 101 - a listing of the city’s best restaurants. We also explore English cuisine, which often does not get its due credit. Known more for their table manners than what’s served at the tables, the English take pride in their cuisine, no matter what the French might think!

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The ‘Recipe Corner’ features Australian and Moroccan recipes which, we assure you, will have you exploring these cuisines after you are done with the recipes featured here. Sanjeev Kapoor tells us why salads and smoothies are healthier options for summer and shares a few recipes too.

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CookeryPlus is published by FourPlus Advertising LLC, Dubai and printed at United Print & Publishing, Abu Dhabi Vol.1 Issue: 4 | Jul-Sep 2012

CookeryPlus intends to make you enjoy the process of cooking and at the same time provide you with some information about the various cuisines, cultures and styles that exist all around the world. So read on... add premium to your home-cooking!

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MUMBAI | DUBAI | SINGAPORE All correspondence should be addressed to FOURPLUS ADVERTISING LLC, P O Box 119755, Dubai, UAE Tel.: (9714) 3254401 Fax: (9714) 3254457 E-mail: cookeryplus@fourplusmedia.com

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CULINARY ART

Jolly Good Stuff “T

he art of cooking as practiced by Englishmen does not extend much beyond roast beef and plum pudding” – Pehr Kalm, Swedish visitor to England in 1748.

It would seem that English food has been receiving a bad rap for centuries. Described variously as stodgy, boring, dull, and just plain uninteresting, some have even gone so far as to call English food an abomination, no doubt agreeing with Bill Marsano that “The British Empire was created as a by-product of generations of desperate Englishmen roaming the world in search of a decent meal.” On the contrary, English food, as any true Brit would tell you, is jolly good stuff – simple, wholesome and delicious. Unfortunately, its simplicity has been mistaken for plainness, and its hearty, rustic dishes for stodge. It wasn’t always so. Culinary historians acknowledge that the original English cuisine was based on homegrown meat, vegetables and grains, which were turned into savoury

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stews flavoured with herbs. Successive invasions over the centuries influenced the cuisine – the Romans and French contributed aromatics and spices such as garlic saffron, cloves, nutmeg and pepper to the English plate. British colonies in South Asia, particularly India, contributed their share of ingredients and techniques, and before long a ‘curry’ – Chicken Tikka Masala - was to achieve the status of Britain’s national dish. So what is English food? In the words of food historian Clarissa Dickson Wright, English food comprises “…lots of meat and fish; plenty of sauces and soups… good substantial bread, fruit and rice puddings ….and plenty of cakes and biscuits, cheesecakes, jellies and syllabubs.” There is also a rich tradition of cooking game – venison, wild hare,

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English Cuisine The pageantry surrounding the celebrations of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee has shone a light on all things British, including food. The perfect occasion to savour English cuisine!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> partridge and pheasant – served up in rich sauces with plenty of fresh vegetables on the side. MaKinG a MeaL oF iT Some standard bearers for English cuisine are the Sunday Roast Dinner, Full English Breakfast and Afternoon Tea. Mealtimes in England can be confusing. While breakfast is always eaten in the morning and lunch in the early afternoon, one is never sure about what tea and dinner refer to. In some parts of England, tea is the meal eaten at the end of the day, referred to as dinner the world over, while dinner refers to the afternoon meal or lunch as we know it! And then there is supper, which is a light meal eaten between dinner at night and bedtime, and elevenses, which is a small snack served between breakfast and lunch!

The Sunday Roast is the most enduring English lunchtime tradition. A large joint of beef, and sometimes lamb or chicken, is roasted in the oven with potatoes and accompanied by a rich gravy, sauce or jelly and Yorkshire pudding, a light savoury pastry. Roast turkey with a bread stuffing and other trimmings is reserved for celebrations such as Christmas.

grilled tomatoes, baked beans and fried bread, with toast, jam and butter on the side. Any wonder then that the writer W Somerset Maugham, who obviously did not think much of most English food, declared, “To eat well in England you should have breakfast three times a day”? Afternoon tea is one of those genteel English traditions that demand a teapot covered with a tea cosy, milk and sugar served separately, and delicate china teacups with floral designs. Tea was made popular by Catherine of Braganza,

The Full English Breakfast or ‘Fry-Up’ is a gourmand’s delight. While dishes for breakfast in stately homes and manors were laid out in covered silver or china dishes on a sideboard and included such delights as kedgeree (rice and smoked haddock - an adaptation of the Indian khichdi), pickled herring and devilled kidneys, the Full English is a large plate piled high with fried eggs, sausages, sautéed mushrooms, CookeryPlus

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a Portuguese princess and wife of King Charles II of England, and is now an integral part of English culinary custom. Tea can mean the English ‘cuppa’ by itself, or an elaborate ‘cream tea’ that comprises tea accompanied by scones with clotted cream and jam, thin watercress or cucumber sandwiches, bikkies, as biscuits are affectionately called, and perhaps a tray of iced fairy cakes. Besides tea, coffee and cocoa are other preferred English beverages, but neither has the charm of the classic cuppa. To the Manner Born The English have made a fine art of etiquette. While one may find fault with English food, one would be hard pressed to fault their manners. “On the Continent, people have good food;

in England, people have good table manners,” George Mikes, the British author and satirist, wrote. Dining rituals are strictly observed with prescribed place settings, use of appropriate cutlery and glasses, and the right way to use a serviette – dab your lips discreetly and never use it as a handkerchief! Table manners are fortunately relaxed when it comes to street food and finger foods. Fish and Chips – batter-fried fish served with potato chips sprinkled with vinegar and traditionally served in newspaper – is an English classic. England being an island, seafood is naturally abundant. Among its favourite seafood are cod, haddock, salmon, plaice, crabs, prawns, oysters, clams and mussels. Smoked fish, especially herring, salmon and eels are a delicacy. Sandwiches are another all-time favourite. The Earl of Sandwich is credited with having invented this snack of meat slapped between two slices of bread. Roast beef sandwiches are popular, as are Marmite or yeast extract sandwiches, but the Ploughman’s Lunch is one of England’s

most prized sandwiches. It brings some of England’s favourite ingredients - bread, butter, cheese and pickles or relish – all together in one comfort-giving snack. Traditional English breads are varied and delicious, including rustic looking cottage loaves, small baps or rolls, small round cobs, malt loaves and England’s gift (or curse!) to the world – mass-produced sliced bread. Reams can be written about English cheeses but the most popular are the Kings of English cheeses – Cheddar and Stilton, which is a blue-veined cheese. Nutty Red Leicester and creamy Double Gloucester are some of England’s favourite cheeses. Traditional English condiments add zing and bags of flavour – English mustard, mango chutney, piccalilli – a spiced diced vegetable relish, Worcestershire (pronounced Wooster) sauce, and brown sauce. Georgie Porgie and Friends Puddings and pies are the stuff of nursery rhymes – Georgie Porgie, Little Jack Horner, Simple Simon, the

CORONATION CHICKEN  Serves 4-6

This curried chicken salad dish was created to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, and incorporates flavours from the cuisines of Commonwealth nations.

»» Ingredients 1 kg (2.2lb) chicken, jointed 1 star anise 2.5 cm (1 inch) fresh ginger, chopped 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped Salt and pepper sauce

2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil 1 small onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 cm (1/2 inch) ginger, finely chopped 1½ tablespoons curry powder, or to taste ½ teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon ground cumin 2 cardamoms, split open

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½ teaspoon sugar Salt and pepper 1 teaspoon lemon juice 3 tablespoons mango chutney ¾ cup mayonnaise, preferably homemade 4 tablespoons yoghurt 2 tablespoons raisins 2 tablespoons almonds, blanched and slivered »» Method Place the chicken in a pan with the star anise, ginger, garlic, salt and pepper. Add 1 cup water and cook till tender. Remove the chicken and strain the stock. Reserve 1 cup stock.

Remove the flesh of the chicken in large pieces and set aside to cool, moistened with a little stock. Discard the skin and bones. For the sauce, heat the oil in a pan; add the onions, ginger and garlic and fry for about 5 minutes till the onions are translucent. Add the curry powder, ground spices, cardamoms, sugar, salt and pepper and cook on high heat for 2-3 minutes. Stir in the reserved 1 cup stock and cook on high heat till the sauce thickens. Stir in the lemon juice. Remove from heat and pass through a sieve.

In a bowl, combine the mayonnaise, yoghurt, mango chutney and strained sauce. Stir in the raisins. Fold in the chicken pieces (drain any excess stock) and heap on a platter lined with lettuce leaves. Sprinkle the almonds on top and serve. Note: A contemporary version would be to poach chicken breasts, slice them and arrange on a plate, with a little sauce spooned over and some watercress on the side. Coronation chicken makes a wonderful filling for sandwiches and topping for roast jacket potatoes and canapés.

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Muffin Man, and the four and twenty blackbirds are all indicative of how large a role baked or steamed pies and puddings play at the English dining table. There are sweet and savoury, hot and cold, steamed and baked pies and puddings. Among the most popular savoury versions are Cottage Pie, Steak and Kidney Pudding and Fish Pudding. The sweet versions include Treacle Pudding, Bread and Butter Pudding, Sticky Toffee Pudding, Queen of Puddings, Summer Pudding, and Bakewell Tart, all of which are also perfect as desserts. Pudding is, in fact, the English name for dessert and includes other favourites such as Eton Mess – a confection of meringue, strawberries and cream, Trifle – layered sponge cake fruit and custard, and Jam Roly-Poly – resembling a Swiss Roll. Baking is a national pastime in England. Trays of biscuits, scones, pies, cakes and tarts are turned out in homes all over the country. The sturdy cast iron, Aga cooking stove and oven occupied pride of place in many an English kitchen, but has now been replaced by sleeker, more efficient modern versions. Great English baked goods include Rich Fruit Cake, Battenberg Cake, Fig Newtons, Shortbreads, Sausage Rolls, Cornish Pasties, Scones, and the list goes on. TasTe ConQUers aLL Fish and Chips, Bangers and Mashfried sausage with mashed potato, Bubble and Squeak – a stir-fried dish of cabbage and potatoes, Shepherd’s

Pie – mashed potato over mince are all iconic English dishes in which the potato plays a starring role. Potatoes are a staple in English cooking considering they came to the country rather late in its history from the New World in South America. From the New World also came sugar, tropical fruits, coffee and cocoa. India gave England Mulligatawny soup, Worcestershire Sauce, Chutney – the mildly spiced sweet condiment, and a whole range of spices, including ‘curry powder’. Curry houses have taken over many English high streets, serving up versions of the South Asian staple including Balti, which is a form of kadai or wok cooking believed to originate in either a northern Pakistan region or Birmingham! Italian and Chinese food are also hugely popular in England with ‘spag-bol’ (Spaghetti Bolognese), Sweet and Sour and Chop Suey competing with curry for the English palate. Curries, noodles and pasta may be just passing fancies or eventually become pucca English, but cooking in England is all about, as the celebrated food writer Tom Parker Bowles writes, “good ingredients, simply cooked, with little wasted. This is the philosophy at the heart of good British food.” >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> — Rita D’Souza

SUMMER PUDDING

Serves 4-6 » IngredIents 450 g (1 lb) raspberries 300g (10 oz) mixed fruit such as strawberries, black currants, red currants and mulberries 3 tablespoons apple juice ⁄ cup caster sugar 7-8 large slices bread Butter for greasing to serve

A few assorted berries Whipped cream, ice cream or custard » Method Remove the stalks from the fruit and hull the strawberries. Place the fruit in a pan with the apple juice and sugar. Cook over a low heat, stirring gently occasionally, till the fruit has softened but not broken up. Strain the fruit and reserve the syrup. Remove the crusts from the bread. Grease an 850 ml (1½ pint) pudding basin and line with the bread slices (reserve 1 slice for the top) pressing them firmly against the sides. Fill any gaps with small pieces of bread. Pour the fruit into the basin. Reserve about ½ cup syrup and pour the rest in. Place a small plate or saucer on top and place a weight such as a tin of beans on the plate. Place in the refrigerator overnight. Turn the pudding out onto a dish, pour the reserved syrup over and serve in wedges with whipped cream, ice cream or custard.

“I BEG YOUR PARDON?” soMe very englIsh culInary terMs that May need eXplaInIng!

» bangers and Mash – sausages and mashed potato » bap – a large round spongy bread roll, dusted with flour » bubble and sQueak – stir-fried potatoes and cabbage » butty – a filled or open sandwich; a chip butty is a sandwich of fried 10

potato chips! » cruMpet – a thick, flat, porous savoury yeast cake, toasted and slathered with butter » hot pot – a meat and vegetable casserole topped with crispy sliced potatoes » nosh – another word for food

» parson’s nose – the tail of the chicken or turkey » soldIers – fingers of toasted bread that are dipped into soft-boiled eggs » spotted dIck – a steamed suet pudding studded with dried black currants » toad-In-the-hole – sausages baked in batter

CookeryPlus

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Shama Food Industries LLC, P O Box 234894, Dubai, UAE. Ph: +971 4 2679079, Email: shama@iffco.com, Web: www.shamaspice.com

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TÊTE-À-TÊTE

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here is an aura about Vikas Khanna, the Michelinstarred chef of Junoon, the fine-dining Indian restaurant in New York City. His warm smile lights up his face like a thousand candles, which burn even more brightly as they reach his eyes. His gentleness is warm and touching, and you feel you are in the presence of a man of peace and profound wisdom. Then he begins to laugh – a hearty, heaving laugh, slapping his thighs in amusement, jumping up to display his collection of traditional Indian rolling pins, and suddenly, he turns into a little boy excitedly showing off a new toy. Innocence and joy, wisdom and peace, all rolled into one. It would be too easy to attribute his wisdom and gentleness to the trauma he endured as a child born with twisted feet, having to wear heavy, corrective footwear till well into his teens. His demeanour stems from an almost spiritual connection to food and his guests, a connection that is rooted in a reverence for creation – both natural and God made, and that which flows from his own being – the work of his hands. Vikas touches each plate or dish of food as it 12

leaves his kitchen, a sign of his respect for his own creation and for his revered guests. “I spent time in Amma’s (Mata Amritanandamayi Devi) Ashram in South India and watched how she fed everyone. It was an awakening to see such deep reverence for food. I have learned and shared this with a lot of people,” Vikas says by way of explanation. His reverence for food was enhanced when he met His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Vikas says, “Meeting His Holiness the Dalai Lama changes everyone somewhere. It is an important moment of your life to witness this level of compassion and love. I have met him several times, and each time it’s like a new experience. His thoughts about respect for food have impacted me very

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Zen ...and the Art of Cooking with Reverence Vikas Khanna cooks with his heart and has a spiritual connection with food and his guests. Cumin and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Pepper Lamb Chops with much. The Buddhist mealtime prayer Asian-Style ‘every grain is a sacrifice of life, may I be worthy of this sacrifice’ is soulGreen Salad awakening and hearing it from His Holiness the Dalai Lama is truly empowering.” SPIRITUALITY IN HIS KITCHEN So how does he communicate this reverence at the helm of a busy, noisy kitchen, where head chefs have the reputation of being tyrants and perfectionists with little tolerance for mistakes? “It is true to some extent that leadership is very important to run a kitchen. I think that keeping a balance of everyone’s strengths is very important. It all begins with the head. Just like we say that, ‘fish stinks from the head’, I think that if the leader is always aggressive, the chain of command becomes very aggressive. Personally, I feel that if a kitchen can be run with compassion, discipline, integrity and respect, you never need to raise your voice. It is all about respecting each other.” Weekly group

»» Ingredients 400 g (14 oz) New Zealand lamb chops 2½ tablespoons ginger-garlic paste ¾ cup drained or Greek yoghurt ¼ cup fresh coriander, finely chopped 2½ tablespoons mint paste Salt 2 teaspoons cumin seeds, lightly roasted and crushed 2 teaspoons black peppercorns, crushed 4 tablespoons butter, melted Salad

Mixed lettuce Asian style balsamic reduction Star anise Balsamic vinegar Sugar Vanilla extract Salt and pepper

»» Method In a mixing bowl, combine the lamb chops with ginger-garlic paste, yoghurt, coriander and mint paste and marinate for an hour. Mix in salt, crushed cumin, crushed pepper and about 2 tablespoons of butter. Set aside for another 10 minutes. Meanwhile preheat oven to the hottest setting. Thread the marinated lamb chops onto skewers and cook in the oven for 10 minutes or till tender, turning regularly and basting occasionally with the remaining butter. Serve with the salad. For the salad, mix all the ingredients for the dressing. Place the lettuce leaves in a mixing bowl and pour the dressing over. Toss to mix. Serve at once.

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meditation with the staff enhances the sense of calmness and unity of purpose in the kitchen. Reverence and respect are also reflected in the philosophy and the décor of ‘Junoon’. The Tree of Life is a prominent motif displayed in eight stone panels set in a 50-foot long reflecting pool, signifying the Buddhist Eight-fold Path to enlightenment. A large abstract painting of the Tree of Life covers one wall and Vikas has also created a cauliflower dish in which a whole cauliflower is cut in slices resembling a tree with floral branches. “A tree represents the connection between earth and the ‘All’ above. It is a great symbol of nourishment for mankind... it’s also a fact that we always water the roots for growth, therefore Junoon waters our Indian roots for our growth.” Vikas sees a strong connection between food and religion, which is reflected in the series of documentaries he has made called Holy Kitchens, showcasing the foods served by community kitchens in religious shrines of all the major religions, beginning with the largest community kitchen (langar) in the world at the Sikh Golden Temple at Amritsar, India. “There is a face of food that represents the wholeness of our communities. I am deeply aware that every faith has a major connection through food. These documentaries are created to promote interfaith understanding. To see the divine in sharing of food, culture and traditions,” he notes. His gift for sharing has prompted Vikas to write several best-selling cookbooks – Modern Indian Cooking, The Spice Story of India, The Cuisine of Gandhi, and most recently, Flavours First. He is at present working on several books including Savour Mumbai, on the iconic foods of the flavour capital of India, a book on Amritsar’s food, and one on Indian regional cooking. Every book is a labour of love and is testimony to his belief in food is the best means of communication and building of ties that bind.

“I would love to open a restaurant in the Middle East. Well, I think every chef is thinking of it. It’s becoming a melting pot of cultures and very importantly a big culinary stage.”

FAITH AND FOOD Faith and food translate into action in two organizations founded by Vikas that provide aid and assistance to those in need, particularly as a result of disasters or calamities. ‘SAKIV’ and ‘Cooking for Life’ host culinary events all over the world in aid of relief efforts and to raise awareness of pressing social issues. Vikas has also conducted ‘A Heightened Sense of Taste’ in New York – a workshop for the visually impaired, an initiative that speaks volumes of his ability to use food to bring magic and hope into people’s lives. The divine is very much present in the food that emanates from Vikas’ kitchen. He was awarded a Michelin star in 2011,

joining the ranks of other Michelinstarred chefs like Gordon Ramsay, Mario Batali, Thomas Keller, Eric Ripert and Daniel Boulud. Vikas cooks what is called ‘Modern Indian cuisine’, which is a contemporary take on traditional Indian cuisine, while preserving its intrinsic flavours. Trained at the prestigious Culinary Institute of America and Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, Vikas had the good fortune to learn from the best chefs in the world. He has been recognised by the James Beard Foundation, has starred on numerous television shows (most recently as the host on MasterChef India Season 2), and is the recipient of multiple international and US food and humanitarian awards and accolades, the most recent one being CookeryPlus

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“A comment from a guest who says that the food reminded him of home is the BIGGEST award for me.” an invitation to cook at a fund-raising event for President Barack Obama at the Rubin Museum in New York at $ 35,000 a plate! When asked which one of the awards he values the most, he responds, not surprisingly, “A comment from a guest who says that the food reminded him of home is the BIGGEST award for me.” The menu at Junoon is divided according to 5 cooking techniques – pot cooking (handi), clay oven (tandoor), stone cooking (patthar), open fire pit (sigri) and iron griddle (tawa) – a presentation of the different Indian regional cooking styles and flavours. Spices, naturally, feature large at the restaurant, which has a unique Spice Room where guests are invited to become acquainted with the array and aromas of spices from all over the world. And which one is Vikas’ favourite one? “I like using a lot of undertones of subtle flavours. I never stop trying to discover new flavour blends and use them in the kitchen. Moroccan dried rose buds are an amazing example of a new dimension of taste I have discovered,” he says. Which brings us to Vikas’ plans for the Middle East. “I would love to open a restaurant in the Middle East. Well, I think every chef is thinking of it. It is becoming a melting pot of cultures and very importantly a big culinary stage,” he says. And which Middle Eastern dishes are his favourites? “Foul Mudammas, which is boiled fava beans with spices. I used to have it for breakfast every day. It varies from house to house, but I loved every version of it, 16

whole or mashed. I love eating at small kiosks and streets. Everything - from the flavours to the aromas. I also love Makdous, a dish I had on a trip to Syria. It is eggplants stuffed with nuts and peppers.” As he talks about food, you realise that at heart, Vikas Khanna is still a little boy who is fascinated by the world around him – its treasures, its people and the many opportunities that have propelled him to his present position as New York’s most sought-after chef. He speaks enthusiastically and with wonder of the many accolades that have come his way, humbly acknowledging that he could not have achieved them on his own. He proudly states that he owes all his success to his grandmother in whose kitchen he learned the basics of

producing honest, hearty meals laced with love, and his mother who would not let his disability keep him from reaching for the stars. And you see that the little lad with the misaligned feet has travelled a long way from a small town in North India to straddle the culinary scene in New York City as one of the Big Apple’s most talented, exciting and enlightened chefs. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> — Rita D’Souza

Seekh Kebab

(Ground Mutton Skewers)

»» Ingredients ½ cup split Bengal gram (chana dal) ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder ½ kg minced lamb or mutton 1 clove garlic, minced 2 scallions (spring onions), minced 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander 2 teaspoons finely grated ginger 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon cumin seeds, lightly toasted ½ teaspoon black pepper powder ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper or chilli powder Oil for basting 4 long metal skewers to serve

1 small red onion, cut into rings 1 lime, cut into wedges »» Method In a saucepan, combine the split gram with turmeric and about 1 cup water, cover bring to a boil and cook over a medium heat for 15 to 18 minutes, or till the gram is cooked and water has dried up. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature. Using a mortar and pestle, grind the

cooked gram coarsely. In a mixing bowl, combine the crushed gram with minced lamb, garlic, scallion, coriander, ginger, salt, cumin seeds, pepper and cayenne pepper. Mix thoroughly and squeeze out any extra moisture that may have accumulated. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 1 hour. Once the mixture is rested and the flavours have blended well, remove from refrigerator and divide into 4 equal portions. Lightly wet your hands with cold water, then, starting about 1 inch from the tip of a skewer, shape one portion of the mixture around the skewer to form a sausage about 10 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. Repeat with the remaining portions of kebab mixture. Heat a large tawa or griddle, and brush it liberally with oil. Arrange the skewers on the griddle and cook turning and basting with oil regularly till kebabs are browned and cooked through. Slide the kebabs off the skewers and cut into finger-sized pieces. Arrange the kebabs on a serving plate and serve hot with onion rings and lime wedges.

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RECIPE CORNER

Celebrating the tastes and flavours of Australia and Morocco

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n this issue, we explore cuisines from the two hemispheres! Morocco – land of the Berbers and Australia – where barbecues (also referred to as barbies) are a way of life. We bring you delicious and fresh summery recipes that will surely brighten your holidays.

Issue Food Consultant: Marta Yanci Special thanks to: Rita D’Souza Food Photography: Alim Bolar Our food consultant for Recipe Corner in this issue is Marta Yanci, a Spanish chef and owner of Marta´s Kitchen, a Dubai- based bespoke catering company, which offers traditional and fusion cuisine. Marta believes in cooking with fresh ingredients and encourages everyone to enjoy the complete cooking process, from the shop to the table and everything in between! You can follow her on her website www.martaskitchen.com and blog (www.blog.martaskitchen.com), where she shares easy and healthy recipes.

Modern Australian cuisine blends traditional indigenous food, with British and Irish influences acquired during colonial times, as well as ingredients particular to the country, like kangaroo meat and certain types of seafood such as yabbies and Balmain bugs. The beauty of Moroccan cuisine is how diverse it can be! Morocco has received influences from several cultures over the centuries, which is reflected in its rich cuisine. Besides, Morocco produces a large variety of Mediterranean fruits and vegetables, which also contribute to the flavour of its dishes. CREAMY COLESLAW Although found on most menus all over the world, Aussies consider this a typical Australian dish.

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AUSTRALIAN BARBECUE The classic Australian barbecue includes lamb chops, sausages and either beef steaks or chicken, accompanied by creamy coleslaw and a fresh green salad. MACADAMIA-CRUSTED BARRAMUNDI Barramundi or Asian sea bass is indigenous to Australia. Encrusted with macadamias – another Aussie original – it is the perfect light summer dish that requires little preparation and is ready in minutes. PAVLOVA This light-as-air creation of meringue, fruit and cream was named after the celebrated Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova to commemorate her visit to New Zealand and Australia

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in the 1920s, and has ever since been Australia’s most beloved dessert. ZAALOUK (COOKED EGGPLANT AND TOMATO SALAD) You may find different versions of Zaalouk in the different regions of Morocco, but the one we are sharing with you is our favourite and probably the most popular!

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VEGETABLE COUSCOUS Couscous, that ubiquitous Middle Eastern dish, is popular in many households nowadays but preparing an authentic Moroccan couscous requires a certain technique and the use of a couscoussier to produce tender, plump separate grains of semolina, perfect to soak up the aromatic vegetable stew. CHICKEN AND OLIVE TAGINE (BRAISED CHICKEN WITH OLIVES) If I had to choose two ingredients that bring Morocco to my mind, it would be preserved lemons and ras el hanout, the traditional Moroccan blend of spices. As with any blend of spices, each family or store will have its own combination, but ras el hanout normally includes cloves, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, cardamoms and nutmeg amongst other spices.

 Creamy Coleslaw  Australian Barbecue  MacadamiaCrusted Barramundi  Pavlova  Zaalouk  Vegetable Couscous  Chicken and Olive Tagine  Spiced Oranges with Yoghurt

SPICED ORANGES WITH YOGHURT As in any Mediterranean country, fresh fruit is a common ending to Moroccan meals. This recipe, however, is not your average daily dose of fruit, but combines spices and flavours in a delicious way!

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Creamy Coleslaw

Serves: 6 Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: None Category: Appetizer

Although found on most menus all over the world, Aussies consider this a typical Australian dish. Ingredients 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) white cabbage 2-3 (200 g/ 7 oz) Granny Smith apples 2-3 (200 g/ 7 oz) large carrots 1 small (50 g/ 2 oz) red onion 1 tablespoon yellow mustard sauce 2 tablespoons apple vinegar Juice of 1 lemon ½ cup mayonnaise TESTED WITH NOOR MAYONNAISE Salt and pepper

Method Start by shredding the cabbage, apples, carrots and onion. Alternatively, simply cut them into thin strips. Sprinkle some lemon juice over the apples to prevent oxidation. Now add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Enjoy with an Aussie barbecue!

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Chefs Tip: For a lighter version, substitute half the mayonnaise with natural yoghurt.

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Chef’s Tip: You can also cook the meats on a grill plate over the stove or roast them in an oven. 24

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Australian Barbecue Lamb chops, sausages and chicken or beef steaks – the classic Australian favourite for barbecues. Serves: 4 Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 20 minutes Category: Main course

Ingredients 500 g (1lb 2oz) lamb chops 500 g (1lb 2oz) chicken breasts TESTED WITH AL KHAZNA CHICKEN 500 g (1lb 2oz) sausages (also known as snags) Marinade 200 ml (7 fl oz) tomato sauce 2 tablespoons mace 2 tablespoons mustard powder 2 tablespoons chili powder 2 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce Juice of 1 lemon Salt and pepper

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Method Prepare the marinade by mixing all the ingredients in a bowl. Brush the marinade over the chops and chicken breasts. If the sausages are plain and not spiced, brush some marinade over them as well. Cover and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours. Now get your barbecue ready, your apron and tongs, and let the barbecue begin! You can also barbecue some potatoes, corn and vegetables and serve them with your favourite sauces.

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Macadamia-Crusted Barramundi

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Macadamia nuts with ‘large-scaled river fish’ (or as the Australian aboriginal would call it, Barramundi). Yummy! Makes: 20 Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 15 minutes Category: Main course

Ingredients 500 g (1lb 2oz) crushed macadamia nuts 200 g (7oz) breadcrumbs Zest and juice of 1 lemon Salt and pepper 4 (1 kg /2.2 lb) skinless Barramundi fillets (or any other fleshy fish) 4 tablespoonfuls olive oil TESTED WITH RAHMA OLIVE OIL

Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/ Gas 4. With the help of a food processor, combine the nuts, breadcrumbs, lemon zest and juice, and salt and pepper to make a coarse mixture. Coat the top of the Barramundi fillets with the nut mixture and place in a baking tray, greased with the olive oil. Cook in the preheated oven for 20 minutes or until done.

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Chef’s Tip: You can enjoy this dish with oven-baked potatoes or a fresh green salad. CookeryPlus

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Pavlova While the Australians and Kiwis debate on the origin of this dessert, we suggest you relish the taste. Serves: 6-8 Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 90 minutes Category: Dessert

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Ingredients 6 egg whites TESTED WITH KHALEEJ FARM FRESH EGGS 250 g (8 oz) caster sugar 1 tablespoon vinegar 1 tablespoon cornflour 200 ml (7 fl oz) whipping cream 2 kiwi fruits 200 g (7 oz) strawberries

Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C/ 350°F/Gas 4. Line a baking tray with greaseproof or baking paper. Whisk the egg whites, preferably using an electrical beater, until they form stiff peaks. Start by adding the sugar gradually till it is all used up. Then fold in the vinegar and cornflour. Pour the meringue into the baking tray shaping it into a circle. Place the tray in the preheated oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 100°C/212°F and bake for 90 minutes. Switch the oven off and let the meringue cool inside it with the oven door slightly open. To finish the pavlova, whip the cream till soft peaks form, and spread it over the meringue. Arrange the sliced kiwis and strawberries on top and serve.

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Chef’s Tip: Whisk the egg whites till the sugar dissolves completely as undissolved sugar will cause the meringue to soften.

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Zaalouk (Cooked Eggplant and Tomato Salad)

Also called eggplant caviar, Zaalouk can be eaten as a snack with bread, or as a side dish with either meat or fish. Makes: 500 g Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 45 minutes Category: Appetizer

Ingredients 250 g (8 oz) eggplant 200 g (7 oz) ripe red tomatoes 2 garlic cloves 2 teaspoons ground cumin TESTED WITH SHAMA CUMIN POWDER 2 teaspoons paprika Olive oil TESTED WITH RAHMA OLIVE OIL Salt and pepper

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Method Start by cooking the eggplants. There are two ways to do this. You can either boil them in salted water, or roast them in the oven. I personally prefer roasting them whole, as I enjoy the smoky flavour it provides. While the eggplants are cooking, peel and finely chop the tomatoes and garlic. Peel and chop the eggplants and cook all the ingredients together, including the spices, in a large pan with some olive oil, until most of the water has evaporated. Finally, with the help of a fork, blend all the ingredients well. Serve warm or cold with crusty bread.

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Serving suggestion: Add some fresh parsley or coriander for extra flavour.

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Vegetable Couscous Deliciously comforting plump grains of semolina perfumed by an aromatic stew simmering below.

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Serves: 4 Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 90 minutes Category: Main course

Ingredients 300 ml (10.5 fl oz) olive oil TESTED WITH RAHMA OLIVE OIL 3-4 small (100 g /3.5 oz) red onions 3-4 (100 g /3.5 oz) tomatoes, finely chopped 100 g (3.5 oz) chickpeas, soaked overnight in water 1 small (200g/ 7 oz) cabbage, finely chopped 2 litres water 1kg (2.2lb) dry couscous 5-6 (200g/ 7 oz) carrots, cut into large chunks 5-6 (200g/ 7 oz) zucchini, sliced lengthwise Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons turmeric Fresh parsley to taste Fresh coriander to taste

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Method Heat 100 ml (3.5 fl oz) oil in a couscoussier and sauté the onions and tomatoes for about 10 minutes. Add the chickpeas, cabbage and water, and let it boil for 20 minutes. Add the couscous to the top container over the steaming vegetables, cover and steam for about 20 minutes. Remove the couscous from the steamer, let it cool and mix in 6 tablespoon (90 ml) of olive oil and ½ cup water with your hands. Before the second steaming, add the carrots to the pan. Add the couscous to the steamer, cover and cook once again for 15 minutes. Remove and mix in another 90 ml of oil and water, as above. Add the zucchini, parsley and coriander to the pan and cook the couscous in the steamer for the third time. If this sounds too complicated to you, you can simply cook the vegetables in a regular pan, following the same order, as each vegetable requires a specific time to cook. Then just cook some instant couscous. It won’t be the same as the traditional couscous, but it is a perfectly good option for busy families! Serve the vegetables with the couscous.

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Chef’s Tip: Soak a clay tagine in water before using or it may crack.

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Chicken and Olive Tagine (Braised Chicken with Olives)

The dish is named after tagine - the clay or earthenware pot with a cone-shaped cover in which it is cooked. Serves: 4 Preparation time: 4 hours Cooking time: 90 minutes Category: Main course

Ingredients 2 preserved lemons 1.2 kg (2lb 10 oz) whole chicken, cut into pieces with skin removed TESTED WITH AL KHAZNA CHICKEN A handful of fresh coriander, finely chopped A handful of fresh parsley, finely chopped 1 tablespoon ras el hanout 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 200 g (7 oz) yellow onion, finely chopped 50 g (2 oz) green olives, pitted 4 tablespoons olive oil TESTED WITH RAHMA OLIVE OIL Salt

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Method Cut the preserved lemons into 4 wedges each, remove the flesh and reserve the skin for use later. Marinate the chicken in a mixture of coriander, parsley, ras el hanout, garlic, onion and the flesh of the preserved lemons for at least 4 hours, but ideally overnight. Pour the olive oil in the base of the tagine, and add the chicken, onion, olives and the skin of the lemons, as well as some salt and pepper. Add 50 ml water, cover the tagine and bring it to a slow boil. Cook for 1½ hours on a low heat till the chicken is tender. Leave to rest in the tagine for another 10 minutes before serving with Arabic bread.

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Spiced Oranges with Yoghurt Fresh and aromatic - summer desserts don’t get any better than this Moroccan orange delight. Serves: 4 Preparation time: 75 minutes Cooking time: None Category: Dessert

Ingredients 4 navel oranges 2 teaspoons orange blossom water 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon TESTED WITH SHAMA CINNAMON POWDER 1 tablespoon icing sugar 2 cartons (125 g / 4.5 oz each) full-fat yoghurt

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Method Peel the oranges and separate each segment, removing the thin membranes. Arrange the segments on a large tray and sprinkle with the orange blossom water. Cover and refrigerate for an hour. Remove from the refrigerator and sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon over the oranges. To serve, place a few orange segments in the bottom of a glass; add a dollop or two of yoghurt on top, and place some more orange segments over the yoghurt. Serve at once.

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Chef’s Tip: Use low-fat yoghurt for a lighter dessert.

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issUe sPeCiAL

After 30 days of prayer and fasting, Muslims around the world rejoice with a banquet of delectable sweet and savoury dishes.

The Feast to End all Fasts

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t’s that time of year again. The air is filled with the prayers of the devout, the spirit of charity and the enticing smell of food. Barriers disappear – the rich and the poor, the young and the old – all come together during this wonderful month that magically brings out the best of humanity in every believer. Yes, Ramadan is here.

Muslims around the world celebrate the month of Ramadan by fasting from sunrise till sunset, in an effort to abstain as much as possible from material temptations, and spend more time in prayer and good work. It is fitting, then, that after a month-long abstinence comes a period of indulgence. Shawwal, the first day of the month that follows Ramadan, is celebrated the world over as Eid-ul-Fitr, an auspicious day made more special by the sumptuous food served to celebrate it. The day starts off with special prayers at dawn, and as the men make their way back from the congregational prayers at 40

the mosque, they are greeted with the wonderful aromas of the most lovingly prepared food of the year – aromas that differ from region to region, and from community to community.

In Egypt, for instance, the air is heady with the fragrance of freshly baked Kahk – special festive Middle Eastern cookies filled with nuts and dusted with powdered sugar. An Afghan kitchen, on the other hand, turns out juicy spiralled Jelabi and Shor Nakhod – chickpeas with delicious toppings. South Asian specialities on Eid include Sevaiyaan and Sheer Khurma, which are vermicelli and dried fruit confections, and hefty meat biryanis. The streets in China are chock-a-block with vendors selling

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-Fitr ...after a monthlong abstinence comes a period of indulgence.

Sanzi – tall towers of crisp fried, ropelike noodles, a speciality of the Chinese Muslim communities. MEAT - AN IMPORTANT INGREDIENT Irrespective of the country or community, beef, mutton or goat meat is de rigeur in most Muslim households on this day. In Morocco, Eid dinner includes couscous with lamb or beef

tagines or stews, cooked with olives, preserved lemons and prunes. A Saudi Arabian Eid spread would include Kebdah, a dish of lamb liver and tomatoes, and an assortment of kebabs. In Singapore, Chilli Chicken or Chilli Prawns are part of the menu. In Indonesia, seafood is considered to be too ordinary an ingredient for so grand an occasion – meat therefore is the star of an Indonesian Eid table in dishes such as Gulai Kambing or Goat Curry. In Fiji, curried beef and chicken dishes are served on the day, and Malaysians serve their national dish Beef Rendang with lemang – coconutflavoured rice cooked in hollowed-out bamboo. In India and Pakistan, lush

biryanis, creamy kormas and kebabs form part of the festive menu. In Turkey, Eid is known as Seker Bayram or ‘the sugar festival’ and sweets are naturally a big part of the celebrations. There is a profusion of Turkish Delight in delicious fruit flavours and jewelled colours under the heavy coating of sugar, and of course Baklava to mark the occasion. In Malaysia, a celebration of the day is incomplete without pineapple tarts, almond and peanut sugar cookies and butter cakes. BAKED TREATS Moroccan bakeries display their best traditional cookies and pastries for people to feast on, and in Tunisia special CookeryPlus

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biscuits, Baklava and Kahk are distributed. Sweets are a major part of a Saudi Arabian Eid celebration, fashioned out of the choicest dates and dried fruit, like Debyaza – a sweet apricot pudding with a profusion of nuts.

MA’AMOUL (Date and Nut Cookies) Makes 24 Ma’amoul

In Algeria, M’shawek or orangeflavoured almond cookies, and Ghribia – light shortbread cookies are a hit. Ma’amoul is another baked Eid delicacy. Around the world, variants of a sweet vermicelli dish made with milk and nuts, also known as Sheer Khurma, Shemai or Samai, is an Eid staple. With all the delicious food served on the day, Eid-ul-Fitr is not just a feast for the senses, but is also a way of binding people together, irrespective of their religion or social standing. One of the most heart-warming customs on Eid is to share one’s food with one’s neighbour, and especially with the less privileged. Everyone eats, drinks and feasts together, and the food tastes that much more heavenly! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> - Sanam Khan

»» Ingredients 225g (8oz) plain flour 110g (40z) butter 2 teaspoons rose water 2 tablespoons water 200g (7 oz) pitted dates, chopped 4 tablespoons chopped walnuts Icing (confectioners’) sugar for dusting, (optional) Note: Ma’amoul are often made with a mix of plain flour and semolina. Replace 3 oz (85 g) flour with semolina . You can also stuff the maa’moul with chopped pistachios mixed with caster sugar and a little rose water.

»» Method Sift the flour into a bowl. Add the butter and mix with your fingertips till the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add the rose water and water and mix together to make a smooth soft dough. Cover the dough and leave to rest for 30 minutes. In the meanwhile, place the dates in a pan with ¼ cup water and cook till soft and pulpy. Leave to cool. Stir in the walnuts. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/ Gas 4. Grease and line a baking tray. Divide the dough into 12 equal parts and roll each one into a ball. Hollow out each ball and fill with the date mixture. Bring the edges of the ball together to seal the filling. Press the balls into a Ma’amoul mould and remove. Alternatively flatten slightly and press the top with a fork to make an attractive design. Place the Ma’amoul on the prepared tray and bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Do not allow the cookies to brown. Place a sheet of aluminium foil over the cookies if beginning to brown. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Dust with icing sugar when cold.

GULAI KAMBING (Javanese goat meat and coconut curry)  Serves 6 »» Ingredients 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 1kg (2.2 lb) boneless goat meat, cut into cubes 3½ cups coconut milk 7.5 cm (3 inch) piece of lemon grass, crushed 3 kaffir lime leaves or grated zest of ½ lime

6 macadamia nuts or blanched and peeled almonds 2.5 cm (1 inch) cinnamon stick 4 cloves 3 cardamoms ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon ground turmeric Salt and pepper

Spice Paste

1 onion or 6 shallots, chopped 4 cm (1½ inch) piece ginger, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1-2 fresh green chillies, chopped (optional) 42

»» Method Process all the ingredients for the spice paste with very little water to make a thick, smooth paste.

Heat the oil in a pan and add the paste. Sauté till the oil begins to separate from the paste. Add the goat meat and sauté till browned. Add 1½ cups water, the lemon grass and lemon zest and cook till the meat is almost tender, about 30 minutes. Pour in the coconut milk, lower the heat and simmer till the meat is tender and the gravy thickens. Adjust seasoning and remove from heat. Remove the lemon grass and discard. Serve immediately with steamed rice.

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Food FOR THOUGHT

Salads and Smoothies: Perfect Foods for Summery Days

Summertime can leave one feeling slow and sluggish, with very little appetite. Salads and smoothies are the answer: they are nutritious, versatile and very refreshing.

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n the summer our bodies lose a lot of minerals and water-soluble vitamins through perspiration. Our skin also becomes dry and damaged. To keep the body hydrated we need to eat foods that have a lot of moisture. They not only help keep the body cool but also provide necessary minerals and vitamins. The bottom line: keep yourself cool. For this, as a foodie, I suggest eating plenty of cold salads and drinking smoothies that include seasonal vegetables and fruits.

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Why salads Salads are a great way to add vegetables and greens to our diets without adding a lot of calories. However, there are a few salads that can be calorie-heavy because of creamy and mayonnaise-based dressings. In summer, I suggest that you watch what you put on top of your salad. If possible, consume most fruits and vegetables with their skins on as maximum nutrients are found just below the skin. Use nuts occasionally and sparingly. Almonds and walnuts contain hearthealthy fats and add a pleasing crunch and texture to salads. Why smoothies All you need is a blender, seasonal good quality ingredients, an active imagination; and making a delicious, healthy smoothie is a breeze! Smoothies

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are an excellent way of getting a nutrient-dense meal on the go! It is possible to design your smoothie according to your nutritional needs and personal tastes. Fruits, yogurt or milk and nuts in your smoothie provide you with the required calcium, vitamins and minerals on a hot summer day. Besides, they are the best way, to keep you hydrated, perhaps even better than water. If you are well hydrated the whole day there is bound to be a feeling of well being. As smoothies use whole fruits, they contain more fiber than plain fruit juice. Make your own homemade smoothie with no added sugar for a low calorie pick-me-up. All in all a refreshing restorative snack! A good salad will have: Base: So much to choose from! Leafy vegetables like lettuce, radish leaves, red or green cabbage, spinach…choose

fresh, crisp leaves to ensure fibre, minerals, iron, Vitamin A in plenty. For a cooling effect there is nothing better than cucumbers, tomatoes, melons and onions. Citrus fruits like oranges and sweet limes are full of Vitamin C. Add capsicums too, for they are not only cooling but a storehouse of antioxidants and carotenoids. Apples and grapes will provide both taste and nutrients.

fruit juice…besides flavour, dressings also add moisture, taste and seasoning to the salad making it more palatable. They also enhance the nutritive value adding vitamins and antioxidants. Choose from a sprig of coriander, mint leaves, shredded lettuce, chopped olives, slivered nuts or some sesame seeds, for some enticing garnish options.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> — Sanjeev Kapoor

Body: It can be anything in the world! Pasta, boiled rice, burghul, cut vegetables, tofu cubes, fruits, raisins, nuts, legumes, grains, pulses, sprouts will give you basic carbohydrates, some protein, fat-soluble vitamins and essential amino acids. Boiled and shredded chicken, seafood or meat also provide good options. Dressing: Take your pick! Vinegar, lemon juice, low-fat yoghurt, honey,

CHILLED MELON BALL SALAD »» INGREDIENTS ¼ watermelon 1 medium musk melon dressing 1½ teaspoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons orange juice 3-4 black peppercorns, crushed 1 tablespoon roughly torn fresh mint leaves Salt to taste Black salt to taste »» METHOD Using a Parisienne scoop (melon baller) scoop out small balls from the watermelon. Discard the seeds. Cut the musk melon in half. Scoop out small balls from the center, leaving a thick shell. Discard the seeds. Reserve the melon shells. Place melon balls in a refrigerator to chill thoroughly. Mix together all the ingredients for the dressing. Pour over the melon balls and toss gently once or twice to mix. Spoon into the melon shells and serve immediately.

Recipes courtesy, Sanjeev Kapoor’s books ‘SALADS’ and ‘DRINKS AND MOCKTAILS’. Other books also available online at www.sanjeevkapoor.com A multi-faceted personality, Sanjeev Kapoor is chef extraordinaire, author of best-selling cookbooks, restaurateur, the very first in SE Asia to launch a 24 x 7 food channel, TV show host, winner of several culinary awards and a familiar face in many brand endorsements. He is living his dream of making Indian cuisine the No. 1 cuisine in the world and empowering Indian women through the power of cooking to become self-sufficient.

TROPICAL FRUIT AND NUT SMOOTHIE »» INGREDIENTS 1 apple 2 ripe mangoes 2 bananas 85 grams (3oz) golden raisins Crushed ice as required 12-16 pistachios, chopped »» METHOD Peel and core apple and cut into slices. Peel and chop mangoes. Peel and slice bananas. Place the prepared fruits in a freezer till frozen. Blend frozen apple, mango and banana slices with golden raisins and crushed ice in a blender or smoothie maker. Pour into individual tall glasses. Serve chilled, garnished with chopped pistachios.

Chef’s tip: The melon shells can be given a decorative zigzag edge using a small sharp knife.

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THE ‘FOOD’ STUFF

Sehri and Iftaar

Muslims the world over observe Ramadan as a time for prayer and fasting from dawn to dusk. Explore the variety of delicious food served in different parts of the world at Sehri and Iftaar.

T

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> he holy month of Ramadan is upon us, and Muslims from all walks of life know that this month is going to be different from the rest of the year. The sun now determines meal timings, with devout Muslims fasting from sunrise till sunset. There’s more time given to prayer, however, this is also the time when some very special dishes are prepared! It is not surprising then, that many of the dishes served during this period also appear on the festive Eid menu. SeHRI In most Muslim households, three meals are consumed during Ramadan – Sehri, Iftaar and a late dinner. The morning meal takes place before sunrise, and is called Sehri or Suhoor. This meal consists of dishes that are not only filling, but also provide energy for the entire day. The food prepared is mildly spiced to be easy on the stomach, and hydrating to compensate for the absence of water consumption till sunset. Foods that are slow to digest are popular as they keep one going through the 46

day. These include grains and seeds like barley, wheat, millet, beans and unpolished rice. In Iran, this family meal is simply a big breakfast, with flatbreads and Kofteh, feta and eggs, while in Qatar, the pre-dawn favourite is Al-Harees, a dish similar to Haleem, which is popular all over the Islamic world. Another Middle Eastern favourite is Shakshuka, a poached egg and spicy tomato dish. Ful Medames, a porridge of slowcooked fava beans is every Egyptian’s go-to for Sehri, but in Morocco the Sehri dish of choice is Harcha – fried semolina flatbreads eaten with honey. Pakistanis, on the other hand, cook up Khajila or Pheni – deep-fried vermicelli soaked in milk, which is sure to see them through the day.

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IFtAAR But it is the meal after sunset, Iftaar, that has caught the attention of people the world over. The fast is traditionally broken with dates, one reason being that they are an instant source of energy. In many regions, the fast is broken by eating just dates and water or a cool drink, after which prayers are offered. The Iftaar meal is a community event, one that is prepared with effort and skill. Special energy-giving beverages such as the Egyptian Qamar-edden – apricot juice with dried fruits and nuts – are popular, as are lentil soups and hearty shorbas. Egyptian Iftaar meals commonly consist of lentil soup, a rice and vegetable pastry called Mahshi, a green soup of the leaf of the jute tree and chicken

SHAKSHUKA (Poached Eggs with Spicy Tomatoes and Peppers) Serves 4-6 » INGREDIENTS 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 2-3 fresh chillies, finely chopped 5 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1½ teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons paprika ½ teaspoon turmeric Salt and pepper I red pepper, cut into 2.5 cm (1-inch) strips 1 yellow pepper, cut into 2.5 cm (1-inch) strips 8- 10 large ripe tomatoes, blanched, peeled and roughly chopped 1 teaspoon sugar 4 tablespoons chopped coriander 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 8 eggs Za’atar spice mix

» METHOD Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan or skillet. Add the onions and sauté till translucent. Add the chillies and garlic and sauté for a minute. Add the cumin, paprika, turmeric, salt and pepper. Sauté for a few seconds. Add the peppers and sauté on high heat for a few minutes. Add the tomatoes, sugar and half the coriander and parsley and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally till it has the consistency of a pasta sauce. Adjust the flavours. Spread the sauce evenly in the frying pan and make 8 depressions with the back of a spoon. Break the eggs into the depressions. Sprinkle salt and pepper and the remaining coriander and parsley. Cover and cook on a low heat for about 7-10 minutes till the whites of the eggs are set and the yolks are just set. Sprinkle with Za’atar and serve immediately with crusty bread or pitas.

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Every Middle Eastern region has its traditional cookie made especially for this month, such as Ma’amoul... broth, called Molokhia, and Katayif – sweet pancakes stuffed with walnuts and goat cheese. Haleem is popular in many countries in the Middle East and South Asia, with Hyderabadi Haleem being one of the most prized. In Turkey, the famous Moussaka – layered dish of fried eggplant and minced meat is an Iftaar special, accompanied by pide or pita bread.

sugar, flour, walnuts and sweet spices, or Moroccan Sellou and Chebekia. Popular Middle Eastern Iftaar sweets include Libyan Asidah – boiled wheat flour pudding with date sauce or honey, and Emirati Balaleet – a sweet egg and vermicelli omelette, and the Qatari Al-Muhallabiyyah – a rice and milk dish flavoured with cardamom and saffron.

and Iftaar, particularly the latter, have acquired the status of gourmet feasts, they are in essence meant to be community and family meals, where people come together to share food in a spirit of brotherhood, bound by a common faith. And it is this which makes the food served at these meals that much more enjoyable and special. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Every Middle Eastern region has its traditional cookie made especially for this month, such as Maa’moul, and there’s always the popular fruit salad that is commonly consumed at this time.

— Sanam Khan

For all their variety and sometimes lavishness and though, both Sehri

HALEEM

Serves 6-8

Saudi Arabian Iftaars consist of some of their popular dishes like Saliq – a rice dish made with milk and lamb, Al-Kabsa a Saudi staple of rice cooked with meat or chicken, Jarish – meat cooked in sour milk, and Qursan – wheat pancakes topped with meat and vegetable stew. Qatari food during this month includes Ath-Thareed, a hearty dish of shredded local bread in a meat broth, and Emirati’s serve Al-Majboos, a dish of rice layered with meat or chicken. An Iftaar spread in Jordan will include its most famous dish Mansaf – a Bedouin dish of rice slow-cooked in a rich meat and sour milk broth. In Yemen the Futoor spread includes samboosas and a host of kebabs. In many Middle Eastern regions, special camel meat is imported from Somalia mainly for Ramadan.

»» INGREDIENTS 1 cup barley, soaked for 8 hours 1 cup wheat, soaked for 8 hours 2 tablespoon red chilli powder 1 tablespoon turmeric ½ cup split Bengal gram, soaked for 4 hours ¼ cup split green gram, soaked for 4 hours ¼ cup split red lentil, soaked for 4 hours 1 kg boneless meat, boiled (mutton or beef ) 1 tablespoon ground mint leaves 2 tablespoons ginger and garlic paste 1 tablespoon green chilli paste 1 tablespoon garam masala 2 tablespoons salt 1 cup yoghurt 3 tablespoons coriander powder 2 cup oil ½ teaspoon nutmeg powder 1 teaspoon mace powder Garnish

Sweets An Iftaar spread is laden with sweet dishes, each one a masterpiece in itself. Some of these dishes can be found only during Ramadan, like North Iranian Reshteh-Khoshkar, a pastry made with 48

1 large onion, finely sliced and fried golden brown 1 lemon sliced 1 inch fresh ginger, finely sliced lengthwise

»» METHOD Boil the barley and wheat with ½ tablespoon red chilli powder and 1 teaspoon turmeric till soft. Grind this mixture. Boil the lentils till soft and grind. Heat oil in a vessel, add the boiled meat, mint leaves, ginger garlic paste, chilli paste and fry for a minute. Add remaining chilli powder and turmeric powder, garam masala powder, salt and yoghurt. Add 2 ½ cup water and cook over low flame for 10 minutes. Mash the meat well. Add the ground lentils, wheat and barley to the meat mixture and cook for 30 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes to avoid the mixture to stick to the bottom of the vessel. Add nutmeg, mace powder and cook for 5 minutes. Serve with the garnish.

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TIDBITS AL-BAKER CHAKKI FRESH ATTA WITH MULTIGRAIN

RAHMA EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL – GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Al-Baker Chakki Fresh Atta with Multigrain is a readymade blend of eight grains, including wheat, soy, corn, fava beans, oats, barley and ragi. It is enriched with iron, proteins, calcium and vitamins to help you cook a wholesome meal for your family and keep them healthy and active.

Rahma Extra Virgin Olive Oil is produced from the finest selection of olives from the green fields of the Mediterranean region. 100 per cent natural, it is obtained in a single cold press. With its rich aroma, taste and nutritional benefits, this oil adds flavour to a variety of recipes. It is low in acidity and is obtained without any application of heat or chemical processing, which helps preserve all the nutrition benefits and Vitamins A, D and E, present in the olive fruit.

ASSURED QUALITY IN JUST A PINCH

The robust aroma and taste of Rahma Extra Virgin Olive Oil complements all your meat, fish and poultry dishes. Go ahead, enrich your sauces and marinades with this oil. You can also make Rahma Olive Oil your cooking medium of choice and enjoy tasty, healthy eating.

Shama Food Industries has unveiled a range of Arabic spices, ‘Flavours of Arabia’, in addition to a wide array of blended spices, created under the advice of renowned chefs. It has revisited the age-old culinary traditions of the Arab world and packaged spices for Arab homes – a strategy that it extended across its market footprint that spans the GCC region. This approach, now a decade old, has paid off handsomely for Shama, which is available across all hypermarkets and trade outlets across the GCC. After sourcing premium quality spices, it is cleaned and packaged at Shama’s state-of-the-art factory adhering to strict quality parameters. All products are tested stringently for microbes as well as cancercausing alfatoxins, synthetic colours and presence of heavy metals. A testimony to its quality and hygiene is Shama’s HACCP certification by BSCIC and Halal certification by Jakims Malaysia, making it the first Halal-certified company in GCC.

ENJOY THE DELIGHTFUL TASTE OF ALLEGRO PASTA Allegro’s premium quality pasta, made with 100 per cent durum semolina, has a delightful taste and is nutritious as well. Available at all leading outlets, this pasta has a healthy nutritional profile, made healthier with the inclusion of vegetables in the recipe. CookeryPlus

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CHOPPING BOARD

Tips

Top of the Pops ICE POPS ARE FROZEN FLAVOURED WATER, JUICES OR SMOOTHIES! BUY YOURSELF SOME ICE POP MOULDS, AND STOCK YOUR FREEZER WITH THESE LICKALICIOUS POPS! JUICY POPS Fill ice pop moulds two-third full with your favourite juice. Seal and freeze. Suck on all those icy fruity flavours and enjoy! SMOOTHIE POPS Whip up your favourite fruit, milk or yoghurt smoothie, and freeze in the moulds. Remove and lick up all that goodness. FIZZY POPS Pour carbonated drinks into the popsicle moulds and freeze. ICE CREAM POPS Freeze homemade ice cream or kulfi in popsicle moulds. Or for a cheat’s version, melt store bought ice-cream, stir in a little extra cream and freeze. For multi flavoured popsicles, layer 2-3 flavours of ice-cream, freezing between layers. Add a layer of jello or jelly for a more dramatic effect! POPTAILS Freeze your mocktails that you fancy in moulds for cool new ways to imbibe old favourites. Virgin Piña Colada or Mojito anyone? ICED TEA AND COFFEE POPS Freeze green tea, lemon tea or sweetened brewed coffee without milk for a refreshing pick-me-up.

HUMOUR Sheila: I trained my dog not to beg at the table. Friend: How did you do that? Sheila: I let him taste my cooking.

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QUOTE-UNQUOTE “We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons” - Alfred Newman

ICE CUBES TO THE RESCUE!

GRAB AN ICE CUBE OUT OF YOUR FREEZER TO AVERT A CRISIS IN THE KITCHEN!

HOLLANDAISE OR AN EGG SAUCE OR CUSTARD SHOWING SIGNS OF CURDLING? Drop an ice cube in and stir vigorously. Your sauce will regain its texture and be as smooth as silk once again. GLOBULES OF FAT FLOATING ON TOP OF A SOUP OR STEW? Place a few ice cubes in a ladle and move the bottom of the ladle across the top of the dish and the watch the fat cling to the ladle. VINAIGRETTE OR SALAD DRESSING NOT CREAMY ENOUGH? Add an ice cube to the ingredients in a jar, close tightly with the lid and shake, shake, shake. The solid cube with help pulverise the ingredients and blend them into a smooth sauce. Remove the ice cube and serve. RICE TURNS DRY WHEN REHEATED IN THE MICROWAVE? Place a cube of ice on top of the rice while reheating. The ice will melt and moisten the rice and you will have a steaming bowl of rice in a jiffy. TEA TOO HOT TO DRINK IN A HURRY? Drop a cube of ice into your tea and it will cool it down in a flash.

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